Drop Test Simulation: Analyze Stress & Deformation without Breaking Your Device – Webinar

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Phoenix Business Journal: Marketing Gold, “It’s not about the Nail,” and Vagueness

Busy times here at PADT, so three articles have gone out in the Phoenix Business Journal that we have not highlighted here on the Blog.  Without further comment, here are the last three articles published:

Marketing Gold

A lot of effort can go into marketing a technology company, and every once in a while you hit marketing gold, and you see real revenue from your efforts. Revenue you would not have otherwise seen. Over the years, when we have hit gold, we executed on the “2 key steps to achieving marketing gold.”

“It’s not about the Nail”

A few weeks back, my post in this guest blog was a bit of a rant about how frustrated I get when people just say, “it sucks” and they do not give details on what is wrong or offer a solution. The problem is, I was wrong. I explore why I was wrong in “Sometimes it is not about the nail” and explore a video meme that had a big impact on me.

Vagueness

Customers can be vague. Due to no fault of their own, they are vague about what they want and how they want it. For a technology company like PADT, it can be a real problem. “Get comfortable with customer vagueness” takes a look at how we deal with the reality of finding certainty when things just are not defined yet.

Exploring RAPID 2018 in Fort Worth, TX

Waking up at 3 A.M. isn’t something I like to do often. However, for this conference I was about to attend, it was worth the early rise! Caffeine is a must to get through a long day of walking around and being educated by all the different new and old manufacturers of 3D printers. If you have been around 3D printing, you know there are really two conferences that are above the rest; AMUG and RAPID. Here are some of the things that were announced that I believe are the most significant at RAPID.

Stratasys:

Stratasys didn’t disappoint this year in introducing a new carbon fiber 3D printer, material, and metal technology that will be coming in a year+. We are very familiar with the Nylon 12 Carbon Fiber reinforced material that Stratasys has. It is THE best Nylon 12 carbon fiber material on the market and there are a few factors as to why that is the case. One is that they are using longer strands of Carbon Fiber than the competitor along with 35% carbon fiber filled parts compared to 15%. Soluble support is huge for this material as well, along with 2 to 5 times faster printer speeds. Check out how One Wheel is using this printer to help with manufacturing their cool skateboard:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tOojDgd7KVE

ANTERO 800 is the new material that Stratasys released recently. This material is being used in many amazing ways. Lockheed Martin/NASA/Stratasys/PADT collaborated in a very successful task to get flight approved hardware for one of the next missions to space. Below is the full story on this new and exciting ESD version of Antero 800 FDM material. Could your company also benefit from using this type of material? We would like to help!

http://www.3ders.org/articles/20180418-lockheed-martin-padt-stratasys-to-3d-print-over-100-parts-for-nasas-orion-capsule.html

Vero Magenta V and Vero Yellow V are the new Polyjet materials to help with getting more vibrant colors along with deeper red and brighter yellow. 500,000 color combinations can be achieved now with these 2 materials that have been improved upon. Absolutely beautiful parts can be made with a Stratasys J750 or J735.

Metal We have been asking (and have been asked) for metal for the longest time! When is Stratasys going to jump into the metal game? One of the main reasons why I went to RAPID this year was to see Stratasys Metal parts. They did not disappoint. As far as what density these metal parts are, the process for printing, and when a machine will be available, that is still the big unknown. One thing mentioned at the conference is that they are wanting to make metal 3D printing affordable to all with the ability to 3D print metal 80% cheaper than anything available right now. How this compares to what Desktop Metal, Mark Forged, HP, and others who proclaim to make metal parts cheaper than the Laser or Electron Beam options is yet to be known. Stratasys wants to be able to provide value to the metal market by focusing on areas that are lacking, which is Aluminum. Always good to have competition against the large companies of metal as it makes everyone get better at what they are doing. Read more about this machine and what Phil Reeves (VP of Strategic Consulting from Stratasys) has to say in an exclusive interview with TCT. Also below are a few pictures I took in the Stratasys booth of their metal parts that were on display.

www.tctmagazine.com/tct-events/3d-printing-at-rapid-tct/stratasys-metal-3d-printing/

 

 

 

 

 

 

Software was featured big time at RAPID because it unlocks the ability to 3D print amazing parts like this that was featured in the EOS booth. Lattice structures and topology optimized parts!

There were a lot of companies present at RAPID that highlighted where the industry is headed. Materials with vibrant color capabilities was one such area receiving a lot of attention. While competitors have introduced machines that are capable of printing in a wide variety of colors, they still fall short when compared to the Stratasys Polyjet offerings. Machines such as the J750 and J735 both offer a similar range of color compared to other companies on the market, but surpass them when it comes to material options, applications, and overall usability.

I enjoyed talking with all the major 3D printer manufactures at RAPID. One questions I would ask each of them is, what makes your system better than the competitors? I loved hearing the sales pitch about their machines and there was some great insight gained by asking this.At the end of the day, it all comes down to how you are wanting to use the 3D printer. At PADT we have many different 3D printers, and while we see and understand the appeal of the various different offerings on the market today, there is a reason why we continue to resell and support the brands we do. Let us know how we can help you out and any questions that you have with 3D printing.

What defines a prototype? 2018 UofA Engineering Design Day

Last week I had the distinct privilege to head down to the University of Arizona and help judge projects for the 2018 Engineering Design Day.  It is always fun to see all the different, multidisciplinary projects that combine teams from the mechanical, electrical, biomedical, optical, chemical, mining, and environmental departments.  Projects range from a new Secure Wireless Protocol, to autonomous UAVs, to medical devices of all types, to automated manufacturing process equipment used to cover electronics with epoxy. That last team had the forethought to demonstrate the equipment by programming it to put ketchup on hot dogs to give to the hungry judges. Good job, team!

In the morning, groups of judges visit 5 design teams and score their presentations and projects on a number of criteria.  They also decide if any of those teams should be nominated for any of the 27 cash awards given out this year.  In the afternoon, the same groups of judges go around to each of the nominated groups for a specific award and judge the project based on the criteria for that award. PADT sponsors the Phoenix Analysis & Design Technologies Award for Best Use of Prototyping, which this year, went to the Noncontact Detection of Bioelectric Fields project team. This innovative product is able to detect and monitora human heartbeat from a distance without the usual EKG wires and probes.

This was my sixth year judging, and I am always impressed with the amount of work and skill that the students put into their projects. I am also surprised each year by seemingly on-going confusion over what constitutes a physical prototype, not only from students but from the industry judges.  Among ten other nominations was the Laser-Guided Ankle Positioning for Total Ankle Arthroplasty team, which won the Raytheon Award for Best Overall Design.  These two teams, the winner and the runner up, stood out from the rest because in their presentations they used one small phrase for which I am always listening; “We made this to see if…”, or “to try out …”, or “to find out…”   They made a prototype specifically to learn from it.

 

Noncontact Detection of Bioelectric Fields Design Team (not in order): Kyle James Bachelor, James Norrid Lacey, Khalid Mobarak Omer, James Samuel Pelham, Bernd Francisco Steklis (I’m the young guy in the yellow.)

Since PADT is the southwest leader in 3D printing and rapid prototyping technologies, many of the nominations are made because the team had a large amount, or good use of, 3D printing in their final design.  The teams may even have jumped directly to 3D printing as a first pass, but many times much less expensive material could have been used. (i.e. don’t 3D print a $35 tubular housing when a $2 piece of PVC will fit the bill.)  Most of the other teams get nominated for the Best Use of Prototyping Award because they had many iterations of their design.  “Our first one broke, so we added a support here on the next one,” is a very common phrase heard in the presentations.  In my opinion, that constitutes a lack of foresight, planning, and analysis, but not a good use of a prototype.

The best prototype is one that is not only inexpensive but made to gather specific information or to be configured quickly to try out different scenarios. The winning team this year used a breadboard circuit first to layout all their electronics. They then converted to a pin-board to quickly make sure that they could isolate their components from the sensor signals when everything was packed in tighter, before following through with the final PCB design.  (See guys, I was listening.)  The ankle positioning team printed several individual pieces of the system to then have an orthopedic surgeon try out the different configurations to see what worked best and get his input on any missing features needed for the final design.  Last year’s winners of this award made an esophageal guidance system so doctors would know if they were in the esophagus or the trachea.  Their final product was an incredibly small sensor, but the first thing they did was use two beakers and a salt-bridge to see if they could tell the acidity level accurately enough to distinguish the two environments. They then made a full prototype of the proposed sensor array that was about 50 times larger than the final product. It was much easier to build and test, and modify, the larger prototype than the miniaturized final sensor array.  These are all good examples of using physical prototypes.

I was glad to see that we had only eleven nominees this year, down from 21 last year. I look forward to seeing if the trend continues next year as the judges listen for the phrases above.  Of course, I meant to write this article last year when I came back from Design Day, and the year before that, but I’ll talk about procrastination in my next article.  …when I get around to get it.

ANSYS Technical Support Team from PADT Recognized as Silver Customer Service Department of the Year in the American Business Awards

We are honored, pleased, and humbled to announce that PADT won a very special national award, a 2018 Silver Stevie for our ANSYS Technical Support Team.  This is a very special award for us because what it recognized goes to the heart and soul of who PADT is.  Technical support across the company is where we put our blood, sweat, and sometimes tears.  For ANSYS, Stratasys 3D Printers, SCA’s, scanners, or consulting; whatever product or service it is that we support for customers, how we interact with those customers so that they can be successful with those products and services is really what makes PADT different.

And now a bunch of independent and outside judges looked at what we do and how we do it, and they said: Outstanding Job! In fact, they said, “PADT defines what premium customer service looks like.”   As an ANSYS Elite Channel Partner, our technical support is key to keeping and growing customers.  These tools are incredibly capable and diverse. Also, they are not cheap. When a customer purchases ANSYS software they expect a higher level of service, and this award confirms that we deliver.

The official award was: Silver Stevie (R) Winner: Customer Service Department of the Year – Computer Software – Up to 2,500 Employees

Our customers also agree, based on the response to surveys that we send them when support tickets are closed, 92% of respondents said we solved their problem and 96% were satisfied or very satisfied. Having great customers with real and challenging issues is also key to our success. And we would not have received this award without backup from our backup, the ANSYS Customer Excellence team around the world. Without their help, we literally would not have had answers for our customers.

Everyone who does support earned this award.  But, their families also deserve a big thank you. thanks. Doing tech support is hard and can be frustrating.  You are basically taking on other peoples problems and trying to fix them. All day. Every day.  And sometimes we take that home. Sometimes our engineers will check a test run at 2:00 am. Or they will get an idea at the dinner table and send an email.

And although we applied for and won an award that focused on our ANSYS team, the same outstanding support is supplied to all of our customers. It is one of the key ways that “We Make Innovation Work.”

Here is a link to the Stevie Awards page itself: Check out the other companies. We are very happy to be listed with them.   You can also find links there to the process, and especially the judging.  We had to submit a lot of data.

You can read the official press release here or here as a PDF.

Do you want award-winning support for your ANSYS products? If you are in the Southwestern US and you are not currently our customers, contact us and we would be honored to have you join our group of happy customers.  Not an ANSYS user? Let’s talk about how to get these fantastic tools into your organization.  And don’t worry, as stated above, this level of service is available for everything PADT does, so reach out and let’s see how we can work together.

Contact us at 480.813.4884 or info@padtinc.com

 

Press Release:

ANSYS Technical Support Team from PADT Recognized as
Silver Customer Service Department of the Year
in the American Business Awards

Globally Recognized Provider of Numerical Simulation, Product Development and 3D Printing Services Honored for
Quality and Speedy Engagement with Customers

TEMPE, Ariz., May 3, 2018 ─ Phoenix Analysis and Design Technologies (PADT) today announced its ANSYS Technical Support team received a Silver award in the Customer Service Department of the Year category in this year’s American Business Awards. Because PADT is an ANSYS Elite Channel Partner and a globally recognized provider of numerical simulation, product development, and 3D printing services; top-notch support is essential for bridging the gap between customers and the technology that PADT represents.

“Our simulation support team is constantly learning new tools and technologies, distributing resources to fit customer needs, answering questions and taking all steps necessary to ensure fluid customer experiences,” said Ted Harris, manager, Simulation Support, PADT. “I’m incredibly proud of my team and their dedication to helping our customers do amazing things with their ANSYS software tools.”

One of the keys to PADT’s success with simulation support is speedy engagement with clients. The team never leaves client questions unanswered and provides prompt, high-quality feedback on any issues that arise. PADT’s simulation support team makes it a top priority to keep customers informed of progress, give them quick fixes that allow them to keep working, and then take the time to provide a long-term solution.

Ted Harris Leads the Simulation Support group at PADT, which includes the ANSYS Technical Support Team that won this award.

All members of the PADT simulation support team have also earned one or more ANSYS product support certifications, which helps them better educate customers about ANSYS products. Because PADT sells premium products, the team understands that premium service must follow. The team’s application engineers also attend PADT’s sales calls to help communicate the advantages of ANSYS technology and how customers can better use it to drive product development.

The American Business Awards are the premier business awards program both nationally and internationally. The program was founded in 2002 to honor and recognize the exceptional achievements and positive contributions of both organizations and working professionals.

About Phoenix Analysis and Design Technologies

Phoenix Analysis and Design Technologies, Inc. (PADT) is an engineering product and services company that focuses on helping customers who develop physical products by providing Numerical Simulation, Product Development, and 3D Printing solutions. PADT’s worldwide reputation for technical excellence and experienced staff is based on its proven record of building long-term win-win partnerships with vendors and customers. Since its establishment in 1994, companies have relied on PADT because “We Make Innovation Work.” With over 80 employees, PADT services customers from its headquarters at the Arizona State University Research Park in Tempe, Arizona, and from offices in Torrance, California, Littleton, Colorado, Albuquerque, New Mexico, Austin, Texas, and Murray, Utah, as well as through staff members located around the country. More information on PADT can be found at www.PADTINC.com.

About the Stevie Awards

Stevie Awards are conferred in seven programs: the Asia-Pacific Stevie Awards, the German Stevie Awards, The American Business Awards®, The International Business Awards®, the Stevie Awards for Women in Business, the Stevie Awards for Great Employers, and the Stevie Awards for Sales & Customer Service. Stevie Awards competitions receive more than 10,000 entries each year from organizations in more than 60 nations. Honoring organizations of all types and sizes and the people behind them, the Stevies recognize outstanding performances in the workplace worldwide. Learn more about the Stevie Awards at http://www.StevieAwards.com.

Sponsors of The 2018 American Business Awards include HCL America, John Hancock Financial Services and SoftPro.

# # #

Media Contact
Alec Robertson
TechTHiNQ on behalf of PADT
585-281-6399
alec.robertson@techthinq.com
PADT Contact
Eric Miller
PADT, Inc.
Principal & Co-Owner
480.813.4884
eric.miller@padtinc.com

Getting to Know PADT: High Performance Computing (HPC) IT Support Services

 This post is the twelfth installment in our review of all the different products and services PADT offers our customers. As we add more, they will be available here.  As always, if you have any questions don’t hesitate to reach out to info@padtinc.com or give us a call at 1-800-293-PADT.

The fact of the matter is, to be blunt, that building, maintaining, and optimizing systems for high-performance computing (HPC) is different than any other part of the IT world.  That is why most companies engaged in simulation who use HPC often struggle with their computers and networks. There is nothing wrong with their IT departments, they simply don’t have the manpower or the experience to support HPC systems. And that is why PADT offers IT support services tailored towards the needs of simulation users.  We bridge that gap between the unique needs of HPC for simulation and customer’s existing IT infrastructure.

We started offering this service simply because customers asked us to. As part of  ANSYS technical support duties, we kept getting calls from customers who were just not getting good performance out of some very expensive computer hardware. After looking into it we often found that they had the wrong hardware, it was configured wrong for HPC, or there was unnecessary overhead on the system.  In each case, we got together with the customer’s IT department and the users to understand the problem and implement fixes.

PADT’s IT team can offer a variety of services, including, but not limited to:

  • Implementing data management software
  • Performance benchmarking
  • Troubleshooting and Debugging Systems
  • High-performance Network design and installation
  • Making things run faster
  • System tuning
  • System design and configuration
  • Upgrading existing hardware
  • Installing software packages
  • Setting up queuing and monitoring tools

Focused on Performance

Most computer systems and the IT infrastructure that supports them, in the commercial world, are focused on security first, operating cost second, then performance.  And these are the right priorities. But in the HPC world, those same systems and infrastructure have to be focused on performance, with robustness second.  Security is important, but you solve that problem by isolating the systems and controlling access. PADT’s IT team gets this and because we run a large HPC infrastructure for our own simulation consulting business, they know how to set things up right and keep them tuned for performance.

A Partnership Between Users, IT, and PADT

Our deep knowledge of scientific computing and the hardware it runs on is only one part of our success in this area. The other is knowing how to be that translator between IT and the users of demanding numerical software packages.  We understand why IT can or can not open certain ports, and why the user needs those ports. We get the desire to establish a company-wide policy using remote drives that use RAID 1. We also know that doing that kills HPC performance. That starts the conversation on why users need local drives in RAID 0 for their number crunching.

The examples go on and on and involve memory, network fabric, different versions of MPI for each solver, and much more.  Often times just being able to explain these issues in terms everyone can understand is the greater value PADT can add.  And then our IT experts will be there with the customer’s IT experts at 11:30 PM installing those GPU cards and configuring them.

Maximize the Return on your HPC Investment

The cold hard reality is that companies spend large sums on advanced hardware, software, and infrastructure. Why not spend a little more to make sure you are getting the most from that sizeable investment.  PADT is here to help, to work with your IT and users, to get the most out of the tools you have.   Please don’t hesitate to call us at 480.813.4884 or send an email to info@padtinc.com to learn more.

What is New and Exciting in Mechanical Simulation – Webinar Recording

The use of FEA and CFD techniques to simulate the behavior of structures, fluids, and electromagnetic fields has gone from an occasional task done by experts to a standard method for driving product development.

The webinar below is a presentation by PADT’s Co-Owner and Principal, Eric Miller discussing recent advances in simulation that are pushing the technology towards covering more phenomenon, faster run times, and greater accuracy. From up-front real-time stress and fluid flow to massive combustion models with chemistry, fluid flow, thermals, and turbulence; simulation is how products are designed.

The talk covers:

  • What is Simulation and How did we Get Where we are
  • Five Current Technology Trends in Simulation
  • Business Trends to be Aware Of
  • What Is Next?
  • How to Keep Up
If you would like to learn more, especially how simulation can drive your company’s product development, please contact PADT.

ANSYS Licensing FAQ

Were you so excited to jump on your analysis only to have a “server is down or not responsive” message pop out and alienate you from the fun like a prestigiously exclusive club would make their patrons wait at the door? It might have been your manager running a reverse psychology trick on you or maybe not.

If it is the latter, you are not alone. As a matter of fact, licensing questions come to us on a regular basis. And even though there are plenty of information on the web, we figured it would be beneficial to have the most frequent answers gathered into one place: an FAQ document (attached on this blog).

The Table of Contents includes the following topics:

  1. Server down or not responsive
  2. Installation/Migration
  3. VPN
  4. TECS and license expiry
  5. Versions compatibility
  1. Overuse of licenses
  2. Include list
  3. HPC
  4. Virtual server
ANSYS LICENSING FAQ

Download the PDF here.

The document was written with the assumption of the reader having no prior experience with ANSYS or licensing in general. It is formatted in an easy step by step format with photos. The table of contents has hyperlinks embedded in it and can be used to easily navigate to the relevant sections.

We do hope that this document will bring value in solving your licensing issues, and we are always here to help if it doesn’t:

1-800-293-PADT or 480-813-4884

support@padtinc.com

Simulate Moving Parts Faster & Easier with Overset Mesh – Webinar

Don’t miss this informative presentation – Secure your spot today!
Register Here

If this is your first time registering for one of our Bright Talk webinars, simply click the link and fill out the attached form. We promise that the information you provide will only be shared with those promoting the event (PADT).

You will only have to do this once! For all future webinars, you can simply click the link, add the reminder to your calendar and you’re good to go!

Mission to the Moon: Stratasys Joins Forces with Lockheed Martin and PADT to Engineer Advanced 3D Printed Parts For NASA’s Orion Mission

Sometimes we get to help on some very cool projects and helping Lockheed Martin and NASA leverage Additive Manufacturing Technology from Stratasys on their Orion Mission is one of those special opportunities that we will never forget.  The right combination of material and 3D Printer allowed the team to create functional parts for the Orion vehicle as it prepares to journey to the moon and beyond.

Working with Stratasys, Lockheed Martin, and NASA has been rewarding and we are honored to have been part of this historic project.  I could go on and on, or you could read the details in the press release below.

A link to a PDF version is here.

PADT is unique in the world of 3D Printing because of our in-depth technical knowledge and experience. We don’t just print parts or sell machines, we provide world-class design, simulation, and testing services as well. That how we are able to contribute to projects like this.  If you are facing engineering challenges of any kind, and especially if you working to adopt 3D Printing technology to your engineering projects, just give us a call at 480.813.4884 or send an email to info@padtinc.com.

Press Release:

Mission to the Moon: Stratasys Joins Forces with Lockheed Martin and PADT to Engineer Advanced 3D Printed Parts For NASA’s Orion Mission

Stratasys 3D printers and materials provide extremely high levels of strength, durability and thermal properties to power missions to deep space

Variant of new Stratasys Antero™ 800NA, PEKK-based material offers electro-static dissipative (ESD) functionality for advanced mechanical, chemical, and thermal properties

Minneapolis, MN & Rehovot, Israel and TEMPE, AZ., April 17, 2018 – Stratasys Ltd. (NASDAQ: SSYS), a global leader in applied additive technology solutions, and Phoenix Analysis & Design Technologies, Inc. (PADT) jointly announced the companies are teaming with Lockheed Martin Space to deliver next-generation 3D printed parts for NASA’s Orion deep-space spacecraft. Key to the project are Stratasys advanced materials – including an ESD variant of the new Antero™ 800NA, a PEKK-based thermoplastic offering high performance mechanical, chemical, and thermal properties.

The Orion spacecraft leverages a variant of new Stratasys Antero 800NA to build an intricately-connected 3D printed docking hatch door

Orion is NASA’s spacecraft that will send astronauts to the Moon and beyond. Orion’s next test flight, dubbed Exploration Mission-1 (EM-1), will be the first integration mission with the world’s most powerful rocket, the Space Launch System, where an un-crewed Orion will fly thousands of miles beyond the Moon during an approximately three week mission.

The following flight, EM-2, will also go near the Moon, but with astronauts on-board, a first since 1972 and will enable NASA to prepare for increasingly complex missions in deep space. The mission will use more than 100 3D printed production parts on board – engineered in conjunction with Lockheed Martin, Stratasys and PADT.

The production-grade, thermoplastic 3D printed parts on NASA’s Orion vehicle are produced at the Additive Manufacturing Lab at Lockheed Martin in conjunction with PADT, which now includes the latest in Stratasys 3D printers and materials. Using advanced materials such as ULTEM 9085 and the new Antero material incorporating critical electro-static dissipative (ESD) functionality – NASA could meet key requirements for 3D printed parts to perform in the extremes of deep space. Antero is ideally suited to meet NASA’s requirements for heat and chemical resistance, along with the ability to withstand high mechanical loads.

“Working with PADT, Stratasys, and NASA has enabled us to achieve highly consistent builds that move beyond the realm of prototyping and into production,” said Brian Kaplun, Manager of Additive Manufacturing at Lockheed Martin Space. “We’re not just creating parts, we’re reshaping our production strategy to make spacecraft more affordable and faster to produce.”

Lockheed Martin is one of the first customers leveraging Stratasys’ Antero material – a PEKK-based thermoplastic with advanced mechanical, chemical and thermal properties.

The Lockheed Martin, Stratasys and PADT-engineered collaboration is differentiated by an ability to create consistency and repeatability in mass scale across the entire additive manufacturing part production process. Lockheed Martin is also one of the first customers leveraging Stratasys’ Antero, using the new thermoplastic for a critical part situated just outside of Orion’s docking hatch. The complex part consists of six individual 3D printed components locked together to form a ring on the craft’s exterior. The part is currently on display in the Lockheed Martin booth #603 at the 34th Space Symposium in Colorado Springs, CO April 16-19.

“The demands of space travel require extremely high performance materials and the most rigorous manufacturing processes in the industry. Part integrity and repeatability are essential and must pass NASA’s demanding testing and validation process,” said Scott Sevcik, Vice President of Manufacturing at Stratasys. “Based on decades of experience delivering strong and lightweight additive manufacturing solutions for leaders across the aerospace industry, Stratasys technology is ideally suited to match the high-reliability manufacturing processes required for production parts in space exploration.”

“It’s exciting to be a part of the Orion mission and Lockheed Martin’s efforts to transition additive manufacturing from prototyping to production,” said Rey Chu, Principal and Co-Owner at PADT. “Additive manufacturing technology and materials have come a long way to become a full-fledged end-use manufacturing option.”

PADT is currently joining Stratasys in their booth #537 at this week’s 34th Space Symposium. For further detail on how Stratasys is transforming aerospace and space exploration through 3D printing please visit: http://www.stratasys.com/aerospace.

Stratasys (NASDAQ: SSYS) is a global leader in applied additive technology solutions for industries including Aerospace, Automotive, Healthcare, Consumer Products and Education. For nearly 30 years, a deep and ongoing focus on customers’ business requirements has fueled purposeful innovations—1,200 granted and pending additive technology patents to date—that create new value across product lifecycle processes, from design prototypes to manufacturing tools and final production parts. The Stratasys 3D printing ecosystem of solutions and expertise—advanced materials; software with voxel level control; precise, repeatable and reliable FDM and PolyJet 3D printers; application-based expert services; on-demand parts and industry-defining partnerships—works to ensure seamless integration into each customer’s evolving workflow. Fulfilling the real-world potential of additive, Stratasys delivers breakthrough industry-specific applications that accelerate business processes, optimize value chains and drive business performance improvements for thousands of future-ready leaders. Corporate headquarters: Minneapolis, Minnesota and Rehovot, Israel. Online at: www.stratasys.com, http://blog.stratasys.com and LinkedIn.

Phoenix Analysis and Design Technologies (PADT) is an engineering product and services company that focuses on helping customers who develop physical products by providing Numerical Simulation, Product Development, and 3D printing solutions. PADT’s worldwide reputation for technical excellence and experienced staff is based on its proven record of building long-term win-win partnerships with vendors and customers. Since its establishment in 1994, companies have relied on PADT because “We Make Innovation Work”. With over 80 employees, PADT services customers from its headquarters in Tempe, Arizona, and from offices in Torrance, California, Littleton, Colorado, Albuquerque, New Mexico, Austin, Texas, and Murray, Utah. More information on PADT can be found at www.padtinc.com.

Lockheed Martin, headquartered in Bethesda, Maryland, is a global security and aerospace company that employs approximately 97,000 people worldwide and is principally engaged in the research, design, development, manufacture, integration, and sustainment of advanced technology systems, products and services.

 

 

Stratasys and PADT Media Contacts

Stratasys Corporate &
North AmericaCraig.Librett@stratasys.com+1 518 424 2497Joe.Hiemenz@stratasys.com

+1 952 906 2726

Europe, Middle East, and
AfricaJonathan Wake / Miguel Afonso, Incus Mediastratasys@incus-media.com+44 1737 215200
Greater China, Southeast Asia, ANZ, and India

Alison.Yin@stratasys.com

+ 86-21-33196051

Japan and Korea

Aya.Yoshizawa@stratasys.com

+81 3 5542 004

Mexico, Central America, Caribe and South America

Yair.Canedo@stratasys.com

+52 55 4169 4181

Brazil

Caio.Ramos@GPcom.com.br

Nando@GPcom.com.br

GP Communications

+55 (11) 3129 5158

 

For PADT

Alec Robertson
TechTHiNQ

Alec.robertson@techthinq.com

+585 281 6399

 

Eric Miller

Eric.miller@padtinc.com

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Phoenix Business Journal: 4 reasons why responding to emails in a timely way is good for business (and your karma)

The norm these days is to just ignore emails you don’t want to deal with. In “4 reasons why responding to emails in a timely way is good for business (and your karma)” I explore why this is not a good idea with four reasons that are real and have an impact on your business. Like it or not email is the primary mode of communication and we just need to deal with that.

What’s New & Exciting in Mechanical Simulation – Webinar

Don’t miss this informative presentation – Secure your spot today!
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The ANSYS Discovery Product Family in R19 – Webinar Recording

If you have any other questions, feel free to contact us at sales@padtinc.com or contact PADT’s Simulation Support Manager Ted Harris at Ted.Harris@padtinc.com.

My View: Self-driving car death a sad reminder of the importance of regulation

When someone loses their life, it is too late to start regulating a company’s behavior. The recent tragic death of a pedestrian in a collision with an Uber self-driving car showed that “Self-driving car death a sad reminder of the importance of regulation.

Since the feature is called, “My View” I shared my views on this topic in the Phoenix Business Journal. A little more editorial than my normal business/technology posts in the PBJ.

Forbes.com: Finding True Innovators Is Tough, But The Talent Pool Is There

We have learned the hard way that “Finding True Innovators Is Tough, But the Talent Pool Is There.” And that pool is in the much-maligned millennial generation. In this contributions to Forbes.com, in their Grad of LifeVoice section, I explore what we have learned about that pool and offer up four suggestions:
1. Look for proactive behavior
2. Seek and encourage diversity in your workforce
3. Ask for a creative leam, then encourage more
4. Reward people who challenge your thinking and make you uncomfortable