Discovery Updates in ANSYS 2019 R1 – Webinar

The ANSYS 3D Design family of products enables CAD modeling and simulation for all design engineers. Since the demands on today’s design engineer to build optimized, lighter and smarter products are greater than ever, using the appropriate design tools is more important than ever.

Two key tools helping design engineers meet such demands are ANSYS Discovery AIM and ANSYS Discovery Live. ANSYS Discovery AIM seamlessly integrates design and simulation for all engineers, helping them to explore ideas and concepts in greater depth, while Discovery Live operates as an environment providing instantaneous simulation, tightly coupled with direct geometry modeling, to enable interactive design exploration.

Both tools help to accelerate product development and bring innovations to market faster and more affordably.

Join PADT’s Simulation Support Manager, Ted Harris for a look at what exciting new features are available for design engineers in both Discovery Live and AIM, in ANSYS 2019 R1. This webinar will include discussions on updates regarding: 

  • Suppression of loads, constraints, & contacts
  • Topology Optimization
  • Improving simulation speed
  • Transferring data from AIM to Discovery Live

Register Here

If this is your first time registering for one of our Bright Talk webinars, simply click the link and fill out the attached form. We promise that the information you provide will only be shared with those promoting the event (PADT).

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All Things ANSYS 035 – The History of ANSYS: An Interview with Dr. John Swanson, author of the original program & founder of ANSYS Inc.

 

Published on: April 22nd, 2019
With: Eric Miller, Ted Harris, & Dr. John Swanson
Description:  

In this episode your host and Co-Founder of PADT, Eric Miller is joined by PADT’s Ted Harris for a very special interview for users of ANSYS software, Dr. John Swanson. Dr. Swanson is known as the founder of “Swanson’s Analysis Systems” in 1970; the company that would later be known to the public as ANSYS Inc. He also wrote the original ANSYS program in his home, and since leaving the company has gone on the work in philanthropy and alternative energy.

A John Fritz Medal winner, and member of the National Academy of Engineering, John is considered an authority and pioneer in the application of Finite Element methods to engineering.

We are incredibly thankful that John was able to join us for this interview, and we hope you enjoy learning a little bit about the history of ANSYS from the founder himself.

If you have any questions, comments, or would like to suggest a topic for the next episode, shoot us an email at podcast@padtinc.com we would love to hear from you!

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Analyze, Visualize, and Communicate – What’s New With EnSight In ANSYS 2019 R1 – Webinar

Effective prototyping in today’s day and age requires not only an understanding of your product’s capabilities but also those of the environment it operates in, and how said environment impacts its use.

Engineers are finding that it is no longer possible to ignore the interactions between fluids and the structures that surround them, as they strive to optimize their product’s performance. 

EnSight helps you visualize coupled fluid-structure interaction data to gain the insights you need; providing a highly effective environment regardless of the complexity of the situation and the simulation being run. After exploring your data, EnSight can also be used to create a high quality visual representation to effectively communicate your results, thanks to the ability to place your model in immersive environments, add realistic lighting conditions, and so much more. 

Join PADT’s CFD Team Lead Engineer, Clinton Smith as we explore the capabilities of this tool, and take a look at what’s new in ANSYS 2019 R1, including updates on:

  • Parallel Fluent to Parallel Ensight capabilities
  • Transnational visual symmetry
  • EnVision handling of multi-panel display
  • And much more

Register Here

If this is your first time registering for one of our Bright Talk webinars, simply click the link and fill out the attached form. We promise that the information you provide will only be shared with those promoting the event (PADT).

You will only have to do this once! For all future webinars, you can simply click the link, add the reminder to your calendar and you’re good to go!

Seven Tips for 3D Printing with Nylon 12CF

If you’ve been thinking of trying out Nylon 12 Carbon Fiber (12CF)  to replace aluminum tooling or create strong end-use parts, do it! All the parts we’ve built here at PADT have shown themselves to be extremely strong and durable and we think you should consider evaluating this material.

Nylon 12CF filament consists of black Nylon 12 filled with chopped carbon fibers; it currently runs on the Stratasys Fortus 380cf, Fortus 450 and Fortus 900 FDM systems when set up with the corresponding head/tip configuration. (The chopped fiber behavior requires a hardened extruder and the chamber runs at a higher temperature.) We’ve run it on our Fortus 450 and found with a little preparation you get excellent first-part-right results.

Forming tool printed in Nylon 12CF on a Stratasys Fortus 450 FDM printer. Build orientation was chosen to have the tool on its side while printing, producing a smooth curved surface (the critical area). (Image courtesy PADT)

With Nylon 12CF, fiber alignment is in the direction of extrusion, producing ultimate tensile strength of 10,960 psi (XZ orientation) and 4,990 psi (ZX orientation), with tensile modulus of 1,100 ksi (XZ) and 330 ksi (ZX). By optimizing your pre-processing and build approach, you can create parts that take advantage of these anisotropic properties and display behavior similar to that of composite laminates.

Best Practices for Successful Part Production

Follow these steps to produce best-practice Nylon 12CF parts:

  1. Part set-up in Insight or GrabCAD Print software:
    • If the part has curves that need a smooth surface, such as for use as a bending tool, orient it so the surface in question builds vertically. Also, set up the orientation to avoid excess stresses in the z-direction.
    • The Normal default build-mode selection works for most parts unless there are walls thinner than 0.2 inches/0.508 mm; for these, choose Thin Wall Mode, which reduces the build-chamber temperature, avoiding any localized overheating/melting issues. Keep the default raster and contour widths at 0.2 inches/0.508 mm.
    • For thin, flat parts (fewer than 10 layers), zoom in and count the number of layers in the toolpath. If there is an even number of layers, create a Custom Group that lets you define the raster orientation of the middle two layers to be the same – then let the rest of the layers alternate by 90 degrees as usual. This helps prevent curl in thin parts.
    • Set Seam Control to Align or Align to nearest, and avoid setting seams on edges of thin parts; this yields better surface quality.

2. In the Support Parameters box, the default is “Use Model Material where Possible” – keep it. Building both the part and most of the surrounding supports from the same material reduces the impact of mismatched thermal coefficient of expansion between the model and support materials. It also shortens the time that the model extruder is inactive, avoiding the chance for depositing unwanted, excess model material. Be sure that “Insert Perforation Layers” is checked and set that number to 2, unless you are using Box-style supports – then select 3. This improves support removal in nearly enclosed cavities.

3. Set up part placement in Control Center or GrabCAD Print software: you want to ensure good airflow in the build chamber. Place single parts near the center of the build-plate; for a mixed-size part group, place the tallest part in the center with the shorter ones concentrically around it.

4. Be sure to include a Sacrificial Tower. This is always the first part built, layer by layer, and should be located in the right-front corner. Keep the setting of Full Height so that it continues building to the height of the tallest part. You’ll see the Tower looks very stringy! That means it is doing its job – it takes the brunt of stray strings and material that may not be at perfect temperature at the beginning of each layer’s placement.

Part set-up of a thin, flat Nylon 12CF part in GrabCAD print, with Sacrificial Tower in its correct position at lower right, to provide a clean start to each build-layer. (Image courtesy PADT)

5. Run a tip-offset calibration, or two, or three, on your printer. This is really important, particularly for the support material, to ensure the deposited “bead” is flat, not rounded or asymmetric. Proper bead-profile ensures good adhesion between model and support layers.

6. After printing, allow the part to cool down in the build chamber. When the part(s) and sheet are left in the printer for at least 30 minutes, everything cools down slowly together, minimizing the possibility of curling. We have found that for large, flat parts, putting a 0.75-inch thick aluminum plate on top of the part while it is still in the chamber, and then keeping the part and plate “sandwiched” together after taking it out of the chamber to completely cool really keeps things flat.

7. If you have trouble getting the part off the build sheet: Removing the part while it is still slightly warm makes it easier to get off; if your part built overnight and then cooled before you got to it, you can put it in a low temp oven (about 170F) for ten (10) to 20 minutes – it will be easier to separate. Also, if the part appears to have warped that will go away after the soluble supports have been removed.

Be sure to keep Nylon 12CF canisters in a sealed bag when not in use as the material, like any nylon, will absorb atmospheric moisture over time.

Many of these tips are further detailed in a “Best Practices for FDM Nylon 12CF” document from Stratasys; ask PADT for a copy of it, as well as for a sample or benchmark part. Nylon 12 CF offers a fast approach to producing durable, custom components. Discover what Nylon 12CF can mean for your product development and production groups. Don’t forget to check the Custom Printing San Diego services for more information on the best printing techniques.

PADT Inc. is a globally recognized provider of Numerical Simulation, Product Development and 3D Printing products and services. For more information on Nylon 12CF and Stratasys products, contact us at info@padtinc.com.

Introducing the Stratasys F120 3D Printer

An industrial 3D printer at a price that brings professional 3D printing to the masses. Introducing the powerfully reliable F120, the newest addition to the Stratasys F123 Series. Stratasys brings their industrial expertise to transform the 3D printing game.

The F120 is everything you have come to expect from Stratasys: Accurate results, user-friendly interface and workflow, and durable 3D printing hardware. Their industrial-grade reliability means there is low maintenance compared to others.

When it comes to touch-time, there is little to no tinkering or adjustment required. The F120 is proven to print for up to 250 hours, uninterrupted with new, large filament boxes, as well as printing 2-3 times faster than competition, making for a fast return on investment.

Worried about lengthy and complicated setup time? Why wait to print – the Stratasys F120 is easy to install and set up, whether you’re new to 3D printing or not. Ease of use comes standard with GrabCAD Print machine control software. Dramatically simplify your workflow and see how the Stratasys F120 sets the standard for ease of use, with no specialized training or dedicated technician required.

The Stratasys F120 outperforms the competition. But don’t just take our word for it. Over 1000 hours were spent independently testing a number of key build attributes, including feature reproduction, part sturdiness and surface quality. The Stratasys F123 Series and its engineering-grade materials came out on top.

When considering purchasing a printer; time-to-part, failed print jobs, downtime, repairs, and schedule delays all should be accounted for.

The Stratasys F120 has all the features and benefits of their larger industrial-grade 3D printers, along with the superior speed, reliability, minimal touch-time, and affordable purchase price, giving you the best cost-per-part performance. Print complex designs with confidence thanks to soluble support, and enjoy unrivaled ease of use and accuracy with every print.

Don’t waste time and resources on tools that aren’t up to the task. Enhance your productivity. Make it right the first time with the F120.

Want to learn more about this exciting new tabletop printer that’s blowing away the competition?

Contact the industry experts at PADT via the link below:

All Things ANSYS 034 – Celebrating 25 Years of ANSYS Simulation: Changes In The Last Quarter Century & Where The Future Will Take Us

 

Published on: April 8th, 2019
With: Eric Miller, Ted Harris, Tom Chadwick, Sina Ghods, & Alex Grishin
Description:  

In this episode your host and Co-Founder of PADT, Eric Miller is joined by PADT’s Ted Harris, Tom Chadwick, Sina Ghods, and Alex Grishin, for a round-table discussion on their experience and history with simulation, including what has changed since they started using it and what they’re most impressed and excited by, followed by some prediction and discussion on what the future may hold for the world of numerical simulation.

Thank you again for those of you who have made the past 25 years something to remember, and to those of you who have come to know PADT more recently, we look forward to what the next 25 will bring.

If you have any questions, comments, or would like to suggest a topic for the next episode, shoot us an email at podcast@padtinc.com we would love to hear from you!

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Stratasys To Release First Pantone Validated 3D Printer & Much More! – New Product Announcement 2019

In an exciting statement this week, Stratasys, world leader and pioneer of all things of 3D Printing technology announced the launch of three new products: F120 3D Printer, V650 Flex Large Scale Stereolithography Printer, and Pantone Color Validation on the J750 and J735 3D Printers.

As a certified platinum Stratasys channel partner, PADT is proud to offer these new releases to manufacturers, designers, and engineers of all disciplines in the four corners area of the United States (Arizona, Colorado, Utah, and New Mexico).

Check out the brochures listed below, and contact PADT at info@padtinc.com for additional information. More on these offerings will be coming soon.

Introducing the Stratasys F120
Affordable Industrial-grade 3D printing

The newest member of the F123 platform brings the value of industrial grade 3D printing capabilities to an accessible price point​.

To get professional 3D printing results, you need professional tools. But most people think they can make do with low-priced desktop printers. They quickly find out, however, that these printers don’t meet their expectations.

It doesn’t have to be a choice between great performance and price. The Stratasys F120 delivers industrial-grade 3D printing at an attractive price with consistent results that desktop printers can’t match.

Introducing the Stratasys V650 Flex
A Configurable, Open VAT, Large Scale Stereolithography Printer by Stratasys

Introducing the Stratasys V650 Flex: a production ready, open material Vat Polymerization 3D Printer with the speed, reliability, quality, and accuracy you would expect from the world leader in 3D printing.

Upgrade to the Stratasys V650 Flex 3D Stereolithography printer and you can add game-changing advances in speed, accuracy and reliability to the established capabilities of Stereolithography.

Create smooth-surfaced prototypes, master patterns, large concept models and investment casting patterns more quickly and more precisely than ever.

Introducing Pantone Color Validation for the J750 and J735 3D printers
3D printing with true color-matching capabilities is here

Say goodbye to painting prototypes and say hello to the Stratasys J750 and J735 3D Printers. As the first-ever 3D printers validated by Pantone, they accurately print nearly 2,000 Pantone colors, so you can get the match you need for brand requests or design preferences.

This partnership with Pantone sets the stage for a revolution in design and prototype processes. As the industry’s first PANTONE Validated™ 3D printers, they allow designers to build realistic prototypes faster than ever before – shrinking design-to-prototype and accelerating product time-to-market.

Simulate Multibody Dynamics More Accurately with ANSYS Motion – Webinar

As mechanical systems continue to get more advanced and interconnected, there is an ever growing need for tools that can accurately analyze the impacts of various forces on the entirety of the system. Mechanical systems often contain complex assemblies of interconnected parts undergoing large overall motion, and thus require engineering simulation for optimal design.

Tools that produce multibody dynamics solutions are better able to account for these components and thus provide more accurate results quicker than running simulations of each component individually. 

One of the latest offerings from ANSYS Inc. is designed to do just that.

ANSYS Motion is a third generation engineering solution based on an advanced multibody dynamics solver. It enables fast and accurate analysis of rigid and flexible bodies and gives accurate evaluation of physical events through the analysis of the mechanical system as a whole. ANSYS Motion uses four tightly integrated solving schemes: rigid body, flexible body, modal and mesh-free EasyFlex. This gives the user unparalleled capabilities to analyze systems and mechanisms in any desired combination.

Join PADT’s Senior Staff Technologist, Jim Peters for a look at how this tool works, along with a deeper dive into its benefits and capabilities, including:

  • Multiple Advanced Toolkits
  • Various Application Areas
  • Accurate Boundary Conditions
  • Easy Interface with Other Software
  • Tightly Integrated Multi-body & Structural Analysis Solvers
  • And Much More

Register Here

If this is your first time registering for one of our Bright Talk webinars, simply click the link and fill out the attached form. We promise that the information you provide will only be shared with those promoting the event (PADT).
You will only have to do this once! For all future webinars, you can simply click the link, add the reminder to your calendar and you’re good to go!

PADT’s 25 Anniversary Celebration

It is not often that 350+ people get together in a parking lot to talk about Engineering, bouncy houses, economic development, and eat Bar-B-Que. On March 21st, all three of those things and more happened at PADT’s party to celebrate our 25th anniversary. What a fantastic crowd. What a great roster of speakers. We could not have asked for better people to come to our event.

We want to offer special thanks to those twelve speakers:

  • Andrew Lombard, Arizona Commerce Authority, Executive Vice President of Innovation and Venture Development
  • Steve Zylstra, Arizona Technology Council, President & CEO
  • Darryn Jones, Greater Phoenix Economic Council, Vice President, Emerging Technologies
  • Donna Kennedy, City of Tempe, Economic Development Director
  • Kyle Squires, Arizona State University, Dean, Ira A Fulton School of Engineering
  • Ravi Kumar, ANSYS, Inc, Global Channel Strategy & Programs
  • Patrick Carey, Stratasys, Senior Vice President – Americas
  • Philip DeSimone, Carbon, Co-Founder & VP of Business Development
  • Joe Panovsky, Honeywell Aerospace, Director
  • Ward Rand, PADT, Co-Owner
  • Rey Chu, PADT, Co-Owner
  • Eric Miller, PADT, Co-Owner

The highlight of the event were four student teams that PADT supports in one way or another. Lego robots, 3D Printed prosthetic hands, FIRST Robots, and a formula SAE car were on display and were very popular. Every time we have these teams come and show their stuff, we are reminded that the future does have hope. We also hope that at the 30th, 35th, and 40th anniversary celebrations some of those students will be wearing PADT shirts.

For fun there were two bouncy houses, face painting, temporary tattoos, and two cornhole sets. And as always, PADT’s 3D Printing demo room was open for everyone to see the cool things our customers and we are printing every day.

The best part of the whole day was simply thanking our employees and customers for 25 Fantastic years. Please enjoy some images from the event below.

As always, if you have any questions or want to know more about PADT, simply contact us.

All Things ANSYS 033 – Using ANSYS Simulation to Disrupt the World of Capacitor Technology

 

Published on: March 25th, 2019
With: Eric Miller & Sean Katsarelis
Description:  

In this episode your host and Co-Founder of PADT, Eric Miller is joined by Sean Katsarelis form Polycharge for a discussion on how they leverage the ANSYS Startup Program and simulation tools to disrupt the world of capacitor technology.

Listen as they discuss the various capabilities and applications best suited for this market, along with updates on the worlds of PADT and ANSYS.

If you have any questions, comments, or would like to suggest a topic for the next episode, shoot us an email at podcast@padtinc.com we would love to hear from you!

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Using Command Snippets in Solution (And a cool new ACT Extension to make life easier)

So you have results for a job that took several hours to run, or several days, and now you realize that you need to use a post-processing command snippet. In the past, prior to version 14.5, this would be a huge problem, because just adding the command snippet in the Solution branch would trigger a resolve. So, in those cases, we would usually just jump over to MAPDL to do the post-processing.  In version 14.5, however, ANSYS allowed you to add the snippet to the Solution branch without triggering a resolve.

When you hit “Evaluate All Results”, Mechanical will copy the files to a scratch directory and start a separate MAPDL session. This leads to a secondary problem. Often you need to select nodes or elements to use during your snippet. This is usually done with a Named Selection, or a material ID that you saved to a parameter in a Geometry command snippet.  The problem is that the Named Selections, or components in MAPDL, are not saved in the RST file, neither are parameters. They are stored in the DB file. If you thought ahead, then in the Analysis Settings, you set the ‘Save DB file’ option to ‘Yes’ before you solved. In your post-processing command snippet you could then use the RESUME command to bring the database back to the state that it was just before the solve – having all your Named Selections and parameters. But since the default is to not save the DB file, odds are that you don’t have it.  It’s okay, though. There are still some options.

The first thing I recommend is that you save the solved project, and then do a ‘Save As’ to make a copy from which to work, just in case something goes wrong.

Method 1:

When you hit the Solve button in Mechanical, it writes out a ‘ds.dat’ file that then gets run in a batch MAPDL run.

If you have all of your needed Named Selections setup prior to the Solve, then you can open an MAPDL session and use the File>Read Input From… command to read in the ds.dat file.  In interactive mode, the file stops just before the Solve command, so you can then save the database file at that point.  You then need to right-click on the Solution branch in Mechanical and hit “Open Solution Directory”, in to which you need to copy the new “file.db” file.  Then you can resume the file.db in your post-processing command snippet. 

If you need to add a new Named  Selection, you can add a new one, even in 14.5, without triggering a resolve, but then you will have to write out a new input file. To do this, highlight the Solution branch in the tree, go to Tools>Write Input File…, and then follow the procedure above.  

Method 2:

If you are using version 17.1 or later, you have another option. You can Right-click on a Name Selection and choose “Create a Nodal Named Selection”. Then right-click that new nodal named selection and hit “Export Selections to CDB File”.  You can select several Nodal Named Selections to export, and the export will all go to one file. Include that text in your snippet.

Method 3:

In R19.2, the Named Selections are now stored in the RST file. If you don’t need to add a new Named Selection, then can you access the Named Selections that were created prior to the solution run.  After a SET command in your snippet, you can just use the name in the NSEL command, as I did in the picture above, with no need to include the CMBLOCK from the CDB file.  If you need a new Named Selection, however, then you have to use Methods 1 or 2 above.

Pitfalls:

Now that all sounds somewhat difficult, and it actually gets worse. With Method 1, you have to know at least enough MAPDL to open it and read in the input file, and then save the database file.

With Method 2 and 3, the parameters are still not saved in the RST file. So if you need parameters that were created in earlier command snippets, then you have to go back to Method 1.

But there’s hope!!

Method 4:  Oh, Joy!!!

There is one other thing that you can do, and this is my favorite method. (Probably because I wrote it. J)  There is now a new free ACT extension in the ANSYS App store. It is called SAVE_DB, and was written because yours truly got tired of dealing with the other three methods above.  SAVE_DB allows you to save the MAPDL database file without having to solve the Mechanical model, or cause a resolve. SAVE_DB will automatically change the Analysis Settings > Analysis Data Management > Save MAPDL DB value to “Yes” so that future resolves are also saved. MAPDL will be run in the background on the same version as the Workbench project, and the “file.db” will be saved to the Solver Files Directory.  Now any new Named Selections that you add will be ready at the push of a button. This one:

This is the first of many helpful tools planned for a PADT_Toolkit. I will post another plug, I mean ‘blog’, when I get more tools added and the PADT_Toolkit uploaded to the APP Store.  Until then enjoy SAVE_DB!

All Things ANSYS 032 – What’s New in ANSYS Mechanical: Updates Made in 2019 R1

 

Published on: March 11th, 2019
With: Eric Miller & Ted Harris
Description:  

PADT’s Simulation Support Manager, Ted Harris for a discussion on what updates have been made available in the 2019 R1 version on ANSYS Mechanical. Listen as they discuss the various capabilities and applications for this new release, along with what makes these updates so significant.

Want to learn more about what to expect in ANSYS Mechanical 2019 R1? Check out PADT’s webinar covering everything you need to know about the tool’s latest update.

Watch here: https://bit.ly/2SSntmd

If you have any questions, comments, or would like to suggest a topic for the next episode, shoot us an email at podcast@padtinc.com we would love to hear from you!

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PADT is Turning 25!

Wow!. It has been 25 years since Phoenix Analysis & Design Technologies, Inc. went downtown to file incorporation papers on March 7, 1994.  Now we are ninety-some people with offices in six states.

It has been an incredible journey with so many people playing key roles.

Please read our thoughts on this momentous event in the press release below.

You can help us celebrate by coming to our party!  Learn more at www.padtinc.com/padt25.

You can also share your thoughts about working with or at PADT by filling leaving a comment here.

Please find the official press release here in PDF and HTML.

If you have any questions, reach out to info@padtinc.com or call 480.813.4884.

Press Release:

The Southwest’s Leader in Numerical Simulation, Product Development, and 3D Printing Products and Services, PADT, Celebrates its 25th Anniversary

PADT’s Anniversary Celebration to be Held March 21, 2019 from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. at its ASU Research Park Headquarters in Tempe

TEMPE, Ariz., March 7, 2019 ─ The employees and owners of PADT, a globally recognized provider of numerical simulation, product development, and 3D printing products and services, are proud to announce that today marks their twenty-fifth year in business.  In 1994, a group of engineers working at a large Aerospace company decided to try the entrepreneurial life and established Phoenix Analysis & Design Technologies, Inc. (PADT).  After two-and-a-half decades, the company has grown from those humble beginnings to employ over ninety-five people located across six states.

The original vision of the PADT co-founders was to take the advanced computer-aided engineering tools that were changing how turbine engines were designed, and apply them to other industries.  These tools, known today as numerical simulation, comprehensive product development, and 3D Printing, became the foundation of PADT’s business, and have only increased in sophistication and use.

PADT’s Employees, 2018

“A key to our long-term success has been our close relationship with ANSYS, Inc., the leader in engineering simulation software,” said Ward Rand, co-founder, PADT. “As the size of ANSYS and the capabilities of its tools have grown, we’ve increased our customer base and the type of simulation we can deliver to help our customers drive their product designs.”  Today, PADT is an ANSYS Elite Channel Partner selling and supporting ANSYS products across the Southwestern U.S., and providing engineering simulation consulting worldwide.

PADT’s First Company Pictures, 2000

When PADT Co-Owner Mark Johnson joined the company several years in, he grew the original vision of product design to include comprehensive services for product development, including research and testing.  The PADT family sadly lost Mark in 2015 to cancer, but the Product Development team he created continues to grow and thrive. PADT honors his memory by supporting a global customer base creating products from children’s toys to medical devices and aerospace subsystems.

PADT is perhaps best known locally as the leading regional provider of 3D Printing solutions, having earned the designation of being the oldest and largest 3D Printing service based in the Southwest.  “When we bought our first stereolithography machine in 1994, we couldn’t have imagined how widespread additive manufacturing would become,” said Rey Chu, PADT co-founder. “We continue to offer greater options to our customers through the sale of systems and materials, while also providing 3D Printing as a service.”

PADT’s Offices in the ASU Research Park in Tempe, Arizona

Key to PADT’s status as a leader in the rapidly growing area of 3D Printing is its partnership with the leading manufacturer of additive manufacturing systems, Stratasys and PADT’ status as a Stratasys Platinum Channel partner in the four-corner region. For over a decade, PADT has also been the primary supplier of FDM soluble support removal solutions.  The manufacturing department has also successfully teamed with overseas suppliers and partners to deliver millions of dollars in goods and services to customers.

Most of all, PADT credits its success to every past and current member of the PADT family that has contributed to what the company is today, from administration, to engineering, to manufacturing.

“When people ask us how we have thrived for so long, we have to step back and point to our employees,” said Eric Miller, co-founder PADT. “Since the very beginning, their dedication to the vision of the company has been inspirational.  PADT is a place where smart people like to come to work, largely because they get to take on challenging tasks for appreciative customers. It has been a true joy for all three of the company’s owners to grow with everyone. The past twenty-five years have been an amazing journey, and the next twenty-five are full of potential.”

The entire PADT family would like to thank everyone who has made the dream of helping other people innovate a reality by inviting the public to its 25th anniversary party. The event is being held on March 21st from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m., at PADT’s headquarters in ASU’s Research Park, in Tempe, Arizona. Details, including the address and required free registration, can be found at www.padtinc.com/padt25.

PADT’s Four Co-Owners. L-R: Eric Miller, Rey Chu, Ward Rand, Mark Johnson

About PADT

PADT is an engineering product and services company that focuses on helping customers who develop physical products by providing Numerical Simulation, Product Development, and 3D Printing solutions. PADT’s worldwide reputation for technical excellence and experienced staff is based on its proven record of building long-term win-win partnerships with vendors and customers. Since its establishment in 1994, companies have relied on PADT because “We Make Innovation Work.” With over 90 employees, PADT services customers from its headquarters at the Arizona State University Research Park in Tempe, Arizona, and from offices in Torrance, California, Littleton, Colorado, Albuquerque, New Mexico, Austin, Texas, and Murray, Utah, as well as through staff members located around the country. More information on PADT can be found at www.PADTINC.com.

# # #

Media Contact
Alec Robertson
TechTHiNQ on behalf of PADT
585-281-6399
alec.robertson@techthinq.com
PADT Contact
Eric Miller
PADT, Inc.
Principal & Co-Owner
480.813.4884
eric.miller@padtinc.com

PADT Spins-Off Successful 3D Printing Support Removal Equipment Line Into a Separate Company, Oryx Additive

One of the most exciting, and terrifying, aspects of being a parent is when it is time for your children to head out on their own.  Here at PADT we have been growing and nurturing our 3D Printing Post Processing business for 10 years.  With 12,500 Support Cleaning Apparatus systems in the field globally, it was time to give our SCA business the freedom it needs to grow.

We are very proud to announce the creation of a new company, Oryx Additive.

Initially, not much will change, other than the name as we focus on building an outstanding team that is as excited as we are about this much-needed aspect of 3D Printing.  Stay tuned as we all watch Oryx Additive grow and prosper.

Please find the official press release on this new partnership below and here in PDF and HTML.

If you have any questions about soluble support removal or other post-processing steps for additive manufacturing, reach out to info@padtinc.com or call 480.813.4884.

Press Release:

PADT Spins-Off Successful 3D Printing Support Removal Equipment Line Into a Separate Company, Oryx Additive

PADT’s Industry Leading Support Cleaning Apparatus (SCA) Business Becomes Oryx Additive, Focused on Developing New Post-Processing Equipment for Additive Manufacturing

TEMPE, Ariz., March 5, 2019 ─ PADT, a globally recognized provider of numerical simulation, product development, and 3D printing products and services, today announced the spin-off its successful Support Cleaning Apparatus (SCA) 3D printing support removal equipment business into a separate company, Oryx Additive. Taking the reins after PADT’s successful 10-year run as the leading supplier in the industry, Oryx Additive will build on PADT’s existing line and develop new innovations for 3D printing post-processing.

“In additive manufacturing, parts coming off the printer often require the removal of support material or other secondary processes to yield the finished parts. The PADT SCA product-line has been the most popular soluble support removal product for more than a decade,” said Rey Chu, principal and co-founder, PADT. “The growth of the 3D printing industry has increased the demand for post processing equipment and provided us with the opportunity to expand this portion of PADT’s business by creating a separate company. Oryx Additive will continue PADT’s legacy of offering solutions that reliably process 3D printed parts while reducing cycle time and increasing productivity.”

Oryx Additive will leverage PADT’s experience in engineering, manufacturing, and 3D printing post-processing to continue developing innovative solutions to meet additive manufacturing post processing needs. Oryx Additive will take over the responsibility of continuing supply and service on the current SCA products immediately. Oryx Additive will also provide future upgrades and develop expanded applications of these products.

PADT has developed a comprehensive post-processing product roadmap and a broad product pipeline that Oryx Additive will focus on bringing into the market in the near future. With strong leadership, a wide installed customer base, extensive industry knowledge, and engineering expertise, Oryx Additive is positioned to introduce new post-processing products to serve the 3D printing and additive manufacturing industry quickly.

For more information on Oryx Additive or PADT and its background in 3D printing post-processing equipment, please visit www.oryxadditive.com or www.padtinc.com.

About PADT

PADT is an engineering product and services company that focuses on helping customers who develop physical products by providing Numerical Simulation, Product Development, and 3D Printing solutions. PADT’s worldwide reputation for technical excellence and experienced staff is based on its proven record of building long-term win-win partnerships with vendors and customers. Since its establishment in 1994, companies have relied on PADT because “We Make Innovation Work.” With over 80 employees, PADT services customers from its headquarters at the Arizona State University Research Park in Tempe, Arizona, and from offices in Torrance, California, Littleton, Colorado, Albuquerque, New Mexico, Austin, Texas, and Murray, Utah, as well as through staff members located around the country. More information on PADT can be found at www.PADTINC.com.

About Oryx Additive

Oryx Additive is a subsidiary of PADT, specializing in the innovation and engineering of additive manufacturing post-processing solutions. Headquartered in Tempe, Arizona and serving a global customer base, Oryx Additive was founded based on the success of PADT’s industry-leading 3D printing support removal equipment line, the Support Cleaning Apparatus (SCA). Oryx Additive will continue to supply the SCA as well as develop new support removal equipment to serve the growing population of companies leveraging additive manufacturing across industries More information on Oryx Additive can be found at www.oryxadditive.com.

# # #

Media Contact
Alec Robertson
TechTHiNQ on behalf of PADT
585-281-6399
alec.robertson@techthinq.com
PADT Contact
Eric Miller
PADT, Inc.
Principal & Co-Owner
480.813.4884
eric.miller@padtinc.com

Our Parking Lot Gets Cool for PADT Motorsport Day

There were Chevys and Fords, Porches and Harleys, Teslas and Acuras. Big trucks and little sports cars. And of course, there was pizza. Our first ever Motorsport Day was a blast. Mechanical engineers have a special relationship with cars. For those of us who studied machine design, statics, dynamics, thermo, and CAD, various forms of motor driven transportation often represent the pinnacle of our trade during a given era. So having a parking lot full of wheeled vehicles tickled our brains.

Employees, as well as family and friends of employees, brought their rides. The best part was to see the love and passion that the owners put into their vehicles. These are far more than just a way to get to and from work. One thing we can’t share in words is the sound of each machine. From the purr of the Porche to the throaty roar of the two drag cars to the rumble of the Harley, each one had its own unique and special sound. And the Tesla, not wanting to be left out in the sound department, cranked up its stereo did a dance for us.

This was our first attempt at this type of an event, a practice run to see if anyone was interested. Duh. It was a huge success. So, watch your email and this blog for an announcement of our 2020 Motorsport Day when we will open it up to customers and vendors who are interested in sharing their ride or taking a look.

Words don’t do these marvelous machines justice, so here is a gallery with this year’s entries. And for the car fans, a table after that gives specifics on each vehicle.


—-Owner—-

—-Year—-

———-Make———-

———-Model———-
Rob R1935ChevyStandard Three Window Coupe
Tom S1950Chevy3100 – Resto Mod Patina Truck
Ralph G1964ChevyNova SS (Chevy II)
Steve G1968FordMustang Cobra Covertible
Vince E1969ChevyNova SS
Dwaine R1973ChevyCorvette
Scott R1983Datsun 280ZX
Mark M2001DodgeRAM 2500
Ted H2003AcuraCL Type S
Tom B2011ChevyCamaro SS
Teri S2015Harley DavidsonDyna Lowrider
Tim M2015Porsche911 Carrera S
Roger S2018TeslaX