ANSYS Licensing FAQ

Were you so excited to jump on your analysis only to have a “server is down or not responsive” message pop out and alienate you from the fun like a prestigiously exclusive club would make their patrons wait at the door? It might have been your manager running a reverse psychology trick on you or maybe not.

If it is the latter, you are not alone. As a matter of fact, licensing questions come to us on a regular basis. And even though there are plenty of information on the web, we figured it would be beneficial to have the most frequent answers gathered into one place: an FAQ document (attached on this blog).

The Table of Contents includes the following topics:

  1. Server down or not responsive
  2. Installation/Migration
  3. VPN
  4. TECS and license expiry
  5. Versions compatibility
  1. Overuse of licenses
  2. Include list
  3. HPC
  4. Virtual server
ANSYS LICENSING FAQ

Download the PDF here.

The document was written with the assumption of the reader having no prior experience with ANSYS or licensing in general. It is formatted in an easy step by step format with photos. The table of contents has hyperlinks embedded in it and can be used to easily navigate to the relevant sections.

We do hope that this document will bring value in solving your licensing issues, and we are always here to help if it doesn’t:

1-800-293-PADT or 480-813-4884

support@padtinc.com

Transitioning to ANSYS

Before joining PADT last July, I have worked on FEA and CFD analyses but my exposure to ANSYS was limited and I was concerned about the transition. To my delight, the software was very easy to learn; most often than not intuitive and self-explanatory (e.g. mechanical wizard), the setup time was minimized after learning couple simple features (e.g. named selection, object generator etc.) and the resources on the ANSYS portal were very instrumental in the learning process. Furthermore, the colleagues at PADT proved to be very knowledgeable and experienced and more importantly responsive and eager to jump for help.

One of the most attractive features that caught my attention was the streamline of the Multiphysics nature that ANSYS has. I have been satisfied with the performance of standalone CFD packages in the past, and same goes for structural ones. But never have I dealt with an extensive software that maintained the quality of a specialized one. The importance of this attribute is showing more and more its powers in recent years given the development of new convoluted products of Multiphysics nature e.g. medical applications.

Using ANSYS to simulate medical applications is one of the most rewarding experience I personally enjoy. Even though, it is definitely satisfying to be able to help accelerate innovation in the aerospace, automotive, and a myriad of other industrial areas…the experience in the medical area has a more refreshing taste, probably due to the clear and direct link to human lives. From intravascular procedures to shoulder implants and microdevices, there is one common factor: ANSYS is decreasing the risks of catastrophic failures, improving the product capabilities and shortening the innovation cycle.

Editors Note: Ziad is part of PADT’s team in Southern California.   He is a graduate of USC and has worked at Boeing, Meggit, and Pacific Consolidated Industries before joining PADT.  He works with the rest of our ANSYS technical staff to make sure our users are getting the most from their ANSYS investment.