Phoenix Business Journal: Security – This is the biggest challenge for the Internet of Things

pbj-phoenix-business-journal-logoThis is our final post in a series on The Internet of Things, or IoT.  In “This is the biggest challenge for the Internet of Things” I take a look at the monster that keeps IoT companies up at night – Security.  In the end, security is a big concern when designing your IoT device, but one that can be easily addressed with the right experts, systems, and planning.

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Money Radio: Business for Breakfast Interviews PADT’s Eric Miller

money_radioKen Morgan and Mark Asher of Money Radio interviewed PADT’s Eric Miller to learn more about what we do here and how “We Make Innovation Work” as part of the Business Leader Spotlight.

Listen to the interview here:

 

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The Record Reporter: Simulation Solutions

record-reporter-logoPADT’s Ward Rand and Eric Miller were interviewed recently by Chris Gilfallan of  “The Record Reporter” about what PADT does and how it impacts the local product development and intellectual property community. It ended up being a great overview and is aimed at helping the Arizona legal profession understand a bit more about what we do.   If you have a subscription you can read the article here.

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Phoenix Business Journal: How to deal with all that data from your Internet of Things device

pbj-phoenix-business-journal-logoThe next step in our look at the Internet of Things, or IoT, is what to do with all that data.  Having sensors track something is great, but it makes a lot of ones and zeros.  Saying “it is Big Data” doesn’t solve the problem.  “How to deal with all that data from your Internet of Things device” I take a look at how planning and using the right tools can give you a handle for this critical part of IoT products.

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Spinning Gears: 3D Printing Awards for 2016 AZ SciTech Festival Sponsors

SciTech-Festival-Award-2016-2For several years now PADT has 3D Printed special thank you awards for the fantastic companies that sponsor the Arizona SciTech Festival.  This year we decided to stick with the color of the Stratasys Connex3 but add some moving parts. This gear design spins around and was made as one part, we just wash the support material out of the gaps between parts.

This is a great example of going directly from a CAD model to a custom part.  Each award has the recipient’s name printed on the smaller gear.  Everything was designed in an hour or so and it took about another hour to add in the 30 or so names.  We think these may be the best awards we have made so far.

SciTech-Festival-Award-2016-1

SciTech-Festival-Award-2016-3

Here is a video showing off how they spin:

Awards are kind of simple and fun. But the same technology is applied by PADT to help our customers design and build better medical devices, rockets, aircraft engines, computers, and pretty much any physical product you can think of.  Give us a call at 1-800-293-PADT or email info@padtinc.com to see how “We Make Innovation Work”

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Unexpected Joys at Rapid 2016

While much has been (justifiably) written about HP and XJet releasing new, potentially game-changing products at RAPID 2016, I wanted to write this post about some of the smaller, unexpected joys that I discovered. If I sound overly enthusiastic about the people and companies behind them, it is likely due to the fact that I wrote this on the flight back, staring out at the clouds and reflecting on what had been a wonderful trip: I own no locks, stocks or barrels in any of these companies.

1. Essentium Materials – Carbon Nanotubes and Microwaves to improve FDM mechanical properties
Over the past year, I have studied, written and made presentations about the challenges of developing models for describing Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM) given their complex and part-specific meso-structure. And while I worked on developing analytical and numerical techniques for extracting the best performance from parts in the presence of significant anisotropy, the team at Essentium has developed a process to coat FDM filaments with Carbon nanotubes and extrude them in the presence of microwave radiation. In the limited data they showed for test specimens constructed of unidirectional tool-paths, they demonstrated significant reduction in anisotropy and increase in strength for PLA. What I liked most about their work is how they are developing  this solution on a foundation of understanding the contributions of both the meso-structure and inter-filament strength to overall part performance. Essentium was awarded the “RAPID Innovations award”, first among the 27 exhibitors that competed and are, in my opinion, addressing an important problem that is holding back greater expansion of FDM as a process in the production space.
Website: http://essentiummaterials.com/

2. Hyrel 3D – Maker meets Researcher meets The-Kid-in-All-of-Us
I only heard of Hyrel 3D a few days prior to RAPID, but neglected to verify if they were exhibiting at RAPID and was pleasantly surprised to see them there. Consider the options this 3D printer has that you would be hard pressed to find in several 3D printers combined: variable extrusion head temperatures (room temp to 450 C), sterile head options for biological materials, a 6W laser (yes, a laser), spindle tools, quad head dispensing with individual flow control and UV crosslinking options. Read that again slowly. This is true multiple degree-of-freedom material manipulation. What makes their products even more compelling is the direct involvement of the team and the community they are building up over time, particularly in academia, across the world, and the passion with which they engage their technology and its users.
Website: http://www.hyrel3d.com/

3. Technic-Print: New Chemistry for Improved FDM Support Removal
If you manufacture FDM parts with soluble supports, keep reading. A chemist at Technic Inc. has developed a new solution that is claimed to be 400% faster than the current Sodium-Hydroxide solution we use to dissolve parts. Additionally, the solution is cited as being cleaner on the tank, leaving no residue, has a color indicator that changes the solution’s color from blue to clear. And finally, through an additional agent, the dissolved support material can be reclaimed as a clump and removed from the solution, leaving behind a solution that has a pH less than 9. Since PADT manufactures one of the most popular machines that are used to dissolve these supports that unbeknown to us, were used in the testing and development of the new solution, we had an enriching conversation with the lead chemist behind the solution. I was left wondering about the fundamental chemistry behind color changing, dissolution rates for supports and the reclaiming of support – and how these different features were optimized together to develop a usable end-solution.
Website: http://www.technic.com/techni-print-lp

 

4. Project Pan: Computationally Efficient Metal Powder Bed Fusion Simulation
I presented a literature review at AMUG (another Additive Manufacturing conference) last month, on the simulation of the laser-based powder bed fusion. At the time, I thought I had captured all the key players between the work being done at Lawrence Livermore National Labs by Wayne King’s group, the work of Brent Stucker at 3DSIM and the many academics using mostly commercially available software (mostly ANSYS) to simulate this problem. I learned at RAPID that I had neglected to include a company called “Project Pan” in my review. This team emerged from Prof. Pan Michaleris’s academic work. In 2012, he started a company that was acquired by Autodesk two months ago. In a series of 3 presentations at RAPID, Pan’s team demonstrated their simulation techniques (at a very high level) along with experimental validation work they had done with GE, Honeywell and others through America Makes and other efforts. What was most impressive about their work was both the speed of their computations and the fact that this team actually had complex part experimental validations to back up their simulation work. What most users of the powder bed fusion need is information on temperatures, stresses and distortion – and within time frames of a few hours ideally. It seems to me that Pan and his team took an approach that delivers exactly that information and little else using different numerical methods listed on their site (novel Hex8 elements, an element activation method and intelligent mesh refinement) that were likely developed by Pan over the years in his academic career and found the perfect application, first in welding simulation and then in the powder bed fusion process. With the recent Autodesk acquisition, it will be interesting to see how this rolls out commercially. Details of some of the numerical techniques used in the code can be found at their website, along with a list of related publications.

Website: http://pancomputing.com/

5. FDA Participation: Regulating through education and partnership
On a different note from the above, I was pleasantly surprised by the presence of the FDA, represented by Matthew Di Prima, PhD. He taught part of a workshop I attended on the first day, took the time to talk to everyone who had an interest and also gave a talk of his own in the conference sessions, describing the details of the recently released draft guidance from the FDA on 3D printing in medical applications. It was good to connect the regulatory agency to a person who clearly has the passion, knowledge, intelligence and commitment to make a difference in the Additive Manufacturing medical community. Yes, the barriers to entry in this space are high (ISO certifications, QSR systems, 510(k) & Pre-Market Approvals) but it seems clear that the FDA, at least as represented by Dr. Di Prima, are doing their best to be a transparent and willing partner.
Website: http://www.fda.gov/MedicalDevices/ProductsandMedicalProcedures/3DPrintingofMedicalDevices/default.htm

What really makes a trip to a conference like RAPID worth it are the new ideas, connections and possibilities you come away with that you may not stumble upon during your day job – and on that account, RAPID 2016 did not disappoint. As a line in one of my favorite song’s goes:

“We’ll never know, unless we grow.
There’s too much world outside the door.”
– Fran Healy (Travis, “Turn”).

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Live Webinar: Stratasys and Aerospace Manufacturing & Design

stratasys-SSYS-TYPEMARK-rgb-400x

Next week, Stratasys will be hosting a live webinar with Aerospace Manufacturing and Design.  Hear from drone manufacturer Monarch about the competitive advantages they have gained by using Stratasys 3D Printing in their design process.

Register Here

Monarch is a drone manufacturer who uses 3D printing to provide a wide range of application-focused drone services for the agriculture, energy and land survey industries.  Building these drones with the use of 3D printing gives them the ability to produce a wide range of drones for specialized applications and build custom drones in a short period of time, giving them a tremendous advantage over the competition.  Monarch chose the Stratasys Fortus 400mc 3D printer because of its ability to build large parts that are strong and rugged enough to fly their drones.  They have taken advantage of these capabilities to design and build drones for special applications that include inspecting crops, wind turbines and solar panels, aerial surveying, accident and crime scene mapping, historical building documentation and many others.

When: May 25th at 1:00pm EST

Register Here

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Just One CUBE With Just One Click! A 1.3x Speedup For ANSYS® Mechanical™

Greetings from the HPC numerical simulation proving grounds of PADT, Inc. in Tempe, Arizona. While bench marking the very latest version of ANSYS® Mechanical™ I learned something very significant and I need to share this information with you right now.As I gazed down on the data outputs from the new solve.out files, I began to notice something. Yes change indeed, something was different, something had changed.

A brief pause for emphasis, in regards in overall ANSYS® productivity and amazing improvements please read this post.

However, pertaining to this blog post, I am focusing on one very important HPC performance metric to me. It is one of the many HPC performance metrics that I have used when creating a balanced HPC server for engineering simulation.. But wait there is more! so please wait just a little bit longer, for very soon I will post even more juicy pieces of data garnered from taken from these new ANSYS® benchmark solver files.

To recap in all of its bullets points & glories:

  • For today and just for today, we are focusing on just one of the performance metrics.
    • The Time Spent Computing The Solution!
  • This 1.3x speedup in solve times was achieved using just one CUBE workstation and with just one click!
    • Open ANSYS®and while you are creating your solve.
    • Select, withjust one click either the INTEL MPI or IBM Platform MPI.
    • Next, run your test repeat as necessary using whichever MPI version that you did not start your test with.

The ANSYS® Mechanical™ Benchmark Description:

  • V15sp-5
    • Sparse solver, symmetric matrix, 6000k DOFs, transient, nonlinear, structural analysis with 1 iteration
    • GPU Accelerator or Co-Processor enabled for: NVIDIA and Intel Phi
    • A large sized job for direct solvers, should run incore on machines with 128 GB or more of memory, good test of processor flop speed if running incore and I/O if running out-of-core

CUBE ANSYS Numerical Simulation Appliance Used:

The ANSYS® Mechanical™ Benchmark Results:


TIME SPENT COMPUTING THE SOLUTION TIME SPENT COMPUTING THE SOLUTION
IBM Platform MPI INTEL MPI
Cores 2016 CUBE w16i-v4 2016 CUBE w16i-v4 This Speedup is…X faster!
2 396.1 380.9 1.04
4 239.7 229.6 1.04
6 210.1 196.7 1.07
8 182.9 168.7 1.08
10 167.2 161.4 1.04
12 167.1 160.7 1.04
14 196.1 151.3 1.30
16 184.7 161.7 1.14

justonecubejustoneclickspeedup

Wow! using these latest 14nm INTEL® XEON®  CPU’s, phew, I have been forever changed! As you can see from the data above, in just one simple click, changing from the IBM Platform MPI to using INTEL MPI and look! the benchmark time spent computing times are faster! A 1.3x Speedup!

Now in this specific benchmark example along with the use of the latest  ANSYS® Mechanical achieving a 1.3x speedup without spending another penny is very wise and not so foolish.

Disclaimer: Please check with your ANSYS Software Sales Representative for the very latest on solver updates and information. Because some of the models and compatibility can very on the . You may need to use the MS-MPI, INTEL-MPI or IBM Platform MPI for your distributed solving. If you are not sure please contact your local ANSYS® Corporate Software Sales or ANSYS® Software Channel Partner that was assigned specifically to you and/or your company.

References:

http://www.ansys.com/Solutions/Solutions-by-Role/IT-Professionals/Platform-Support/Benchmarks-Overview/ANSYS-Mechanical-Benchmarks

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Phoenix Business Journal: Connectivity – What makes the Internet of Things a big deal

pbj-phoenix-business-journal-logoIn this second article on the Internet of Things, or IoT, we take a look at ways you can connect a smart device to the internet.  “Connectivity: What makes the Internet of Things a big deal” gives some basic information on options and talks about the important decisions you need to make when developing your connectivity plan.

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Synergy in Action, or How PADT is More than the Sum of its Parts

PADT-Company-Photo-2016-01-600wPADT talks a lot about synergy as a key strength and a key element of the value we provide to our customers. Our three departments, Manufacturing, Services, and Sales, are in constant communication, always leveraging one another’s expertise to solve problems. Strong internal relationships — a consequence of being under the same roof — precipitate easy and abundant information and resource sharing. Communication, paradigm, alignment, synergy: clear as day.

But what does any of that mean?

When a PADT product development customer meets us for the first time, he or she may be shown a slide that looks like this:

synergy-f01

Strong bilateral communication among the Product Development, 3D Printing, and Analysis groups means that the project is enriched by contributions from experts across several fields, multiplying the value we add in the development process. For instance, the product will likely someday run into a sticky problem without a clear solution. PADT can attack it from multiple angles, such as design adjustment, finite element analysis (FEA) optimization, and the iterative testing of 3D printed prototypes.

Ok, but still: what does any of that mean?

A longtime customer of PADT’s product development group recently ran into an urgent problem without a clear path to a solution. Their manufacturing partner called them and said that a particular subassembly in their design will cost three times more than expected, which would raise the price of the product above the maximum the market would bear. PADT was presented with the problem: how do we reduce the subassembly cost by 66% while maintaining overall performance, and how do we confidently select a solution in under a week?

PADT’s three engineering groups jumped in to help.

The Product Development group held a brainstorming session and came out with two adjustments to bring overall cost down. First, the subassembly of three bonded unique steel parts would be replaced by a single injection molded plastic part. This change reduces component cost to within the target, but also significantly reduces the final assembly’s structural integrity.

synergy-f02

Reduction of 3 parts to 1 part

Secondly, a plastic stiffener truss was added between components to mitigate the reduction in overall stiffness. This change adds a little assembly cost, but also significantly increases the final assembly’s structural integrity, which had been weakened by the first change.

synergy-f03

Addition of Stiffening Member

The Analysis group conducted a series of FEA simulations, first to determine the increased bending under load and second to select a material to balance the conflicting requirements for stiffness, strength, and cost. After multiple simulation iterations, it was determined that Product Development had selected a permissible path forward and that a glass-filled polypropylene provides the best combination of the three parameters.

synergy-f04

Bending under load for Material Choices 1, 2, and 3

The 3D Printing group then printed the new design for qualitative “look and feel” testing and quantitative force/deflection study. The group was able to closely match the properties of the selected material from their collection of printable filaments and top-shelf industrial printers, reproducing even the fine details — subtle fillets, radii — that boost strength but are missed with lower quality printers. Through prototype tests, it was determined that Analysis selected an appropriate material and Product Development selected an appropriate design.

In the end, PADT was able to confidently select a solution to the customer’s unique cost problem in under a week. Thanks to the synergy of three groups — Product Development, Analysis, and 3D Printing — the customer was able to stay on schedule and enter the market at a relevant price.

So how can PADT help my product?

PADT’s system for delivering services is a textbook example of synergy in action, and it represents a uniquely effective solution to your company’s product problems. Whether you’re in concept design or high-volume production, PADT will tailor-make a solution that fits your budget, schedule, and technical requirements.
Give us a call at 1–800–293-PADT or email info@padtinc.com.

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Webinar on the new Stratasys J750 The first ever, full-color, multi- material 3D Printer

J750 Shoes 3

REGISTER 

Stratasys recently released the most advanced PolyJet 3D Printer on the market.  The Stratasys J750 promises to be a game changer by printing complex parts with diverse properties quickly while minimizing post processing time.  We invite you to join us for a webinar to learn more about this amazing technology.

Realistic Prototypes

The J750 provides true, full-color capability. The color range is possible because with the J750, you can choose between 5 different colors: cyan, magenta, yellow, black and white allowing the J750 to achieve a broad color spectrum.

Color textures and gradients are also possible now allowing for a variety of realistic patters like wood grain, plaid or even photographs and illustrations.

Full color is also now able to be combined with a variety of material characteristics such as a range of transparencies and durometers.  All of this variety can now be done in a single print.

Register now and learn how to create stunning prototypes quickly and efficiently with full color realism.

Half Head

Versatile

The J750 not only produces incredibly realistic models, it is also capable of creating thousands of colors, translucencies and durometers simply by combining base resins right on the build tray.  The versatility provided by the J750 can drastically reduce the amount of time spend on post processing a model.  Before the Stratasys J750, no single 3D printer could deliver full color, smooth surfaces and multiple materials. A shop that wanted to achieve all of these qualities would have had to adopt multiple 3D printing technologies and still resort to extensive post-processing, such as sanding, painting and bonding.

 

J750_ControlPnl_hands - Medium Quality JPG

Fast, Efficient Workflow

PolyJet Studio is the latest generation of ObjetStudio Software.  The intuitive interface makes it easy to choose materials, optimize the build and manage print queues.

The six-material capacity means less time spending changing over materials, less waste purging to switch materials and less overall down time.

There is so much more to the J750.  Please join us for a webinar to learn more and get your questions answered by our Application Engineer and PolyJet Technology expert, James Barker.

REGISTER today for our upcoming webinar to find out even more about this game-changing technology.

If you have any questions or encounter a problem while registering, please email kathryn.pesta@padtinc.com or call Kathryn at 480.813.4884.

Take a look at some other cool prototypes made on the J750.

J750 Console StickshiftJ750 Cartoon CharactersJ750_Tennis Shoes_GreenSide2 - Low Resolution JPGJ750_Liver2 - High Resolution JPGFEAJ750_Sushi 1_R - Low Resolution JPG

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PADT and ASU Collaborate on 3D Printed Lattice Research

The ASU Capstone team (left to right): Drew Gibson, Jacob Gerbasi, John Reeher, Matthew Finfrock, Deep Patel and Joseph Van Soest.

ASU student team (left to right): Drew Gibson, Jacob Gerbasi, John Reeher, Matthew Finfrock, Deep Patel and Joseph Van Soest

Over the past two academic semesters (2015/16), I had the opportunity to work closely with six senior-year undergraduate engineering students from the Arizona State University (ASU), as their industry adviser on an eProject (similar to a Capstone or Senior Design project). The area we wanted to explore with the students was in 3D printed lattice structures, and more specifically, address the material modeling aspects of these structures. PADT provided access to our 3D printing equipment and materials, ASU to their mechanical testing and characterization facilities and we both used ANSYS for simulation, as well as a weekly meeting with a whiteboard to discuss our ideas.

While there are several efforts ongoing in developing design and optimization software for lattice structures, there has been little progress in developing a robust, validated material model that accurately describes how these structures behave – this is what our eProject set out to do. The complex internal meso- and microstructure of these structures makes them particularly sensitive to process variables such as build orientation, layer thickness, deposition or fusion width etc., none of which are accounted for in models for lattice structures available today. As a result, the use of published values for bulk materials are not accurately predictive of true lattice structure behavior.

In this work, we combined analytical, experimental and numerical techniques to extract and validate material parameters that describe mechanical response of lattice structures. We demonstrated our approach on regular honeycomb structures of ULTEM-9085 material, made with the Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM) process. Our results showed that we were able to predict low strain responses within 5-10% error, compared to 40-60% error with the use of bulk properties.

This work is to be presented in full at the upcoming RAPID conference on May 18, 2016 (details at this link) and has also been accepted for full length paper submission to the SFF Symposium. We are also submitting a research proposal that builds on this work and extends it into more complex geometries, metals and failure modeling. If you are interested in the findings of this work and/or would like to collaborate, please meet us at RAPID or send us an email (info@padtinc.com).

Our final poster and the Fortus 400mc that we printed all our honeycomb structures with

The final poster summarizing our work rests atop the Stratasys Fortus 400mc that we printed all our honeycomb structures on

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Webinars: Overview of Add-On Products that Work with ANSYS Mechanical

PADT-Webinar-LogoWith the introduction of the new ANSYS Mechanical Enterprise, many add-on products that had to be purchased separate, are now included. In these webinars PADT’s engineers will provide an overview of the key applications that users now have easy access to.

Each product will be reviewed by one of PADT’s engineers. The will share the functionality of each tool, discuss some lessons we have learned in using and supporting each tool, and provide a short demonstration. Each session will have time for Questions and Answers.

ANSYS-Footer-RBD-STR-ACT

Sign up for the one you want, or all three. Everyone that registers will receive a link to the recording and to a copy of the slides. So register even if you can not make the specific dates.

Here are the times and links to register:

Overview of ANSYS Rigid Body Dynamics (RBD) and ANSYS Explicit STR
May 19, 2016 (Thu)
11:00 am MST & PDT / 12:00 pm MDT

      REGISTER

Overview of ANSYS SpaceClaim and ANSYS AIM
May 24, 2016 (Tue)
11:00 am MST & PDT / 12:00 pm MDT

    REGISTER

Overview of ANSYS Customization Toolkit (ACT) and ANSYS DesignXplorer (DX)
May 26, 2016 (Thu)
11:00 am MST & PDT / 12:00 pm MDT

     REGISTER

We hope to see you online.  If you have any questions, contact us at support@padtinc.com or call 480.813.4884.

ANSYS_Mechanical_Header

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KJZZ: Has Arizona’s Biotech Community Achieved Critical Mass?

kjzz-logoKJZZ’s Mark Brodie interviewed PADT’s Eric Miller as a follow on to the blog post Eric did on the AZ BioTech industry.  He asked great questions on where the industry is and what we should be doing next.

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PADT Events – May 2016

April was a busy month, but May looks a bit more normal.  We hope to see some of you at the following PADT events happening in the next 5 or 6 week. You can also get a summary of what happened in April below.


iot_world_logo

May 11: Internet of Things World
Santa Clara, CA

A couple of us are headed to Santa Clara for this gigantic event.  No booth, we will be walking around and checking it out.  With so much of our work turning towards support IoT, we felt this was a good place to network and find other partners. Look for us if you are there… we will of course have PADT shirts on.


rapid-logo-100May 16-19: RAPID Show
Orlando, FL

The other big Additive Manufacturing show in the US is Rapid, held in Orlando, FL this year. PADT will be presenting at least one, and perhaps two times at this event. We will also be hanging out with Stratasys and other partners in the exhibit area.


SBIR-ConfMay 23: National SBIR/STTR Conference
National Harbor, Maryland

PADT will be visiting this years gathering on SBIR and STTR contracts.  It is a great opportunity to meet the program officers that are in charge of projects we are applying for as well as a place to meet other companies like PADT that are strong participants in the program.


PADT-Webinar-Logo

We have 4 fantastic webinars for May. All PADT webinars are recorded, so even if you can’t make the specified time register and we will send you a link to the recoreding.

Thursday, May 19, 11:00 AM
Overview of ANSYS Rigid Body Dynamics (RBD) and ANSYS Explicit STR
RegisterFriday, May 20, 1:00 PM
The Stratasys J750 – A new revolutionary full color 3D Printer
Register

Tuesday, May 24, 10:00 AM Phx
Overview of ANSYS SpaceClaim and ANSYS AIM
Register

Thursday, May 26, 10:00 AM Phx
Overview of ANSYS Customization Toolkit (ACT) and ANSYS DesignXplorer (DX)
Register


April Events in Review

April matched March in the number of events.  We made a lot of new contacts and were able to learn about some new industries and people.


amug-2Our 3D printing sales and services team got off to a great start at this years AMUG Annual Meeting in St. Luis. PADT’s Dhruv Bhate gave two very well received presentations.  Besides catching up with customers and partners, the team was able to check out the latest technologies in Additive Manufacturing


navy_sbire-1The RevAZ team at the Arizona Commerce Authority was nice enough to let PADT host their seminar on Additive Manufacturing and the Navy SBIR Program. We had a great turnout of over 30 people for the seminar put on by Jonathan Leggett, the NAVSEA SBIR Program Manager on how to better utilize the SBIR program. This was followed by one-on-one discussions with John and people from RevAZ.


SpaceSymposiumThis year’s Space Symposium in Colorado Springs was fantastic. The best part was meeting Bill Nye and learning more about the mission to mars. Even better was having our customers from different Aerospace companies meet in our booth and interact.


AZTC-Tucson-LnLThe Tucson tech community provided a great audience for our Lunch & Learn with the AZ Technology Council on “Innovation is easier said than done: Why skipping product simulation is no longer an option” Dan Hartman gave a great talk on the subject.


SMR-FlownexFlownex shined at this year the SMR 2016 conference in Atlanta. Many people in the nuclear field were able to see Flownex for the first time and get a feel for how powerful it is for designing a modular reactor.


There were two lectures to students in April. Dhruv Bhate crossed the valley and gave an inspirational talk to students at Peoria High School.  As always, the students questions and feedback were fantastic.  Later in the month, Ted Harris headed down to the University of Arizona in Tucson to talk to an engineering class about Finite Element Analysis.


nacet-design-daysApril also saw the start of a new initiative at PADT, Design Days. This is where some of our product development engineers visit incubators and offer up free advice for an hour.  Nothing too complicated, just one-on-one time for Startups with an experienced engineer.  We started at NACET in Flagstaff where we met some great inventors.  Next was a larger event at CEI in Phoenix followed by sessions at Chandler Innovations.


AZBio-2016The last big event in a busy month was the AZBio Expo in Phoenix. As always, this event is packed full of people in the Arizona Biotech space. We caught up with long time customers and met some new people. The talks were informative and at time entertaining.

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