ANSYS R17 Brings Added Tools to Mechanical Licenses

ansys-r17-splashSome of you have probably already noticed, but ANSYS Mechanical licenses have some changes at version 17. First, the license that for years has been known as ANSYS Mechanical is now known as ANSYS Mechanical Enterprise. Further, ANSYS, Inc. has enabled significantly more functionality with this license at version 17 than was available in prior versions. Note that the license task in the ANSYS license files, ‘ansys’ has not changed.

16.2 and Older (task) 17.0 (task)
ANSYS Mechanical (ansys) ANSYS Mechanical Enterprise (ansys)

The 17.0 ANSYS License Manager unlocks additional capability with this license, in addition to the existing Mechanical structural/thermal abilities. Previously, each of these tools used to be an additional cost. The change includes other “Mechanical-” licenses: e.g. Mech-EMAG, Mech CFD. The new tools enabled with ANSYS Mechanical Enterprise licenses at version 17.0 are:

Fatigue Module Rigid Body Dynamics Explicit STR Composite PrepPost (ACP)
SpaceClaim DesignXplorer ANSYS Customization Suite AQWA

Additionally, at version 17.1 these tools are included as well:

AIM Simplorer Entry

These changes do not apply to the lower level licenses, such as ANSYS Structural and Professional. In fact, these licenses are moving to ‘legacy’ mode at version 17. Two newer products now slot below Mechanical Enterprise. These newer products are ANSYS Mechanical Premium and ANSYS Mechanical Pro. We won’t explain those products here, but your local ANSYS provider can give you more information on these two if needed.

Getting back to the additional capabilities with Mechanical Enterprise, these become available once the ANSYS 17.0 and/or the ANSYS 17.1 license manager is installed. This assumes you have a license file that is current on TECS (enhancements and support). Also, a new license task is needed to enable Simplorer Entry.
Ignoring Simplorer Entry for the moment, once the 17.0/17.1 license manager is installed, the single Mechanical Enterprise license task (ansys) now enables several different tools. Note that:

  • Multiple tool windows can be open at once
    • g. ANSYS Mechanical and SpaceClaim
  • Only one can be “active” at a time
    • If solving, can’t edit geometry in SpaceClaim
  • Capabilities are then available in older versions, where applicable, once the 17.0/17.1 license manager is installed

Here is a very brief summary of these newly available capabilities:

Fatigue Module:

  • Runs in the Mechanical window
  • Can calculate fatigue lives for ‘simple’ products (linear static analysis)
    • Stress-life for
      • Constant amplitude, proportional loading
      • Variable amplitude, proportional loading
      • Constant amplitude, non-proportional loading
    • Strain-life
      • Constant amplitude, proportional loading
    • Activated by inserting the Fatigue Tool in the Mechanical Solution branch
    • Postprocess fatigue lives as contour plots, etc.
    • Requires fatigue life data as material properties

ansys-rbd-1Rigid Body Dynamics:

  • Runs in the Mechanical window
  • ANSYS, Inc.-developed solver using explicit time integration, energy conservation
  • Use when only concerned about motion due to joints and contacts
    • To determine forces and moments
  • Activated via Rigid Dynamics analysis system in the Workbench window

drop-test-of-mobile-phoneExplicit STR:

  • Runs in the Mechanical window
  • Utilizes the Autodyn solver
  • For highly nonlinear, short duration structural transient problems
    • Drop test simulations, e.g.
    • Lagrangian-only
  • Activated via Explicit Dynamics analysis system in the Workbench window

simulation-of-3d-compositesComposite PrepPost (ACP):

  • Tools for preparing composites models and postprocessing composites solutions
  • Define composite layup
    • Fiber Directions and Orientations
    • Draping
    • Optimize composite design
  • Results evaluation
    • Layer stresses
    • Failure criteria
    • Delamination
    • Wrinkling
  • Activated via ACP (Pre) and ACP (Post) component systems in the Workbench window

SpaceClaim-Model1bSpaceClaim:

  • Geometry creation/preparation/repair/defeaturing tool
  • Try it, learn it, love it
  • A direct modeler so no history tree
    • Just create/modify on the fly
    • Import from CAD or create in SpaceClaim
    • Can be an incredible time saver in preparing geometry for simulation
  • Activated by right clicking on the Geometry cell in the Workbench project schematic

DesignXplorer:

  • Design of Experiments/Design Optimization/Robust Design Tool
  • Allows for variation of input parameters
    • Geometric dimensions including from external CAD, license permitting
    • Material property values
    • Loads
    • Mesh quantities such as shell thickness, element size specifications
  • Track or optimize on results parameters
    • Max or min stress
    • Max or min temperature
    • Max or min displacement
    • Mass or volume
  • Create design of experiments
  • Fit response surfaces
  • Perform goals driven optimizations
    • Reduce mass
    • Drive toward a desired temperature
  • Understand sensitivities among parameters
  • Perform a Design for Six Sigma study to determine probabilities
  • Activated by inserting Design Exploration components into the Workbench project schematic

ANSYS Customization Suite:

  • Toolkit for customization of ANSYS Workbench tools
  • Includes tools for several ANSYS products
    • Top level Workbench
    • DesignModeler
    • Mechanical
    • DesignXplorer
  • Based on Python and XML
  • Wizards and documentation included

AQWA:

  • Offshore tool for ship, floating platform simulation
  • Uses hydrodynamic defraction for calculations
  • Model up to 50 structures
  • Include effects of moorings, fenders, articulated connectors
  • Solve in static, frequency, and time domains
  • Transfer motion and pressure info to Mechanical
  • Activated via Hydrodynamic Diffraction analysis system in the Workbench window

AIM:

  • New, common user interface for multiphysics simulations
    • Structural
    • Thermal
    • CFD
    • Electromagnetics
  • Capabilities expanding with each ANSYS release (was new at 16.0)
  • Uses SpaceClaim as geometry tool
  • Single window
  • Easy to follow workflow
  • Activated from the ANSYS 17.0/17.1 Start menu

Simplorer Entry:

  • System level simulation tool
  • Simulate interactions such as between
    • Controllers
    • Actuators
    • Sensors
    • Structural Reduced Order Models
    • Simple circuitry
  • Optimize complex system performance
    • Understand interactions and trade offs
  • Entry level tool, limited to 30 models (Simplorer Advanced enables more)
  • Activated from the ANSYS Electromagnetics tools (separate download)
  • Requires an additional license task from ANSYS, Inc.

Where to get more information:

  • Your local ANSYS provider
  • ANSYS Help System
  • ANSYS Customer Portal

Do you have an Internet of Things Strategy? PADT Can Help

thing-1-250w“It is not just a trend, it is a Tsunami. One day you will wake up and see a giant wave headed your way, and that wave will be the Internet of Things!”

This was the opening line from a presentation given by the VP of sales for a major engineering software company. It got my attention because it wasn’t hype or hyperbole.  He was just pointing out the obvious. Over the past two years the signs have been there. Smart devices will connected to the internet, and older devices will be made smart and then connected. Those that don’t, will no longer be competitive.

It is not all about smart thermostats. Far from it.  I went to IoT world in San Jose last week and saw a lot of people scrambling to find their solution. And a few that found them.  The best example was an older letter stamping machine, you can guess at the manufacturer, that plugged a modular device from Electric Imp in to their controller and boom – they were connected.  Some back end programming and they now had a competitive IoT device.

iot-networ-graphic-1 It is time to define and execute on your IoT strategy

When we visit customers, we will often ask them what their IoT Strategy is.  The answers vary from “we don’t really think our products have an IoT play” to existing products on the market.  The focus in the media is on consumer IoT products, but the bigger push right now is for industrial Internet, where machines used in manufacturing, energy generation, raw material extraction, and processing are smart and connected.

Customers from consumers to other companies will be requiring the benefits of IoT devices as they look to replace older hardware.  That is why every company that makes physical products needs to develop an IoT strategy.

PADT Can Help

We have been helping our customers define and implement their approach to IoT well, since before it was called the Internet of Things.  From assisting semiconductor companies that make MEMS sensors to making smart medical devices we are plugged in to what is needed to make IoT work.

iot-landing-page-padt-1A good place to start is our IoT landing page at:

www.padtinc.com/iot

There you can find some basic information about how PADT is a more comprehensive and technically capable solution then most design houses that claim to have IoT solutions.  We are uniquely qualified to make sure the “Thing” in your IoT strategy is designed and manufactured right.

pbj-phoenix-business-journal-logoWe also published a series of articles in the Phoenix Business Journal that provide some fundamental background information on the Internet of Things and how to deal with the challenges it presents:

ansys-iot-wheelSimulation can play a big role in almost every aspect of making your IoT device development faster and more productive.  PADT uses ANSYS, Inc.’s comprehensive Multiphysics simulation tool set to model everything from the chip to the embedded system software.

We highly recommend this white paper, “Engineering the Internet of Things

We also have a recording of a very popular webinar that we did: “Engineering the Internet of Things Devices with ANSYS Simulation

and this video on how ANSYS can drive your IoT Design:

For detailed examples, check out the ANSYS IoT Landing page to get a feel for why so many companies are driving their design with ANSYS simulation software:  www.ansys.com/iot

PADT-Webinar-Logo

Engineering the Internet of Things Devices with ANSYS Simulation

June 21, 2016 (Tue)
1:00 PM AZ & PDT / 2:00 pm MDT

REGISTER

Make sure you subscribe to PADT’s email list so you don’t miss future Events

Talking is the Best Approach

We hope that you find all of the material above, and the information we will provide in the coming months useful. But they are no substitute for giving us a call or sending us an email and setting up a face-to-face to talk about your IoT strategy and device development needs.  If you are doing the work in-house, we have the hardware and software tools you need to be successful. If you need outside help, you won’t find engineers with more applicable experience.

Give us a call at 1-800-293-PADT or email info@padtinc.com.

shutterstock_321231902

Unexpected Joys at Rapid 2016

While much has been (justifiably) written about HP and XJet releasing new, potentially game-changing products at RAPID 2016, I wanted to write this post about some of the smaller, unexpected joys that I discovered. If I sound overly enthusiastic about the people and companies behind them, it is likely due to the fact that I wrote this on the flight back, staring out at the clouds and reflecting on what had been a wonderful trip: I own no locks, stocks or barrels in any of these companies.

1. Essentium Materials – Carbon Nanotubes and Microwaves to improve FDM mechanical properties
Over the past year, I have studied, written and made presentations about the challenges of developing models for describing Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM) given their complex and part-specific meso-structure. And while I worked on developing analytical and numerical techniques for extracting the best performance from parts in the presence of significant anisotropy, the team at Essentium has developed a process to coat FDM filaments with Carbon nanotubes and extrude them in the presence of microwave radiation. In the limited data they showed for test specimens constructed of unidirectional tool-paths, they demonstrated significant reduction in anisotropy and increase in strength for PLA. What I liked most about their work is how they are developing  this solution on a foundation of understanding the contributions of both the meso-structure and inter-filament strength to overall part performance. Essentium was awarded the “RAPID Innovations award”, first among the 27 exhibitors that competed and are, in my opinion, addressing an important problem that is holding back greater expansion of FDM as a process in the production space.
Website: http://essentiummaterials.com/

2. Hyrel 3D – Maker meets Researcher meets The-Kid-in-All-of-Us
I only heard of Hyrel 3D a few days prior to RAPID, but neglected to verify if they were exhibiting at RAPID and was pleasantly surprised to see them there. Consider the options this 3D printer has that you would be hard pressed to find in several 3D printers combined: variable extrusion head temperatures (room temp to 450 C), sterile head options for biological materials, a 6W laser (yes, a laser), spindle tools, quad head dispensing with individual flow control and UV crosslinking options. Read that again slowly. This is true multiple degree-of-freedom material manipulation. What makes their products even more compelling is the direct involvement of the team and the community they are building up over time, particularly in academia, across the world, and the passion with which they engage their technology and its users.
Website: http://www.hyrel3d.com/

3. Technic-Print: New Chemistry for Improved FDM Support Removal
If you manufacture FDM parts with soluble supports, keep reading. A chemist at Technic Inc. has developed a new solution that is claimed to be 400% faster than the current Sodium-Hydroxide solution we use to dissolve parts. Additionally, the solution is cited as being cleaner on the tank, leaving no residue, has a color indicator that changes the solution’s color from blue to clear. And finally, through an additional agent, the dissolved support material can be reclaimed as a clump and removed from the solution, leaving behind a solution that has a pH less than 9. Since PADT manufactures one of the most popular machines that are used to dissolve these supports that unbeknown to us, were used in the testing and development of the new solution, we had an enriching conversation with the lead chemist behind the solution. I was left wondering about the fundamental chemistry behind color changing, dissolution rates for supports and the reclaiming of support – and how these different features were optimized together to develop a usable end-solution.
Website: http://www.technic.com/techni-print-lp

 

4. Project Pan: Computationally Efficient Metal Powder Bed Fusion Simulation
I presented a literature review at AMUG (another Additive Manufacturing conference) last month, on the simulation of the laser-based powder bed fusion. At the time, I thought I had captured all the key players between the work being done at Lawrence Livermore National Labs by Wayne King’s group, the work of Brent Stucker at 3DSIM and the many academics using mostly commercially available software (mostly ANSYS) to simulate this problem. I learned at RAPID that I had neglected to include a company called “Project Pan” in my review. This team emerged from Prof. Pan Michaleris’s academic work. In 2012, he started a company that was acquired by Autodesk two months ago. In a series of 3 presentations at RAPID, Pan’s team demonstrated their simulation techniques (at a very high level) along with experimental validation work they had done with GE, Honeywell and others through America Makes and other efforts. What was most impressive about their work was both the speed of their computations and the fact that this team actually had complex part experimental validations to back up their simulation work. What most users of the powder bed fusion need is information on temperatures, stresses and distortion – and within time frames of a few hours ideally. It seems to me that Pan and his team took an approach that delivers exactly that information and little else using different numerical methods listed on their site (novel Hex8 elements, an element activation method and intelligent mesh refinement) that were likely developed by Pan over the years in his academic career and found the perfect application, first in welding simulation and then in the powder bed fusion process. With the recent Autodesk acquisition, it will be interesting to see how this rolls out commercially. Details of some of the numerical techniques used in the code can be found at their website, along with a list of related publications.

Website: http://pancomputing.com/

5. FDA Participation: Regulating through education and partnership
On a different note from the above, I was pleasantly surprised by the presence of the FDA, represented by Matthew Di Prima, PhD. He taught part of a workshop I attended on the first day, took the time to talk to everyone who had an interest and also gave a talk of his own in the conference sessions, describing the details of the recently released draft guidance from the FDA on 3D printing in medical applications. It was good to connect the regulatory agency to a person who clearly has the passion, knowledge, intelligence and commitment to make a difference in the Additive Manufacturing medical community. Yes, the barriers to entry in this space are high (ISO certifications, QSR systems, 510(k) & Pre-Market Approvals) but it seems clear that the FDA, at least as represented by Dr. Di Prima, are doing their best to be a transparent and willing partner.
Website: http://www.fda.gov/MedicalDevices/ProductsandMedicalProcedures/3DPrintingofMedicalDevices/default.htm

What really makes a trip to a conference like RAPID worth it are the new ideas, connections and possibilities you come away with that you may not stumble upon during your day job – and on that account, RAPID 2016 did not disappoint. As a line in one of my favorite song’s goes:

“We’ll never know, unless we grow.
There’s too much world outside the door.”
– Fran Healy (Travis, “Turn”).

Just One CUBE With Just One Click! A 1.3x Speedup For ANSYS® Mechanical™

Greetings from the HPC numerical simulation proving grounds of PADT, Inc. in Tempe, Arizona. While bench marking the very latest version of ANSYS® Mechanical™ I learned something very significant and I need to share this information with you right now.As I gazed down on the data outputs from the new solve.out files, I began to notice something. Yes change indeed, something was different, something had changed.

A brief pause for emphasis, in regards in overall ANSYS® productivity and amazing improvements please read this post.

However, pertaining to this blog post, I am focusing on one very important HPC performance metric to me. It is one of the many HPC performance metrics that I have used when creating a balanced HPC server for engineering simulation.. But wait there is more! so please wait just a little bit longer, for very soon I will post even more juicy pieces of data garnered from taken from these new ANSYS® benchmark solver files.

To recap in all of its bullets points & glories:

  • For today and just for today, we are focusing on just one of the performance metrics.
    • The Time Spent Computing The Solution!
  • This 1.3x speedup in solve times was achieved using just one CUBE workstation and with just one click!
    • Open ANSYS®and while you are creating your solve.
    • Select, withjust one click either the INTEL MPI or IBM Platform MPI.
    • Next, run your test repeat as necessary using whichever MPI version that you did not start your test with.

The ANSYS® Mechanical™ Benchmark Description:

  • V15sp-5
    • Sparse solver, symmetric matrix, 6000k DOFs, transient, nonlinear, structural analysis with 1 iteration
    • GPU Accelerator or Co-Processor enabled for: NVIDIA and Intel Phi
    • A large sized job for direct solvers, should run incore on machines with 128 GB or more of memory, good test of processor flop speed if running incore and I/O if running out-of-core

CUBE ANSYS Numerical Simulation Appliance Used:

The ANSYS® Mechanical™ Benchmark Results:


TIME SPENT COMPUTING THE SOLUTION TIME SPENT COMPUTING THE SOLUTION
IBM Platform MPI INTEL MPI
Cores 2016 CUBE w16i-v4 2016 CUBE w16i-v4 This Speedup is…X faster!
2 396.1 380.9 1.04
4 239.7 229.6 1.04
6 210.1 196.7 1.07
8 182.9 168.7 1.08
10 167.2 161.4 1.04
12 167.1 160.7 1.04
14 196.1 151.3 1.30
16 184.7 161.7 1.14

justonecubejustoneclickspeedup

Wow! using these latest 14nm INTEL® XEON®  CPU’s, phew, I have been forever changed! As you can see from the data above, in just one simple click, changing from the IBM Platform MPI to using INTEL MPI and look! the benchmark time spent computing times are faster! A 1.3x Speedup!

Now in this specific benchmark example along with the use of the latest  ANSYS® Mechanical achieving a 1.3x speedup without spending another penny is very wise and not so foolish.

Disclaimer: Please check with your ANSYS Software Sales Representative for the very latest on solver updates and information. Because some of the models and compatibility can very on the . You may need to use the MS-MPI, INTEL-MPI or IBM Platform MPI for your distributed solving. If you are not sure please contact your local ANSYS® Corporate Software Sales or ANSYS® Software Channel Partner that was assigned specifically to you and/or your company.

References:

http://www.ansys.com/Solutions/Solutions-by-Role/IT-Professionals/Platform-Support/Benchmarks-Overview/ANSYS-Mechanical-Benchmarks

PADT and ASU Collaborate on 3D Printed Lattice Research

The ASU Capstone team (left to right): Drew Gibson, Jacob Gerbasi, John Reeher, Matthew Finfrock, Deep Patel and Joseph Van Soest.
ASU student team (left to right): Drew Gibson, Jacob Gerbasi, John Reeher, Matthew Finfrock, Deep Patel and Joseph Van Soest

Over the past two academic semesters (2015/16), I had the opportunity to work closely with six senior-year undergraduate engineering students from the Arizona State University (ASU), as their industry adviser on an eProject (similar to a Capstone or Senior Design project). The area we wanted to explore with the students was in 3D printed lattice structures, and more specifically, address the material modeling aspects of these structures. PADT provided access to our 3D printing equipment and materials, ASU to their mechanical testing and characterization facilities and we both used ANSYS for simulation, as well as a weekly meeting with a whiteboard to discuss our ideas.

While there are several efforts ongoing in developing design and optimization software for lattice structures, there has been little progress in developing a robust, validated material model that accurately describes how these structures behave – this is what our eProject set out to do. The complex internal meso- and microstructure of these structures makes them particularly sensitive to process variables such as build orientation, layer thickness, deposition or fusion width etc., none of which are accounted for in models for lattice structures available today. As a result, the use of published values for bulk materials are not accurately predictive of true lattice structure behavior.

In this work, we combined analytical, experimental and numerical techniques to extract and validate material parameters that describe mechanical response of lattice structures. We demonstrated our approach on regular honeycomb structures of ULTEM-9085 material, made with the Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM) process. Our results showed that we were able to predict low strain responses within 5-10% error, compared to 40-60% error with the use of bulk properties.

This work is to be presented in full at the upcoming RAPID conference on May 18, 2016 (details at this link) and has also been accepted for full length paper submission to the SFF Symposium. We are also submitting a research proposal that builds on this work and extends it into more complex geometries, metals and failure modeling. If you are interested in the findings of this work and/or would like to collaborate, please meet us at RAPID or send us an email (info@padtinc.com).

Our final poster and the Fortus 400mc that we printed all our honeycomb structures with
The final poster summarizing our work rests atop the Stratasys Fortus 400mc that we printed all our honeycomb structures on

Webinars: Overview of Add-On Products that Work with ANSYS Mechanical

PADT-Webinar-LogoWith the introduction of the new ANSYS Mechanical Enterprise, many add-on products that had to be purchased separate, are now included. In these webinars PADT’s engineers will provide an overview of the key applications that users now have easy access to.

Each product will be reviewed by one of PADT’s engineers. The will share the functionality of each tool, discuss some lessons we have learned in using and supporting each tool, and provide a short demonstration. Each session will have time for Questions and Answers.

ANSYS-Footer-RBD-STR-ACT

Sign up for the one you want, or all three. Everyone that registers will receive a link to the recording and to a copy of the slides. So register even if you can not make the specific dates.

Here are the times and links to register:

Overview of ANSYS Rigid Body Dynamics (RBD) and ANSYS Explicit STR
May 19, 2016 (Thu)
11:00 am MST & PDT / 12:00 pm MDT

      REGISTER

Overview of ANSYS SpaceClaim and ANSYS AIM
May 24, 2016 (Tue)
11:00 am MST & PDT / 12:00 pm MDT

    REGISTER

Overview of ANSYS Customization Toolkit (ACT) and ANSYS DesignXplorer (DX)
May 26, 2016 (Thu)
11:00 am MST & PDT / 12:00 pm MDT

     REGISTER

We hope to see you online.  If you have any questions, contact us at support@padtinc.com or call 480.813.4884.

ANSYS_Mechanical_Header

An Eye for the Win! – Signal Integrity with ANSYS

DDRComparisonIn today’s world of high speed communication we are continuously pushing the envelope in data throughput and reliability – There are many challenges that restrict speedy progress: Time – Spinning multiple boards to find and fix problems costs valuable time and money; Cost – additional test procedures can significantly add to this cost; Scalability of Solutions – it’s fundamentally difficult to accurately predict what might happen solely through previous experiences; which is often why multiple spins are required.

ANSYS has the simulation platform that enable signal integrity engineers to predict and improve the performance of high speed communication channels before any board is prototyped – Imagine being able get the design right the first time by testing several design parameters such as different trace routing, power profiles and components.

This sounds like a great proposition but in actuality what do you get from doing that? The answer is a reduced design cost, detailed insight into the design and a reduced time to market. The only way to obtain this “full picture” is to understand the electrical, thermal and mechanical aspects of the design.

EyediagramEye Diagram of Data Signal Obtained in ANSYS

A critical characterization in high speed communication channel design is the Eye diagram. Extensive testing is done to obtain Eye diagrams for various signal nets across a PCB or Package – ANSYS can provide the Eye diagram so that engineers can address potential failures and weaknesses in their design before it is sent out for prototyping. Bathtub curves, effects of jitter and identifying crosstalk are equally important in the design of communication channels and all can be obtained and considered with ANSYS tools.

ANSYS supports IBIS-AMI modeling, SERDES design, TDR measurement and Statistical Eye analysis among much more. With chip, memory and board manufacturers all utilizing ANSYS products it is easy to incorporate and analyze real world product performance of the entire PCB.

TDRTDR Measurement Across Net

ANSYS allows all aspects of the design to be tested and optimized before prototyping. Apart from signal integrity ANSYS tools can also accurately model power integrity concerns such as decoupling capacitor optimization, thermal response and structural issues, as well as cooling solutions for chips, packages, PCBs and full electronic systems. With the ability to analyze and help optimize different design characteristics of a PCB, ANSYS can provide engineers with “the full picture” to help reduce cost and time to market, and to understand the design’s expected real world operation.

VoltageDropBoardWarpageElectronicsCooling

Top: Voltage Drop; Middle: PCB Warpage;
Bottom: Cooling Flow Through Enclosure

The “Eye” is only a phone call away.

Please give us a call at 1-800-293-PADT or reach out to me directly at manoj@padtinc.com for more information.

Phoenix Business Journal: ​What is numerical simulation? And why should I care?

pbj-phoenix-business-journal-logoNumerical simulation has been the bulk of my career for 30 years now. I love simulation. It has had a huge positive impact on product development as well as many other industries.  In “What is numerical simulation? And why should I care?” I evangelize a bit about my professional passion.

Helpful New Meshing Feature in ANSYS Mechanical 17.0 – Nonlinear Mechanical Shape Checking

ansys=new-mesh-r17Meshing for Nonlinear Structural Problems

Overcoming convergence difficulties in nonlinear structural problems can be a challenge. I’ve written a couple of times previously about tools that can help us overcome those difficulties:

I’m pleased to announce a new tool in the ANSYS Mechanical tool belt in version 17.0.
With version 17.0 of ANSYS we get a new meshing option for structural simulations: Nonlinear Mechanical Shape Checking. This option has been added to the previously available Standard Mechanical Shape Checking and Aggressive Mechanical Shape Checking. For a nonlinear solution in which elements can become significantly distorted, if we start with better-shaped elements they can undergo larger deformations without encountering errors in element formulation we may encounter fewer difficulties as the nodes deflect and the elements become distorted. The nonlinear mechanical setting is more restrictive on the element shapes than the other two settings.

We’ve been recommending the aggressive mechanical setting for nonlinear solutions for quite a while. The new nonlinear mechanical setting is looking even better. Anecdotally, I have one highly nonlinear customer model that reached 95% of the applied load before a convergence failure in version 16.2. That was with the aggressive mechanical shape checking. With 17.0, it reached 99% simply by remeshing with the same aggressive setting and solving. That tells you that work has been going on under the hood with the ANSYS meshing and nonlinear technology. By switching to the new nonlinear mechanical shape checking and solving again, the solution now converges for the full 100% of the applied load.
Here are some statistics using just one measure of the ‘goodness’ of our mesh, element quality. You can read about the definition of element quality in the ANSYS Help, but in summary better shaped elements have a quality value close to 1.0, while poorly shaped elements have a value closer to zero. The following stats are for tetrahedral meshes of a simple turbomachinery blade/rotor sector model (this is not a real part, just something made up) comparing two of the options for element shape checking. The table shows that the new nonlinear mechanical setting produces significantly fewer elements with a quality value of 0.5 or less. Keep in mind this is just one way to look at element quality – other methods or a different cutoff might put things in a somewhat different perspective. However, we can conclude that the Nonlinear Mechanical setting is giving us fewer ‘lower quality’ elements in this case.

Shape Checking Setting Total Elements Elements w/Quality <0.5 % of elements w/Quality <0.5
Aggressive Mechanical 31683 1831 5.8
Nonlinear Mechanical 31865 1249 3.9

Here are images of a portion of the two meshes mentioned above. This is the mesh with the Aggressive Mechanical Shape Checking option set:ansys-new-meshing-17-01
The eyeball test on these two meshes confirms fewer elements at the lower quality contour levels.

And this is the mesh with the Nonlinear Mechanical Shape Checking option set:

ansys-new-meshing-17-02

So, if you are running nonlinear structural models, we urge you to test out the new Nonlinear Mechanical mesh setting. Since it is more restrictive on element shapes, you may see longer meshing times or encounter some difficulties in meshing complex geometry. You may see a benefit in easier to converge nonlinear solutions, however. Give it a try!

Driving the Design of Small Modular Nuclear Reactors with Flownex

Flownex-Logo-2015-250wThe development of small modular nuclear reactors, or SMR’s, is a complex task that involves balancing the thermodynamic performance of the entire system. Flownex is the ideal tool for modeling  pressure drop [flow] and heat transfer [temperature] for the connected components of a complete system in steady state and transient, sizing and optimizing pumps or compressors, pipes, valves, tanks, and heat exchangers.

To highlight this power and capability,  PADT and Flownex will be exhibiting at the 2016 SMR conference in Atlanta where we will be available to discuss exciting new Flownex developments in system and subsystem simulations of SMRs.  If you are attending this year’s event, please stop by the Flownex booth and say hello to experts from M-Tech and PADT.

If you are not able to make the conference or if you want to know more now, you can view more information from the new Flownex SMR brochure or this video:

Why is Flownex a Great Tool for SMR Design and Simulation?

These developments offer greatly reduced times for performing typical design tasks required for Small Modular Nuclear Reactor (SMR) projects including sizing of major components, calculating overall plant efficiency, and design for controllability

This task involves typical components like the reactor primary loop, intermediate loops, heat exchangers or steam generators and the power generation cycle. Flownex provides for various reactor fuel geometries, various reactor coolant types and various types of power cycles.

Flownex can also be used for determining plant control philosophy. By using a plant simulation model, users can determine the transient response of sensed parameters to changes in input parameters and based on that, set up appropriate pairings for control loops.

For passive safety system design Flownex can be used to optimize the natural circulation loops.  The program can calculate the dynamic plant-wide temperatures and pressures in response to various accident scenarios, taking into account decay heat generation, multiple natural circulation loops, transient energy storage and rejection to ambient conditions.

flownex-smr-model-1

Learn more at www.padtinc.com/flownex, give us a call at 480.813.4884 or email brian.duncan@padtinc.com.

 

New Tricks for an Old Dog: Eric Learns ANSYS SpaceClaim – Post 3

Adding Complexity and Moving

ANSYS-SpaceClaim-Learning-00-00
This post is the third in a series on learning ANSYS SpaceClaim. After over 31 years of CAD use, it has become difficult for me to learn new tools. In this series I will share my experience as I explore and learn how to use this fantastic tool.
If you have not read the previous post, start here.  A table of contents is here.

After playing with that block it seems like it may be time to try a more complex geometry.  For business banking, I’ve got this key fob that generates a number every thirty seconds that I use for security when I log in.  Might as well sort of model that.

keyfob

So the first thing I do is start up a new model and orient myself on to the sketch plane:

ANSYS-SpaceClaim-Learning-03-01

Then I use the line and arc tools to create the basic shape. Play around a bit. I found that a lot of things I had to constrain in other packages are just assumed when you define the geometry.  A nice thing is that as you create geometry, it locks to the grid and to other geometry. ANSYS-SpaceClaim-Learning-03-02

I dragged around and typed in values for dimensions to get the shape I wanted. As I was doing it I realized I was in metric. I’m old, I don’t do metric. So I went in to File and selected SpaceClaim options from the bottom of the window.  I used the Units screen to set things to Imperial.

ANSYS-SpaceClaim-Learning-03-03

This is the shape I ended up with:

ANSYS-SpaceClaim-Learning-03-04

I took this and pulled it up and added a couple of radii:

ANSYS-SpaceClaim-Learning-03-05

But if I look at the real object, the flat end needs to be round.  In another tool, I’d go back to the sketch, modify that line to be an arc, and regen.  Well in SpaceClaim you don’t have the sketch, it is gone.    Ahhh. Panic. I’ve been doing it that way for 25 some years.  OK. Deep breath, just sketch the geometry I need. Click on the three point arc tool, drag over the surface, then click on the first corner, the second, and a third point to define the arc:

ANSYS-SpaceClaim-Learning-03-06

Then us pull to drag it down, using the Up to icon to lock it to the bottom of the object.

ANSYS-SpaceClaim-Learning-03-07

Then I clicked on the edges and pulled some rounds on there:

ANSYS-SpaceClaim-Learning-03-08

OK, so the next step in SolidEdge would be to do a thin wall.  I don’t see a thin wall right off the top, but shell looks like what I want, under the Create group on the Design tab.  So I spinned my model around, clicked on the bottom surface I want to have open and I have a shell.  A thickness of 0.035″ looks good:

ANSYS-SpaceClaim-Learning-03-09

My next feature will be the cutout for the view window.   What I have not figured out yet is how to lock an object to be symmetrical. Here is why. I sketch my cutout as such, not really paying attention to where it is located.  Now I want to move it so that it is centred on the circle.

ANSYS-SpaceClaim-Learning-03-10

Instead of specifying constraints, you move the rectangle to be centered.  To do that I drag to select the rectangle then click Move. By default it puts the nice Move tool in the middle of the geometry.  If I drag on the X direction (Red) you can see it shows the distance from my start.

ANSYS-SpaceClaim-Learning-03-11

So I have a couple of options, to center it. The easiest is to use Up To and click the X axis for the model and it will snap right there.  The key thing I learned was I had to select the red move arrow or it would also center horizontally where I clicked.

If I want to specify how far away the edge is from the center of the circle, the way I did it is kind of cool.  I selected my rectangle, then clicked move. Then I clicked on the yellow move ball followed by a click on the left line, this snapped the move tool to that line. Next I clicked the little dimension Icon to get a ruller, and a small yellow ball showed up. I clicked on this and dragged it to the center of my circle, now I had a dimension from the circle specified that I could type in.ANSYS-SpaceClaim-Learning-03-13

After playing around a bit, if found a second, maybe more general way to do this.  I clicked on the line I want to position.  One of the icons over on the left of my screen is the Move Dimension Base Point icon. If you click on that you get another one of those small yellow balls you can move. I dragged it over to the center of the circle and clicked. then I can specify the distance as 0.75″

ANSYS-SpaceClaim-Learning-03-14

I’ve got the shape I want, so I pull, using the minus icon to subtract, and I get my cutout:

ANSYS-SpaceClaim-Learning-03-15

If you look closely,you will notice I put rounds on the corners of the cutout as well, I used Pull again.

The last thing I want to do is create the cutout for where the bank logo goes. It is a concentric circle with an arc on the right side.  Saddly, this is the most complex thing I’ve ever sketched in SpaceClaim so I was a bit afraid. It was actually easy.  I made a circle, clicking on the center of the outside arc to make them concentric. The diameter was 1″. Then I made another circle of 2″ centered on the right.  To get the shape I wanted, I used the Trim Away command and clicked on the curves I don’t want. The final image is my cutout.

ANSYS-SpaceClaim-Learning-03-16

Now I can do the same thing, subtract it out, put in some rounds, and whalla:

untitled.3

Oh, and I used the built in rendering tool to quickly make this image. I’ll have to dedicate a whole posting to that.

But now that I have my part, it is time to play with move in 3D.

Moving in 3D

Tyler, who is one of our in-house SpaceClaim experts (and younger) pointed out that I need to start thinking about editing the 3D geometry instead of being obsessed with controlling my sketches. So here goes.

If I wanted to change the size of the rectangular cutout in a traditional CAD tool, I’d go edit the sketch. There is no sketch to edit! Fear. Unknown. Change.

So the first thing I’ll do is just move it around. Grab one of the faces and see happens.

ANSYS-SpaceClaim-Learning-03-17

It moves back and forth, pretty simple.  The same tools for specifying the start and stop points are available. Now, if I ctrl-click on all four surfaces the whole thing moves. That is pretty cool.

ANSYS-SpaceClaim-Learning-03-18

Note: I’m using the undo all the time to go back to my un-moved geometry.

Another Note:  As you select faces, you have to spin the model around a lot. I use the middle mouse button to do this rather than clicking on the spin Icon and then having to unclick it.

Play with it some more. I was able to put draft by using the arcs on the Move gizmo, and if you pull far enough it adds material.ANSYS-SpaceClaim-Learning-03-19

That is enough for this post. More soon.

 

 

 

New Tricks for an Old Dog: Eric Learns ANSYS SpaceClaim – Post 2

Learning More About Pulling

ANSYS-SpaceClaim-Learning-00-00
This post is the second in a series on learning ANSYS SpaceClaim. After over 31 years of CAD use, it has become difficult for me to learn new tools. In this series I will share my experience as I explore and learn how to use this fantastic tool.
If you have not read the previous post, start here.  A table of contents is here.

As I explored ANSYS SpaceClaim in my first try, it became obvious that a lot of capabilities that are in multiple operations in most CAD systems, are all combined in Pull for SpaceClaim.  In this posting I feel like it would be a really good idea for me to really understand all the things Pull can do.

Start with the Manual

Not very exciting or adventurous. But there is so much in this operation that I feel like I will miss something critical if I don’t read up first.   It states:

“Use the Pull tool to offset, extrude, revolve, sweep, and draft faces; use it to round, chamfer, extrude, copy, or pivot edges. You can also drag a point with the Pull tool to draw a line on a sketch plane.”

Let’s think about that for a second.  What it is basically saying is if I pull on an object of a given dimension, it creates an object that is one higher dimension. Point pulls to a curve, a curve pulls to a face, and a face pulls to a solid. Kind of cool. The big surprise for me is that there is no round or fillet command. To make a round you pull on an edge. This is change.

Pull some Stuff

I started by reading my block with a hole back in.

ANSYS-SpaceClaim-Learning-02-01

This fillet pull thing scares me so I thought I’d confront it first. So selecte Pull, and selected an edge:

ANSYS-SpaceClaim-Learning-02-02

Then I dragged it away from the block. Nothing. You can’t create a surface that way. Then I dragged in towards the center. A round was created.

ANSYS-SpaceClaim-Learning-02-03

If anything, too simple. Back in my day, adding a round to an edge took skill and experience!

So next I think I want to try and change the size of something. Maybe the diameter of the hole. So I select the cylinder’s face. Is shows the current radius. I could just change that value:

ANSYS-SpaceClaim-Learning-02-04

Instead I drag, and while I do that I noticed that there are two numbers, the current radius and the change to the radius!  Kind of cool. No, really useful.

ANSYS-SpaceClaim-Learning-02-05

You use tab to go between them. So I hit tab once, typed 3 then tab again (or return) and I get a 8 mm diameter.  I like the visual feedback as well as the ability to enter a specific change number.

Next thing that I felt like doing was rounding a corner. Put a 5mm round on the corner facing out:

ANSYS-SpaceClaim-Learning-02-07

So I grabbed the point and dragged, and got a line.

ANSYS-SpaceClaim-Learning-02-07a

 

Remember, it only goes up one entity type – point to curve. Not point to surface. So I ctrl-clicked (that is how you select multiple entities) on the three curves that intersect at the corner:

ANSYS-SpaceClaim-Learning-02-08

Then I dragged and got my round.

ANSYS-SpaceClaim-Learning-02-09

Pulling Along or Around Something

This are all sort of dragging straight. After looking at the manual text it seems I can revolve and sweep as well with the Pull operation.  Cool. But what do I revolve or sweep around and along?  Looking at the manual (and it turns out the prompt on the screen) I use Alt-Clicking to define these control curves.  Let’s try it out by revolving something about that line I mistakenly made.

I click on one of the curves on the round. then Alt-Click the line – It turns blue. So there is a nice visual clue that it is different than the source curve.  Now I’ve also got spinny icons around the curve rather than pull icons.

ANSYS-SpaceClaim-Learning-02-10

So I drag and… funky revolved surface shows up. I had to spin the model to see it clearly:

ANSYS-SpaceClaim-Learning-02-11

Let me stop and share something special about this. In most other CAD tools, this would have involved multiple clicks, maybe even multiple windows. In SpaceClaim, it was Click, Alt-Click, Drag.  Nice.

Using the Pop=up Icons

As you play with the model you may start seeing some popup icons near the mouse when you select geometry while using pull. The compound round on the block is complicated, so I spun it around and grabbed just one edge and pulled it in to be a round.  Then I clicked on it and got this:

ANSYS-SpaceClaim-Learning-02-12

Not only can I put a value in there, I can drop ones I use a lot. I can also change my round to a chamfer, or I can change it to a variable radius. This is worth noting. In most other CAD tools you pick what type of thing you want to do to the edge. Here we start by dragging a round, then specify if it is a chamfer or a variable.

The variable radius is worth digging more in to.  I clicked on it and it was not intuitive as to what I should do. Let’s try help. Search on Variable Radius… duh. Click on the arrow that shows up and drag that. There are three arrows. The one in the middle scales both ends the same, the one on either end, well it sets the radius for either end.

ANSYS-SpaceClaim-Learning-02-13Reading more I see if I hold down the CTRL key and click on the arrow, I can drag a new control point along the edge. I can type in a percentage as well.  Very useful.

ANSYS-SpaceClaim-Learning-02-14

Clicking on a control point and hitting delete, gets rid of them.

That’s just one icon that pops up.  Playing some more it seems the other icons control how it handles corners and multiple fillets merging… something to look at as I do more complex parts.

The other popup I want to look at is the Up To one.  It looks like an arrow on a surface.  In other tools I extrude, cut, revolve all the time to some other piece of geometry.  This is the way to do it in Space Claim.  Let’s say I want to pull a feature to the middle of my hole. First I sketch the outline on a face:ANSYS-SpaceClaim-Learning-02-15

Then I select the outline, and get a popup. First thing I want to do is click on the + sign, because I want to add, not cut, then I click on the Up To and then select the axis of the hole:  ANSYS-SpaceClaim-Learning-02-16

That is enough for pulling and for today.  In the next session it may be time to explore the Move command.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

New Tricks for an Old Dog: Eric Learns ANSYS SpaceClaim – Table of Contents

ANSYS-SpaceClaim-Learning-00-00This post is a table of contents to a series about ANSYS SpaceClaim. After over 31 years of CAD use, it has become difficult for me to learn new tools. In this series I will share my experience as I explore and learn how to use this fantastic tool.

  1. Introduction, Getting Started, The Interface, A Block with a Hole in It
  2. Learning More About Pulling
  3. Adding Complexity and Moving

Phoenix Business Journal: 5 reasons why nerds celebrate Pi Day

pbj-phoenix-business-journal-logo

Have you heard? It’s Pi Day! This post, “5 reasons why nerds celebrate Pi Day” shares the reasons why those of us in the know like Pi day so much.
pie-pi

New Tricks for an Old Dog: Eric Learns ANSYS SpaceClaim – Post 1

ANSYS-SpaceClaim-Learning-00-00Thirty-one.  That is the number of years that I have been using CAD software. CADAM was the tool, 1985 was the year.  As some of our engineers like to point out, they were not even born then.

Twenty-one. that is the number of years that I have been using SolidEdge.  This classifies me as an old dog, a very old dog. As PADT has grown the amount of CAD I do has gone way down, but every once in a while I need to get in there and make some geometry happen. I’m usually in a hurry so I just pop in to SolidEdge and without really thinking, I get things done.

Then ANSYS, Inc. had to go and buy SpaceClaim. It rocks.  It is not just another solid modeler, it is a better way to create, repair, and modify CAD.  I watch our engineers and customers do some amazing things with it. I’m still faster in SolidEdge because I have more years of practice than they have been adults. But this voice in my head has been whispering “think how fast you would be in SpaceClaim if you took the time to learn it.” Then that other voice (I have several) would say “you’re too old to learn something new, stick with what you know. You might break your hip”

I had used SpaceClaim a bit when they created a version that worked with ANSYS Mechanical four or five years ago, but nothing serious.  Last month I attended some webinars on R17 and saw how great the tool is, and had to accept that it was time.  That other voice be damned – this old dog needs to get comfortable and learn this tool.  And while I’m at it, it seemed like a good idea to bring some others along with me.

These posts will be a tutorial for others who want to learn SpaceClaim.  Unlike those older tools, it does not require five days of structured training with workshops.  The program comes with teaching material and tutorials.  The goal is to guide the reader through the process, pointing out things I learned along the way, as I learn them.

A link to the table of contents is here.

Getting Started

The product I’m learning is ANSYS SpaceClaim Direct Modeler, a version of SpaceClaim that is built into the ANSYS simulation product suite. There is a stand alone SpaceClaim product but since most of our readers are ANSYS users, I’m going to stick with this version of the tool.

This is what you see when you start it up:

ANSYS-SpaceClaim-Learning-01-01

I’ve been using the same basic layout for 20 years, so this is a bit daunting for me. I like to start on a new program by getting to know what different areas of the user interface do. The “Welcome to ANSYS SCDM” kind of anticipates that and gives me some options.

Under “Getting Started” you will see a Quick Reference Card, Introduction, and Tutorials. Open up the Quick Reference and print it out. Don’t bother with it right now, but it will come in handy, especially if you are not going to use SpaceClaim every day.

The Introduction button is a video that gets you oriented with the GUI. Just what we need. It is a lot of information presented fast, so you are not going to learn everything the first viewing, but it will get you familiar with things.

File Mar 11, 3 53 54 PM

Here I am watching the video.  Notice how attentive I am.

Once that is done you should sort of know the basic lay of the land. Kind of like walking into a room and looking around. You know where the couch is, the window, and the shelf on one wall.  Now it is time to explore the room.

It is kind of old school, but I like user guides.  You can open the SpaceClaim User Guide from the Help line in the “Welcome” window.  I leave it open and use it as a reference.

The Interface

The best place to learn where things are in the interface is to look at the interface section in the manual. It has this great graphic:

ANSYS-SpaceClaim-Learning-01-03

The top bit is pretty standard, MS office like. You have your application menu, quick access toolbar, and Ribbon Bar.  The Ribbon Bar is where all the operations sit.  We used to call these commands but in an object oriented world, they are more properly referred to as operations – do something to objects, operate on them.  I’ll come back and explore those later. Over on the left there are panels, the thing we need to explore first because they are a view into our model just like the graphics window.

ANSYS-SpaceClaim-Learning-01-04

The Structure Panel is key.  This is where your model is shown in tree form, just like in most ANSYS products.  In SpaceClaim your model is collection of objects, and they are shown in the tree in the order you added them. You can turn visibility on and off, select objects, and act on objects (using the right mouse button) using the tree. At this point I just had one solid, so pretty boring.  I’m sure it will do more later.

Take a look at the bottom of the Structure Panel and you will find some tabs. These give access to Layers, Selection, Groups, and Views.  All handy ways to organize and interact with your model.  I felt like I needed to come back to these later when I had something to interact with.

TIP: If you are like me, you probably tried to drag these panels around and hosed up your interface. Go to File > SpaceClaim Options (button at the bottom) > Appearance and click the “Reset Docking Layout” button in the upper right of the window.  Back to normal. 

The options panel changes dynamically as you choose things from the ribbon. If you click on the Design > Line you get this:

ANSYS-SpaceClaim-Learning-01-05

And if you click on Pull you get this:

ANSYS-SpaceClaim-Learning-01-06

Keeps the clutter down and makes the commands much more capable.

Below that is the Properties Panel.  If the Options panel is how you control an operation, then the Properties panel is how you view and control an object in your model.  No point in exploring that till we have objects to play with.  It does have an appearance tab as well, and this controls your graphics window.

At the bottom is the Status Bar. Now I’m a big believer in status bars, and SpaceClaim uses theirs well.  It tells you what is going on and/or what to do next.  It also has info on what you have selected and short cut icons for selection and graphics tools. Force yourself to read and use the status bar, big time saver.

The last area of the interface is the graphics window. It of course shows you your geometry, your model.  In addition there are floating tools that show up in the graphics window based upon what you are doing.  Grrr. #olddogproblem_1.  I’m not a fan of these, cluttering up my graphics. But almost all modern interfaces work this way now and I will have to overcome my anger and learn to deal.

Make Something

For most of the 30+ years that I’ve been doing this CAD thing, I’ve always started with the same object: A block with a hole in it.  So that is what we will do next.  I have to admit I’m a little nervous.

I’m nervous because I’m a history based guy.  If you have used most CAD tools like SolidWorks or ANSYS DesignModeler you know what history based modeling is like. You make a sketch then you add or subtract material and it keeps track of your operations. SpaceClaim is not history based. You operate on objects and it doesn’t track the steps, it just modifies your objects.  SolidEdge has done this for over ten years, but I never got up the nerve to learn how to use it.  So here goes, new territory.

Things start the same way. But instead of a sketch you make some curves.  The screen looks like this when you start:

ANSYS-SpaceClaim-Learning-01-07

The default plane is good enough, so I’ll make my curves on that. Under Design>Sketch click on the Rectangle icon then move your mouse on to the grid. You will notice it snaps to the grid. Click in the Upper Left and the Lower Right to make a rectangle then enter 25mm in to each text box, making a 25 x 25 square:

ANSYS-SpaceClaim-Learning-01-08

Next we want to make our block.  In most tools you would find an extrude operation. But in SpaceClaim they have combined the huge multitude of operations into a few operation types, and then use context or options to give you the functionality you want. That is why the next thing we want to do is click on Pull on the Edit group.

But first, notice something important. If you look at the model tree you will notice that you have only one object in your design, Curves. When you click Pull it gets out of sketch mode and into 3D mode. It also automatically turns your curves into a surface. Look at the tree again.

ANSYS-SpaceClaim-Learning-01-09    ANSYS-SpaceClaim-Learning-01-10

This is typical of SpaceClaim and why it can be so efficient. It knows what you need to do and does it for you.

Move you mouse over your newly created surface and notice that it will show arrows. Move around and put it over a line, it shows what object will be selected if you click.  Go to the inside of your surface and click. It selects the surface and shows you some options right there.

ANSYS-SpaceClaim-Learning-01-11

Drag your mouse over the popup menu and you can see that you can set options like add material, subtract material, turn off merging (it will make a separate solid instead of combining with any existing ones), pull both directions, get a ruler, or specify that you are going to pull up to something.  For now, we are just going to take the default and pull up.

As you do this the program tells you how far you are pulling. You can type in a value if you want.  I decided to be boring and I put in 25 mm.  Geometry has been created, no one has been hurt, and I have not lost feeling in any limbs. Yay.

ANSYS-SpaceClaim-Learning-01-12

On the status bar, click on the little menu next to the magnifying glass and choose Zoom Extents.  That centers the block. Whew. That makes me feel better.

Now for the hole. It is the same process except simpler than in most tools.  Click on the circle tool in Sketch. The grid comes back and you can use that to sketch, or you can just click on the top of the block. Let’s do that. The grid snaps up there.  To make the circle click in the middle of the grid and drag it out.  Put 10 in for the diameter. A circle is born.

Take a look at your tree. You have a solid and a set of curves.  ANSYS-SpaceClaim-Learning-01-13

Now choose Pull from the Edit section. There is only a Solid now?

ANSYS-SpaceClaim-Learning-01-14

SpaceClaim went ahead and split that top surface into two surfaces. Saving a step again.

Click on the circle surface and drag it up and down. If you go up, it adds a cylinder, if you go down, it automatically subtracts.  Go ahead and pull it down and through the block and let go. Done.  Standard first part created. Use the File>Save command to save your awesome geometry.

ANSYS-SpaceClaim-Learning-01-15

That is it for the getting started part.  In the next post we will use this geometry to explore SpaceClaim more, now that we have an object to work on.  As you were building this you probably saw lots of options and input and maybe even played with some of it. This is just a first look at the power inside SpaceClaim.

Click here for Post 2 where the Pull command is explored.