Arizona Chief Science Officers Design Their Own 3D Printed Name Badges

az-scitech-cso-badges-3d-printed-0The Chief Science Officer program is a program for 6th-12th grade students to represent their school in STEM. And what better way is there for them to identify themselves then with 3D Printed name badges?  The program’s sponsors, the AZ SciTech Festival offer a training retreat for the kids who get elected as their school’s CSO and we all thought introducing design and 3D Printing would be a great activity.

As part of the 2015 Fall CSO Institute, PADT’s Jeff Nichols joined local designer and artist John Drury to spend some time with the kids explaining how to work with logos and shapes to convey an idea, and how to design for 3D Printing.  The kids worked out their own design and sent it to PADT for printing.

We converted their sketch into a 3D Model, starting in Adobe Illustrator. The sketch was traced with vector geometry and then a generic name was added. This was then copied 144 times and each name was typed in, with a few extras. This step was the only boring part.

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The design worked great because it is a simple extrusion with no need for support material.    The outline of their names were exported as DXF from Illustrator and then imported onto the 3D Model and extruded up to make a solid model of a badge. This was then copied to make a badge for each student. Then the names were imported and extruded on the patterned badges.

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The was a simple extrusion for each feature, allowing for contrast and readability but keeping things simple.
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This project was a great opportunity to use both patterns and importing 2D drawings. By laying everything out in a grid, we only had to make one badge and copy that. Then import the names and extrude those on the patterned badges.

STL files were then made and sent off to one of our Stratasys FDM 3D Printers. The FDM (Fused Deposition Modeling) process extrudes an ABS plastic filament, and you can change material during the build. So, to add a bit of contrast, we changed the filament color after the base of the design was done, making the logo and student names stand out.  The final results came out really nice.

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This is what they look like right out of the machine. We swapped out two color for each build. With some clever packing, we were able to get 12 badges on each platform.
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The final products really stand out.

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This project was a lot of fun because we were able to work with the students. They got what John and Jeff taught them and did a great job.  We know they will be placed with pride on back backs and jackets across Arizona.

To learn more about the CSO program, visit their website: http://chiefscienceofficers.org/ Check out the blog.  Some of these kids can really write well and their insight into Science, Technology, Math, and Education is insightful.

Stuff I Learned about Injection Molding with 3D Printed Tooling

3DPrinting-Injection-Molding-Pic-StauberMaking injection molding tools using 3D Printing has been a long term goal for the industry.  I knew the technology had advanced recently, but was really not aware how far it had come until I attended two seminars in Utah on the subject. In this post I’ll share what I learned, and share some content that goes into greater detail.

The Seminars

The reason for my update on this subject was a visit to PADT’s Utah office.  Our two people there, Anthony Wagoner (sales) and James Barker (engineering), told me they were doing a seminar on injection molding and I should go. I figured why not, I’m in town. Maybe I’ll meet a couple of customers.  Almost 30 people showed up to the Salt Lake Community College Injection Molding lab for the event.  Gil Robinson from Stratasys presented a fantastic overview (included in the download package) on where the technology is, how to apply it, and gave some great real world examples.  There were some fantastic questions as well which allowed us to really explore the technology

 

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Then the best part happened when we walked into the shop and saw parts being made right there on the machine. They had recently printed a tool and were shooting polypropylene parts while we were in the classroom next door. During the hour long presentation, Richard Savage from ICU Medical was able to fine-tune the injection molding machine and good parts were popping out. As you can imagine, what followed next was they type of discussion would expect with  a room full of injection molding people. “What material? How hot? What pressure? What is the cooling time? Do you use compressed air to cool it? Not a lot of flash, how hard are you clamping it? These features here, what draft did you need?”  Good stuff.  I got caught up in everything and forgot to grab some pictures.

I learned so much at that event that I decided to head north along the Wasatch Range to Clearfield and the Davis Applied Technology College.  About the same number of people were able to make it from medical, aerospace, and consumer products companies in Northern Utah.  Gil presented the same material, but this time we got some different questions so I learned a bit more about material options and some other lessons learned.

Then we visited their lab where I did remember to take some pictures:

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Here is a shot of different shots that Jonathan George from DATC did to dial in the parameters.  It took him about an hour, not bad for the first time using a 3D Printed tool.

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The part is actually a clam shell assembly for Christmas lights, in the shape of a snow flake. Here is what they look like on the tree itself. IMG_8235

And here is a video they made showing the process. He was able to get 950 shots out of the tool.

In talking to attendees at both events I learned of several great applications that they were going to try, varying from medical devices for clinical trials to making rubber masking tools for surface treatments. The injection molding community in Utah is very sophisticated and forward thinking.

Stratasys-PolyJet-based-3D-printed-mold-tools

What I Learned

I’ll spare you the details on what we had for dinner Monday night for the Utah office holiday celebration and jump right in to what I learned.

  1. For  the right applications, you can get some very nice parts from 3D Printed tools
  2. You do need to take the process in to account and oriented the tools facing upward in the machine, add a bit more draft than usual, and keep your pressures and temperature down when compared to metal tools.
  3. For some parts, you can get over 1,000 shots from a tool, but most poeple are getting a couple of hundred parts.
  4. As with any injection molding, the magic is in the tool design and setting up the right parameters on the injection molding press.
  5. Tricky parts can be made by using metal inserts
  6. Some machining may be required on your 3D printed tool to get it just right, but that is mostly reaming holes for ejector pins and metal inserts
  7. Plastic is an insulator (duh) so plastic tools have to be cooled more slowly and with air.
  8. Conformal cooling is a great idea, but some work still needs to be done to get it to work.
  9. The mold usually fails during part ejection, so using mold release, good draft, and proper design can reduce the loading during ejection and get more parts from the tool.
  10. The material of choice for this is DigitalABS on Stratasys Connex Machines.

There was a ton more, and you can find most of it in the download package.

The big take-away from both events was that this technology works and it really does allow you to create an injection molding tool in a couple of hours on a 3D Printer. In the time it normally takes to just get the order figured out for a machined tool (RFQ, Quote, Iterate, PO, etc…) you can have your parts.

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Next Steps

Interested in trying this out yourself or learning more?  We have put together an injection molding package with the following content:

  • Polyjet Injection Molding Application Brief
  • 18 Page Polyjet Injection Molding Technical Guide
  • 12 Page White Paper: Precision Prototyping – The Role of 3D Printed Molds in the Injection Molding Industry
  • 3D Printed Injection Molding Application Guide from PADT and Stratasys
  • Presentation from Seminars
  • List of Relevant Videos
  • Four Real World Case Studies
  • Link List for Other Resources  on the Web

We have spent some time putting all this information in one place and put it into one convenient ZIP file.  Please click here to download this very useful content.

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Seminar: Additive Manufacturing & the Honeywell Global Initiative

honeywell-speachDonald Godfrey, Honeywell Engineering Fellow for Additive Manufacturing will be presenting a seminar at Arizona State University on the status of metal Additive Manufacturing (AM) within the company worldwide.  This live event, being held at the ASU Polytechnic Campus in Mesa, Arizona, will be a fantastic opportunity to learn how this exciting technology is used in the real world to change the way aerospace parts are designed and made.

Download the PDF:  Honewell-additive-asu-1, to learn more.

3D Printing – A 2D Explainer from Shapeways

shapeways_3d_printing_headerWhat is this 3D Printing anyway?  It doesn’t take long for someone new to the technology to see the wide range of applications and implications it brings to the table.  But what how does it actually work. Our friends at Shapeways have put together a great infographic that explains things well.

Take a look and share:

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If you scrolled down this far, you may be asking, “Why is PADT sharing Shapeways material? Are they not competitors?”  Well, to be honest, we recommend Shapeways to people all the time. Our Additive Manufacturing business is about producing engineering prototypes, tooling, and end-use products for manufacturing companies. When a hobbiest or artist comes to ask us for a prototype, we often recommend that they go visit Shapeways.

We also recommend that people who are interested in all the non-engineering applications for 3D Printing check out their marketplace. The things that people have come up with is just amazing and shows the unbounded potential of this technology.

Manufacturing Open House Highlights – October 2015

padt-mfg-openhouse-2015-1Here at PADT we help people who make products, stuff that gets manufactured.  So we focused our open house yesterday on advanced manufacturing and invited the community to come out and network, learn, and share.  Even though it was a busy week for technology events in Arizona, we had a great turnout on a surprisingly cloudy Wednesday evening.

October is Manufacturing month and this open house was part of the Arizona Commerce Authority’s coordinated events to highlight manufacturing in Arizona.   You can learn more about other events in the state here.

This event was a bit more casual and less structured then past PADT open houses, letting attendees spend more time one-on-one with various experts and dig deep in to technologies like metal 3D Printing, urethane casting, topological optimization, and scanning.

What struck all of us here was the keen interest in and knowledge about the various tools we were showing across a wide range of attendees.  From students with home built 3D Printers to managers from local aerospace companies that are on the forefront of Additive Manufacturing, the questions that were asks and comments that were made with insightful and show a transition of this technology from hype to real world application.

Below are some more quick snapshot taken during the event.

A big thanks to everyone who made it out and we hope to see more of you next time. If you have any questions about the application of advanced manufacturing technologies to your products, don’t hesitate to reach out to us at info@padtinc.com or 480.813.4884.  As always, visit www.PADTINC.com to learn more.

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PADT’s Dr. Dhruv Bhate explains the latest developments in metal Additive Manufacturing.

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PADT’s Director of Engineering, Rob Rowan, discusses how PADT Medical has helped companies turn their medical device ideas into products.
 

 

 

 

 

Ademola Falade, PADT's scanning expert, describes how blue light scanning has changed how we capture geometry of existing parts.
Ademola Falade, PADT’s scanning expert, describes how blue light scanning has changed how we capture geometry of existing parts.

PADT's Seminar Room was packed with people talking to PADT's expert engineering staff.
PADT’s Seminar Room was packed with people talking to PADT’s expert engineering staff.
 

 

PADT’s 3D Printing Demo room was the place to hang and discuss different ways to use 3D Printing.
  
 

Beyond the Hype – Additive Manufacturing and 3D Printing Worldwide, A Summary of Terry Wholers’ Thoughts

3d-printing-terry-wholers-padt-1Terry Wholers is the founder and principal consultant of Wohlers Associates Inc., an independent consulting firm that was launched 28 years ago. Wohlers and his team have provided consulting work to over 240 organizations in 24 countries as well as to 150 companies in the investment community. He has authored over 400 books, articles, and technical papers. Terry has twice served as a presenter at the White House. For the past 20 years hes has been the principal author for the Wohlers Report which is an annual worldwide publication focused on Additive Manufacturing and 3D Printing. In 2007 more than a 1,000 industry professionals from around the world selected Terry as the most influential person in Rapid Prototyping Development and Additive Manufacturing.

PADT was fortunate enough to sponsor, with the local SME group, an event in Fort Collins, Colorado where Terry came and shared his views on the industry. What follows is a summary of what we learned. They are basically notes and observations.  Please contact us for any clarification or details: 

Terry Wohlers started his talk by asking: How many people have heard of 3D printing?

He noted that these days it was pretty much everyone and if you haven’t then you must be living in a cave. It is like everyone can’t get enough of it.

There has been a lot of growth. In the last 5 years the industry has quadrupled. Last year it was a 4.1 billion industry and this year 5.5 billion. Terry doesn’t own any stock in any of the different 3D printing companies. He cautioned everyone to not confuse the share prices with the growth and the expansion within this industry.

After this introduction, Terry stated that there were really two things in the industry that really excited him.  3D Printing for Manufacturing and for Production Parts.

3D Printing in Manufacturing.

The first area to watch is the use of this technology for manufacturing applications. The team looking at the sales data drew a line in the sand for the low cost hobbyist printers at $5,000. There were 140,000 of them sold last year compared to under 13,000 above $5k. However, they don’t cost much so the money is still in the industrial machines. Here are the revenues for 2014:

Industrial: 1.12 Billion, or 86.6%.
Hobbyist: 173.3 Million, or 13.4%

There are FDM clones everywhere. 300 or more brands. There is a lot of open source software out there to develop your own FDM printer.

One thing to watch in the industry is expiring patents. This opens up competition and lowers prices and sometimes brings better machines to market.  Right now, the SLS patent expired in June of last year so we are seeing new Selective Laser Sintering devices coming to market.

An exciting example of using 3D printing in manufacturing is the landing gear created by Stratasys. It was built and assembled with a Stratasys FDM printer and used for a fit check. Very Cool!

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www.makepartsfast.com/2008/06/523/how-to-make-accurate-cad-to-stl-file-transitions

In medical, some great examples of tooling are jigs, fixtures, drill press, and custom cutting guide for knee replacement. You can take scanned data and create a custom cutting guide for replacing your knee. Tens of thousands of those have been done.

Lots of work is being done on test fixtures as well.

In tooling, with additive manufacturing you can do things that are highly complex. Instead of just straight gun drilled cooling channels you can make the cooling channels conform to the purpose of the part. You can reduce 30-300% cycle time by improving the cooling channels for injection molding dies.  It turns out that Lego is printing their molds! They are using conformal cooling to increase their cycle times.

On the aerospace side of things, end use parts are literally taking off.  Airbus is flying today 45,000 to 60,000 Ultem plastic parts. Both passenger and non-passenger planes have Ultem parts on them.

3D Printing for Final Production Parts

The second area to watch is the next frontier, and that is what excites him. You can do structural ribs in 3D printed parts. You need to make sure there are places in your parts to remove the support material used if you are going to use structural ribs. Design is absolutely critical. When he was at Solidworks world in Orlando a few years ago, there was a 3D printed bird that was flapping its wings.

This is a part of that bird that was being flown.

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Two weeks ago Terry did a four day course at NASA on Design for Additive Manufacturing. The importance of the subject now is that companies and organizations are paying a lot of money to host people to teach them how to design for additive manufacturing. It was a great learning experience and NASA has already signed up for a second course that is focused on metals. NASA 3D printed a turbopump with 45%fewer parts that runs at 90,000 rpm, and creates 2,000 hp. This turbopump manufactured with conventional methods costs $220,000 for one, they can 3D print 2 of them in Inconel for $20,000.

A big part of Design for Additive Manufacturing is using the correct thinking but also using the right tools. There is a lack of both. We are taught to design for the conventional method of manufacturing. Now we have to undo some of that and think, hey there can be a better way to design this part.

One of those ways is Topology Optimization (let mathematics decide where to place the support structure so there is a increased strength to weight ratio). Another is the use of lattice structure (mesh and cellular). Ever since the beginning of time, man would make parts out of a solid material. Well now you can have a thin skin and a lattice structure on the interior to produce something superior in some cases.

We need these kind of tools integrated into the different CAD software’s so that we can design better parts.  This bracket is flying on a Airbus. This cabinet bracket is made out of titanium and is flying on the A35 Airbus. It was designed for 2.3 tons and actually holds up to 12.5-14 tons depending on the test. Peter Zander at Airbus believes that in 2 years they will be printing 30 tons of metal per month!

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GE Aviation is building fuel nozzles for the new leap engine. The new design is 25% lighter and five times more durable than the previous design that took 20 different parts to assemble to make one fuel nozzle. The will be printing 40,000 fuel nozzles per year.

Consumer Products:
It is going to be very big. Terry thinks this is going to be a sweet spot in the industry. Once example is this guitar called the Hive Bass. It is built out of Nylon and would cost you $3,500. You can have a custom guitar made for that price.

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There is a Belgium company that creates custom frames for eyewear.

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There is also a lot of Jewelry available for consumers along with many other products.

For metal part production there are many steps needed to finish the part. About 9 steps that Terry counted so it can be a long process.

Myth: Additive Manufacturing is fast! Well that depends on Polymers versus Metals and the size and complexity of the parts. Airbus had one build that took 14 days to print with their metal printer! GE mentioned that they have to print the same part twice before they get it right because they will have to reorient the part or change the build parameters to get the best quality build possible.

According to some estimates the global manufacturing economy is in the range of $13 trillion. If this technology were to penetrate 2% of it then that is over a quarter of a trillion dollars. 5% is approaching two thirds of a trillion!

Terry finished by asking: How many of you think this will be North of the 5% estimate?

We want to thank Terry for giving such an informative talk, and New Belgium Brewing for hosting. The networking afterwords was fantastic. 

If you would like to stay up to date on 3D Printing, we recommend the Wohlers Report. It is our primary reference document here at PADT.  

ReBlog: An Insider’s View on 3D Printing in Aerospace

In all the hype and hoopla around 3D Printing there are teams around the world that are quietly making a difference in manufacturing – making real parts and figuring out the processes, testing, and protocols needed to realize the dream of additive manufacturing.  One such team is at Honeywell Aerospace, and we are proud to be one of their vendors.

They just published a great blog on where they are and what they have achieved and we recommend you give it a read. Very informative.

An Insider’s View on 3D Printing in Aerospace

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If you would like to learn how you can use this same technology to move your manufacturing process forward, fill out our simple form here, call us at 480.813.4884, or send an email to info@padtinc.com.

3D Printing the 4th Dimension – GISHWHES 2015 Scavenger Hunt

padt-sundial-insun-apple-watch-wGISHWHES is a huge international scavenger hunt. Every year teams around the globe comb through the list of 215 tasks and pick as many as possible that their team can do.  Last year they introduced 3D Printing as a task, and we helped a team 3D Print a quill pen. That was a lot of fun, so when this year’s list included an item on 3D printing, we jumped at the chance to be involved.

The item was:

110: VIDEO. Use a cutting edge 3D printer to 3D print your representation of the 4th dimension.62 POINTS

Being engineers we said “4th Dimension?  Time.”  Then it became a choice between the way mass distorts the space-time continuum or some sort of clock’ish thing.  The distortion thing seemed difficult so we focused on a clock.  Being that we were constrained on budget and time we decided to do a sundial.

The result can be seen here in this YouTube video.

It was a fun project and the team spent a bit of time in the 112F sunshine trying it out.  We can’t wait to see what we will get to do for the 2016 scavenger hunt.

Making the Model

A couple of people have asked if we downloaded the solid model for the sundial or if we made it. We actually made it. After a little bit of research we found that making a simple horizontal sundial like this one is very easy. Here are the steps we took:

Get Geometry Values

So it turns out that the angle of each hour line is determined by the latitude of where the dial will go. The angle of the pointy thing, called a gnomon, is also the latitude.  So for Tempe, AZ that is 33.4294°.That gets applied to the equation:

angle(h) = arctan(sin(L*tan(15° · h))

h = integer of the hour, 6 am to 6 pm
L = latitude

I plopped that into Excel:

=ABS(DEGREES(ATAN(SIN(RADIANS($C$3))*TAN(RADIANS(15)*B7))))

and got the following:

Latitude 33.4294
Hour Angle
6 90.00
7 64.06
8 43.66
9 28.85
10 17.64
11 8.40
12 0.00

Build the Solid Model

The next step is to build the model. I used SolidEdge because I know it real well and was able to knock it out quickly.  But all CAD tools would be the same:

  1. Pick a center point.
  2. Add lines as rays from that using the angles in the table above for each hour.
  3. Design the shape of your sundial to look cool. I did a simple circle .
  4. Mark the hours using the sketch. I raised up thin rectangles.
  5. Model the gnomon using the latitude as the angle.  Make this as fancy or simple as you want.
  6. Add whatever doo-dads you want.
  7. Label the hours if you want.
  8. Save to STL

Here is what my sketch looked like:PADT-sundial-cad-model-hour-sketc

And the final solid model looked like this:

PADT-sundial-cad-modelWe sent this to the printer as shown in the video, and got a sundial.

 

 

 

 

 

 

AmCon Phoenix 2015: Comments and Presentation Notes

prezo_padt_amcon_phoenix-2015We just finished up our third and final AmCon show of the year at what turned out to be the best show of the three.  The PADT booth was packed during the exhibition time with a wide variety of people asking questions and checking out examples of what PADT and Stratasys can do.  We were able to meet with a lot of our local customers, and even better, were able to get to know a ton of new potential clients.  Some shows are kind of boring and people just don’t get what we do. AmCon shows are the exact opposite. The attendees are smart, informed, and eager to learn more.

As is usual, we had a collection of parts on display. We also had a Geomagic Capture scanner showing off our growing offering of optical scanning solutions.  Here is a picture of Mario at the show.  He definitely photographs the best:

mario_padt_amcon_phoenix-2015In addition to the booth, we were asked to speak on 3D Printing at the event.  Yours truly gave a presentation entitled: “The Practical Application of 3D Printing for Prototyping, Tooling, and Production” that lasted a bit over an hour.

As promised the notes from that presentation can be downloaded here.

We hope to see more of you at future events. If you have questions about 3D Printing and its application please don’t hesitate to contact us.

 

3D Printing Users Lunched & Learned about Dealing with Scanned, Repaired, and Legacy Geometry

PADT-Geometry-Scanning-PartnersThis Thursday we had the first of seven free seminars on how to deal with geometry created with 3D scanning, how to repair faceted geometry, and how to deal with old CAD geometry.  Don’t panic, we have six more scheduled. Scroll down to see the schedule and register for upcoming versions of this seminar. The inaugural session was held in PADT’s Tempe office and engineers from several departments across the company shared the tools we use in consulting and the lessons we have learned over the years to a pack room full with customers that represented everything from the home inventor to engineers from some of Arizona’s largest aerospace and electronics companies.

badgeometry

As more and more companies do 3D printing we are finding that they struggle with imperfect geometry. Whether it was scanned, from another CAD system, or an STL (3D Printer) file from someone else, when it came time to print parts people were having difficulty getting valid geometry.  So we created a road show to go over the tools we use here to 1) get good scan geometry in the first place, 2) convert scan geometry into something useful, and 3) repair bad STL and CAD files.

Things got kicked off with a presentation on the various ways you can scan 3D geometry.  Our scanning engineer, Ademola, also demonstrated our Geomagic Capture and Steinbichler scanner on some real parts.

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After some food, we moved on to looking at Geomagic Design X.  This is the tool we use to convert our scan data to a fully usable and clean CAD model.  If you have tried to go from scan to CAD without this tool, you know how much work it is.  padt-scanning-spaceclaim-seminar-tempe-2015_05_14

Next we looked that the tool that we use to import, modify, and clean existing geometry: SpaceClaim.  As the presenter Tyler Smith said “No matter the source of geometry, SpaceClaim is the tool to help”

padt-scanning-spaceclaim-seminar-tempe-2-2015_05_14

We finished up with topological optimization. Where we spent most of the event talking about how to get good geometry, in this last presentation we talked about how to make the geometry better by using simulation to optimize the shape of your parts.

padt-scanning-spaceclaim-seminar-tempe-5-2015_05_14

It was a great crowd with the kind of questions you hope for when doing a seminar.  If you are in the Southwest, there is still time to attend one of these lunch & learns being held in other locations. Click on the event you want to register.

 
 
 
 
 
 

Or you can contact PADT directly to learn more about the products and services we covered, which included:

 

Press Release: PADT Acquires Stratasys Business from CADCAM Systems

PADT_Logo_Color_100x50At the beginning of this month, CADCAM Systems agreed to sell their Stratasys 3D Printer sales and support business to PADT.  With customers in Colorado, New Mexico, and Utah this acquisition will increase PADT’s presence and investment in those states. This is PADT’s first acquisition in our 21 year history and we are very excited about the whole thing.  If you have worked with us in the past you know we are all about win-win situations.  We feel that this move will be a win for our customers, CADCAM System’s customers, and Stratasys.

We would like to begin by welcoming all of CADCAM System’s customers to the PADT family. Over the coming months we will be working to get to know you and to show you the variety of products and services that PADT offers.  although a few of you are already customers for other things PADT does, we really look forward to meeting the rest of you and understanding how we can help you bring your products to market better and faster.

Secondly, we want to let our existing customers know that this will give us additional customers and revenue that we  will use to fund expanded services in Utah, Colorado, and New Mexico.  Once we have time to get a feel where these new customers are and what they need, we will plan our sales and support staff to better serve everyone. A larger and stronger community will be one of the key ways this will be a win-win for everyone.

You can read more about the acquisition in the press release below or view a PDF version here.

The new customers will grow PADT’s customer base for 3D Printing systems by around 20% to 40%  depending on how you count things. About half of the new customers are in Colorado and the rest are split between Utah and New Mexico; with a few single customers in other states in the west.  Our staff in those states (Littleton, CO, Albuquerque, NM, and Murray, UT) have already started reaching out to the new customers.  As an example of our growing commitment, we recently moved to a new larger suite in the Utah office to make room for a new Application Engineer, more demo machines, and additional space for training and meetings.

We are usually pretty bad about documenting these things for posterity, but fortunately someone remember to snap a picture on their phone during the signing.  From left to right are Ward Rand (PADT Co-Owner), Gloria Ontiveros (CADCAM Co-Owner), John D. Clark (PADT’s Council), and Mario Vargas (PADT’s Sales Manager for 3D Printing):

Official-Signing-CADCAM-Acquisition

 

Customers who have existing support contracts with CADCAM Systems, will continue to be supported by them until those contract expire, including the purchase of their consumables and materials.  When the contracts are up for renewal, they have the option to renew with PADT and we will be the source for their consumables and materials.  Customers who are not on maintenance can contact PADT now for support:

Repair and Maintenance:  480.813.4884 or 3dps@padtinc.com

Those who wish to purchase material and consumables can do so over the phone, via email, or at our online store: padtmarket.com.

Material: 480.813.4884, sales@padtmarket.com, or www.padtmarket.com.

This is an exciting time and we look forward to the growth and mutual success that this acquisition will bring.

Press Release:

PADT Expands 3D Printer Activities with Acquisition of the Stratasys Reselling Business of CADCAM Systems

Strategic move positions PADT as the largest provider of industrial 3D Printing solutions in the Four Corners region.

Tempe, Ariz., May 13, 2015 Phoenix Analysis & Design Technologies, Inc. (PADT) the Southwest’s largest provider of Numerical Simulation, Product Development, and 3D Printing services and products, is pleased to announce the acquisition of the Stratasys Reseller business of CADCAM Systems, based in Boulder Colorado. This move immediately boosts PADT’s existing 3D Printer sales and support customer base by approximately 30%, adding clients in Colorado, Utah, and New Mexico, making PADT the largest distributor of 3D Printing systems to commercial customers in the Four Corners region.

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CADCAM Systems, like PADT, has been a leader in 3D Printing sales and support, working with global manufacturer Stratasys to help build usage in the Rocky Mountain States. Throughout the course of its history, CADCAM Systems has built a reputation for outstanding technical ability and customer service. As customers transition to PADT for system support, consumables and future machines, they will receive the same exceptional service they are used to, now from PADT’s offices in Littleton, Colorado, Murray, Utah, and Albuquerque, New Mexico. Additional support will come from PADT’s headquarters in Tempe, Arizona. Customers will have the added advantage of access to PADT’s other products and services, including 3D Printing services, ANSYS simulation software, product development, and simulation services.

“When we heard that CADCAM Systems was interested in selling their Stratasys business, we were immediately interested. Said Rey Chu, co-owner at PADT and a recognized expert in the Additive Manufacturing industry. “We knew they took excellent care of their customers and had strong client bases in Colorado, New Mexico, and Utah, three states that we’ve been growing aggressively in. It was an obvious fit for both companies.”

The acquisition will have no impact on the number of people employed at either company. During the transition, customers who purchased maintenance agreements from CADCAM Systems will be serviced by them until they expire, at which time they have the option to renew with PADT. Some 3D Printing material supplies will be available from CADCAM Systems as well during the transition, with PADT taking over that service in the coming months.

This acquisition was made as part of PADT’s long term strategy to strengthen their position as the premier supplier of mechanical engineering products and services in the Southwest. The company continues to make investments in staff, services offered, and products represented to meet the demands of existing and future customers, continuing to prove a commitment to the company’s motto “We Make Innovation Work.”

To learn more about this exciting expansion visit http://www.padtinc.com/cadcam, email sales@padtinc.com or call 480.813.4884.

About Phoenix Analysis and Design Technologies
Phoenix Analysis and Design Technologies, Inc. (PADT) is an engineering product and services company that focuses on helping customers who develop physical products by providing Numerical Simulation, Product Development, and Rapid Prototyping solutions. PADT’s worldwide reputation for technical excellence and experienced staff is based on its proven record of building long term win-win partnerships with vendors and customers. Since its establishment in 1994, companies have relied on PADT because “We Make Innovation Work.” With over 75 employees, PADT services customers from its headquarters at the Arizona State University Research Park in Tempe, Arizona, and from offices in Littleton, Colorado, Albuquerque, New Mexico, and Murray, Utah, as well as through staff members located around the country. More information on PADT can be found at http://www.PADTINC.com.

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PADT Joins America Makes

America-Makes-Logo-2As part of our long-term commitment to the advancement and growth of Additive Manufacturing (3D Printing), PADT is now a Silver Member of America Makes. We join many of our customers and partners in supporting this National Institute that is focused on "helping the United States grow capabilities and strength in 3D printing, also known as additive manufacturing."   This is an important step in our journey, which started in 1994 when PADT purchased our first Stereolithography machine.  Our Rapid Prototyping team, lead by PADT Co-Owner Rey Chu, has been a key player in the industry over the years – as leaders in the Additive Manufacturing User Group (AMUG), an early channel partner for Stratasys, and as the largest provider of Additive Manufacturing services in the Southwestern US.

We joined America Makes because it is delivering on its mission of collaborating on innovation, overcoming challenges that the industry faces, and accelerating overall time to market for companies that use additive manufacturing. As a member we will be able to work closer with others, have access to intellectual property developed by America Makes, and gain access to consolidated technical information.  One of our first efforts will be to work with America Makes on our initiatives to advance simulation and design for Additive Manufacturing.  We will also work with other companies in the Southwest that are already engaged with America Makes to support them and further the growth of the technology in the region.  Membership will also facilitate our ongoing support of the educating of students on Additive Manufacturing and 3D Printing. 

It was extra special to see that ANSYS, Inc. became a Platinum member at the same time as PADT joined as a Sliver member. As many of you know, PADT is a long time ANSYS Channel Partner and a close collaborator with the ANSYS development teams. Working together on Additive Manufacturing simulation efforts with ANSYS was another key reason why we joined. 

The future of Additive Manufacturing looks bright, and PADT is proud the play the role we have in the past, and look forward to the additional contributions we will be able to add through America Makes. 

America-Makes-FrontExteriorTo learn more about America Makes we recommend the following:

– Watch the introduction video here.
– Visit their website.
– See who the other members are.

Based in Youngstown, Ohio, the National Additive Manufacturing Innovation Institute was founded in 2012 as the flagship institute of the National Network for Manufacturing Innovation. It is a true public-private-academic initiative.

 

Real World 3D Printing: PADT Helps ULA Save with Stratasys Digital Manufacturing

Every once in a while a customer hits a home run with Additive Manufacturing, and United Launch Alliance had done that with their application of Stratasys technology to the production of flight-ready components for their rockets.  They were able to leverage 3D printing to take one component from 140 parts to 16, reducing the risks associated with creating the assembly, the piece part costs, and the assembly cost. And PADT is proud to say we were partners in this effort with ULA and Stratasys.

If you are not familiar with ULA, they are the worlds premier launch service company in the US.  It is a joint venture of Boeing and Lockheed that launches the majority of military and civilian payloads that are sent in to space. True "rocket scientists" who are headquartered down the street from PADT's Littleton Colorado office.  They just released a ton of information on how they are using the Stratasys devices they acquired through PADT as an example of what the technology can achieve. 

Here is a picture from Stratasys of one of ULA's structural engineers, Kyle Whitflow, holding an ECS duct they created on the Stratasys Fortus 900mc they purchased through PADT: 

Stratasys just released a great video on how ULA is using the technology. This is a great example of the right people, using the right technology, in the right way:

You can also read the official press release here

We are highlighting his application as a way to let people know that 3D Printing is not just about makers, nor is it just about engineering prototypes. Every day users are creating production hardware to produce usable parts that save them time and money.  Ducts for rockets are a perfect use of the technology because they are complex, low volume, and can make single parts that need to be made in multiple pieces using traditional methods.   This application also highlights the power of the material choices available to users of Stratasys FDM technology.  ULA is using ULTEM 9085 for these ducts because it is durable, lightweight, and can stand up to the heat of the launch event. 

Those of you familiar with the process will notice the dots on the duct. Those are target dots for 3D scanning. ULA took the technology one step further and scan the completed hardware to make sure the manufactured part is within specifications. 

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The team at ULA has been a pleasure to work with.  They saw the promise of Additive Manufacturing but dealt with it like the seasoned professionals that they are. They started by making engineering prototypes, then as they got a feel for the technology they switched to the production of tooling for manufacturing.  They have now developed the confidence needed to move to flight hardware.  In addition to supplying the machines, PADT consulted with ULA early on, touring their manufacturing facilities to better understand their needs and taking them to see how others are using FDM for manufacturing.  We were fortunate enough to even be invited to attend the launch of their Orion spacecraft from Florida as their guest.  

We are very excited about the additional uses ULA and other companies will develop in the near future for Additive Manufacturing.

 If you want to know more, or would like to have PADT help you in the same way we assisted ULA, please reach out or email info@padtinc.com. If you need promotional services or banners (e.g., to buy Thanksgiving banners online) – feel free to contact us.

Press Release: Grand Opening of 3D Printing and Design Resource for Start-Up Companies in Phoenix

 PADT_StartUpLabs-1

The Phoenix area startup community gathered last night at the Center for Entrepreneurial Innovation to celebrate the grand opening of PADT's StartUpLabs. It was a bit warm for April but around 120 people made it out to the Gateway Community College campus to tour the facility, enjoy some food and beverage, and to hear a few words from representatives from a collection of three and four letter acronyms: CEI, PADT, the ACA, ATI, and PCC*. PADT StartUpLabs is a facility at CEI focused on delivering 3D Printing and Design services to early stage startups, rounding out the already excellent offerings at CEI including business planning, leadership training, marketing, and legal services. 

It was an opportunity for those who came to tour the facilities and network with others in the startup community including investors, inventors, entrepreneurs, professional service providers, and some students.  You can read the press release below or download a PDF here. In addition we enjoyed entertainment from Rachel Lydia Ellis and Colten Reece Hood and demonstration from Falcon Robotics of their latest robot that featured an amazing vision system.  

If you would like to learn more about PADT StartUpLabs, please visit the website: www.padtinc.com/startup or contact us at 480.813.4884.  

Here are some images from the event:

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Jeff Saville, Executive Director of CEI Shares his thoughts. 
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The PADT Medical Mascot watches over the display booths
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The displays in the lab are ready to go and are a great example of the marketing help CEI offers their clients. 
PADT-StartUpLabs-CEI-Grand-opening-1
A steady stream of visitors toured the new lab.
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Attendees escape the heat and network in the main hallway at CEI.
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Falcon Robotics, a great example of the future of technology and entrepreneurship. 
PADT-StartUpLabs-CEI-Grand-opening-7
MedicoLabs is a maker space for medical device development and is collocated in PADT StartUpLabs.  
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Rachel and Colten entertain the crowd with great voices.
 

Press Release:

Grand Opening of 3D Printing and Design Resource for Start-Up Companies in Phoenix

PADT and CEI officially open StartUpLabs to provide 3D Printing and design services to high-tech startups. StartupLabs focuses on helping early stage companies meet their product development and prototyping needs in a timely, efficient, and cost effect way through 3D Printing, Mentoring, and Design Services.

Tempe, AZ – April 20, 2015 – Phoenix Analysis & Design Technologies, Inc. (PADT), the Southwest’s largest provider of simulation, product development, and 3D Printing services and products, is pleased to announce the grand opening of StartUpLabs, a joint effort with the Center for Entrepreneurial Innovation (CEI). Located in CEI’s Phoenix, Arizona facility, the lab features state-of-the-art Additive Manufacturing (3D Printing) systems from Stratasys, leading Computer Aided Design (CAD) tools, and the equipment and space to provide needed services to early stage companies developing physical products.

The official Grand Opening for StartUpLabs was held at CEI on April 20th, 2015 from 3:00 to 7:00 PM. However, CEI clients have been utilizing the lab since the beginning of the year, with great success.

“We were approached in 2014 by CEI to help them build up a 3D Printing capability” noted Eric Miller, one of PADT’s owners. “As we worked together both sides saw the need for something more than a room full of printers, and PADT StartUpLabs was born. The experience has been fantastic for everyone involved and we feel we are well on the way to providing affordable access to these services that are critical to new product companies.”

The mission for StartUpLabs is simple:

Establish an additive manufacturing and product development lab within CEI to provide the Arizona physical product startup community with high quality 3D Printing and Design resources at an accessible price. 

What makes this lab unique is a combination of a fantastic facility, leading-edge equipment, entrepreneurs that are part of a well-managed program, and experienced engineers to guide the use of the resources being made available. In addition, both CEI and PADT have a particular focus on Medical Device related product development, bringing the experience of both teams to play for this critical and growing part of the Arizona startup community.

“Our mission at CEI is to provide commercialization assistance for job-creating technology entrepreneurs in the Phoenix area,” said Jeff Saville, CEI Executive Director. “PADT, with its product development expertise and specific medical device specialties, fills a major role for us in support of our client companies and their growth.”

At this time, only CEI Clients have access to discounted services at the lab. Over time the goal is to expand the services offered, furthering the contribution that both PADT and CEI make to the high-tech ecosystem in the state. In addition, PADT uses the impressive facilities at CEI as a central location for meetings with customers and as a location to hold meetings, seminars, and training sessions. 

To learn more about the StartUpLabs, visit http://www.padtinc.com/startuplabs or contact PADT at 480.813.4884 or CEI at 602.286.8950. 

About Phoenix Analysis and Design Technologies

Phoenix Analysis and Design Technologies, Inc. (PADT) is an engineering product and services company that focuses on helping customers who develop physical products by providing Numerical Simulation, Product Development, and Rapid Prototyping solutions. PADT’s worldwide reputation for technical excellence and experienced staff is based on its proven record of building long term win-win partnerships with vendors and customers. Since its establishment in 1994, companies have relied on PADT because “We Make Innovation Work. “  With over 75 employees, PADT services customers from its headquarters at the Arizona State University Research Park in Tempe, Arizona, and from offices in Littleton, Colorado, Albuquerque, New Mexico, and Murray, Utah, as well as through staff members located around the country. More information on PADT can be found at http://www.PADTINC.com.

About CEI
A division of the Maricopa Corporate College, the Center for Entrepreneurial Innovation (CEI) is a community-based business incubator located on the campus of GateWay Community College in the heart of Discovery Triangle. With funding from the US Economic Development Administration, City of Phoenix, and Maricopa Community College District, CEI provides targeted business services and proactive business support to create a systemic link between technology development, compelling markets, and opportunities; entrepreneurial and managerial talent development; early stage capital sourcing; and education and training, interns, coaching and business counseling. For more about CEI, visit http://www.ceigateway.com.  

* The acronyms translate to:
CEI: Center for Entrepreneurial Innovation
PADT: Phoenix Analysis & Design Technologies
ACA: Arizona commerce Authority
ATI: Arizona Technology Investors
PCC:Phoenix City Council… OK, that one is a stretch to make the joke work.

Press Release: Fast, Intuitive, and Precise 3D Scanning Solution from Steinbichler Added to PADT’s Portfolio

steinbichler-PADT-multiproduct-1Yes. Another press release from PADT announcing a new partner.  The truth is we have the advantage of having worked with some great companies in 2014 and we are now fortunate enough to be able to add several of the great products we use in-house to our product offering. It all kind of happened at once.  Don't worry, we are almost done… only one or two more surprises out there.

At the beginning of the year we mentioned that we were offering full professional optical scanning. That service was based on using a Steinbichler blue light scanner. And as is usually with a tool we really like, we quickly negotiated an agreement with that company to represent their products. They offer the COMET line of blue light scanners and the T-SCAN line of laser scanners. There is of course a nice software package, called colin3D, that serves as a way to interact with the devices and get the data into a useful form. Both technologies offer high-precision at a reasonable price, something that not only PADT, but many of our customers were looking for.  

Please find the official press release below or as a PDF file.  You can also learn more about the products on our website here. We hope to schedule some webinars on this tool, and publish some blog articles, in the coming months. But the best way to try out this technology is to have us scan a part for you.

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As always, feel free to contact us for more information.  

Press Release:

Industry leading 3D Scanning systems are now available through PADT with the addition of both Blue Light and Laser sensors from Steinbichler.  These solutions round out PADT’s offering for complete reverse engineering and inspection, providing greater accuracy and the scanning of very small to very large objects. 

Phoenix Analysis & Design Technologies, Inc. (PADT), the Southwest’s largest provider of simulation, product development, and 3D Printing services and products, is pleased to announce that an agreement has been reached with Steinbichler Vision Systems, Inc. for PADT to become a distributor of Steinbichler’s optical scanning solutions in the Southwestern United States. These highly precise and easy-to-use devices offer PADT’s customers a professional solution for their inspection, quality, and reverse engineering needs.

The COMET line of blue light scanners combine high-end technology, ergonomics, and compact design to offer optimum flexibility and precision for challenging scanning tasks. The product family includes multiple options for resolution and lenses.  The top-of-the-line COMET 6 boasts a 16 megapixel camera, adaptive projection 3D ILC technology, and six different camera lens options. At the same time, the entry level COMET L3D provides outstanding 3D data acquisition and accuracy at an affordable price. 

Coordinate measurement technology can be taken to a new level with the T-SCAN line of devices that couples an ergonomic and lightweight handheld laser scanner with a high precision tracking camera.  A touch probe can also be added for precise location measurement.  The result is a flexible system that allows accurate part measurement of everything from fine surface features to automobiles size objects.

“We have been using a Steinbichler system for our service work with great success” commented Rey Chu, a co-owner of PADT, “and it became obvious that this was the type of equipment, and the type of company, that would be a great match for our customers who needed professional high resolution non-contact 3D scanning and measuring capability.”

PADT is offering these systems with Steinbichler’s colin3D software and geometry tools from Geomagic and ANSYS SpaceClaim. This combination of hardware and software meets the full spectrum of needs encountered by customers to capture, clean, compare, and use geometry from point clouds to usable 3D parametric solid models.

To learn more about the COMET and T-SCAN professional 3D scanners, visit http://www.padtinc.com/steinbichler or contact our technical sales team at 480.813.4884 or sales@padtinc.com.

About Phoenix Analysis and Design Technologies

Phoenix Analysis and Design Technologies, Inc. (PADT) is an engineering product and services company that focuses on helping customers who develop physical products by providing Numerical Simulation, Product Development, and Rapid Prototyping solutions. PADT’s worldwide reputation for technical excellence and experienced staff is based on its proven record of building long term win-win partnerships with vendors and customers. Since its establishment in 1994, companies have relied on PADT because “We Make Innovation Work. “  With over 75 employees, PADT services customers from its headquarters at the Arizona State University Research Park in Tempe, Arizona, and from offices in Littleton, Colorado, Albuquerque, New Mexico, and Murray, Utah, as well as through staff members located around the country. More information on PADT can be found at http://www.PADTINC.com.

About Steinbichler
Steinbichler is a worldwide leading manufacturer and supplier of 3D scanning technology. We develop & market highly precise measurement systems with corresponding software solutions for a wide range of applications. Our best in class 3D scanning products – COMET® and T-SCAN are in operation at numerous well-known industrial companies & research institutes. As a technology oriented company, we offer innovative and effective inspection solutions to address our customer’s needs. http://www.steinbichler.com