An Update on The All Things ANSYS Podcast – Episode 016

 

Published on: June 8th, 2018
With: Eric Miller
Description: The All Things ANSYS Podcast will be back in full swing in the near future, however we wanted to give you a quick heads up on where we’ve been, and how we plan on reformatting and presenting the show going forward. We love putting these together and sharing them with you all, so we will be regrouping and exploring some new options to ensure we can continue to share the high quality news, content, and discussion that you’ve come to expect from this show as we move forward.

For the time being, check out this update on the new release of ANSYS Mechanical 19.0 and 19.1, and stay tuned for more content, hopefully coming soon.

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10 Great New Features in ANSYS Mechanical 19.0 and 19.1

ANSYS Mechanical version 19.0 has been available since late January 2018, while version 19.1 was released in May. If you haven’t had a chance to check them out, we thought it would be helpful to list what we see as 10 of the top newest features. We’ll start with five new features from version 19.0 and will then round it out with five from version 19.1.

ANSYS Mechanical 19.0

1. 4 Cores HPC Solving with No Additional Licensing

Previously, you were limited to solving on 2 cores at a maximum without having additional ANSYS HPC or HPC Pack licenses. That limit has been raised to 4 cores at 19.0.
To utilize the cores while solving, from the Solution branch in Mechanical click on the Tools menu, then Solve Process Settings. Click the Advanced button. Set the Max number of utilized cores to 4 and click OK.

2. Topology Optimization Includes Inertial Loads

Topology optimization became a native option in ANSYS Mechanical in version 18.0. Topology optimization allows us to perform studies in which we preserve stiffness while reducing weight, for example. Since inertia loads are now supported in a topology optimization, one type of problem we can now solve is starting with geometry that has a mix of an inertial load (gravity in the downward direction) along with additional loading such as forces or pressures.

Solving the topology optimization and moving to the verification step we can see the optimization results (shape and contour results plot) for the combined loading.

The ability to include inertia loads adds quite a few more problems that can be considered for topology optimization.

3. Small Sliding Contact

The idea here is that if we have confidence that the contact and target elements within a contact region will not slide very much, we can turn on the small sliding assumption. This speeds up the computations because less checking is needed for the contact elements during the solution. It’s activated in the Details view for one or more contact regions. We’ve seen some marginal improvements in solution times for a couple of test models. It’s clearly worth trying this if it applies to your simulations.

4. Element Birth and Death

We now no longer have to use APDL command objects to incorporate element birth and death. If you’re not familiar with what this is, it’s the ability to selectively deactivate and/or activate portions of the finite element model to simulate forming operations, assembly, etc. Further, the implementation is fantastic in that unlike with the old MAPDL implementation, we no longer have to manually keep track of which elements have been ‘killed’ or made ‘alive’. The postprocessing in Mechanical 19.0 automatically displays only elements that are alive for a given results set.
Here is how it is implemented in the Mechanical tree, under the analysis type branch:

The entities to be killed or made alive can be selected by geometry or Named Selections. There is a handy table that shows the alive or dead status for each Element Birth and Death object once they are setup:

This animation shows a temperature results plot and demonstrates how the killed elements are made alive and automatically displayed when postprocessing:

5. Clipboard Tool

This new menu pick gives us an improved method for tasks such as selecting multiple faces. Rather than having to carefully pick all of them at once or use a combination of named selections, we can now simply select the faces that are easy to pick, add them to the clipboard, rotate the model, select more faces now that they are in view, etc.

Once all the desired faces are in the Clipboard, we simply use the Select Items in Clipboard dropdown and we can now assign a load or mesh control, etc. to the desired faces.

Note there are convenient hot keys for Adding to, Removing from, and Clearing the clipboard, shown in the screen captures of the menu dropdowns above.

ANSYS Mechanical 19.1

6. Granta Design Sample Materials

Version 19.1 adds a whole new set of sample materials from Granta. To access them, open up Engineering Data, click on the Engineering Data Sources button, and then click on the Granta Design Sample Materials button. This adds a lot more sample materials than have been available in Engineering Data previously.

7. Materials folder in Mechanical

You’ll see a new branch in the tree in Mechanical 19.1: Materials. All materials that are part of your Engineering Data set will show up in this branch. For each material defined, we can click on the Material Assignment button or right click as shown here:

One the new Assignment branch is created for a material, we can then select the bodies for which that material should be assigned. Each material has its own color which can be changed in Engineering Data if so desired.

Important note for Mechanical APDL command users: Assigning material properties using the Materials branch results in all parts with the same material property having the same MAPDL material number. This is different from prior behavior in Mechanical in which each part in the geometry tree had its own material number identified with the ‘magic’ parameter name matid. Parameter matid now no longer is unique for each part if materials area assigned using the Materials branch. There is a new ‘magic’ parameter named typeids which identifies the element type number for each part in the tree. This new parameter is actually a 1x1x1 array parameter rather than a scalar parameter, so to make use of it in a command snippet we need to add the dimension (1) to the parameter name, like this:

thtest1=typeids(1)

or

et,typeids(1),solid65

8. Result Tracking During Solution

A new, useful capability is to be able to view a result item on a body, while the solution is running. You can now insert certain results items under Solution Information and view the status of the results while the solution is progressing. If birth and death is employed it will even display just the elements that are alive as the solution progresses. Here is an example of a temperature plot on a body while a transient solution is in progress:

9. Save Animations to .wmv and .mp4 Formats

We now have two new options besides the old .avi format for exporting animation files. The .mp4 and .wmv formats both tend to produce smaller files than .avi format. When you click on the Export Video File button the new options are available in the dropdown:

10. Solution Statistics Page

Finally, there is a new Solution Statistics page, available under Solution Information when a solution has completed. This is a quick and easy way to view performance information from your solution and helps determine if more cores or more RAM could be beneficial in future solutions of the same model. Here is an example:

Conclusions

These are just a few of the enhancements that have been implemented in versions 19.0 and 19.1. These should help you be more productive with your solutions in ANSYS Mechanical as well as increase your capacity for simulating reality, and creating new geometry when it comes to topology optimization.

Getting to Know PADT: Medical Device Product Development

 This post is the thirteenth installment in our review of all the different products and services PADT offers our customers. As we add more, they will be available here.  As always, if you have any questions don’t hesitate to reach out to info@padtinc.com or give us a call at 1-800-293-PADT.

The development of medical devices is difficult.  The regulatory challenges, quality requirements,  and technical hurdles of dealing with the complex system that is the human body make the processes required to bring products for this industry to market unique and difficult. That is why PADT has a team in our Engineering Services department that is focused on one thing: Medical Device Development.

If you read our article on Product Development Services or watched the flashy video then you know how we do product development differently.  That our processes and staff are proven, that we are all about solving problems and using project management intelligently, all geared towards to deliver a complete solution.  Every one of those characteristis is true for our Medical Device team as well, we just add more on top to give our customers the confidence to work with us on their product development.

We sometimes get involved in projects all the way from defining specifications to coordinating with manufacturing. We also provide assistance at every step along the way: testing, concept modeling, trade studies, material evaluations, quality consulting, design for manufacturing, and testing to name just a few areas that we can help.  That is one of the things that makes PADT unique in this particular industries. Most companies will only do the full product development, whereas we serve as an outside resource for the whole thing, or only where our customers need additional help.

Solving the Tough Problems

There are a lot of medical device design companies out there.   We often get asked how we can stay busy in this industry, especially when we are not located in a hot-bed of device design and manufacturing like California, Boston, or Minneapolis.   The answer is simple.  Customers from those locations and other markets come to Tempe to work with us because we are good at solving the difficult problems.  Most of this capability comes from the skill and experience of our staff.  They know their stuff and they know how to systematically investigate and solve the most difficult problems.  They also have access to advanced tools like 3D Printing and world-class simulation in-house. Combine this with solid project management and a well-provisioned lab, and you have a winning combination.

Understanding Medical Devices

The other key requirement for anyone doing medical device product development is a thorough understanding of Medical Devices themselves. Every industry has its buzzwords and acronyms, but medical devices are in a category all their own. They are a bridge between the world of mechanical engineering and medicine, so they terminology and operating environment are different then say aerospace devices or consumer products.  To work on medical devices you have to understand all the physics, manufacturing, software, and electronics that every mechanical device needs. You also need to understand biology and treatment.  PADT’s staff walks that fine line between the two worlds and often serves as a translator between the end user (doctors and nurses) and engineering, even within our customer’s organizations.

Quality Centric

Quality is the most important, and least understood, unique aspect of Medical Device Product Development.  Any team attempting to bring a product to market who does not know ISO 13485 and the FDA requirements will fail.  We also know that Quality is a tool, not a barrier.  We understand the client’s quality system and adapt our processes as efficiently as possible to get value from the entire quality process.

Let us Engineer your Medical Device Innovations

Here is a powerpoint we put together last year with even more information:

Product development for medical devices is something we are just plain good at.  Large corporations and startups come to PADT to because we get the job done.  You can see some great case studies here that tell the story in the words of our customers.  Reach out to us via email (info@padtinc.com) or give us a call at 480.813.4884 and we can talk about how our team can help engineer your medical device innovation.

PADT-Medical-Overview-Portfolio-2018_02_13-1

How to Accelerate & Simplify your Antenna Impedance Matching Network Design – Webinar

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You will only have to do this once! For all future webinars, you can simply click the link, add the reminder to your calendar and you’re good to go!

ANSYS Drop Test Simulation Webinar – Recording

If you have any other questions, feel free to contact us at sales@padtinc.com, or reach PADT’s Lead Application Engineer, Manoj Mahendran directly at manoj.mahendran@padtinc.com.

Understanding Big Data: You have it, but how do you get value from it?

The idea of Big Data, so much information that traditional data analysis tools cannot process it, has been around for a while now. We collect data, we store it, and we plan to use it. There must be value in all that information. Many of us are actively saving terabytes of data. In “Understanding Big Data: You have it, but how do you get value from it?” I take a look at the four critical questions you can answer with your mountains of ones and zeros.

The Beatles and other world-changing revolutions

The problem with most business revolutions is you do not realize you are in the middle of one until you are in the middle of one. We are in the middle of so many right now, it is hard to keep up. While taking a flight and listening to some Beatles, I had a thought about “The Beatles and other world-changing revolutions.”

Press Release: Additive Manufacturing Users Group Selects PADT’s Rey Chu as a DINO Award Recipient

You know you have been doing something for a while when you win an award called the DINO!  3D Printing has been around for over thirty years, and the Additive Manufacturing User Group (AMUG) has been the user-driven organization that has been a foundation of the industry since its beginning.  At their 30th annual conference this year, they handed out awards to individuals who made a significant contribution to Additive Manufacturing.

We are very honored that PADT Co-Founder and Co-Owner, Rey Chu, received one of those awards.  DINO stands for Distinguished INnovator Operator. We agree with AMUG that ““Rey’s contribution to additive manufacturing innovation throughout his career made his selection a simple choice for our awards committee.”

Rey started his three decades in the industry by initiating the Rapid Prototyping Lab at AlliedSignal Engines in Phoenix thirty years ago, now Honeywell Aerospace. In 1994 he co-founded PADT, bringing his Additive Manufacturing experience to our customers for almost twenty-five years now.

Anyone who has been a PADT 3D Printing customer knows that what sets our services apart is our deep technical knowledge about the technologies and our dedication to delivering an outstanding product.  If you have not experienced our world class services for SLA, SLS, FDM, PolyJet, DLS, and Metal Additive Manufacturing, please contact us to see how a team led by a seasoned veteran gets things done.

Please find the official press release on this new partnership below and here in PDF and HTML

As always, just give us a call at 480.813.4884 or send an email to info@padtinc.com to learn more

Press Release:

Additive Manufacturing Users Group Selects PADT’s Rey Chu as a DINO Award Recipient

The Award Celebrates Seasoned Innovators of 3D Printing

TEMPE, Ariz., May 22, 2018 ─ Phoenix Analysis and Design Technologies (PADT) today announced that its Co-founder and Principal, Rey Chu, has been selected as a recipient of the Additive Manufacturing User Group’s (AMUG) DINO (Distinguished INnovator Operator) award for additive manufacturing expertise and service. The 2018 DINO’s were presented at AMUG’s 30th annual user group conference in St. Louis, Missouri. Chu joins a select group of only 149 DINO recipients selected in AMUG’s 30-year history.

“To be a DINO, one must advance and give back to the industry, as well as support AMUG and its members,” said Paul Bates, president, AMUG. “Rey’s contribution to additive manufacturing innovation throughout his career made his selection a simple choice for our awards committee.”

Chu was an early adopter of additive manufacturing, bringing stereolithography to Allied Signal Engines in 1988.  With thirty years in the industry, he is a recognized leader who has been a key contributor in every step of 3D Printing’s evolution. As Chu enters his fourth decade in additive manufacturing, he spends his time traveling the world evaluating new technologies and bringing innovative 3D printed parts to his customers and user communities.

“I have dedicated my professional career to researching and improving the impact that additive manufacturing has on design, engineering and manufacturing across all industries,” said Chu. “AMUG’s recognition of my contributions to this technology is very humbling, and I am very proud to be a part of their community.”

As one of the three founders of PADT in 1994, Chu brought his expertise to the company and built one of the most well-respected 3D Printing service providers in the industry. Chu and his manufacturing team at PADT have worked hand-in-hand with new technology providers, serving as beta testers and early adopters of FDM, SLS, PolyJet, and now DLS technology.  He also led the effort to bring PADT’s SCA (Support Cleaning Apparatus) devices to market; managing design and production for these effective and dependable accessories that effortlessly dissolve away all of the support material from 3D Printed parts.

About Phoenix Analysis and Design Technologies

Phoenix Analysis and Design Technologies, Inc. (PADT) is an engineering product and services company that focuses on helping customers who develop physical products by providing Numerical Simulation, Product Development, and 3D Printing solutions. PADT’s worldwide reputation for technical excellence and experienced staff is based on its proven record of building long-term win-win partnerships with vendors and customers. Since its establishment in 1994, companies have relied on PADT because “We Make Innovation Work.” With over 80 employees, PADT services customers from its headquarters at the Arizona State University Research Park in Tempe, Arizona, and from offices in Torrance, California, Littleton, Colorado, Albuquerque, New Mexico, Austin, Texas, and Murray, Utah, as well as through staff members located around the country. More information on PADT can be found at www.PADTINC.com.

# # #

Media Contact
Alec Robertson
TechTHiNQ on behalf of PADT
585-281-6399
alec.robertson@techthinq.com
PADT Contact
Eric Miller
PADT, Inc.
Principal & Co-Owner
480.813.4884
eric.miller@padtinc.com

The age of large format 3D printing is here, and it is going to be huge

Several recently commercialized technologies have made the dream of being able to print large, we are talking feet instead of inches, parts a reality. In fact “The age of large format 3D printing is here, and it is going to be huge.”

In praise of cut, copy, and paste

We use the clipboard on our computers and phones every day and over the years it may have saved days if not weeks of cumulative time. I felt like it was time to speak “In praise of cut, copy, and paste.”

Drop Test Simulation: Analyze Stress & Deformation without Breaking Your Device – Webinar

Don’t miss this informative presentation – Secure your spot today!
Register Here

If this is your first time registering for one of our Bright Talk webinars, simply click the link and fill out the attached form. We promise that the information you provide will only be shared with those promoting the event (PADT).

You will only have to do this once! For all future webinars, you can simply click the link, add the reminder to your calendar and you’re good to go!

Phoenix Business Journal: Marketing Gold, “It’s not about the Nail,” and Vagueness

Busy times here at PADT, so three articles have gone out in the Phoenix Business Journal that we have not highlighted here on the Blog.  Without further comment, here are the last three articles published:

Marketing Gold

A lot of effort can go into marketing a technology company, and every once in a while you hit marketing gold, and you see real revenue from your efforts. Revenue you would not have otherwise seen. Over the years, when we have hit gold, we executed on the “2 key steps to achieving marketing gold.”

“It’s not about the Nail”

A few weeks back, my post in this guest blog was a bit of a rant about how frustrated I get when people just say, “it sucks” and they do not give details on what is wrong or offer a solution. The problem is, I was wrong. I explore why I was wrong in “Sometimes it is not about the nail” and explore a video meme that had a big impact on me.

Vagueness

Customers can be vague. Due to no fault of their own, they are vague about what they want and how they want it. For a technology company like PADT, it can be a real problem. “Get comfortable with customer vagueness” takes a look at how we deal with the reality of finding certainty when things just are not defined yet.

Exploring RAPID 2018 in Fort Worth, TX

Waking up at 3 A.M. isn’t something I like to do often. However, for this conference I was about to attend, it was worth the early rise! Caffeine is a must to get through a long day of walking around and being educated by all the different new and old manufacturers of 3D printers. If you have been around 3D printing, you know there are really two conferences that are above the rest; AMUG and RAPID. Here are some of the things that were announced that I believe are the most significant at RAPID.

Stratasys:

Stratasys didn’t disappoint this year in introducing a new carbon fiber 3D printer, material, and metal technology that will be coming in a year+. We are very familiar with the Nylon 12 Carbon Fiber reinforced material that Stratasys has. It is THE best Nylon 12 carbon fiber material on the market and there are a few factors as to why that is the case. One is that they are using longer strands of Carbon Fiber than the competitor along with 35% carbon fiber filled parts compared to 15%. Soluble support is huge for this material as well, along with 2 to 5 times faster printer speeds. Check out how One Wheel is using this printer to help with manufacturing their cool skateboard:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tOojDgd7KVE

ANTERO 800 is the new material that Stratasys released recently. This material is being used in many amazing ways. Lockheed Martin/NASA/Stratasys/PADT collaborated in a very successful task to get flight approved hardware for one of the next missions to space. Below is the full story on this new and exciting ESD version of Antero 800 FDM material. Could your company also benefit from using this type of material? We would like to help!

http://www.3ders.org/articles/20180418-lockheed-martin-padt-stratasys-to-3d-print-over-100-parts-for-nasas-orion-capsule.html

Vero Magenta V and Vero Yellow V are the new Polyjet materials to help with getting more vibrant colors along with deeper red and brighter yellow. 500,000 color combinations can be achieved now with these 2 materials that have been improved upon. Absolutely beautiful parts can be made with a Stratasys J750 or J735.

Metal We have been asking (and have been asked) for metal for the longest time! When is Stratasys going to jump into the metal game? One of the main reasons why I went to RAPID this year was to see Stratasys Metal parts. They did not disappoint. As far as what density these metal parts are, the process for printing, and when a machine will be available, that is still the big unknown. One thing mentioned at the conference is that they are wanting to make metal 3D printing affordable to all with the ability to 3D print metal 80% cheaper than anything available right now. How this compares to what Desktop Metal, Mark Forged, HP, and others who proclaim to make metal parts cheaper than the Laser or Electron Beam options is yet to be known. Stratasys wants to be able to provide value to the metal market by focusing on areas that are lacking, which is Aluminum. Always good to have competition against the large companies of metal as it makes everyone get better at what they are doing. Read more about this machine and what Phil Reeves (VP of Strategic Consulting from Stratasys) has to say in an exclusive interview with TCT. Also below are a few pictures I took in the Stratasys booth of their metal parts that were on display.

www.tctmagazine.com/tct-events/3d-printing-at-rapid-tct/stratasys-metal-3d-printing/

 

 

 

 

 

 

Software was featured big time at RAPID because it unlocks the ability to 3D print amazing parts like this that was featured in the EOS booth. Lattice structures and topology optimized parts!

There were a lot of companies present at RAPID that highlighted where the industry is headed. Materials with vibrant color capabilities was one such area receiving a lot of attention. While competitors have introduced machines that are capable of printing in a wide variety of colors, they still fall short when compared to the Stratasys Polyjet offerings. Machines such as the J750 and J735 both offer a similar range of color compared to other companies on the market, but surpass them when it comes to material options, applications, and overall usability.

I enjoyed talking with all the major 3D printer manufactures at RAPID. One questions I would ask each of them is, what makes your system better than the competitors? I loved hearing the sales pitch about their machines and there was some great insight gained by asking this.At the end of the day, it all comes down to how you are wanting to use the 3D printer. At PADT we have many different 3D printers, and while we see and understand the appeal of the various different offerings on the market today, there is a reason why we continue to resell and support the brands we do. Let us know how we can help you out and any questions that you have with 3D printing.

What defines a prototype? 2018 UofA Engineering Design Day

Last week I had the distinct privilege to head down to the University of Arizona and help judge projects for the 2018 Engineering Design Day.  It is always fun to see all the different, multidisciplinary projects that combine teams from the mechanical, electrical, biomedical, optical, chemical, mining, and environmental departments.  Projects range from a new Secure Wireless Protocol, to autonomous UAVs, to medical devices of all types, to automated manufacturing process equipment used to cover electronics with epoxy. That last team had the forethought to demonstrate the equipment by programming it to put ketchup on hot dogs to give to the hungry judges. Good job, team!

In the morning, groups of judges visit 5 design teams and score their presentations and projects on a number of criteria.  They also decide if any of those teams should be nominated for any of the 27 cash awards given out this year.  In the afternoon, the same groups of judges go around to each of the nominated groups for a specific award and judge the project based on the criteria for that award. PADT sponsors the Phoenix Analysis & Design Technologies Award for Best Use of Prototyping, which this year, went to the Noncontact Detection of Bioelectric Fields project team. This innovative product is able to detect and monitora human heartbeat from a distance without the usual EKG wires and probes.

This was my sixth year judging, and I am always impressed with the amount of work and skill that the students put into their projects. I am also surprised each year by seemingly on-going confusion over what constitutes a physical prototype, not only from students but from the industry judges.  Among ten other nominations was the Laser-Guided Ankle Positioning for Total Ankle Arthroplasty team, which won the Raytheon Award for Best Overall Design.  These two teams, the winner and the runner up, stood out from the rest because in their presentations they used one small phrase for which I am always listening; “We made this to see if…”, or “to try out …”, or “to find out…”   They made a prototype specifically to learn from it.

 

Noncontact Detection of Bioelectric Fields Design Team (not in order): Kyle James Bachelor, James Norrid Lacey, Khalid Mobarak Omer, James Samuel Pelham, Bernd Francisco Steklis (I’m the young guy in the yellow.)

Since PADT is the southwest leader in 3D printing and rapid prototyping technologies, many of the nominations are made because the team had a large amount, or good use of, 3D printing in their final design.  The teams may even have jumped directly to 3D printing as a first pass, but many times much less expensive material could have been used. (i.e. don’t 3D print a $35 tubular housing when a $2 piece of PVC will fit the bill.)  Most of the other teams get nominated for the Best Use of Prototyping Award because they had many iterations of their design.  “Our first one broke, so we added a support here on the next one,” is a very common phrase heard in the presentations.  In my opinion, that constitutes a lack of foresight, planning, and analysis, but not a good use of a prototype.

The best prototype is one that is not only inexpensive but made to gather specific information or to be configured quickly to try out different scenarios. The winning team this year used a breadboard circuit first to layout all their electronics. They then converted to a pin-board to quickly make sure that they could isolate their components from the sensor signals when everything was packed in tighter, before following through with the final PCB design.  (See guys, I was listening.)  The ankle positioning team printed several individual pieces of the system to then have an orthopedic surgeon try out the different configurations to see what worked best and get his input on any missing features needed for the final design.  Last year’s winners of this award made an esophageal guidance system so doctors would know if they were in the esophagus or the trachea.  Their final product was an incredibly small sensor, but the first thing they did was use two beakers and a salt-bridge to see if they could tell the acidity level accurately enough to distinguish the two environments. They then made a full prototype of the proposed sensor array that was about 50 times larger than the final product. It was much easier to build and test, and modify, the larger prototype than the miniaturized final sensor array.  These are all good examples of using physical prototypes.

I was glad to see that we had only eleven nominees this year, down from 21 last year. I look forward to seeing if the trend continues next year as the judges listen for the phrases above.  Of course, I meant to write this article last year when I came back from Design Day, and the year before that, but I’ll talk about procrastination in my next article.  …when I get around to get it.

ANSYS Technical Support Team from PADT Recognized as Silver Customer Service Department of the Year in the American Business Awards

We are honored, pleased, and humbled to announce that PADT won a very special national award, a 2018 Silver Stevie for our ANSYS Technical Support Team.  This is a very special award for us because what it recognized goes to the heart and soul of who PADT is.  Technical support across the company is where we put our blood, sweat, and sometimes tears.  For ANSYS, Stratasys 3D Printers, SCA’s, scanners, or consulting; whatever product or service it is that we support for customers, how we interact with those customers so that they can be successful with those products and services is really what makes PADT different.

And now a bunch of independent and outside judges looked at what we do and how we do it, and they said: Outstanding Job! In fact, they said, “PADT defines what premium customer service looks like.”   As an ANSYS Elite Channel Partner, our technical support is key to keeping and growing customers.  These tools are incredibly capable and diverse. Also, they are not cheap. When a customer purchases ANSYS software they expect a higher level of service, and this award confirms that we deliver.

The official award was: Silver Stevie (R) Winner: Customer Service Department of the Year – Computer Software – Up to 2,500 Employees

Our customers also agree, based on the response to surveys that we send them when support tickets are closed, 92% of respondents said we solved their problem and 96% were satisfied or very satisfied. Having great customers with real and challenging issues is also key to our success. And we would not have received this award without backup from our backup, the ANSYS Customer Excellence team around the world. Without their help, we literally would not have had answers for our customers.

Everyone who does support earned this award.  But, their families also deserve a big thank you. thanks. Doing tech support is hard and can be frustrating.  You are basically taking on other peoples problems and trying to fix them. All day. Every day.  And sometimes we take that home. Sometimes our engineers will check a test run at 2:00 am. Or they will get an idea at the dinner table and send an email.

And although we applied for and won an award that focused on our ANSYS team, the same outstanding support is supplied to all of our customers. It is one of the key ways that “We Make Innovation Work.”

Here is a link to the Stevie Awards page itself: Check out the other companies. We are very happy to be listed with them.   You can also find links there to the process, and especially the judging.  We had to submit a lot of data.

You can read the official press release here or here as a PDF.

Do you want award-winning support for your ANSYS products? If you are in the Southwestern US and you are not currently our customers, contact us and we would be honored to have you join our group of happy customers.  Not an ANSYS user? Let’s talk about how to get these fantastic tools into your organization.  And don’t worry, as stated above, this level of service is available for everything PADT does, so reach out and let’s see how we can work together.

Contact us at 480.813.4884 or info@padtinc.com

 

Press Release:

ANSYS Technical Support Team from PADT Recognized as
Silver Customer Service Department of the Year
in the American Business Awards

Globally Recognized Provider of Numerical Simulation, Product Development and 3D Printing Services Honored for
Quality and Speedy Engagement with Customers

TEMPE, Ariz., May 3, 2018 ─ Phoenix Analysis and Design Technologies (PADT) today announced its ANSYS Technical Support team received a Silver award in the Customer Service Department of the Year category in this year’s American Business Awards. Because PADT is an ANSYS Elite Channel Partner and a globally recognized provider of numerical simulation, product development, and 3D printing services; top-notch support is essential for bridging the gap between customers and the technology that PADT represents.

“Our simulation support team is constantly learning new tools and technologies, distributing resources to fit customer needs, answering questions and taking all steps necessary to ensure fluid customer experiences,” said Ted Harris, manager, Simulation Support, PADT. “I’m incredibly proud of my team and their dedication to helping our customers do amazing things with their ANSYS software tools.”

One of the keys to PADT’s success with simulation support is speedy engagement with clients. The team never leaves client questions unanswered and provides prompt, high-quality feedback on any issues that arise. PADT’s simulation support team makes it a top priority to keep customers informed of progress, give them quick fixes that allow them to keep working, and then take the time to provide a long-term solution.

Ted Harris Leads the Simulation Support group at PADT, which includes the ANSYS Technical Support Team that won this award.

All members of the PADT simulation support team have also earned one or more ANSYS product support certifications, which helps them better educate customers about ANSYS products. Because PADT sells premium products, the team understands that premium service must follow. The team’s application engineers also attend PADT’s sales calls to help communicate the advantages of ANSYS technology and how customers can better use it to drive product development.

The American Business Awards are the premier business awards program both nationally and internationally. The program was founded in 2002 to honor and recognize the exceptional achievements and positive contributions of both organizations and working professionals.

About Phoenix Analysis and Design Technologies

Phoenix Analysis and Design Technologies, Inc. (PADT) is an engineering product and services company that focuses on helping customers who develop physical products by providing Numerical Simulation, Product Development, and 3D Printing solutions. PADT’s worldwide reputation for technical excellence and experienced staff is based on its proven record of building long-term win-win partnerships with vendors and customers. Since its establishment in 1994, companies have relied on PADT because “We Make Innovation Work.” With over 80 employees, PADT services customers from its headquarters at the Arizona State University Research Park in Tempe, Arizona, and from offices in Torrance, California, Littleton, Colorado, Albuquerque, New Mexico, Austin, Texas, and Murray, Utah, as well as through staff members located around the country. More information on PADT can be found at www.PADTINC.com.

About the Stevie Awards

Stevie Awards are conferred in seven programs: the Asia-Pacific Stevie Awards, the German Stevie Awards, The American Business Awards®, The International Business Awards®, the Stevie Awards for Women in Business, the Stevie Awards for Great Employers, and the Stevie Awards for Sales & Customer Service. Stevie Awards competitions receive more than 10,000 entries each year from organizations in more than 60 nations. Honoring organizations of all types and sizes and the people behind them, the Stevies recognize outstanding performances in the workplace worldwide. Learn more about the Stevie Awards at http://www.StevieAwards.com.

Sponsors of The 2018 American Business Awards include HCL America, John Hancock Financial Services and SoftPro.

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Media Contact
Alec Robertson
TechTHiNQ on behalf of PADT
585-281-6399
alec.robertson@techthinq.com
PADT Contact
Eric Miller
PADT, Inc.
Principal & Co-Owner
480.813.4884
eric.miller@padtinc.com