Optimize Product Performance with ANSYS Digital Twins – Webinar

Engineering simulation has traditionally been used for new product design and virtual testing, eliminating the need to build multiple prototypes prior to product launch.

Now, with the emergence of the Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT), simulation is expanding into operations. The IIoT enables engineers to communicate with sensors and actuators on an operating product to capture data and monitor operating parameters. The result is a digital twin of the physical product or process that can be used to monitor real-time prescriptive analytics and test predictive maintenance to optimize asset performance.

Join PADT’s Senior Analyst & Lead Software Developer Matt Sutton for an in depth look at how digital twins created using ANSYS simulation tools optimize the operation of devices or systems, save money by reducing unplanned downtime and enable engineers to test solutions virtually before doing physical repairs.

This webinar will include an overview of technical capabilities, packaging for licensing, and updates made with the release of ANSYS 2019 R1.

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3D Printing Infill Styles – the What, When and Why of Using Infill

Have you ever wondered about choosing a plain versus funky infill-style for filament 3D-printing? Amongst the ten standard types (no, the cat infill design is not one of them), some give you high strength, some greatly decrease material use or printing time, and others are purposely tailored with an end-use in mind.

Highly detailed Insight slicing software from Stratasys gives you the widest range of possibilities; the basic versions are also accessible from GrabCAD Print, the direct-CAD-import, cloud-connected slicing software that offers an easy approach for all levels of 3D print users.

A part that is mimicking or replacing a metal design would do best when built with Solid infill to give it weight and heft, while a visual-concept model printed as five different test-versions may work fine with a Sparse infill, saving time and material. Here at PADT we printed a number of sample cubes with open ends to demonstrate a variety of the choices in action. Check out these hints for evaluating each one, and see the chart at the end comparing build-time, weight and consumed material.

Infill choices for 3D printed parts, offered with Stratasys’ GrabCAD Print software. (Image courtesy PADT Inc.)

Basic Infill Patterns

Solid (also called Alternating Raster) This is the default pattern, where each layer has straight fill-lines touching each other, and the layer direction alternates by 90 degrees. This infill uses the most material but offers the highest density; use it when structural integrity and super-low porosity are most important.

Solid (Alternating Raster)

Sparse Raster lines for Sparse infill also run in one direction per layer, alternating by layer, but are widely spaced (the default spacing is 0.080 inches/2 mm). In Insight, or using the Advanced FDM settings in GrabCAD, you can change the width of both the lines and the spaces.

Sparse Double Dense As you can imagine, Sparse Double Dense achieves twice the density of regular Sparse: it deposits in two directions per layer, creating an open grid-pattern that stacks up throughout the part.

Sparse High Density Just to give you one more quick-click option, this pattern effectively sits between Sparse Double Dense and Solid. It lays rasters in a single direction per layer, but not as closely spaced as for Solid.

Hexagram The effect of this pattern looks similar to a honeycomb but it’s formed differently. Each layer gets three sets of raster lines crossing at different angles, forming perfectly aligned columns of hexagons and triangles. Hexagram is time-efficient to build, lightweight and strong in all directions.

Hexagram
Additional infill styles and the options for customizing them within a part, offered within Stratasys Insight 3D printing slicing and set-up software. (Image courtesy PADT Inc.)

Advanced Infill Patterns (via Custom Groups in Insight)

Hexagon By laying down rows of zig-zag lines that alternately bond to each other and bend away, Hexagon produces a classic honeycomb structure (every two rows creates one row of honeycomb). The pattern repeats layer by layer so all vertical channels line up perfectly. The amount of build material used is just about one-third that of Solid but strength is quite good.

Hexagon

Permeable Triangle A layer-by-layer shifting pattern of triangles and straight lines creates a strong infill that builds as quickly as Sparse, but is extremely permeable. It is used for printing sacrificial tooling material (i.e., Stratsys ST130) that will be wrapped with composite material and later dissolved away.

Permeable Triangle

Permeable Tubular This infill is formed by a 16-layer repeating pattern deposited first as eight varying wavy layers aligned to the X axis and then the same eight layers aligned to the Y axis. The resulting structure is a series of vertical cylinders enhanced with strong cross-bars, creating air-flow channels highly suited to tooling used on vacuum work-holding tables.

Permeable Tubular 0.2 Spacing
Permeable Tubular 0.5 Spacing

Gyroid (so cool we printed it twice) The Gyroid pattern belongs to a class of mathematically minimal surfaces, providing infill strength similar to that of a hexagon, but using less material. Since different raster spacings have quite an effect, we printed it first with the default spacing of 0.2 inches and then widened that to 0.5 inches. Print time and material use dropped dramatically.

Gyroid 0.2 Spacing
Gyroid 0.5 Spacing

Schwarz D (Diamond) This alternate style of minimal surface builds in sets of seven different layers along the X-axis, ranging from straight lines to near-sawtooth waves, then flipping to repeat the same seven layers along the Y-axis. The Schwarz D infill balances strength, density and porosity. As with the Gyroid, differences in raster spacing have a big influence on the material use and build-time.

Schwarz Diamond 0.2 Spacing
Schwarz Diamond 0.5 Spacing

Digging Deeper Into Infill Options

Infill Cell Type/0.2 spacing Build Time Weight Material Used
Alternating Raster (Solid) 1 h 57 min 123.77 g 6.29 cu in.
Sparse Double Dense 1 hr 37 min 44.09 g 4.52 cu in.
Hexagon (Honeycomb) 1 h 49 min 37.79 g 2.56 cu in.
Hexagram (3 crossed rasters) 1 h 11 min. 47.61 g 3.03 cu in.
Permeable Triangle 1 h 11 min. 47.67 g 3.04 cu in.
Permeable Tubular – small 2 h 5 min. 43.95 g 2.68 cu in.
Gyroid – small 1 h 48 min. 38.68 g 2.39 cu in.
Schwarz Diamond (D) – small 1 h 35 min. 47.8 g 3.04 cu in.
Infill Cell Type/0.5 spacing Build Time Weight Material Used
Permeable Tubular – Large 1 h 11 min. 21.84 g 1.33 cu in.
Gyroid – Large 57 min. 20.59 g 1.29 cu in.
Schwarz Diamond (D) – Large 58 min. 23.74 g 1.51 cu in.

Hopefully this information helps you perfect your design for optimal strength or minimal material-use or fastest printing. If you’re still not sure which way to go, contact our PADT Manufacturing group: get your questions answered, have some sample parts printed and discover what infill works best for the job at hand.

PADT Inc. is a globally recognized provider of Numerical Simulation, Product Development and 3D Printing products and services. For more information on Insight, GrabCAD and Stratasys products, contact us at info@padtinc.com.

Introducing the Stratasys V650 Flex – Stereolithography Upgraded

The result of over four years of testing, the Stratasys V650 Flex delivers high quality outputs unfailingly, time after time. More than 75,000 hours of collective run time have gone into the V650 Flex; producing more than 150,000 parts in its refinement.

Upgrade to the Stratasys V650 Flex 3D Stereolithography printer and you can add game-changing advances in speed, accuracy and reliability to the established capabilities of Stereolithography. Create smooth-surfaced prototypes, master patterns, large concept models and investment casting patterns more quickly and more precisely than ever.  

In partnership with DSM, Stratasys have configured, pre-qualified and fine-tuned a four-strong range of resins specifically to maximize the productivity, reliability and efficiency of the V650 Flex 3D printer. Create success with thermoplastic elastomers, polyethylene, polypropylene and ABS:

Next-generation stereolithography resins, ideal for investment casting patterns.

Stereolithography accuracy with the look, feel and performance of thermoplastic.

For applications needing strong, stiff, high-heat-resistant composites. Great detail resolution

A clear solution delivering ABS and PBT-like properties for stereolithography.

Thanks to reduced downtime and increased workflow, the Stratasys V650 Flex prints through short power outages, and if you ever need to re-start, you can pick up exactly where you left off. Years of testing have helped deliver not only the stamina to run and run, but also low maintenance needs and high efficiency. To make life even easier, the V650 Flex runs on 110V power, with no need to switch to a 220V power source.

For ease of use, every V650 Flex comes with a user-friendly, touch-enabled interface developed in parallel with SolidView build preparation software. This software contains smart power controls and an Adaptive Power Mode for automated adjustment of laser power, beam size and scan speeds for optimum build performance. 

The V650 Flex also comes equipped with adjustable beam spot sizes from 0.005” to 0.015” that enhance control, detail, smoothness and accuracy. With more precise printing comes better informed decision-making and better chances of success. You have twice the capacity and, to ease workflow further, this production-based machine provides a large VAT for maximum output (build volume 20”W x 20”D x 23”H) and interchangeable VATs.

Through partnering with Stratasys and Stereolithography now comes with an invaluable component: peace of mind. The V650 Flex is backed by the end-to-end and on-demand service and world-class support that is guaranteed with Stratasys. Any field issues get fixed fast, and their 30 years’ experience in 3D printing enable us to help you do more than ever, more efficiently.

Discover how you can work with advanced efficiency thanks to the all new Stratasys V650 Flex.

Contact the industry experts at PADT via the link below for more information:

All Things ANSYS 036 – Updates for Design Engineers in ANSYS 2019 R1 – Discovery Live, AIM, & SpaceClaim

 

Published on: May 6th, 2019
With: Eric Miller, Ted Harris, & Clinton Smith
Description:  

In this episode your host and Co-Founder of PADT, Eric Miller is joined by PADT’s Simulation Support Manager Ted Harris, and CFD Team Lead Engineer Clinton Smith for a round-table discussion regarding new capabilities for Design Engineers in the latest release of the ANSYS Discovery family of products (Live, AIM, & SpaceClaim). Listen as they express their thoughts on exciting new capabilities, long anticipated technical improvements, and speculate at what has yet to come for this disruptive set of tools.

If you would like to learn more about this update and see the tools in action, check out PADT’s webinar covering ANSYS Discovery AIM & Live in 2019 R1 here: shorturl.at/gyKLM

If you have any questions, comments, or would like to suggest a topic for the next episode, shoot us an email at podcast@padtinc.com we would love to hear from you!

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Discovery Updates in ANSYS 2019 R1 – Webinar

The ANSYS 3D Design family of products enables CAD modeling and simulation for all design engineers. Since the demands on today’s design engineer to build optimized, lighter and smarter products are greater than ever, using the appropriate design tools is more important than ever.

Two key tools helping design engineers meet such demands are ANSYS Discovery AIM and ANSYS Discovery Live. ANSYS Discovery AIM seamlessly integrates design and simulation for all engineers, helping them to explore ideas and concepts in greater depth, while Discovery Live operates as an environment providing instantaneous simulation, tightly coupled with direct geometry modeling, to enable interactive design exploration.

Both tools help to accelerate product development and bring innovations to market faster and more affordably.

Join PADT’s Simulation Support Manager, Ted Harris for a look at what exciting new features are available for design engineers in both Discovery Live and AIM, in ANSYS 2019 R1. This webinar will include discussions on updates regarding: 

  • Suppression of loads, constraints, & contacts
  • Topology Optimization
  • Improving simulation speed
  • Transferring data from AIM to Discovery Live

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If this is your first time registering for one of our Bright Talk webinars, simply click the link and fill out the attached form. We promise that the information you provide will only be shared with those promoting the event (PADT).

You will only have to do this once! For all future webinars, you can simply click the link, add the reminder to your calendar and you’re good to go!

All Things ANSYS 035 – The History of ANSYS: An Interview with Dr. John Swanson, author of the original program & founder of ANSYS Inc.

 

Published on: April 22nd, 2019
With: Eric Miller, Ted Harris, & Dr. John Swanson
Description:  

In this episode your host and Co-Founder of PADT, Eric Miller is joined by PADT’s Ted Harris for a very special interview for users of ANSYS software, Dr. John Swanson. Dr. Swanson is known as the founder of “Swanson’s Analysis Systems” in 1970; the company that would later be known to the public as ANSYS Inc. He also wrote the original ANSYS program in his home, and since leaving the company has gone on the work in philanthropy and alternative energy.

A John Fritz Medal winner, and member of the National Academy of Engineering, John is considered an authority and pioneer in the application of Finite Element methods to engineering.

We are incredibly thankful that John was able to join us for this interview, and we hope you enjoy learning a little bit about the history of ANSYS from the founder himself.

If you have any questions, comments, or would like to suggest a topic for the next episode, shoot us an email at podcast@padtinc.com we would love to hear from you!

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Analyze, Visualize, and Communicate – What’s New With EnSight In ANSYS 2019 R1 – Webinar

Effective prototyping in today’s day and age requires not only an understanding of your product’s capabilities but also those of the environment it operates in, and how said environment impacts its use.

Engineers are finding that it is no longer possible to ignore the interactions between fluids and the structures that surround them, as they strive to optimize their product’s performance. 

EnSight helps you visualize coupled fluid-structure interaction data to gain the insights you need; providing a highly effective environment regardless of the complexity of the situation and the simulation being run. After exploring your data, EnSight can also be used to create a high quality visual representation to effectively communicate your results, thanks to the ability to place your model in immersive environments, add realistic lighting conditions, and so much more. 

Join PADT’s CFD Team Lead Engineer, Clinton Smith as we explore the capabilities of this tool, and take a look at what’s new in ANSYS 2019 R1, including updates on:

  • Parallel Fluent to Parallel Ensight capabilities
  • Transnational visual symmetry
  • EnVision handling of multi-panel display
  • And much more

Register Here

If this is your first time registering for one of our Bright Talk webinars, simply click the link and fill out the attached form. We promise that the information you provide will only be shared with those promoting the event (PADT).

You will only have to do this once! For all future webinars, you can simply click the link, add the reminder to your calendar and you’re good to go!

Seven Tips for 3D Printing with Nylon 12CF

If you’ve been thinking of trying out Nylon 12 Carbon Fiber (12CF)  to replace aluminum tooling or create strong end-use parts, do it! All the parts we’ve built here at PADT have shown themselves to be extremely strong and durable and we think you should consider evaluating this material.

Nylon 12CF filament consists of black Nylon 12 filled with chopped carbon fibers; it currently runs on the Stratasys Fortus 380cf, Fortus 450 and Fortus 900 FDM systems when set up with the corresponding head/tip configuration. (The chopped fiber behavior requires a hardened extruder and the chamber runs at a higher temperature.) We’ve run it on our Fortus 450 and found with a little preparation you get excellent first-part-right results.

Forming tool printed in Nylon 12CF on a Stratasys Fortus 450 FDM printer. Build orientation was chosen to have the tool on its side while printing, producing a smooth curved surface (the critical area). (Image courtesy PADT)

With Nylon 12CF, fiber alignment is in the direction of extrusion, producing ultimate tensile strength of 10,960 psi (XZ orientation) and 4,990 psi (ZX orientation), with tensile modulus of 1,100 ksi (XZ) and 330 ksi (ZX). By optimizing your pre-processing and build approach, you can create parts that take advantage of these anisotropic properties and display behavior similar to that of composite laminates.

Best Practices for Successful Part Production

Follow these steps to produce best-practice Nylon 12CF parts:

  1. Part set-up in Insight or GrabCAD Print software:
    • If the part has curves that need a smooth surface, such as for use as a bending tool, orient it so the surface in question builds vertically. Also, set up the orientation to avoid excess stresses in the z-direction.
    • The Normal default build-mode selection works for most parts unless there are walls thinner than 0.2 inches/0.508 mm; for these, choose Thin Wall Mode, which reduces the build-chamber temperature, avoiding any localized overheating/melting issues. Keep the default raster and contour widths at 0.2 inches/0.508 mm.
    • For thin, flat parts (fewer than 10 layers), zoom in and count the number of layers in the toolpath. If there is an even number of layers, create a Custom Group that lets you define the raster orientation of the middle two layers to be the same – then let the rest of the layers alternate by 90 degrees as usual. This helps prevent curl in thin parts.
    • Set Seam Control to Align or Align to nearest, and avoid setting seams on edges of thin parts; this yields better surface quality.

2. In the Support Parameters box, the default is “Use Model Material where Possible” – keep it. Building both the part and most of the surrounding supports from the same material reduces the impact of mismatched thermal coefficient of expansion between the model and support materials. It also shortens the time that the model extruder is inactive, avoiding the chance for depositing unwanted, excess model material. Be sure that “Insert Perforation Layers” is checked and set that number to 2, unless you are using Box-style supports – then select 3. This improves support removal in nearly enclosed cavities.

3. Set up part placement in Control Center or GrabCAD Print software: you want to ensure good airflow in the build chamber. Place single parts near the center of the build-plate; for a mixed-size part group, place the tallest part in the center with the shorter ones concentrically around it.

4. Be sure to include a Sacrificial Tower. This is always the first part built, layer by layer, and should be located in the right-front corner. Keep the setting of Full Height so that it continues building to the height of the tallest part. You’ll see the Tower looks very stringy! That means it is doing its job – it takes the brunt of stray strings and material that may not be at perfect temperature at the beginning of each layer’s placement.

Part set-up of a thin, flat Nylon 12CF part in GrabCAD print, with Sacrificial Tower in its correct position at lower right, to provide a clean start to each build-layer. (Image courtesy PADT)

5. Run a tip-offset calibration, or two, or three, on your printer. This is really important, particularly for the support material, to ensure the deposited “bead” is flat, not rounded or asymmetric. Proper bead-profile ensures good adhesion between model and support layers.

6. After printing, allow the part to cool down in the build chamber. When the part(s) and sheet are left in the printer for at least 30 minutes, everything cools down slowly together, minimizing the possibility of curling. We have found that for large, flat parts, putting a 0.75-inch thick aluminum plate on top of the part while it is still in the chamber, and then keeping the part and plate “sandwiched” together after taking it out of the chamber to completely cool really keeps things flat.

7. If you have trouble getting the part off the build sheet: Removing the part while it is still slightly warm makes it easier to get off; if your part built overnight and then cooled before you got to it, you can put it in a low temp oven (about 170F) for ten (10) to 20 minutes – it will be easier to separate. Also, if the part appears to have warped that will go away after the soluble supports have been removed.

Be sure to keep Nylon 12CF canisters in a sealed bag when not in use as the material, like any nylon, will absorb atmospheric moisture over time.

Many of these tips are further detailed in a “Best Practices for FDM Nylon 12CF” document from Stratasys; ask PADT for a copy of it, as well as for a sample or benchmark part. Nylon 12 CF offers a fast approach to producing durable, custom components. Discover what Nylon 12CF can mean for your product development and production groups.

PADT Inc. is a globally recognized provider of Numerical Simulation, Product Development and 3D Printing products and services. For more information on Nylon 12CF and Stratasys products, contact us at info@padtinc.com.

Introducing the Stratasys F120 3D Printer

An industrial 3D printer at a price that brings professional 3D printing to the masses. Introducing the powerfully reliable F120, the newest addition to the Stratasys F123 Series. Stratasys brings their industrial expertise to transform the 3D printing game.

The F120 is everything you have come to expect from Stratasys: Accurate results, user-friendly interface and workflow, and durable 3D printing hardware. Their industrial-grade reliability means there is low maintenance compared to others.

When it comes to touch-time, there is little to no tinkering or adjustment required. The F120 is proven to print for up to 250 hours, uninterrupted with new, large filament boxes, as well as printing 2-3 times faster than competition, making for a fast return on investment.

Worried about lengthy and complicated setup time? Why wait to print – the Stratasys F120 is easy to install and set up, whether you’re new to 3D printing or not. Ease of use comes standard with GrabCAD Print machine control software. Dramatically simplify your workflow and see how the Stratasys F120 sets the standard for ease of use, with no specialized training or dedicated technician required.

The Stratasys F120 outperforms the competition. But don’t just take our word for it. Over 1000 hours were spent independently testing a number of key build attributes, including feature reproduction, part sturdiness and surface quality. The Stratasys F123 Series and its engineering-grade materials came out on top.

When considering purchasing a printer; time-to-part, failed print jobs, downtime, repairs, and schedule delays all should be accounted for.

The Stratasys F120 has all the features and benefits of their larger industrial-grade 3D printers, along with the superior speed, reliability, minimal touch-time, and affordable purchase price, giving you the best cost-per-part performance. Print complex designs with confidence thanks to soluble support, and enjoy unrivaled ease of use and accuracy with every print.

Don’t waste time and resources on tools that aren’t up to the task. Enhance your productivity. Make it right the first time with the F120.

Want to learn more about this exciting new tabletop printer that’s blowing away the competition?

Contact the industry experts at PADT via the link below:

All Things ANSYS 034 – Celebrating 25 Years of ANSYS Simulation: Changes In The Last Quarter Century & Where The Future Will Take Us

 

Published on: April 8th, 2019
With: Eric Miller, Ted Harris, Tom Chadwick, Sina Ghods, & Alex Grishin
Description:  

In this episode your host and Co-Founder of PADT, Eric Miller is joined by PADT’s Ted Harris, Tom Chadwick, Sina Ghods, and Alex Grishin, for a round-table discussion on their experience and history with simulation, including what has changed since they started using it and what they’re most impressed and excited by, followed by some prediction and discussion on what the future may hold for the world of numerical simulation.

Thank you again for those of you who have made the past 25 years something to remember, and to those of you who have come to know PADT more recently, we look forward to what the next 25 will bring.

If you have any questions, comments, or would like to suggest a topic for the next episode, shoot us an email at podcast@padtinc.com we would love to hear from you!

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Stratasys To Release First Pantone Validated 3D Printer & Much More! – New Product Announcement 2019

In an exciting statement this week, Stratasys, world leader and pioneer of all things of 3D Printing technology announced the launch of three new products: F120 3D Printer, V650 Flex Large Scale Stereolithography Printer, and Pantone Color Validation on the J750 and J735 3D Printers.

As a certified platinum Stratasys channel partner, PADT is proud to offer these new releases to manufacturers, designers, and engineers of all disciplines in the four corners area of the United States (Arizona, Colorado, Utah, and New Mexico).

Check out the brochures listed below, and contact PADT at info@padtinc.com for additional information. More on these offerings will be coming soon.

Introducing the Stratasys F120
Affordable Industrial-grade 3D printing

The newest member of the F123 platform brings the value of industrial grade 3D printing capabilities to an accessible price point​.

To get professional 3D printing results, you need professional tools. But most people think they can make do with low-priced desktop printers. They quickly find out, however, that these printers don’t meet their expectations.

It doesn’t have to be a choice between great performance and price. The Stratasys F120 delivers industrial-grade 3D printing at an attractive price with consistent results that desktop printers can’t match.

Introducing the Stratasys V650 Flex
A Configurable, Open VAT, Large Scale Stereolithography Printer by Stratasys

Introducing the Stratasys V650 Flex: a production ready, open material Vat Polymerization 3D Printer with the speed, reliability, quality, and accuracy you would expect from the world leader in 3D printing.

Upgrade to the Stratasys V650 Flex 3D Stereolithography printer and you can add game-changing advances in speed, accuracy and reliability to the established capabilities of Stereolithography.

Create smooth-surfaced prototypes, master patterns, large concept models and investment casting patterns more quickly and more precisely than ever.

Introducing Pantone Color Validation for the J750 and J735 3D printers
3D printing with true color-matching capabilities is here

Say goodbye to painting prototypes and say hello to the Stratasys J750 and J735 3D Printers. As the first-ever 3D printers validated by Pantone, they accurately print nearly 2,000 Pantone colors, so you can get the match you need for brand requests or design preferences.

This partnership with Pantone sets the stage for a revolution in design and prototype processes. As the industry’s first PANTONE Validated™ 3D printers, they allow designers to build realistic prototypes faster than ever before – shrinking design-to-prototype and accelerating product time-to-market.

Simulate Multibody Dynamics More Accurately with ANSYS Motion – Webinar

As mechanical systems continue to get more advanced and interconnected, there is an ever growing need for tools that can accurately analyze the impacts of various forces on the entirety of the system. Mechanical systems often contain complex assemblies of interconnected parts undergoing large overall motion, and thus require engineering simulation for optimal design.

Tools that produce multibody dynamics solutions are better able to account for these components and thus provide more accurate results quicker than running simulations of each component individually. 

One of the latest offerings from ANSYS Inc. is designed to do just that.

ANSYS Motion is a third generation engineering solution based on an advanced multibody dynamics solver. It enables fast and accurate analysis of rigid and flexible bodies and gives accurate evaluation of physical events through the analysis of the mechanical system as a whole. ANSYS Motion uses four tightly integrated solving schemes: rigid body, flexible body, modal and mesh-free EasyFlex. This gives the user unparalleled capabilities to analyze systems and mechanisms in any desired combination.

Join PADT’s Senior Staff Technologist, Jim Peters for a look at how this tool works, along with a deeper dive into its benefits and capabilities, including:

  • Multiple Advanced Toolkits
  • Various Application Areas
  • Accurate Boundary Conditions
  • Easy Interface with Other Software
  • Tightly Integrated Multi-body & Structural Analysis Solvers
  • And Much More

Register Here

If this is your first time registering for one of our Bright Talk webinars, simply click the link and fill out the attached form. We promise that the information you provide will only be shared with those promoting the event (PADT).
You will only have to do this once! For all future webinars, you can simply click the link, add the reminder to your calendar and you’re good to go!

PADT’s 25 Anniversary Celebration

It is not often that 350+ people get together in a parking lot to talk about Engineering, bouncy houses, economic development, and eat Bar-B-Que. On March 21st, all three of those things and more happened at PADT’s party to celebrate our 25th anniversary. What a fantastic crowd. What a great roster of speakers. We could not have asked for better people to come to our event.

We want to offer special thanks to those twelve speakers:

  • Andrew Lombard, Arizona Commerce Authority, Executive Vice President of Innovation and Venture Development
  • Steve Zylstra, Arizona Technology Council, President & CEO
  • Darryn Jones, Greater Phoenix Economic Council, Vice President, Emerging Technologies
  • Donna Kennedy, City of Tempe, Economic Development Director
  • Kyle Squires, Arizona State University, Dean, Ira A Fulton School of Engineering
  • Ravi Kumar, ANSYS, Inc, Global Channel Strategy & Programs
  • Patrick Carey, Stratasys, Senior Vice President – Americas
  • Philip DeSimone, Carbon, Co-Founder & VP of Business Development
  • Joe Panovsky, Honeywell Aerospace, Director
  • Ward Rand, PADT, Co-Owner
  • Rey Chu, PADT, Co-Owner
  • Eric Miller, PADT, Co-Owner

The highlight of the event were four student teams that PADT supports in one way or another. Lego robots, 3D Printed prosthetic hands, FIRST Robots, and a formula SAE car were on display and were very popular. Every time we have these teams come and show their stuff, we are reminded that the future does have hope. We also hope that at the 30th, 35th, and 40th anniversary celebrations some of those students will be wearing PADT shirts.

For fun there were two bouncy houses, face painting, temporary tattoos, and two cornhole sets. And as always, PADT’s 3D Printing demo room was open for everyone to see the cool things our customers and we are printing every day.

The best part of the whole day was simply thanking our employees and customers for 25 Fantastic years. Please enjoy some images from the event below.

As always, if you have any questions or want to know more about PADT, simply contact us.

All Things ANSYS 033 – Using ANSYS Simulation to Disrupt the World of Capacitor Technology

 

Published on: March 25th, 2019
With: Eric Miller & Sean Katsarelis
Description:  

In this episode your host and Co-Founder of PADT, Eric Miller is joined by Sean Katsarelis form Polycharge for a discussion on how they leverage the ANSYS Startup Program and simulation tools to disrupt the world of capacitor technology.

Listen as they discuss the various capabilities and applications best suited for this market, along with updates on the worlds of PADT and ANSYS.

If you have any questions, comments, or would like to suggest a topic for the next episode, shoot us an email at podcast@padtinc.com we would love to hear from you!

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Using Command Snippets in Solution (And a cool new ACT Extension to make life easier)

So you have results for a job that took several hours to run, or several days, and now you realize that you need to use a post-processing command snippet. In the past, prior to version 14.5, this would be a huge problem, because just adding the command snippet in the Solution branch would trigger a resolve. So, in those cases, we would usually just jump over to MAPDL to do the post-processing.  In version 14.5, however, ANSYS allowed you to add the snippet to the Solution branch without triggering a resolve.

When you hit “Evaluate All Results”, Mechanical will copy the files to a scratch directory and start a separate MAPDL session. This leads to a secondary problem. Often you need to select nodes or elements to use during your snippet. This is usually done with a Named Selection, or a material ID that you saved to a parameter in a Geometry command snippet.  The problem is that the Named Selections, or components in MAPDL, are not saved in the RST file, neither are parameters. They are stored in the DB file. If you thought ahead, then in the Analysis Settings, you set the ‘Save DB file’ option to ‘Yes’ before you solved. In your post-processing command snippet you could then use the RESUME command to bring the database back to the state that it was just before the solve – having all your Named Selections and parameters. But since the default is to not save the DB file, odds are that you don’t have it.  It’s okay, though. There are still some options.

The first thing I recommend is that you save the solved project, and then do a ‘Save As’ to make a copy from which to work, just in case something goes wrong.

Method 1:

When you hit the Solve button in Mechanical, it writes out a ‘ds.dat’ file that then gets run in a batch MAPDL run.

If you have all of your needed Named Selections setup prior to the Solve, then you can open an MAPDL session and use the File>Read Input From… command to read in the ds.dat file.  In interactive mode, the file stops just before the Solve command, so you can then save the database file at that point.  You then need to right-click on the Solution branch in Mechanical and hit “Open Solution Directory”, in to which you need to copy the new “file.db” file.  Then you can resume the file.db in your post-processing command snippet. 

If you need to add a new Named  Selection, you can add a new one, even in 14.5, without triggering a resolve, but then you will have to write out a new input file. To do this, highlight the Solution branch in the tree, go to Tools>Write Input File…, and then follow the procedure above.  

Method 2:

If you are using version 17.1 or later, you have another option. You can Right-click on a Name Selection and choose “Create a Nodal Named Selection”. Then right-click that new nodal named selection and hit “Export Selections to CDB File”.  You can select several Nodal Named Selections to export, and the export will all go to one file. Include that text in your snippet.

Method 3:

In R19.2, the Named Selections are now stored in the RST file. If you don’t need to add a new Named Selection, then can you access the Named Selections that were created prior to the solution run.  After a SET command in your snippet, you can just use the name in the NSEL command, as I did in the picture above, with no need to include the CMBLOCK from the CDB file.  If you need a new Named Selection, however, then you have to use Methods 1 or 2 above.

Pitfalls:

Now that all sounds somewhat difficult, and it actually gets worse. With Method 1, you have to know at least enough MAPDL to open it and read in the input file, and then save the database file.

With Method 2 and 3, the parameters are still not saved in the RST file. So if you need parameters that were created in earlier command snippets, then you have to go back to Method 1.

But there’s hope!!

Method 4:  Oh, Joy!!!

There is one other thing that you can do, and this is my favorite method. (Probably because I wrote it. J)  There is now a new free ACT extension in the ANSYS App store. It is called SAVE_DB, and was written because yours truly got tired of dealing with the other three methods above.  SAVE_DB allows you to save the MAPDL database file without having to solve the Mechanical model, or cause a resolve. SAVE_DB will automatically change the Analysis Settings > Analysis Data Management > Save MAPDL DB value to “Yes” so that future resolves are also saved. MAPDL will be run in the background on the same version as the Workbench project, and the “file.db” will be saved to the Solver Files Directory.  Now any new Named Selections that you add will be ready at the push of a button. This one:

This is the first of many helpful tools planned for a PADT_Toolkit. I will post another plug, I mean ‘blog’, when I get more tools added and the PADT_Toolkit uploaded to the APP Store.  Until then enjoy SAVE_DB!