Encore Lunch and Learn: Designing and Simulating Products for 3D Printing

3dprinting-production-1PADT would like to invite you to a free seminar or webinar on how to use 3D Printing to manufacture parts for your products.

In February, PADT held a Lunch and Learn with the AZ Tech Council on "Designing and Simulating Products for 3D Printing."  The event sold out and we received a lot of interest in being able to attend over the web. So we have scheduled a second version of this presentation to be given live at CEI in Phoenix on March 23rd, 2015 that will also be broadcast over the web.  

Here is some info on the presentation:

This proven technology has moved from prototyping to tooling and now the creation of final parts.  However, you can't just print your existing design. PADT will cover the techniques and processes needed to evaluate existing designs to find parts that can be switched to 3D printing as well as how to design new parts to take advantage of 3D printing. 

3dprinting-production-2

When:
Monday, March 23, 2015
11:30am – 1:00pm 
Where:
CEI
275 N. GateWay Drive
Phoenix, AZ 85034
Webinar:
WebEx
Please Register, we will send you login information 
  Lunch will be Served for those attending live

We will begin with a review on the current state of 3D Printing technologies, including the creation of accurate and usable metal parts. That will be followed with design guidelines and processes and finishing up with a look at how you can use simulation to drive the design your 3D Printed components so that they work.

Please Register

Lunch is included so we need a headcount for those joining us at CEI, and we need to send login information to those attending over the web.  So Please Register

 

Bringing Life to a Sculpture

Art_man-STL-PointsRecent development in 3D scanning technologies have made a wide variety of application a possibility.  3D scanners can capture data on the shape and texture of real world object and transform it into useable 3D CAD model. Our structured light 3D scanners generate quality high density mesh results which are then used for rapid prototyping, computer-aided engineering (CAE) analysis, reverse engineering, or inspection to 3D CAD data. The scanner works by using a high resolution camera and lens pair to analyze the deformed projection pattern on an object.

Per customer request, we 3D scanned a custom hand crafted character sculpture and separate standing base. We efficiently scanned the sculpture and base using a turntable allowing for quicker and more accurate data. The scanned data was then sent to the computer for alignment or registration into a common reference system and merged into a complete STL model. Next, we optimized the mesh results for 3D printing and printed the model using our FDM printer.

Art_Man

Using PADT’s structured light scanner and FDM printer we were able to capture and produce a detailed model which brought the character to life.

3D-Scan-Sculpture

Once the object was scanned we sent him to the 3D Printer. Here you can see him being made:

Art_Man-FDM-Building

And this is a shot of him taking his post build bath, to remove the support material from the print:

Art_Man-FDM-Bath

And the final part, looking good:

Art_Man-FDM-Part

The customer can use the scanned model to create different sized versions of their sculpture.

Learn more about our 3D Scanning capabilities on our website, or simply contact us at rp@padtinc.com

3d-optical-scanner-1

geocube-hardware-pics

The Computer

The key to converting large scans into accurate 3D models revolves around having the right computer.  A complex model like this with so much detail can really bog down on a normal design workstation, so PADT developed a special line of CUBE Computers just for scanning, called geoCUBES.  For this project Ademola used a geoCUBE w4 which is crammed full of goodies.  Note the use of six Solid State Drives in raid to remove the I/O bottleneck along with an NVIDIA QUADRO K6000 which helps in visualization as a graphics card and as a GPU in doing all of the number crunching needed.

  • INTEL XEON e5-1620V2 – 4Cores@3.7GHz
  • HD Audio 7.1
  • 64GB DDR3-1866 ECC REG RAM
  • Hardware RAID Controller
  • 6 x 240GB Enterprise Class SSD’s
  • NVIDIA QUADRO K6000
  • Blu-Ray BDXL Combo Drive
  • 3D Connexion SpaceNavigator 3D Mouse

3D Printing and Supply Chain Management

ISM-3D-Printing-CoverAs 3D Printing matures it is impacting a larger area within manufacturing companies.  Supply chain management is a key part of any organization that makes physical parts, and 3D Printing has a big, and sometimes ignored, impact there.  The Institute for Supply Chain Management made the topic their cover article for the March issue of their magazine: Inside Supply Management. The article does a good job of pointing out the realities of 3D Printing in a real manufacturing environment. 

The article featured input from PADT and other experts in the area.  Even if you are not directly involved in the supply chain side of things, it is worth a read to understand how the technology impacts things.  The section on building a business case for 3D Printing is especially useful.

There is a nice sidebar that covered some of the lessons we have learned here at PADT:

  • Don't Cheap Out – get a commercial quality 3D Printer that doesn't cut corners
  • It's not for everyone – make sure that 3D Printing has a real benefit for your company
  • Understand quality needs – quality is different with 3D Printed parts, know this and work with it
  • Set traceability standards – you need to know where your material came from and where the parts you make end up

If you have any questions about 3D Printing and supply chain, or any other impact of the technology, don't hesitate to contact us and we will be happy to talk about it. 

ISM-Mag-shot

Major Milestone Achieved: 3D Printing of a Full Turbine Engine

3d-printed-jet-engine

Not long ago the sages in the additive manufacturing world said "Someday in the future we will be able to print a complete Turbine Engine."  That someday is now, much sooner than many of us predicted.  Researchers at Monash University in Australia recently created a modified version of a Safron Microturbo Auxiliary Power Unit using 3D Printing.  The whole thing.  Milestone Achieved.

The best article on this amazing story is on the Melbourne Examiner page:
www.smh.com.au/technology/sci-tech/3d-printing-melbourne-engineers-print-jet-engine-in-world-first-20150226-13pfv1.html 

Turbine Engines are really the peak of machine design. They contain every nasty thing you might run into in other machines, but spin faster and run hotter.  It's hard stuff. The geometry is difficult, lots of small features and holes, and significant assembly and tolerance constraints.  Getting a demonstrator built like this is a huge deal.  As a former turbine engine engineer and a long time user of additive manufacturing, I'm amazed. 

Check out their video:

The "3d Printer" they used was a huge Concept Laser Direct Laser Melting system.  The technology uses a laser to draw on the top of a bed of powder medal, melting the medal in small pools the bind and create a fully dense part with cast like properties.  They used three different metals: nickel alloy, titanium, and aluminum.

Concept-Laser-3d-printed-turbine-enginePADT has chosen to partner with Concept Laser for our metal 3D Printing strategy, which gives us additional excitement for this sucessful project.  

Now that someone has achieved this milestone, the industry can move forward with confidence that even more can be done with metal 3D Printing.  Much was learned in the creation of this advanced device that we can build on and apply to other industries and applications. 

Much is said in the twittersphere and press about printing food or custom dog tags, but this sort of high value industrial application is where the real impact of 3D Printing will be felt. It shows that companies can develop new more efficient products in less time and that are not constrained by traditional manufacturing methods. 

PHX Startup Week Going with Tours at CEI and PADT StartUPLab

PADT_StartUpLabs-1Phoenix Startup Week has started!  One of the key events on the first day centered on tours and talks at CEI, which kikced off with tours of PADT StartUpLabs, the advanced 3D Printing facility for startups located at CEI. This was followed with CEI tours and an afternoon of talks on Medical Device startups.  Then the tours repeated for those who could not make the early ones.

There is a great article in AZ Tech Beat today covering the event and what  we are doing at PADT StartupLabs:

Space travel to startups, 3D printing without limits – PHX Startup Week – AZ Tech Beat

IMG_5445Attendance was great, with a cross section of startups, established companies, the press, and people active in supporting the startup community.  The visits gave us a change to explain how PADT is working with CEI to provide 3D Printing and design expertise to new companies at a reduced price, focusing on getting them over the early stages of product development quickly and effectively. 

Right now PADT StartUpLabs is focused on working with other tenants at CEI.  Engineers from PADT hold regular office hours to answer questions about 3D Printing and product development.  Clients can also set up a consultation with anyone on our staff to talk about simulation, product design or test, quality systems, or manufacturing. The goal is to eventually expand these services to a broader audience. 

This week's events are being followed closely on the twittersphere: #PHXStartupWeek, #yesphx. Or if you are middle-aged like me and use Facebook, like Phoenix Startup Week.

aztechbeat-padt-startuplabs-1

Startup Week is still going and there are many more informative events. Check out the website to learn more and follow AZ Tech Beat's feed as they cover things to see what happened. 

We hope to run in to lots of you at upcoming events!

Not in Phoenix?

Many of you who read this blog are not from the Phoenix area. You may be wondering "What, a vibrant startup community? I thought Phoenix was old people and nutty gun-totting right-wing nut-jobs?"  Well, we certainly have a few of  those but since WWII when large aerospace and electronics companies moved to the valley, Phoenix has been a major high-technology hub.  It is an easy place to start a business and has all the resources and talent to be successful.  PADT has been helping startups in the area for over 20 years now, and we continue to see a steady increase in the number and diversity of new companies that we interact with.  So don't believe what you see on the news, this is a vibrant, high-tech place with great people and a business friendly outlook, affordable housing, and weather that doesn't force us to spend the morning shoveling out our driveways.  

Stratasys Platinum Partner Status Achieved by PADT

  Stratasys_PLAT_Partner_2015

A lot is going on in the various sales groups at PADT after having such a strong 2014.   We are very pleased to announce that the latest result of outstanding efforts across the board is PADT's new status as a Stratasys Platinum Commercial Partner. Stratasys, Ltd (SSYS), the leading provider of Additive Manufacturing (3D Printing) systems, designates only the best of their reseller channel as Platinum Partners. To obtain this highest level, PADT not only had to meet aggressive sales goals, we also had to make significant investments in resources and people.  In 2014 we exceeded those sales goals by 25% and we opened up a fourth sales and support office, located just south of Salt Lake City in Murray, Utah. 

Here is a pixture of our Additive Manufacturing Sales Manager, Mario Vargas, with one of PADT's principals, Ward Rand, pointing out our latest addition to our "wall o' awards."

  PADT-Stratasys-Platinum-Partner-Award-2015

You can read more about this on our press release here.

PADT has been selling Stratasys equipment for over a decade, and we have been using their systems for over fifteen years.  We have seen them go from a few basic systems to a full offering of solutions from desktop hobby solutions to full production manufacturing centers. This year the team was able to help more customers find the right Additive Manufacturing system for their specific needs. In fact, many of the systems we sold in 2015 were additional machines or upgrades to current machines, showing strong customer satisfaction with Stratasys solutions. 

connex3_with_cmy_helmets     400mc_solo  

We could never have achieved last years success and Platinum status without a fantastic team. Our sales professionals, application engineers, field service engineers, and support staff all strive to provide the highly technical win-win sales experience that PADT has become known for. They truly believe in this technology and are truly enthusiastic about finding new and better ways for our customers to apply it.

Those customers also deserve a heartfelt thank you for being such a pleasure to work with.  Every day we get to interact with the full spectrum of users, from the preverbal garage startup to major aerospace corporations; and everything between.  They teach us something new every day and we are always proud of the value that Stratasys and PADT are able to deliver to their product development efforts. 

If you want to learn more about 3D Printing and why Stratasys systems have continued to outsell the closest competitors for years, please contact Kathryn Pesta at 480.813.4884 or kathryn.pesta@padtinc.com.  She will put you in touch with one of our sales people located in your local area.  Or you can visit www.padtinc.com/stratasys to learn more about the technology. 

 

Seminar Info: Designing and Simulating Products for 3D Printing

Note: We have scheduled an encore Lunch & Learn and companion Webinar for March 23, 2015.  Please register here to attend in person at CEI in Phoenix or here to attend via the web.

ds43dp-1People are interested in how to better do design and simulation for products they manufacture using 3D Printing.  When the AZ Tech council let us know they had a cancelation for their monthly manufacturing Lunch and Learn, we figured why not do something on this topic, a few people might show up. We had over 105 people register, so we had to close registration. In the end around 95 total people made it to the seminar, which is more than expected so we had to add chairs. Who would have thought that many people would come for such a nerdy topic?.

For an hour and fifteen minutes they sat and listned to us talk about the ins and outs of using this growing technology to make end use parts.  Here is a copy of the PowerPoint as a PDF.

We did add one bullet item in the design suggestions area based on a question. Someone pointed out that the machine instructions, what the AM machine uses to make the parts, should be a controlled document. They are exactly right and that is a very important process that needs to be put in place to get traceability and repeatability.  

Here are some useful links:

As always, do not hesitate to contact us for more information or with any questions.

If you missed this presentation, don't worry, we are looking to schedule a live/web version of this talk with some enhancements sometime in March.  Watch the usual channels for time, place, and registration information. We will also be publishing detailed blog posts on many of the topics covered today, diving deeper into areas of interest.

Thank you to the AZ Tech Council, ASU SkySong, and everyone that attended for making this our best attended non-web seminar ever.

Design and Simulation for 3D Printing Full House

The Full Power of SpaceClaim Engineer – Now Available from PADT

SpaceClaim-1We have been using SpaceClaim with ANSYS Workbench for about four years now, and we always liked it. Then it came as part of the Geomagic Spark tool and we got more excited.  This was a powerful geometry creation, editing, and reapir tool that was saving us time all across PADT.  The, when ANSYS, Inc. purchased the company SpaceClaim we got realy excited.  So excited that we decided to become a reseller of the full product, and not just the ANSYS or Geomagic tools.  The addition of a module for working with STL files sealed the deal and as of the begining of the year we are offering all flavors of SpaceClaim to our customers.

The official press release can be found here. You can learn a lot about the product by visiting the web page.

To get started learning about why we love this program so much, check out this video showing the new features in the latest version:

Then go visit their YouTube channel and watch videos that may be of special interest to you.

Or, contact us here at PADT and we would be happy to share with your our enthusiasm for this tool.

SpaceClaim-Model1b

 

3D Printing to Combat Deflategate

3d-printed-footballIn honor of the big game this weekend the folks at Stratasys scored big time with a 3D printed footballStratasys has had a history of using 3D printing to improve on a variety of sports; however this time they out did themselves by possibly solving the infamous issue of deflategate. Since the Ideal Gas Law doesn't exactly explain it, maybe 3D printing could help prevent it from interfering in the big game until an answer is found. I’m not sure the NFL will be too keen on using these balls but it’s a thought

super-bowl-3d-printed-football

The football was created on the Objet500 Connex3 Color Multi-Material 3D Production System and was printed in three materials.  VeroMagenta and VeroYellow was used for the bulk of the design however they were also able to replicate the true texture and feel of a real football using the rubber-like TangoPlus material and all in one print job.  It is heavier than a game ball but can still be tossed around.  Of course they wouldn’t print a football and not test it.  Check out their video below. 

Bonus Link – Here is a fun Brady Deflategate Inaction Figure from Shapeways. 

3D Printing Saves Money at Hill Air Force Base in Utah

141212-F-jj999-010
An F-16 wing attachment, molded from plastic in a 3-D printer, was used as a prototype before being machined in metal. The 309th Maintenance Support Group at Hill Air Force Base, Utah, is using Rapid Prototyping, also known as 3-D printing, to create prototype parts. (U.S. Air Force photo/Bill Orndorff)

We had the pleasure of working with Hill Air Force Base in Utah to implement a Rapid Prototyping or 3D printing solution using Stratasys’ Fortus 900.  Since implementing the machine, they have seen some enormous money and time cost savings without compromising quality.

The printer at Hill AFB is used for a variety of applications from form and fit testing of new designs, tooling, and fixtures to training aids and end use parts.  They have received lots of positive feedback from their customers because they are able to adapt and quickly make changes to meet their specifications.  

The Fortus 900 is the largest FDM printer offered by Stratasys and is about the size of a mini-van.  Material options include a variety of thermoplastic materials with capabilities ranging from high heat tolerances and impact resistance to chemical resistance.

For more details on the success at Hill Air Force Base, check out an article they recently published here.

The Real Revolution in 3D Printing: It’s Normal

3D-printed-printerReading through my email this morning I saw an update from the "maker" site Instructables and I glanced at it quickly: "floating bed, how to make a sword, that's cool, 3D printable printer, folding chair charcoal forge, what?, parachord hammer holder, just buy one, duh, blah, blah, blah how do people have time for this… wait, 3D printable printer?" CLICK.  

So this 17 year old kid used his 3D Printer, an arduino board and parts he scrounged from old DVD drives to make a 3D Printer. Read about it here.  This kid, wootin24, designed and built an X, Y, Z positioning device that could be fited with a dremel tool to be a CNC machine, or an extruder to be a 3D Printer.  No CAD experience, no formal engineering training, just a smart person.  And the ad that popped up on the side of the how-to this kid wrote was for a Dremel 3D Printer, available at Home Depot. Not some kickstarter funded rehash of an opensource printer, Dremel. The big guys.  As I was feeling bad about how I spent my time when I was 17 (I'm not going to go there but I never did become a the backup bass player for Rush nor did I get a second date from T—–) and starting to worry about how systems from very capable companies like Dremel will impact our sales of Stratasys equipment, I realized that the true revolution in 3D printing happened and most of us involved day-to-day in the industry didn't even notice.  

3D Printing is Now Normal

When a revolutionary technology comes out there is a lot of hoopla and press. Tons of people start jumping on the bandwagon and your Aunt's friend in Topeka is sending you links on Facebook about 3D Printing and how it is "going to change everything."  Do not get me started on how 3D Printing is not new, we've been doing it at PADT for over 20 years, and certainly do not ask about the "3D printed gun.  The false-newness and fear-mongering stories are what the mainstream press picked up on. The good news is that the hype got the word out. And then smart people like this kid and the engineers at Dremel said "hmmm, that is useful. I can do something with this" and boom, the real revolution happened.  

After all these years this tool that was really a special tool used when needed, has become just another screwdriver in the toolbox.  A standard part of the process it is something most engineers understand well, and a majority of non-engineers are aware of. When we first started showing people our SLA machine back in the 90's they would either not understand what they were looking at or become flabergasted and amazed, treating it more like a magic box than a fairly simple additive curing system.  Now when we give tours we hear "that one looks like the one we have in our office" or "oh yea, an Objet, I'd love to trade my older system in for one of those." And the dreaded "oh, we have three of these in our robotics lab at school, do you have anything interesting?"  

3d-printers2
Amazon now has a section for all the 3D Printers they sell, just like headphones or video games.

So What

There is a lot of power in 3D Printing.  That is the real reason why the technology has blossomed as it has.  The power of 3D Printing is that it lets you make physical objects without special equipment or knowledge, the laser printer of manufacturing. However, as long as the tool is treated as something to be used in special cases or as a mystical new magic bullet, it will not be used correctly.  Now that it is mainstream, the use of additive manufacturing becomes mainstream and the power it brings to the table can be fully realized.  We see this every day at PADT. Product managers have "3D Printed Prototypes" as a standard line item in their budget templates.  Customers are increasingly talking about going back to their current product lines and identifying parts that are machined, injection molded, or cast and determining which can be replaced by 3D printed parts.  And most importantly, the supply chain and quality people are sniffing around and starting to make paperwork to control and manage 3D Printed components.  

As proponents of the technology since the early days, we could not be happier than when we see a check box for "Created with additive manufacturing" on a quality form. When it becomes part of the bureaucracy, the revolution has truly happened. 

Press Release: Dedicated 3D Scanning Added to Round Out PADT’s Scanning Solutions

3d-optical-scanner-1

PADT has been offering 3D Scanning solutions for some time. Over time the company has added the sale of 3D Scanning hardware and software, training for 3D Scaning, and limited 3D Scanning services.  With the addition of a full time scanning engineer, PADT is now able to offer deciated scanning servcies to our customers.

Ademola Falada joins our team from Minnesota where he worked for a scanner manufacturer, CGI, for two years after graduating with an engineering degree from the University of Minnesota.  He brings extensive knowledge of scanning equipment and the scanning process.  Since joining PADT in the late summer, he has been providing limited services to our existing customers as he builds up our scanning capability and puts everything needed to provide a world class service in place.  He will be assisted by engineers and technicians that have been providing scanning on a part time basis in the past.

cross-sectional-scanning      

By offering optical and cross sectional scanning, PADT can provide a more accurate solution to a broader range of customers.  

Read the press release on this expanded service below

.Geomagic-Capture

You can also review our scanning services on our website

Or simply email us at rp@padtinc.com or call 480.813.4884 and our team will be more than happy to explain what we can do and provide you with a quote. 

 geomagic-qualify-probe-screenshot 

Press Release:

Dedicated 3D Scanning Added to Round Out PADT’s Scanning Solutions 

PADT now has a full time engineer and equipment dedicated to providing 3D Scanning services to customers.  Coupled with the sales and support of 3D scanners and software, PADT can now offer a complete solution to its growing number of scanning customers. 

Tempe, AZ – January 8, 2015 – Phoenix Analysis & Design Technologies, Inc. (PADT, Inc.), the Southwest’s largest provider of simulation, product development, and rapid prototyping services and products, is pleased to announce the addition of complete 3D part scanning to our services offering.  Based on growing customer requests, PADT has invested in equipment, software, and personnel to provide a dedicated resource in this area.  The company has been providing scanning as a service for many years, but on a part time basis when staff was free and customers could not find another resource.  PADT’s 3D Printing sales team has also been selling scanners and scanning software for over three years.  Bringing someone on board to focus on this critical need in product development was the next logical step.



3D Scanning is used by engineers to take a part in the real world and measure it accurately in order to get a model of the part on a computer.  This is done using a variety of technologies including lasers, patterned light, and high resolution pictures. The technology is used in product development to capture geometry of existing parts to reproduce (reverse engineering) them or design parts that attach or interact with them. It can also be used to inspect manufactured parts.



Ademola Falada joins our team from Minnesota where he worked for a scanner manufacturer, CGI, for two years after graduating with an engineering degree from the University of Minnesota.  He brings extensive knowledge of scanning equipment and the scanning process.  Since joining PADT in the late summer, he has been providing limited services to our existing customers as he builds up our scanning capability and puts everything needed to provide a world class service in place.  He will be assisted by engineers and technicians that have been providing scanning on a part time basis in the past.



“We are now ready to open our doors wide to customers who need accurate, timely, and useful scanning of their parts.” Commented Rey Chu, one of PADT’s owners and the Principal responsible for the company’s manufacturing services. “We never felt that we could deliver the level of service that customers expect from PADT until we had enough equipment and a dedicated engineer. We are there now.”



The scanning lab consists of two CGI Cross Sectional Scanners for high fidelity scanning of complex plastic parts with internal features, a Geomagic Capture blue light scanner, and a Steinbichler high resolution blue light scanner currently under evaluation. This combination of equipment is matched with the full suite of Geomagic scanning software to provide inspection data, cleaned point clouds, tessellated solids (STL), or usable CAD models. 



Customers who are interested in having parts scanned, or who want to learn more about the service, can contact the team at 480.813.4884 or scanning@padtinc.com 



Phoenix Analysis and Design Technologies, Inc. (PADT) is an engineering service company that focuses on helping customers who develop physical products by providing Numerical Simulation, Product Development, and Rapid Prototyping products and services. PADT’s worldwide reputation for technical excellence and an experienced staff is based on its proven record of building long term win-win partnerships with vendors and customers. Since its establishment in 1994, companies have relied on PADT because “We Make Innovation Work.“  With over 75 employees, PADT services customers from its headquarters at the Arizona State University Research Park in Tempe, Arizona, its Littleton, Colorado office, Albuquerque, New Mexico office, and Murray, Utah office, as well as through staff members located around the country. More information on PADT can be found at www.PADTINC.com.

Coming Soon to CEI

PADT_StartUpLabs-1  cei_logo

Check out this great video from CEI about PADT’s new office in Phoenix.
Watch this space for more details as we get closer to launch.

Fantastic Night at the 2014 GCOI – Winners, Awards, and Fancy Attire

padt_gcoi14
PADT was on hand in force at the 2014 GCOI ceremony: (L to R) FORTUS 250mc, Andrew Miller, Ward Rand, Eric Miller, Mario Vargas, Renee Palacios, and Brad Palumbo

Every year in November the Arizona technology community gathers to celebrate innovation in the state.  The 2014 Governor’s Celebration of Innovation (GCOI) was a great event for the state and for PADT.  This years winners ranged from high school students to legislators to internationally recognized leaders in the software industry.  And, unlike most tech events in the state, everyone was dressed up all fancy.  The gala is put on by our friends at the Arizona Technology Council and the Arizona Commerce Authority.

This is a special event for PADT for a variety of reasons.  We have been a sponsor of the GCOI for several years, hauling out our equipment and samples for a booth to show off Mechanical Engineering in the state.  This year we were also honored to provided a judge to help choose the winners and we also made the trophies for those who won.  In addition, PADT was the winner of the 2011 Pioneering Award.  Every year we add more good memories to this event which puts an exclamation point on the year.

Congratulations to the Winners

pat-award-gcoi14
Pat Sullivan of ACTI! and Contatta Receiving his Lifetime Achievement Award

This years nominees was a great indication of the strength of technology companies and educators in the state.  As always, the students who received recognition were the most inspiring.  It is truly amazing what they have achieved while still in High School.

It was especially nice to see PADT customers Syncardia and Securaplane receive awards. Both companies are based in Tucson and are leading the way in their industries.  Syncardia produces the only FDA approved total artificial heart,  truly saving lives on a daily basis. Securaplane provides the aviation industry with a variety of security and power sub-systems.  

We were also pleased to see Pat Sullivan take home a “Lifetime Achievement Award.”  Pat started ACT! in the early days of personal computing, and many of us at PADT have been users of his software, and we still use it today at PADT. In addition, we are an investor in Pat’s new company, Contatta, through the Arizona Tech Investors.

This year the judges decided to add a special award, the Judges Award, for outstanding contributions to the technology community.  The first ever winner was the Society of Women Engineers.  This group is a big favorite of PADT because of their hard work to diversify the field and support many in school and in their careers.  

Check out the article in the Phoenix Business Journal to see a full list of winners.

3D Printed Awards

gov_gcoi14
Arizona Governor Jan Brewer Holding her very own “Governor’s Celebration of Innovation” Award.

Once again, PADT provided the awards  for the winners.  It is one thing to see people you know and admire win an award, it is even more meaningful when you see them holding an award that you designed and made.  Seeing Governor Brewer pose with her special award was kind of cool.  

In the past, we have used a combination of 3D Printing and traditional methods to make the awards, but this year we were able to produce everything using additive manufacturing technologies.

gcoi-2014-finished-1bThe top portion of the awards was created on our Stratasys Objet500 Connex3 polyjet machine. This device uses inkjet heads to deposit layers of photo-curable polymers.  It has four heads, allowing us to lay down support material, a base material, and two colors.  We used a transparent material for the base, and mixed yellow and magenta to get the different colors that “float” inside the transparent oval. 

The base was created on our FORTUS 400 fused gcoi-2014-finished-2deposition modeling machine using ABS plastic.  Both of the parts were generated in CAD and printed directly.  This application shows the power of 3D Printing. We were able to create 11 unique trophies without the need for tooling, special equipment, or expertise in any given process.  We simply visualized what we wanted on the computer, then sent the resulting custom designs to the printers. Specifically, the unique text for each award was extruded as a solid inside the main body, floating above the state of Arizona.

ScitechFestivalLogoCheck out this great article on the Arizona SciTech Festival site about PADT.

“Innovation Personified: Phoenix Analysis and Design Technologies”

Our very own Josh Heaps talks about how we use 3D Printers, STEM Education, and gives some advice on how students can best prepare for a stem career. 

Learn more about the Arizona SciTech Festival here.
See more about PADT’s STEM activity here.