Press Release: New 3D Printing Support Cleaning Apparatus Features Large Capacity for Stratasys FDM Systems

PADT-Press-Release-IconBuilding on the worldwide success of previous products in the family, PADT has just released the new SCA 3600, a large capacity cleaning system for removing the support material from Stratasys FDM parts.  This new system adds capacity and capability over the existing benchtop SCA-1200HT System.

A copy of the press release is below.
At the same time, we are also launching a new website for support removal: www.padtinc.com/supportremoval.

The SCA 3600 can dissolve support from all the SST-compatible materials you use – ABS, PC, and nylon. A “no heat” option provides agitation at room temperature for the removal of Polyjet SUP706 material as well. The SCA 3600’s versatility and efficient cleaning performance are built on the success of earlier models with all the features you have come to expect, in a larger and more capable model.sca_3600-3pics

Since the launch of the original SCA-1200 in 2008, PADT has successfully manufactured and supported the SCA family of products for users worldwide. Common requests from desktop SCA users were for a larger system for bigger parts, the ability to clean many parts at the same time, and the option to remove supports from PolyJet parts. The SCA 3600 is the answer: Faster, larger, and more capable.

sca-logo3-web7SCA 3600 Key Features are:

  • Removes soluble support from ABS, PC, and nylon 3D printed FDM parts
  • Removes soluble support from PolyJet 3D Printed parts
  • User-selectable temperature presets at 50, 60, 70, and 85°C and “No Heat” for PolyJet
  • User-controlled timer
  • Uses cleaning solutions from Stratasys
  • Unique spray nozzle optimizes flow coverage
  • 230 VAC +/- 10%, 15A
  • Whisper-quiet operation
  • Includes rolling cart for easy movement, filling, and draining.
  • Capacity: 27 gal / 102 L
  • Size: 42.8″ x 22.8″ x 36.5″/ 1,086 x 578 x 927 mm
  • 16” x 16” x 14” / 406 x 406 x 356 mm removable large parts basket
  • Integral hinged lid and small part basket
  • Stainless steel tub and basket
  • Over temperature and water level alarms
  • Automatic halt of operation with alarms
  • Field replaceable sub-assemblies
  • Regulatory Compliance: CE/cTUVus/RoHS/WEEE

You can download our new brochure for both systems:

SCA 3600 Spec Sheet

SCA-1200HT Spec Sheet

If you are interested in learning more or adding an SCA 3600 to your additive manufacturing lab, contact your Stratasys reseller.

Official copies of the press release can be found in HTML and PDF.

Press Release:

New 3D Printing Support Cleaning Apparatus Features Large Capacity for Stratasys FDM Systems

Offered Worldwide, the SCA 3600 is Big Enough to Handle Large 3D Printed Parts, Effortlessly Dissolving Support Material

TEMPE, Ariz., November 17, 2016 – Phoenix Analysis & Design Technologies, Inc. (PADT), the Southwest’s largest provider of simulation, product development, and rapid prototyping services and products, today introduced its new SCA3600 3D Printing Support  Cleaning Apparatus (SCA). The systems are sold exclusively by Stratasys, Ltd. (SSYS) for use with its FORTUS line of 3D Printers. The hands-free support removal technology is a huge advantage to people who use Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM) systems for their 3D Printing.

“With more than 10,000 of our benchtop SCA units in the field, we gathered a wealth of knowledge on performance and reliability,” said Rey Chu, Co-owner and Principal of PADT. “We used that information to design and manufacture a system that cleans larger parts, or multiple small parts, while keeping the speed, easy maintenance and great user experience of the benchtop system.”

A powerful upgrade over PADT’s successful SCA-1200HT and SCA-1200 support removal products that have been in use around the world since 2008, the SCA 3600 features a simpler, more user-friendly design. The new versatile SCA offers temperature choices of 50, 60, 70 and 80 degrees Celsius, as well as no-heat, that readily cleans supports from all SST compatible materials – ABS, PC and Nylon. The SCA 3600 also features a large 16” x 16” x 14” parts basket, 3400 watts of heating for faster warm-up and a wheeled cart design for mobility.

The advantages of the system were highlighted by Sanja Wallace, Sr. Director of Product Marketing and Management at Stratasys, Ltd. when she commented, “the addition of the SCA 3600 as an accessory to our very successful FORTUS systems simplifies the support removal process with increased speed and capacity for multiple large parts.”

Once parts are printed, users simply remove them from their Stratasys FDM system, place them in the SCA 3600, set a cleaning cycle time and temperature, and then walk away.  The device gently agitates the 3D printed parts in the heated cleaning solution, effortlessly dissolving away all of the support material. This process is more efficient and user friendly than those of other additive manufacturing systems using messy powders or support material that must be manually removed.

More information on the systems available at www.padtinc.com/supportremoval. Those interested in acquiring an SCA 3600 should contact their local Stratasys reseller.

About Phoenix Analysis and Design Technologies

Phoenix Analysis and Design Technologies, Inc. (PADT) is an engineering product and services company that focuses on helping customers who develop physical products by providing Numerical Simulation, Product Development, and Rapid Prototyping solutions. PADT’s worldwide reputation for technical excellence and experienced staff is based on its proven record of building long term win-win partnerships with vendors and customers. Since its establishment in 1994, companies have relied on PADT because “We Make Innovation Work.” With over 80 employees, PADT services customers from its headquarters at the Arizona State University Research Park in Tempe, Arizona, and from offices in Torrance, California, Littleton, Colorado, Albuquerque, New Mexico, and Murray, Utah, as well as through staff members located around the country. More information on PADT can be found at http://www.PADTINC.com.

###

Media Contact
Alec Robertson
TechTHiNQ on behalf of PADT
585-281-6399
alec.robertson@techthinq.com
PADT Contact
Eric Miller
PADT, Inc.
Principal & Co-Owner
480.813.4884
eric.miller@padtinc.com

 

ANSYS R17 Topological Optimization Application Example – Saxophone Brace

topo-opt-sax-a2What is Topological Optimization? If you’re not familiar with the concept, in finite element terms it means performing a shape optimization utilizing mesh information to achieve a goal such as minimizing volume subject to certain loads and constraints. Unlike parameter optimization such as with ANSYS DesignXplorer, we are not varying geometry parameters. Rather, we’re letting the program decide on an optimal shape based on the removal of material, accomplished by deactivating mesh elements. If the mesh is fine enough, we are left with an ‘organic’ sculpted shape elements. Ideally we can then create CAD geometry from this organic looking mesh shape. ANSYS SpaceClaim has tools available to facilitate doing this.

topo-opt-sax-a1Topological optimization has seen a return to prominence in the last couple of years due to advances in additive manufacturing. With additive manufacturing, it has become much easier to make parts with the organic shapes resulting from topological optimization. ANSYS has had topological optimization capability both in Mechanical APDL and Workbench in the past, but the capabilities as well as the applications at the time were limited, so those tools eventually died off. New to the fold are ANSYS ACT Extensions for Topological Optimization in ANSYS Mechanical for versions 17.0, 17.1, and 17.2. These are free to customers with current maintenance and are available on the ANSYS Customer Portal.

In deciding to write this piece, I decided an interesting example would be the brace that is part of all curved saxophones. This brace connects the bell to the rest of the saxophone body, and provides stiffness and strength to the instrument. Various designs of this brace have been used by different manufacturers over the years. Since saxophone manufacturers like those in other industries are often looking for product differentiation, the use of an optimized organic shape in this structural component could be a nice marketing advantage.

This article is not intended to be a technical discourse on the principles behind topological optimization, nor is it intended to show expertise in saxophone design. Rather, the intent is to show an example of the kind of work that can be done using topological optimization and will hopefully get the creative juices flowing for lots of ANSYS users who now have access to this capability.

That being said, here are some images of example bell to body braces in vintage and modern saxophones. Like anything collectible, saxophones have fans of various manufacturers over the years, and horns going back to production as early as the 1920’s are still being used by some players. The older designs tend to have a simple thin brace connecting two pads soldered to the bell and body on each end. Newer designs can include rings with pivot connections between the brace and soldered pads.

topo-opt-sax-01
Half Ring Brace

 

Solid connection to bell, screw joint to body
Solid connection to bell, screw joint to body
Older thin but solid brace rigidly connected to soldered pads
Older thin but solid brace rigidly connected to soldered pads
topo-opt-sax-04
Modern ring design
Modern Dual Degree of Freedom with Revolute Joint Type Connections
Modern Dual Degree of Freedom with Revolute Joint Type Connections

Hopefully those examples show there can be variation in the design of this brace, while not largely tampering with the musical performance of the saxophone in general. The intent was to pick a saxophone part that could undergo topological optimization which would not significantly alter the musical characteristics of the instrument.

The first step was to obtain a CAD model of a saxophone body. Since I was not able to easily find one freely available on the internet that looked accurate enough to be useful, I created my own in ANSYS SpaceClaim using some basic measurements of an example instrument. I then modeled a ‘blob’ of material at the brace location. The idea is that the topological optimization process will remove non-needed material from this blob, leaving an optimized shape after a certain level of volume reduction.

Representative Solid Model Geometry Created in ANSYS SpaceClaim. Note ‘Blob’ of Material at Brace Location.
Representative Solid Model Geometry Created in ANSYS SpaceClaim. Note ‘Blob’ of Material at Brace Location.

In ANSYS Mechanical, the applied boundary conditions consisted of frictionless support constraints at the thumb rest locations and a vertical displacement constraint at the attachment point for the neck strap. Acceleration due to gravity was applied as well. Other loads, such as sideways inertial acceleration, could have been considered as well but were ignored for the sake of simplicity for this article. The material property used was brass, with values taken from Shigley and Mitchell’s Mechanical Engineering Design text, 1983 edition.

topo-opt-sax-07
Applied Boundary Conditions Were Various Constraints at A, B, and C, as well as Acceleration Due to Gravity.

This plot shows the resulting displacement distribution due to the gravity load:

topo-opt-sax-08

Now that things are looking as I expect, the next step is performing the topological optimization.

Once the topological optimization ACT Extension has been downloaded from the ANSYS Customer Portal and installed, ANSYS Mechanical will automatically include a Topological Optimization menu:

topo-opt-sax-09

I set the Design Region to be the blog of material that I want to end up as the optimized brace. I did a few trials with varying mesh refinement. Obviously, the finer the mesh, the smoother the surface of the optimized shape as elements that are determined to be unnecessary are removed from consideration. The optimization Objective was set to minimize compliance (maximize stiffness). The optimization Constraint was set to volume at 30%, meaning reduce the volume to 30% of the current value of the ‘blob’.
After running the solution and plotting Averaged Node Values, we can see the ANSYS-determined optimized shape:

topo-opt-sax-10
Two views of the optimized shape.

What is apparent when looking at these shapes is that the ‘solder patch’ where the brace attaches to the bell on one end and the body on the other end was allowed to be reduced. For example, in the left image we can see that a hole has been ‘drilled’ through the patch that would connect the brace to the body. On the other end, the patch has been split through the middle, making it look something like an alligator clip.

 

Another optimization run was performed in which the solder pads were held as surfaces that were not to be changed by the optimization. The resulting optimized shape is shown here:

topo-opt-sax-11

Noticing that my optimized shape seemed on the thick side when compared to production braces, I then changed the ‘blob’ in ANSYS SpaceClaim so that it was thinner to start with. With ANSYS it’s very easy to propagate geometry changes as all of the simulation and topological optimizations settings stay tied to the geometry as long as the topology of those items stays the same.

Here is the thinner chunk after making a simple change in ANSYS SpacClaim:

topo-opt-sax-12

And here is the result of the topological optimization using the thinner blob as the starting point:

topo-opt-sax-13

Using the ANSYS SpaceClaim Direct Modeler, the faceted STL file that results from the ANSYS topological optimization can be converted into a geometry file. This can be done in a variety of ways, including a ‘shrink wrap’ onto the faceted geometry as well as surfaces fit onto the facets. Another option is to fit geometry in a more general way in an around the faceted result. These methods can also be combined. SpaceClaim is really a great tool for this. Using SpaceClaim and the topological optimization (faceted) result, I came up with three different ‘looks’ of the optimized part.

Using ANSYS Workbench, it’s very easy to plug the new geometry component into the simulation model that I already had setup and run in ANSYS Mechanical using the ‘blob’ as the brace in the original model. I then checked the displacement and stress results to see how they compared.

First, we have an organic looking shape that is mostly faithful to the results from the topological optimization run. This image is from ANSYS SpaceClaim, after a few minutes of ‘digital filing and sanding’ work on the STL faceted geometry output from ANSYS Mechanical.

topo-opt-sax-14

This shows the resulting deflection from this first, ‘organic’ candidate:

topo-opt-sax-15

The next candidate is one where more traditional looking solid geometry was created in SpaceClaim, using the topological optimization result as a guide. This is what it looks like:

topo-opt-sax-16

This is the same configuration, but showing it in place within the saxophone bell and body model in ANSYS SpaceClaim:

topo-opt-sax-17

Next, here is the deformation result for our simple loading condition using this second geometry configuration:

topo-opt-sax-18

The third and final design candidate uses the second set of geometry as a starting point, and then adds a bit of style while still maintaining the topological optimization shape as an overall guide. Here is this third candidate in ANSYS SpaceClaim:

topo-opt-sax-19

Here are is the resulting displacement distribution using this design:

topo-opt-sax-20

This shows the maximum principal stress distribution within the brace for this candidate:

topo-opt-sax-21

Again, I want to emphasize that this was a simple example and there are other considerations that could have been included, such as loading conditions other than acceleration due to gravity. Also, while it’s simple to include modal analysis results, in the interest of brevity I have not included them here. The main point is that topological optimization is a tool available within ANSYS Mechanical using the ACT extension that’s available for download on the customer portal. This is yet another tool available to us within our ANSYS simulation suite. It is my hope that you will also explore what can be done with this tool.

Regarding this effort, clearly a next step would be to 3D print one or more of these designs and test it out for real. Time permitting, we’ll give that a try at some point in the future.

ANSYS 17.1 FEA Benchmarks using v17-sp5

The CUBE machines that I used in this ANSYS Test Case represent a fine balance based on price, performance and ANSYS HPC licenses used.

Click Here for more information on the engineering simulation workstations and clusters designed in-house at PADT, Inc.. PADT, Inc. is happy to be a premier re-seller and dealer of Supermicro hardware.

  • ANSYS Benchmark Test Case Information.
  • ANSYS HPC Licensing Packs required for this benchmark
    • I used (2) HPC Packs to unlock all 32 cores.
  • Please contact your local ANSYS Software Sales Representative for more information on purchasing ANSYS HPC Packs. You too may be able to speed up your solve times by unlocking additional compute power!
  • What is a CUBE? For more information regarding our Numerical Simulation workstations and clusters please contact our CUBE Hardware Sales Representative at SALES@PADTINC.COM Designed, tested and configured within your budget. We are happy to help and to  listen to your specific needs.

Figure 1 – ANSYS benchmark data from three excellent machines.

CUBE
CUBE by PADT, Inc. ANSYS Release 17.1 FEA Benchmark

BGA (V17sp-5)

BGA (V17sp-5)
Analysis Type Static Nonlinear Structural
Number of Degrees of Freedom 6,000,000
Equation Solver Sparse
Matrix Symmetric

Click Here for more information on the ANSYS Mechanical test cases. The ANSYS website has great information pertaining to the benchmarks that I am looking into today.

Pro Tip –> Lastly, please check out this article by Greg Corke one of my friends at ANSYS, Inc. I am using the ANSYS benchmark data fromthe Lenovo Thinkstation P910 as a baseline for my benchmark data.  Enjoy Greg’s article here!

  • The CPU Information

The benchmark data is derived off of the running through the BGA (sp-5) ANSYS test case. CPU’s and how they perform with one of the very latest ANSYS releases, ANSYS Release 17.1.

  1.  Intel® Xeon® e5-2680 V4
  2.  Intel® Xeon® e5-2667 V4
  3.  Intel® Xeon® e5-2697a V4
  • It Is All About The Data
    • Only one workstation was used for the data in this ANSYS Test Case
    • No GPU Accelerator cards are used for the data
    • Solution solve times are in seconds
ANSYS 17.1 Benchmark BGA v17sp-5
Lenovo ThinkStation P910 2680 V4 CUBE w16i 2667 V4 CUBE w32i 2697A V4
Cores Customer X  – 28 Core @2.4GHz/ea CUBE w16i CUBE w132i tS
2 1016 380.9 989.6 1.03
4 626 229.6 551.1 1.14
8 461 168.7 386.6 1.19
12 323 160.7 250.5 1.29
16 265 161.7 203.3 1.30
20 261 0 176.9 1.48
24 246 0 158.1 1.56
28 327 0 151.8 2.15
31 0 0 145.2 2.25
32 0 0 161.7 2.02
15-Nov-16 PADT, Inc. – Tempe, AZ –
  • Cube w16i Workstation – Windows 10 Professional
    1 x 4U CUBE APPLIANCE
    2 x 8c @3.2GHz/ea
    Dual Socket motherboard
    256GB DDR4-2400 MHz LRDIMM
    6 x 600GB SAS3 15k RPM
    NVIDIA QUADRO K6000
  • CUBE w32i Workstation – Windows 10 Professional
    1 x 4U CUBE APPLIANCE
    2 x 16c @2.6GHz/ea
    Dual Socket motherboard
    256GB DDR4-2400 MHz LRDIMM
    2 x 600GB SAS3 15k RPM
    NVIDIA QUADRO M4000
  • Lenovo Thinkstation P910 Workstation – Windows 10 Professional
    Lenovo P910 Workstation
    2 x 14c @2.4GHz/ea
    Dual Socket motherboard
    128GB DDR4-2400 MHz
    512GB NVMe SSD / 2 x 4TB SATA HDD / 512GB SATA SSD
    NVIDIA QUADRO M2000

As you will may have noticed above, the CUBE workstation with the Intel Xeon e5-2697A V4 had the fastest solution solve time for one workstation.

  • *** Using 31 cores the CUBE w32i finished the sp-5 test case in 145.2 seconds.

See 32 Cores of Power! CUBE by PADT, Inc.

cube-w32i-coresCUBE w32i

CUBE w32i

CUBE by PADT, Inc. of ANSYS 17.1 Benchmark Data for sp-5
CUBE by PADT, Inc. of ANSYS 17.1 Benchmark Data for sp-5

Thank you!

http://www.cube-hvpc.com/

Phoenix Business Journal: The startup ecosystem cries of despair – ‘There’s no seed money’

Just-Published-PBJ-1If you spend time in the Southwest startup community you here a lot of complaining about not enough seed money.  In “The startup ecosystem cries of despair: ‘There’s no seed money‘” I share my perspective that tight markets make for smarter investments.

ANSYS Startup Roadshow – November 18th, Phoenix AZ

Phoenix!

The Co-Owner of PADT, Inc. Eric Miller will be at The Gateway Center for Entrepreneurial Innovation (CEI) this Friday, November 18th, from 12-1pm to discuss how ANSYS software is helping new entrepreneurs drive success through simulation.

This is a free event, and while registration is not required it is preferred.

The presentation will include a discussion on:

  • What simulation is and how it can be applied to product development

  • How partnering with PADT and ANSYS can be crucial to the success of a startup
  • How using ANSYS software will help deliver ideas to market more rapidly and cost effectively. Thus saving money, time, and increasing the probability of success.

Click Here for directions and additional registration information.

Eric will also be presenting information on the ANSYS Startup Program, which provides entrepreneurs with access to various ANSYS multiphysics simulation products bundled and priced specifically for early stage startup companies.

Acceptance to this program is limited to companies who are not current ANSYS customers and meet a variety of qualifications.

Those who are eligible will also receive access to the ANSYS Customer Portal for marketing opportunities and customer support.

Visit Padtinc.com/ANSYS_Startup to see if you qualify for this program, or Click Here to register to attend the startup presentation on November 18th.

We look forward to seeing you there

Phoenix Business Journal: What does living in a post-fact world imply for business?

Just-Published-PBJ-1One of the many realizations to come from this election cycle is that telling the truth really doesn’t matter anymore, we live in a post-fact world where you can say or post anything and ignore proof that it is wrong.  In this week’s post, I ask: “What does living in a post-fact world imply for business?

ANSYS 17.2 Executable Paths on Linux


ansys-linux-penguin-1When running on a machine with a Linux operating system, it is not uncommon for users to want to run from the command line or with a shell script. To do this you need to know where the actual executable files are located. Based on a request from a customer, we have tried to coalesce the major ANSYS product executables that can be run via command line on Linux into a single list:

ANSYS Workbench (Includes ANSYS Mechanical, Fluent, CFX, Polyflow, Icepak, Autodyn, Composite PrepPost, DesignXplorer, DesignModeler, etc.):

/ansys_inc/v172/Framework/bin/Linux64/runwb2

ANSYS Mechanical APDL, a.k.a. ANSYS ‘classic’:

/ansys_inc/v172/ansys/bin/launcher172 (brings up the MAPDL launcher menu)
/ansys_inc/v172/ansys/bin/mapdl (launches ANSYS MAPDL)

CFX Standalone:

/ansys_inc/v172/CFX/bin/cfx5

Autodyn Standalone:

/ansys_inc/v172/autodyn/bin/autodyn172

Note: A required argument for Autodyn is –I {ident-name}

Fluent Standalone (Fluent Launcher):

/ansys_inc/v172/fluent/bin/fluent

Icepak Standalone:

/ansys_inc/v172/Icepak/bin/icepak

Polyflow Standalone:

/ansys_inc/v172/polyflow/bin/polyflow/polyflow < my.dat

Chemkin:

/ansys_inc/v172/reaction/chemkinpro.linuxx8664/bin/chemkinpro_setup.ksh

Forte:

/ansys_inc/v172/reaction/forte.linuxx8664/bin/forte.sh

TGRID:

/ansys_inc/v172/tgrid/bin/tgrid

ANSYS Electronics Desktop (for Ansoft tools, e.g. Maxwell, HFSS)

/ansys_inc/v172/AnsysEM/AnsysEM17.2/Linux64/ansysedt

SIWave:

/ansys_inc/v172/AnsysEM/AnsysEM17.2/Linux64/siwave

The Chemistry Behind Soluble Support Removal in Fused Deposition Modeling

fdm-support-chemestry-1In the Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM) process, support structures are needed for features with overhang incline angle less than 45-degree from horizontal. Stratasys developed a series of support materials for different model materials: SR-30TM for ABS, SR-100TM for polycarbonate and SR-110TM for nylon. Also, they developed the Waterworks Soluble Concentrate, P400-SC, to be used to dissolve these support materials. In this blog post, I develop a theory for the chemical reaction how P400-SC Waterworks dissolves SR-30TM, SR-100TM and SR-110TM support materials. As part of this, I explain how PADT’s Support Cleaning Apparatus (SCA) tank, with its heating and unique circulation and agitation capabilities that are important for the support dissolving process.

Materials Introduction

We begin by looking at the composition of the different materials involved in the table below.

stratasys-support-removal-chemestry-table-01Adapted from Stratasys.com

How P400-SC Works for Support Materials Removal

Polymer can swell and then dissolve into water as a consequence of abundant hydrophilic groups, like carboxyl group (-COOH), ether group (-O-), hydroxyl group (-OH) and so on in its molecular structure. Theoretically, SR-30TM and SR-100TM /SR-110TM Soluble Support Materials including a carboxyl group (-COOH) in their repeat unit are likely to be water soluble. However, they also have a hydrophobic ester group (-COO-) in their repeat unit, which counteracts the efficacy of the hydrophilic group on the long carbon chain. Thus, the key to making SR-30TM and SR-100TM /SR-110TM soluble, is to somehow get rid of the ester group.

A great example of supports on an FDM part. The part on the right has had the supports dissolved away
A great example of supports on an FDM part. The white material on the part to the left is the soluble support material. The part on the right has had the supports dissolved away

Hydrolysis of ester in pure water is a slow process even the system is heated. Both acid and alkaline conditions can catalyze and speed up the process. Under the acid condition, the hydrolysis is a reversible process until it reaches an equilibrium state, whereas alkaline conditions promote a thorough hydrolysis with a stirring and heating system.

P400-SC Waterworks contains sodium carbonate, sodium hydroxide, sodium lauryl sulfate and sodium metasilicate. The last two constituents, with 1-5 wt% respectively, are auxiliaries in the P400-SC Waterworks. The remaining two react with carboxylic acid and ester group per the following chemical reaction:

  1. R-COOH + NaOH =  R-COONa+ + H2O (neutralization reaction)
  2. 2 R-COOH + Na2CO3 =  2 R-COONa+ + H2O + CO2
  3. R1–COO-R2 + NaOH ≜ R1-COONa+ + R2OH (ester hydrolysis under alkaline condition)

where R is the remaining carbon chain apart from carboxyl group and R1, R2 represent the two-side segments of ester group. Ester hydrolysis is the main reaction we need, which ionizes the ester group and makes it water soluble with an increased polarity. These reactions would happen when SR-30TM or SR-100TM /SR-110TM supports are dropped into a tank with P400-SC Waterworks cleaning solution inside.

From the table above, we can see that ABS-M30TM and PC-10TM don’t have hydrophilic groups, which restrains their solubility into water. Nylon is semi-crystalline polymer and difficult to dissolve into water and most organic solvent, despite the presence of the hydrophilic group acylamino (-CONH-), which still results in a nice water-absorbing ability. All these model materials are common-use engineering plastic with nice chemical resistance (depending on their functional groups), they can be safe in the cleaning solution.

SCA1200HT-side1PADT’s Support Cleaning Apparatus (SCA)

The SCA tank offers an optimized environment with agitation and heating for the ester hydrolysis reaction. The tank has four preset temperature options (50 ℃, 60℃, 70℃, 85℃) for ABS-M30TM, PC-10TM, and FDMTM Nylon 12 model materials, due to their different thermal resistance. The innovative custom designed pump is key to cause the solution to effectively and efficiently dissolve and remove the support materials.

For more information on PADT’s entire line of SCA, please see http://www.supportremoval.com/

The first webinar of the ANSYS Breakthrough Energy Innovation Campaign is now available

download-6

Register here to watch

Simulation of Planar Magnetic Components – Possible or Impossible?

Planar magnetic components consisting of a ferrite magnetic core and numerous conductor/insulation layers have been in use for many years. Historically, determining temperature dependent winding and core losses has only been possible using iterative testing of physical models due to the difficulty in determining 3-D frequency and thermal dependency. The only way to accomplish this now is to use frequency and thermally dependent material properties in a 2-way spatially coupled simulation.

Additionally, you can only construct a frequency dependent system model that accurately represents the real device after the steady-state temperature condition has been reached throughout the device.

Recent breakthrough developments in simulation technology and high-performance computing from ANSYS make it possible to design, simulate and optimize planar magnetic components without building physical models or compromising simulation fidelity.

This webinar demonstrates how you can use ANSYS software tools, featuring a customized interface complete with manufacturer libraries, to automatically set up and then solve a frequency dependent, 2-way coupled magnetic-thermal model.

Register here to watch

This webinar is presented by Mark Christini, the lead ElectromagneticsMark Christini Application Engineer at ANSYS.

He has been working in design, development, application and manufacturing of electrical devices and systems for the past 30 years. Mark has a strong interest in transformers of all kinds ranging, from small electronic transformers to large oil-filled EHV power transformers.

Keep checking back to the Energy Innovation Homepage for more updates on upcoming segments, webinars, and other additional content.

Phoenix Business Journal: It’s time to stop putting innovation on a pedestal, and praise getting stuff done

Just-Published-PBJ-1Innovation has become almost a magic word, and in the startup world innovators are given demi-god status. We like to think that there are people out there who just come up with ideas that change the world. Reality is that we kind of overkill the whole thing and “It’s time to stop putting innovation on a pedestal, and praise getting stuff done.”  Channeling a little Andy Rooney on this one.

Phoenix Business Journal: Pitching a startup well: What I learned while competing for the Unicorn Cup

Just-Published-PBJ-1We had a lot of fun while learning a lot during the first ever Perfect Pitch competition at PADT.  This is an event where startup mentors get up and pitch the same fictitious company. During that process, we learned a few things that are useful for anyone trying to fundraise for a startup or those who mentor companies.  “Pitching a startup well: What I learned while competing for the Unicorn Cup” highlights those lessons.

Thoughts on Biofabrication (and a Visit to WFIRM)

The Wake Forest Institute of Regenerative Medicine (WFIRM) hosted about 400 attendees at the annual Biofabrication conference, held this year at Winston-Salem, NC (Oct 28-Nov 1, 2016). The conference included a 2 hour tour of WFIRM’s incredible facilities, 145 posters, 200 or so presentations and a small trade show with about 30 exhibitors. As a mechanical engineer attending my first bio-related conference, I struggled to fully comprehend many concepts and terms in some of the deeper technical presentations. Nonetheless, there was a lot I DID learn, and this post serves to summarize my thoughts on the four high-level insights I gleaned amidst the pile of information on offer. I hope these are of value to the larger community that is not on the front lines of this exciting and impactful area of research.

More than Organs

To say biofabrication is all about making organs is like saying manufacturing is all about making spacecrafts carrying humans to Mars. It misses a lot of the other valid human needs that can be met and suggests organs are the end of the biofabrication R&D curve, when they only represent one manifestation (arguably the most difficult one in our current sense of the world) of the application of the science. If we take a step back, biofabrication is fundamentally about “manufacturing with living materials” – in that sense, biofabrication blurs the lines between natural and man-made entities. If you could manipulate and engineer living cells in physical constructs, what all could you do? Here is a list of some examples of the different applications that were discussed at the conference:

  • Toxicology Studies – Organovo’s examples of skin, liver and kidney tissue being used to evaluate drug efficacy
  • Body-on-a-Chip – A solution to aid in pre-clinical work to study whole systems (a key regulatory hurdle) and potentially displace animal studies in the future
  • Tissues for Therapy – This could involve patches, stents and other such fixes of a therapeutic nature (as opposed to replacing the entire organ in question)
  • Non-Medical ApplicationsModern Meadow is a company that is using biofabrication techniques to make leather and thereby help reduce our dependency on animal agriculture. Biofabricated meat is another potential application.
  • Functional Tissues and Organs – An interesting thought presented by Prof. Rashid Bashir is that replacing organs with matched constructs may not be optimal – we may be able to develop biological entities that get the job done without necessarily replicating every aspect of the organ being replaced. A similar thought is to to use biological materials to do engineering tasks. The challenge with this approach is living cells need to be kept alive – this is easier done when the fabricated entity is part of a living system, but harder to do when it is independent of one.
  • Full Organ Replacement – Replicating an organ in all its detail: structurally and functionally – WFIRM has done this for a few organs that they consider Level 1-3 in terms of complexity (see Figure 1). Level 4 organs (like the heart) are at the moment exceedingly challenging due to their needs for high vascularity and large size.
Fig 1. Levels of complexity in organs, adapted from Dr. Anthony Atala’s talk at the conference. Image Attributions: Cancer Research UK (Wikimedia Commons), NA, Mikael Häggström (Wikimedia Commons), OpenStax College (Wikimedia Commons)

It Takes a Village (and a Vivarium)

Imagine this is the early 2000s and you are tasked with establishing a center dedicated to accelerating the progress of regenerative medicine. What are the parts this center needs to house? This was probably what Dr. Anthony Atala and others were working out prior to establishing WFIRM in 2004. To give you a sense of what goes on in WFIRM today, here is a (partial) list of the different rooms/groups we visited on our tour: decellularization, imaging, tissue maturation, bioprinting, electrospinning, lab-on-a-chip, direct writing, vivarium that cares for animals (mice, ferrets, sheep, pigs, dogs – beagles to be specific, and “non-human primates”) and a cleanroom for pre-clinical studies. Add administrative, outreach and regulatory staff. Today, about 450 people work at WFIRM and many more collaborate. Going into this conference, I was well aware this field was an inter-disciplinary one. The tour opened my eyes to just how many interdependent parts there are that make an end-to-end solution possible, some more interdisciplinary in nature than others and just how advantageous it must be to have all these capabilities under one roof dedicated to a larger mission instead of spread across a large university campus, serving many masters.

“I Have a Hammer, Where is the Nail?”

I will be honest – I justified my interest in biofabrication on the very dubious basis of my experience with 3D printing, a long standing interest in the life sciences that I had hitherto suppressed, and the fact that I am married to a cancer researching biochemist – bioprinting was my justification for finally getting my feet (close to a) wet (lab). I suspect I am not alone in this (support group, anyone?). When I described this to the only surgeon who entertains my questions, he accurately summarized my approach in the afore mentioned hammer-nail analogy. So, armed with my hammer, I headed to the biofabrication conference seeking nails. The good news is I found a couple. As in exactly two. The bad news? See the section above – this stuff is hard and multi-faceted – and there are folks with a multi-decade head start. So for those of us not on the front lines of this work or not in college planning our next move, the question becomes how best can we serve the scientists and engineers that are already in this field. Better tools are one option, and the trade show had examples of these: companies that make bioprinters (see Figure 2 below), improved nozzles for bioprinting, clean-room alternatives, biomaterials like hydrogels, and characterization and testing equipment. But solving problems that will help the biofabrication community is another approach and there were about 5-10 posters and
presentations (mine included) which attempted to do just that. What are some of the areas that could benefit from such peripheral R&D engagement? My somewhat biased feeling is that there is opportunity for bringing some of the same challenges Additive Manufacturing is going through to this area as well:

  • Design for Bioprinting: fully exploiting the possibilities of bioprinting – “in Silico” has made some progress with medical devices – a similar window of value exists for biofabrication due to the design freedom of 3D printing
  • Modeling: Biofabrication almost always involves multi-materials, often with varying constitutive behaviors and further are in complex, time-varying environments – getting some handle on this is a precursor to item 1 above
  • Challenges of Scale: This has many elements: quality control, cost, automation, data security, bio-safety. This is one of the key drivers behind the recent DOD call for an Advanced Tissue Biofabrication Manufacturing Innovation Institute and is likely to drive several projects in this space over the next 5-7 years.

Moral of the story for me: carry your hammer with pride but take the time to learn, ask and probe to find the pain points that are either already there or are likely to arise in the future, and keep refining your hammer with input from the biofabrication community – conferences are the best place to do this – IF you go in with that intent and prepare ahead of time identifying the people you want to talk to and the questions you wish to ask them – something I hope to be better at next time around.

bioprinters
Fig 2. A few of the Bioprinters on display at the Biofabrication 2016 conference: Rokit, CellInk and RegenHU represented here (the others were: Advanced Solutions, Biobots and EnvisionTEC)

The Rate-of-Progress Paradox

Finally, a more abstract point. From the sidelines, we may ask how far has the field of biofabrication come and how fast is it progressing? It is one thing to sift through media hype and reconcile it with ground realities. It is quite another to discover this conflict seemingly exists even in the trenches – there are several examples of transplanted biofabricated entities, yet there is a common refrain that we have a long way to go to doing just so. And that struck me initially as a paradox as I heard the plenary talks that were alternatingly cautious and wild – but on the very last day I started to appreciate why this was not a paradox at all, it is just the nature of the science itself. Unlike a lot of engineering paradigms, there are limits to efficiencies that can be gained in the life sciences – and once these are gained (shared resources, improved methods etc.), success in one particular tissue or organ may not make the next one progress much faster. Take Wake Forest’s own commonly used approach for regenerative medicine, for example: harvest cells, culture them, build scaffold constructs, mature cells on these constructs, implant and monitor. Sounds simple, but takes 5-10 years to get to clinical implantation and another 5-10 of observation before the results are published. And just because you have shown this in one area, bladder for example, doesn’t make the next one much faster at all. All the same steps have to be followed: pathways to be re-evaluated, developmental studies to be done – prior to extensive animal and clinical trials. The solution? Pursue multiple tissues/organs in parallel, follow each step diligently and be patient. Wake Forest seems to have envisioned this over a decade ago and I expect the coming decade will show a cascade of biofabrication successes hit us with increasingly boring steadiness.

Concluding Thoughts

Finally, we should all be thankful to the many PhD students and post-docs from all over the world putting in the bulk of the disciplined, hard work this field demands, most of them, in my opinion, at salaries not reflective of their extensive education and societal value. We should also spare a thought for all the animals being sacrificed for this and other research, even in the context of best veterinary practices – my personal hope is that biofabrication enables us to stop all animal trials at some point in the near future – indeed, this seems to be the only technology that can. Then we can truly say with confidence, that we have first and foremost, done no harm.

Thank you WFIRM, for a wonderful conference and all the work you do everyday!

ANSYS Startup Roadshow Kickoff – CEI Phoenix

Click Here to Register

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Can’t make it? Keep an eye out as we will be hosting events in other locations as the roadshow continues on!

In the meantime, click here for more information on the ANSYS Startup Program.

PADT Events – November 2016

PADT-Events-LogoWelcome to November, when things start getting really busy with end of year events.  We have a lot going on with celebrations and seminars.  Take a look and we hope to see you this month!


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November 6-10: Las Vegas, NV
ANS Winter Meeting & Expo

PADT’s Flownex team will be at the winter meeting with a both and presentations to talk about how to use the Flownex Simulation Environment to model nuclear reactors and related systems.  Always a good show, it is a chance to learn about the power Flownex for thermal fluid simulation. See you at Caesar’s Palace

The full agenda and all the details for this event are here.


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November 10: Phoenix, AZ
Governor’s Celebration of Innovation Awards

One of our favorite events every year where everyone who is involved in technology in the state of Arizona comes together to celebrate what has been achieved and to catch up on what happened during the year. We will be there at 4:00 in our booth and would love for people to stop by and say hello.  Awards start at 5:30, and PADT was on the selection committee and helped make the awards again this year.

This really is a must attend event, at the Phoenix Convention Center, for anyone involved in tech in the state, large company, small company, or academic.

Get the details and register here.


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November 11-17: Phoenix, AZ
ASME International Mechanical Engineering Congress & Exposition

We are very fortunate to have this year’s congress here in Phoenix at the Convention Center!  We hope to see many of the people we know from around the world.  Please do stop by our booth (November 13-16) and say hello.  Dr. Bhate is also giving some presentations on 3D Printing and simulation and we will be hanging about with our ANSYS and Stratasys partners as well.

Get the details and register here.


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November 18: Phoenix, AZ
ANSYS Startup Roadshow Kickoff

We are kicking our ANSYS Startup Roadshow off at CEI in Phoenix to introduce the ANSYS Startup Program to, you guessed it, startups. This fantastic offering from ANSYS, Inc. allows early stage customers access to the high-end tools they need to get their products to market faster, with better performance, and reliability.  We will also be presenting on how to use simulation to make your startup a success.

If you are a startup and you are making things, this is a must attend.

Register here and watch this blog and your email for events in other locations as we take this on the road to New Mexico, Colorado, Utah, and Southern California.

250+ Gather to Celebrate Arizona Engineering and Manufacturing at Nerdtoberfest

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Customers, friends, partners, and students braved 100 degree temperatures and some unusual traffic to gather at PADT’s Tempe office to celebrate engineering and manufacturing in Arizona at Nerdtoberfest.  Machinists, startup experts, engineers, and professors mingled under the stars and took a tour of the facilities while enjoying pizza and beer.

The day started with a seminar on Metal 3D Printing given by Dr. Dhruv Bhate.  If you missed it, you can watch his talk here:

We followed that with the first ever PADT Perfect Pitch competition, where four teams pitched the same fictitious company as an exercise in seeing if those who teach, can do.  That was such a big part of the day that it has it’s own blog post including a link to a video of all of the pitches.

And after the the laughing and congratulations to the winner of the Unicorn Cup, we started the open house.  A chance to tour PADT and network with other members of the Arizona Tech Community.

If you have ever read a post before about one of our open houses you know we have a consistent problem. Once the party starts we stop taking pictures. The only one I got was of Dhruv showing off our new Laser Concepts Metal 3D Printer.

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That room was definitely the star of the show and we calculated that Dhruv was talking from 3:00 to 8:30 – five and a half hours non-stop.  He earned his pizza and beer.

The table from Basis Chandler was also popular, where they talked about their 3D Printed prosthetic hand project.  We also had representatives from the SciTech Festival and RevAZ talking to visitors.  The 3D Printing demo room was great and many people stopped to hear about how we are combining 3D Printing and ANSYS Simulation.

We always enjoy these events, they give us a chance to socialize with people we see all the time in work situations.  It is also a great opportunity for us to introduce people that would probably otherwise not meet, and grow the strength of the Arizona engineering and manufacturing ecosystem.