ANSYS & 3D Printing: Converting your ANSYS Mechanical or MAPDL Model into an STL File

image3D printing is all the rage these days.  PADT has been involved in what should be called Additive Manufacturing since our founding twenty years ago.  So people in the ANSYS world often come to us for advice on things 3D Printer’ish.  And last week we got an email asking if we had a way to convert a deformed mesh into a STL file that can be used to print that deformed geometry.  This email caused neurons to fire that had not fired in some time. I remembered writing something but it was a long time ago.

Fortunately I have Google Desktop on my computer so I searched for ans2stl, knowing that I always called my translators ans2nnn of some kind. There it was.  Last updated in 2001, written in maybe 1995. C.  I guess I shouldn’t complain, it could have been FORTRAN. The notes say that the program has been successfully tested on Windows NT. That was a long time ago.

So I dusted it off and present it here as a way to get results from your ANSYS Mechanical or ANSYS Mechanical APDL model as a deformed STL file.

UPDATE – 7/8/2014

Since this article was written, we have done some more work with STL files. This Macro works fine on a tetrahedral mesh, but if you have hex elements, it won’t work – it assumes triangles on the face.  It also requires a macro and some ‘C’ code, which is an extra pain. So we wrote a more generic macro that works with Hex or Tet meshes, and writes the file directly. It can be a bit slow but no annoyingly slow.  We recommend you use this method instead of the ones outlined below.

Here is the macro:  writstl.zip

The Process

An STL file is basically a faceted representation of geometry. Triangles on the surface of your model. So to get an STL file of an FEA model, you simply need to generate triangles on your mesh face, write them out to a file, and convert them to an STL format.  If you want deformed geometry, simply use the UPGEOM command to move your nodes to the deformed position.

The Program

Here is the source code for the windows version of the program:

/*
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

 PADT--------------------------------------------------- Phoenix Analysis &
                                                        Design Technologies

---------------------------------------------------------------------------
                             www.padtinc.com
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

       Package: ans2stl

          File: ans2stl.c
          Args: rootname
        Author: Eric Miller, PADT
		(480) 813-4884 
		eric.miller@padtinc.com

	Simple program that takes the nodes and elements from the
	surface of an ANSYS FE model and converts it to a binary
	STL file.

	USAGE:
		Create and ANSYS surface mesh one of two ways:
			1: amesh the surface with triangles
			2: esurf an existing mesh with triangles
         	Write the triangle surface mesh out with nwrite/ewrite
		Run ans2stl with the rootname of the *.node and *.elem files
		   as the only argument
		This should create a binary STL file

	ASSUMPTIONS:
		The ANSYS elements are 4 noded shells (MESH200 is suggested)
		in triangular format (nodes 3 and 4 the same)

		This code has been succesfully compiled and tested
		on WindowsNT

		NOTE: There is a known issue on UNIX with byte order
				Please contact me if you need a UNIX version

	COMPILE:
		gcc -o ans2stl_win ans2stl_win.c

       10/31/01:       Cleaned up for release to XANSYS and such
       1/13/2014:	Yikes, its been 12+ years. A little update 
       			and publish on The Focus blog
			Checked it to see if it works with Windows 7. 
			It still compiles with GCC just fine.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------
PADT, Inc. provides this software to the general public as a curtesy.
Neither the company or its employees are responsible for the use or
accuracy of this software.  In short, it is free, and you get what
you pay for.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
*/
/*======================================================

   SAMPLE ANSYS INPUT DECK THAT SHOWS USAGE

finish
/clear
/file,a2stest
/PREP7  
!----------
! Build silly geometry
BLC4,-0.6,0.35,1,-0.75,0.55 
SPH4,-0.8,-0.4,0.45 
CON4,-0.15,-0.55,0.05,0.35,0.55 
VADD,all
!------------------------
! Mesh surface with non-solved (MESH200) triangles
et,1,200,4
MSHAPE,1,2D   ! Use triangles for Areas
MSHKEY,0      ! Free mesh
SMRTSIZE,,,,,5
AMESH,all
!----------------------
! Write out nodes and elements
nwrite,a2stest,node
ewrite,a2stest,elem
!--------------------
! Execute the ans2stl program
/sys,ans2stl_win.exe a2stest

======================================================= */

#include 
#include 
#include 

typedef struct vertStruct *vert;
typedef struct facetStruct *facets;
typedef struct facetListStruct *facetList;

        int     ie[8][999999];
        float   coord[3][999999];
        int	np[999999];

struct vertStruct {
  float	x,y,z;
  float	nx,ny,nz;
  int  ivrt;
  facetList	firstFacet;
};

struct facetListStruct {
  facets	facet;
  facetList	next;
};

struct facetStruct {
  float	xn,yn,zn;
  vert	v1,v2,v3;
};

facets	theFacets;
vert	theVerts;

char	stlInpFile[80];
float	xmin,xmax,ymin,ymax,zmin,zmax;
float   ftrAngle;
int	nf,nv;  

void swapit();
void readBin();
void getnorm();
long readnodes();
long readelems();

/*--------------------------------*/
main(argc,argv)
     int argc;
     char *argv[];
{
  char nfname[255];
  char efname[255];
  char sfname[255];
  char s4[4];
  FILE	*sfile;
  int	nnode,nelem,i,i1,i2,i3;
  float	xn,yn,zn;

  if(argc <= 1){
        puts("Usage:  ans2stl file_root");
        exit(1);
  }
  sprintf(nfname,"%s.node",argv[1]);
  sprintf(efname,"%s.elem",argv[1]);
  sprintf(sfname,"%s.stl",argv[1]);

  nnode = readnodes(nfname);
  nelem = readelems(efname);
  nf = nelem;

  sfile = fopen(sfname,"wb");
  fwrite("PADT STL File, Solid Binary",80,1,sfile);
  swapit(&nelem,s4);    fwrite(s4,4,1,sfile);

  for(i=0;i<nelem;i++){ 
      i1 = np[ie[0][i]];
      i2 = np[ie[1][i]];
      i3 = np[ie[2][i]];
      getnorm(&xn,&yn,&zn,i1,i2,i3);

      swapit(&xn,s4);	fwrite(s4,4,1,sfile);
      swapit(&yn,s4);	fwrite(s4,4,1,sfile);
      swapit(&zn,s4);	fwrite(s4,4,1,sfile);

      swapit(&coord[0][i1],s4);	fwrite(s4,4,1,sfile);
      swapit(&coord[1][i1],s4);	fwrite(s4,4,1,sfile);
      swapit(&coord[2][i1],s4);	fwrite(s4,4,1,sfile);

      swapit(&coord[0][i2],s4);	fwrite(s4,4,1,sfile);
      swapit(&coord[1][i2],s4);	fwrite(s4,4,1,sfile);
      swapit(&coord[2][i2],s4);	fwrite(s4,4,1,sfile);

      swapit(&coord[0][i3],s4);	fwrite(s4,4,1,sfile);
      swapit(&coord[1][i3],s4);	fwrite(s4,4,1,sfile);
      swapit(&coord[2][i3],s4);	fwrite(s4,4,1,sfile);
      fwrite(s4,2,1,sfile);
  }
  fclose(sfile);
    puts(" ");
  printf("  STL Data Written to %s.stl \n",argv[1]);
    puts("  Done!!!!!!!!!");
  exit(0);
}

void  getnorm(xn,yn,zn,i1,i2,i3)
	float	*xn,*yn,*zn;
	int	i1,i2,i3;
{
	float	v1[3],v2[3];
	int	i;

        for(i=0;i<3;i++){
	  v1[i] = coord[i][i3] - coord[i][i2];
	  v2[i] = coord[i][i1] - coord[i][i2];
	}

	*xn = (v1[1]*v2[2]) - (v1[2]*v2[1]);
	*yn = (v1[2]*v2[0]) - (v1[0]*v2[2]);
	*zn = (v1[0]*v2[1]) - (v1[1]*v2[0]);
}
long readelems(fname)
        char    *fname;
{
        long num,i;
        FILE *nfile;
        char    string[256],s1[7];

        num = 0;
        nfile = fopen(fname,"r");
		if(!nfile){
			puts(" error on element file open, bye!");
			exit(1);
		}
        while(fgets(string,86,nfile)){
          for(i=0;i<8;i++){
            strncpy(s1,&string[6*i],6);
            s1[6] = '\0';
            sscanf(s1,"%d",&ie[i][num]);
          }
          num++;
        }

        printf("Number of element read: %d\n",num);
        return(num);
}

long readnodes(fname)
        char	*fname;
{
        FILE    *nfile;
        long     num,typeflag,nval,ifoo;
        char    string[256];

        num = 0;
        nfile = fopen(fname,"r");
		if(!nfile){
			puts(" error on node file open, bye!");
			exit(1);

		}
        while(fgets(string,100,nfile)){
          sscanf(string,"%d ",&nval);
          switch(nval){
            case(-888):
                typeflag = 1;
            break;
            case(-999):
                typeflag = 0;
            break;
            default:
                np[nval] = num;
                if(typeflag){
                        sscanf(string,"%d %g %g %g",
                           &ifoo,&coord[0][num],&coord[1][num],&coord[2][num]);
                }else{
                        sscanf(string,"%d %g %g %g",
                           &ifoo,&coord[0][num],&coord[1][num],&coord[2][num]);
                        fgets(string,81,nfile);
                }
num++;
            break;
        }

        }
        printf("Number of nodes read %d\n",num);
        return(num);

}

/* A Little ditty to swap the byte order, STL files are for DOS */
void swapit(s1,s2)
     char s1[4],s2[4];
{
  s2[0] = s1[0];
  s2[1] = s1[1];
  s2[2] = s1[2];
  s2[3] = s1[3];
}

ans2stl_win_2014_01_28.zip

Creating the Nodes and Elements

I’ve created a little example macro that can be used to make an STL of deformed geometry.  If you do not want the deformed geometry, simply remove or comment out the UPGEOM command.  This macro is good for MAPDL or ANSYS Mechanical, just comment out the last line  to use it with MAPDL:

et,999,200,4

type,999

esurf,all

finish ! exit whatever preprocessor your in

! move the RST file to a temp file for the UPCOORD. Comment out if you want

! the original geometry

/copy,file,rst,,stl_temp,rst

/prep7 ! Go in to PREP7

et,999,200,4 ! Create a dummy triangle element type, non-solved (200)

type,999 ! Make it the active type

esurf,all ! Surface mesh your model

!

! Update the geometry to the deformed shape

! The first argument is the scale factor, adjust to the appropriate level

! Comment this line out if you don’t want deformed geometry

upgeom,1000,,,stl_temp,rst

!

esel,type,999 ! Select those new elements

nelem ! Select the nodes associated with them

nwrite,stl_temp,node ! write the node file

ewrite,stl_temp,elem ! Write the element file

! Run the program to convert

! This assumes your executable in in c:\temp. If not, change to the proper

! location

/sys,c:\temp\ans2stl_win.exe stl_temp

! If this is a ANSYS Mechanical code snippet, then copy the resulting STL file up to

! the root directory for the project

! For MAPDL, Comment this line out.

/copy,stl_temp,stl,,stl_temp,stl,..\..

An Example

To prove this out using modern computing technology (remember, last time I used this was in 2001) I brought up my trusty valve body model and slammed 5000 lbs on one end, holding it on the top flange.  I then inserted the Commands object into the post processing branch:

image

When the model is solved, that command object will get executed after ANSYS is done doing all of its post processing, creating an STL of the deformed geometry. Here is what it looks like in the output file. You can see what it looks like when APDL executes the various commands:

/COPY FILE FROM FILE= file.rst

TO FILE= stl_temp.rst

FILE file.rst COPIED TO stl_temp.rst

1

***** ANSYS – ENGINEERING ANALYSIS SYSTEM RELEASE 15.0 *****

ANSYS Multiphysics

65420042 VERSION=WINDOWS x64 08:39:44 JAN 14, 2014 CP= 22.074

valve_stl–Static Structural (A5)

Note – This ANSYS version was linked by Licensee

***** ANSYS ANALYSIS DEFINITION (PREP7) *****

ELEMENT TYPE 999 IS MESH200 3-NODE TRIA MESHING FACET

KEYOPT( 1- 6)= 4 0 0 0 0 0

KEYOPT( 7-12)= 0 0 0 0 0 0

KEYOPT(13-18)= 0 0 0 0 0 0

CURRENT NODAL DOF SET IS UX UY UZ

THREE-DIMENSIONAL MODEL

ELEMENT TYPE SET TO 999

GENERATE ELEMENTS ON SURFACE DEFINED BY SELECTED NODES

TYPE= 999 REAL= 1 MATERIAL= 1 ESYS= 0

NUMBER OF ELEMENTS GENERATED= 13648

USING FILE stl_temp.rst

THE SCALE FACTOR HAS BEEN SET TO 1000.0

USING FILE stl_temp.rst

ESEL FOR LABEL= TYPE FROM 999 TO 999 BY 1

13648 ELEMENTS (OF 43707 DEFINED) SELECTED BY ESEL COMMAND.

SELECT ALL NODES HAVING ANY ELEMENT IN ELEMENT SET.

6814 NODES (OF 53895 DEFINED) SELECTED FROM

13648 SELECTED ELEMENTS BY NELE COMMAND.

WRITE ALL SELECTED NODES TO THE NODES FILE.

START WRITING AT THE BEGINNING OF FILE stl_temp.node

6814 NODES WERE WRITTEN TO FILE= stl_temp.node

WRITE ALL SELECTED ELEMENTS TO THE ELEMENT FILE.

START WRITTING AT THE BEGINNING OF FILE stl_temp.elem

Using Format = 14(I6)

13648 ELEMENTS WERE WRITTEN TO FILE= stl_temp.elem

SYSTEM=

c:\temp\ans2stl_win.exe stl_temp

Number of nodes read 6814

Number of element read: 13648

STL Data Written to stl_temp.stl

Done!!!!!!!!!

/COPY FILE FROM FILE= stl_temp.stl

TO FILE= ..\..\stl_temp.stl

FILE stl_temp.stl COPIED TO ..\..\stl_temp.stl

image

The resulting STL file looks great:

image

I use MeshLab to view my STL files because… well it is free.  Do note that the mesh looks coarser.  This is because the ANSYS mesh uses TETS with midside nodes.  When those faces get converted to triangles those midside nodes are removed, so you do get a coarser looking model.

And after getting bumped from the queue a couple of times by “paying” jobs, our RP group printed up a nice FDM version for me on one of our Stratasys uPrint Plus machines:

image

It’s kind of hard to see, so I went out to the parking lot and recorded a short video of the part, twisting it around a bit:

Here is the ANSYS Mechanical project archive if you want to play with it yourself.

Other Things to Consider

Using FE Modeler

You can use FE Modeler in a couple of different ways with STL files. First off, you can read an STL file made using the method above. If you don’t have an STL preview tool, it is an easy way to check your distorted mesh.  Just chose STL as the input file format:

image

You get this:

image

If you look back up at the open dialog you will notice that it reads a bunch of mesh formats. So one thing you could do instead of using my little program, is use FE Modeler to make your STL.  Instead of executing the program with a /SYS command, simply use a CDWRITE,DB command and then read the resulting *.CDB file into FE Modeler.  To write out the STL, just set the “Target System” to STL and then click “Write Solver File”

image

You may know, or may have noticed in the image above, that FE Modeler can read other FEA meshes.  So if you are using some other FEA package, which you should not, then you can make an STL file in FE Modeler as well.

Color Contours

The next obvious question is how do I get my color contours on the plot. Right now we don’t have that type of printer here at PADT, but I believe that the dominant 3D Color printer out, the former Z-Corp and now 3D Systems machines, will read ANSYS results files. Stratasys JUST announced a new color 3D Printer that makes usable parts. Right now they don’t have a way to do contours, but as soon as they do we will publish something.

Another option is to use a /SHOW,vrml option and then convert that to STL with the color information.

Scaling

Scaling is something you should think about. Not only the scaling on your deformed geometry, but the scaling on your model for printing.  Units can be tricky with STL files so make sure you check your model size before you print.

Smoother STL Surfaces

Your FEA mesh may be kind of coarse and the resulting STL file is even coarser because of the whole midside node thing.  Most of the smoothing tools out there will also get rid of sharp edges, so you don’t want those. Your best best is to refine your mesh or using a tool like Geomagic.

Making a CAD Model from my Deformed Mesh

Perhaps you stumbled on this posting not wanting to print your model. Maybe you want a CAD model of your deformed geometry.  You would use the same process, and then use Geomagic Studio.  It actually works very well and give you a usable CAD model when you are done.

Microloaning with Kiva

kiva_121x64

We just updated our loans on www.KIVA.com, a microloan website that PADT has been a member of since 2007.

Kiva-loans-2014_01_29

Kiva takes very small loans from people, pools them together, and makes  small loans to entrepreneurs around the world.  It is a great way to make a big difference in someones life with a small donation.

You know how much we love numbers here at PADT, so here are some about our Kiva loan activity:

Attention: The internal data of table “1” is corrupted!

It is interesting to read the little loan pages and understand a bit about what the applicants are trying to do and where they are coming from. You can see our loans on our lending page:

www.kiva.org/lender/padtinc

At first $1,500 seemed like a lot of money, but over the years it has gone a long way.  Who would have thought we would be involved in pig farming in the Philippines, a Peruvian Beauty Parlor, or a Cafe in Albania?

If you want to try it, make a loan through this invitation link.  When you make a loan, $25 gets added to PADT’s loan pool.

www.kiva.org/invitedby/padtinc

 

PADT Hosts Lunch and Learn: Living in an Engineered World

PADT was pleased to host an Arizona Technology Council (AZTC) Lunch and Learn today.

EngineeringWorldTalk

The topic, “Living in an Engineered World: A look at the Impact of the Engineering Process on all Aspects of Business and How to Take Advantage of It,” attracted a diverse crowd of business owners, educators, salespeople, and others.

The gist of the talk was presented by Eric Miller, one of PADT’s owners,  advanced the theory that humans live in a world that is engineered by humans, and that one can benefit by viewing most aspects of business and life from an engineering frame of reference. It also stressed the importance of process and process optimization in today’s world, as well as the need to understand how people make decisions based on their value propositions.

The talk was followed by a lively question and answer sessions that was in some ways more thought provoking than the presentation.

a3 a2 a1

If you would like to learn more, contact eric.miller@padtinc.com.

Usable Color 3D Printed Parts Now Available with Stratasys Objet500 Connex3

We have been waiting for this day for a long time.  There have been 3D Printers out there that do multiple colors, but let’s be frank, the parts were not very strong.  Nice to look at, but not much else.

This weekend Stratasys announced the Objet500 Connex3 machine.  Based on the proven Object500 Connex this multi-material platform allows the user to use three materials, giving you a choice of 46 colors for each build.  That includes transparent material with color tinting!  You can also still mix rubber and ABS like materials.

Objet 500 machine with man and multi material 3D printed shoes

We will have more to report on this in the coming weeks, but we just wanted to get the word out: Usable Color Prototyping is here and it is bright.

If you have an immediate need, or just want to learn more, contact PADT at 480.813.4884 or shoot an email to sales@padtinc.com.

Blue glasses with tinted lenses and black rubber parts Untitled-1

PADT’s team was able to see parts made on the new device at a recent Stratasys gathering. Then they had to keep their mouths shut for two weeks.  That was hard. These parts are high-quality prototypes like you would expect from the Objet technology. But now in color.  Bright brilliant color on strong parts.  This is what many of us have been waiting for.

Here are some links to get your appetite whetted:

(Yes to our ANSYS readers. We are working on a way to get this to print results)

Customers in the News: Space Data Corp Demonstrates Communications Balloon at Near Space Alliance

CaptureIt is always great to see PADT customers in the news.  This past weekend, January 25, 2014, our long time customer Space Data Corp. launched “a 15-foot latex balloon to carry communications equipment aloft to above 65,000 feet to relay voice and data over a 600-mile range.”  This was at a meeting of the Arizona Near Space Technology Alliance, an organization we suspect may have more PADT customers as members.

Read about it here, or watch the video.

space-data-baloon

The article also points out the two of our local US Representatives, Kyrsten Sinema (D) and Matt Salmon (R) were there.  It was great to see actual bi-partisan support for local business and technology.

PADT has been providing Space Data with design, simulation, prototyping, and manufacturing consulting help since about the time the company was founded.  The company was an early adopter of the extensive use of rapid prototyping in the design and test of their systems, long before it was considered cool and called 3D Printing.

Every time we see one of their balloons go up, we feel proud to have contributed to their growth and success.

 

Efficient Engineering Data, Part 2: Setting Default Materials and Assignments aka No, You’re Not Stuck with Structural Steel for the Rest of Your Life

Longer ago than I care to admit, I wrote an article about creating and using your own material libraries in Workbench. This is the long awaited follow-up, which concerns setting the default Engineering Data materials and default material assignments in Mechanical and other analysis editors.

imageNote:
Part of the reason it’s taken me this long is that I moved to New Mexico to help staff PADT’s new office there, and to shadow Walter White. It has been a hectic, exhausting endeavor but I’m here and I’m finally settled in. If you’re in New Mexico and are interested in ANSYS, engineering services, product development, or rapid prototyping (e.g. 3D printing), please feel free to contact me.

In order to make the best use of the procedures here, you will probably want to know how to create your own material libraries. Part 1 describes how to do this. This will also work with the material libraries that come with the ANSYS installation, though.

Pick Favorites

The first step is to get into Engineering Data and expose the material libraries by clicking on the book stack button ( image ). Then, drag the materials of your choice from the appropriate library(ies) to the Favorites Data Source. These can include materials you want to have available in Mechanical by default as well as materials that you would like to consolidate into a single location for quick access. At this point, the default material availability and assignments have not been altered. These will be handled in the next couple of steps.

image

Drag and Drop Materials to Favorites

Set Default Material Availability

To specify which materials will be immediately available for assignment in future analyses, go to the Favorites Data Source and check all applicable materials in column D. Though not assigned to the immediate set of engineering data, these will be on the default list of available materials in subsequent analyses, i.e. when you create a new analysis in the same project schematic or when you exit and reopen Workbench.

image

Check to Add to Default List of Available Materials

image

Materials Immediately Available Inside Mechanical

Set Default Material Assignment

Now our most commonly used materials are immediately available in our analysis editor. But Structural Steel still lingers. In many, if not most, cases, we would prefer our default assignment to be something else.

The fix is easy. Once again, go to the Favorites Data Source, right click the material you wish to have as your default material, and select Default Solid Material (and if you’re doing Emag or CFD, you can set your default fluid or field material with the right-click menu too). Your default solid material will now replace Structural Steel in subsequent analyses.

image

Example: Aluminum 6061-T651 Set as Default Material Assignment

image

Becomes Default Material Assignment in Analysis

Note that you can stop at any step in this process. If you want to consolidate favorite materials, but don’t want to have them immediately in your analysis editor, you can do that. If you want a default list of materials to select from without specifying a default material assignment, you can do that too. More than likely, though, you’ll want to do all three.

Press Release: PADT and M-Tech Industries to Highlight Fluid-Thermal System Modeling for Mining with Flownex at 2014 SME Annual Meeting and Exhibit

987786-Flownex-SME-2014_Mine-Simulation-3We are very excited about the upcoming 2014 SME Annual Meeting and Exhibit in Salt Lake City, Utah.  Not only is this in our very own back yard (or is it our front or side yard?) it is a great place for us to show off Flownex Simulation Environment and how useful it is for simulation mining systems. Besides promoting Flownex, we will hae a booth in the exhibit area and we will be presenting a paper on some work we did with ANSYS software for mining.  Last years show in Denver was a great experience and we know this years will be as well.

To promote the event and Flownex usage in the industry, we just published the following press release:

image

The release is accompanied by two great videos that Stephen did showing the usage of Flownex on some real mining problems.

Part 1

Part 2

Also, don’t forget that we still have room in our free Denver, Colorado Introduction to Flownex Class.

As always with Flownex, contact Roy Haynie (roy.haynie@padtinc.com) to learn more.

Video Tips: Multiphysics Simulation with ANSYS Maxwell and ANSYS Mechanical – Part 2

This is Part 2 of our 2 part video series showing you a multiphysics simulation with ANSYS Maxwell and ANSYS Mechanical. In this video we take the results from ANSYS Maxwell and use it to compute the temperature distribution and finally the structural deformation due to the current through the parts.

The Part 1 video can be found here

Submit your Video Response to “What does PADT Mean to Me?”

PADt-20-Logo-Rect-500wWhen you have been doing something for 20 years, you sometimes loose track of the impact your efforts have on others.  So we came up with the idea that we should ask our customers, employees, vendors, family, friends, etc… to give us their response to the question: “What does PADT Mean to Me?”

We have prepared a very short, and somewhat silly, video explaining the concept:

Please email your submission to info@padtinc.com.  It does not have to be fancy, we just need to hear you clearly.  Please let us know what name you want us to use with your clip and if we can mention your company.  We would like to have all submissions by March 14, so that give everyone plenty of time to come up with something fun/creative/meaningful.

We will share the results at our 20th Anniversary party and on YouTube.  If we get enough early entries, we will put together a sample video to hopefully inspire others, so don’t wait to get yours submitted.

We will be posting more information on our Anniversary here in this blog.  You can find all of them by searching for #padt20.

#padt20

20th Anniversary Comments on PADT

PADt-20-Logo-Rect-500wWe are creating this blog posting for one simple reason:  As we reflect and celebrate twenty years of being in business, we want to hear from our customers, vendors, partners, and friends.

What would you like to share with the world about PADT?  A story?  An observation?  Even a criticism. We want to know what people think about this company with the funny FLA name.

Please leave your thoughts in the comments below, we can’t wait to hear from everyone.

This is the first of many blog/social media posts that we will be sending out as we reflect and celebrate the past 20 years. All will be tagged with #padt20.

Wohlers Associates Lists Top 3D Printing News of 2013

Wohlers Associates just blogged their list of the top news stories for 2013 in 3D Printing.  It is worth a read to look beyond the hype we have seen this year and focus on the stories that will be having an impact in the future:

http://wohlersassociates.com/blog/2014/01/top-3d-printing-developments-in-2013/

As a Stratasys distributor and provider of additive manufacturing services, PADT can attest to the importance of the stories listed.  The first one, the GE Fuel Nozzle, had an especially significant impact on the world of commercial additive manufacturing, especially with the Aerospace customers we work with.  In many ways, GE’s move was the tipping point for metal additive manufacturing and for companies to really look at AM as an end part manufacturing solution.

2014 is already shaping up to be a big year.  We expect to see consolidation and a weeding out in the consumer and prosumer 3D printer market, better material options across all of the technologies, and more adoption of the technology in new industries and applications.

Wholers Associates has been consulting in additive manufacturing for over 27 years and is PADT’s go-to resource for what is really going on in the AM world.

Video Tips: Multiphysics Simulation with ANSYS Maxwell and ANSYS Mechanical – Part 1

This Part 1 of 2 video shows you the first half of a multiphysics simulation using the low-frequency electromagnetics tool ANSYS Maxwell to do an eddy current analysis. Part 2 will involve taking the results of this analysis and transferring it to perform a thermal-structural analysis using ANSYS Mechanical.

Two New Job Openings at PADT: Utah Sales and IT Engineer

SONY DSCWE ARE HIRING!

PADT is starting 2014 off strong with lots of work ahead  of us.  One manifestation of this is that we are hiring for four positions, including two new positions that we just opened up this week.  Please take a look at our openings and see if they are a good fit for you, or someone you know. We have posted them in the usual places but some of our best employees have been found by word of mouth and recommendations. You can find all of our openings at any time on our website at: www.padtinc.com/about/careers.html

IT Support Engineer

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As a company focused on computer aided engineering, PADT has significant computer and network infrastructure.  With the recent growth in sales of our line of CUBE HVPC computers for simulation users, growth in business across our company, and a new initiative that we will announce this spring, our IT staff is stretched thin. Read the job description to learn more and apply yourself, or please pass this along to anyone you think might be a good fit.  This is a great chance for an experienced and talented IT professional who may be at a large company, to move to a small company environment but still work on leading edge technology.

Sales Executive, Additive Manufacturing, Utah

Stratasys_eden350_350wWe are in need of a new salesperson to represent Stratasys additive manufacturing (3D Printing) systems in Utah.  PADT has been laying the foundation for success in the state for a few years now and we are seeing strong potential sales for 2014, we just need to right person to keep growing the territory and to close the existing pipeline.  Learn more about becoming part of this revolutionary change in manufacturing by learning about the job here.

And don’t forget that we still have two other openings from the end of last year.  We have some good prospects on both but we were so busy that we did not have time to really act on them.  So there is still time to get new resumes submitted:

Experienced CFD Analysis Engineer
Electrical Engineer/Project Lead 

Video Tips: Parallel Part by Part Meshing in ANSYS v15.0

This video shows you a new capability in ANSYS v15.0 that allows multiple parts to be simultaneously meshed on multiple CPU cores…with no additional licenses required!

PADT’s Arizona Holiday Party: Celebrating 2013 and Looking Forward to 2014

photo 3Another year is winding down to a close and PADT’s Arizona staff gathered in Chandler for our annual holiday party. It is always nice to step outside of the cubical and talk with co-worker’s spouses, employees you don’t get to talk with at work, and even with the people you do spend all day with, but in a festive setting. We had already had dinners in Albuquerque and Denver, so it was now time for the bulk of the company to celebrate and reflect.

12191318392013 has been a great year for PADT.  We saw good growth across all of our businesses, doing more business with existing customers and adding a number of new customers.  Our core Simulation, Product Development, and Rapid Manufacturing business all so new and exciting growth. Some highlights include:

  • Growing sales of Flownex for thermal-fluid simulation and CUBE systems for HPC
  • Several key new ANSYS, Inc. product customers have joined our user community
  • An explosion in interest in 3D Printing and the line of systems that PADT sells that resulted in a record number of new customers.
  • We saw significant growth in Product development with several large jobs started and a few others completed.  A typical project was the SPOT Gen3 Satellite GPS Messenger.
  • The recent merger between Stratasys and Objet enabled PADT to begin offering PolyJet additive manufacturing systems.
  • We opened an office in Albuquerque, New Mexico, our second satellite office. We also moved into a larger facility in Littleton, Colorado.

After dinner we read this years gift exchange story… which maybe went a little long. But everyone ended up with something new and exciting to take home (and perhaps re-gift). The evening of great food and conversation was topped off with a little Info about Leicester race course and some recreational gambling. It turns out that some of us are luckier than others… and most of us still don’t really know how to play craps.

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As we cashed in our chips (those that still had chips) and gathered our gift-exchange presents (a talking Sheldon doll was this years big hit) many of us commented on how excited we are about 2014. Many of the investments that PADT has made in the past are starting to pay off and 2014 is looking to be a fantastic experience.

We wish all of you reading this a very Joyous Holiday Season and a peaceful and profitable 2014!