Settling in at our New Colorado Office

One of the cooler features (or is it kewler?) of our new digs in Littleton is the fact that the balcony on the front of the office has flag poles.  So we went out and got a US and Colorado flag, and had a PADT flag made.  The sun came out and the wind picked up and I have to say, it looked pretty good. Then a rainbow came out.  #goodstuff.

2013-07-29 13.58.57  2013-07-29 18.07.36

2013-07-29 18.20.36

 

Utilizing a Thermal Contact Conductance Table in ANSYS ANSYS Mechanical

We recently had a tech support request from a customer, asking for the ability to define a spatially varying thermal contact conductance (TCC) on a contact region in ANSYS Mechanical. We came up with a solution for ANSYS 14.5 via an example which includes a couple of verification plots.

The test model consists of two solids, connected via a contact region. The thermal contact conductance at the contact region was defined as a table, with the rows and columns of the table corresponding to local coordinates within the plane of the contact surface. The table was defined and implemented using Mechanical APDL commands in the Mechanical tree.

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Low values of TCC were used for testing purposes. This helped verify that the tabular values were actually being used as intended. A constant temperature was applied to the face at one end of the model, while a different constant temperature was applied to the face at the extreme other end of the model. This temperature differential caused heat to flow through the contact region, subject to the resistance defined via TCC values.

The coordinates in the plane of the contact surface were Y and Z. Thus, the table of TCC values varied in the Y and Z directions, as shown here:

            Z        
  Y |  0.0        1.0
0.0 | 0.0001    0.0005
1.0 | 0.0005    0.0002

Three ANSYS Mechanical APDL command objects were inserted into the tree in the Mechanical editor. The first command object simply added a scalar parameter to keep track of the contact element type/real constant set number for use later:

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The second command object was placed in the analysis type branch, meaning this set of commands would be executed just prior to the Solve command. This command object does three things:

1. Defines the TCC table vs. Y and Z coordinates.

2. Reads the table in as an MAPDL real constant for the contact elements identified in the first command object.

3. Issues the command, “rstsuppress,none”. More on this later.

This is how the second command object was defined:

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That third step mentioned above was a key to getting this technique to work in 14.5. The rstsuppress command is not documented currently, but Al Hanq of ANSYS, Inc. has told me that it will be documented in the future. The default setting turns off contact results from being written to the results file in a thermal analysis. The idea is to help keep results file sizes from getting excessively large, especially for transient thermal runs. In this case, we actually wanted the thermal contact results in the results file, so we issued “rstsuppress,none” so the thermal contact results were not suppressed.

The final command object was for verification of the applied TCC values. This set of commands generates two plots using MAPDL postprocessing commands. The first plot is of heat flux going through the contact elements. The second plot displays the TCC values for node ‘i’ of each contact element (averaged).

Here is the third command object:

image

Both of these plots show up in the tree, labeled as Post Output and Post Output 2 in the image above.

This is the resulting thermal flux at the contact surface:

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Here is the applied thermal contact conductance, as mapped from the table defined in the second command object:

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In summary, we took advantage of Mechanical APDL command objects to apply thermal contact conductance values that vary along the contact region. We also used MAPDL commands to create two plots that help verify that the TCC values were applied as intended. Hopefully this is a helpful example.

It’s Open House Season at PADT!

PADT-Offices
With the opening of our new office in Albuquerque, our move to a larger office in Colorado, and a whole boat load of new stuff going on at the main office in the Phoenix area, there are a lot of reasons to come visit PADT during one of our upcoming Open Houses.
Albuquerque, New Mexico
August 13, 2013, 4:00 PM – 7:00 PM
Tempe, Arizona
Sept. 10, 2013, 5:00 PM – 10:00 PM
Littleton, Colorado
October 16, 2013, 4:00 PM – 8:00 PM
All of our Open House events are a great opportunity for you to meet PADT’s staff, get to know what we do a bit better, and network with other PADT customers and vendors.  We provide food and drink as well as enough technical information to make it an enjoyable, but justifiable use of your time.
We will be giving tours of each facility including some in-depth information about 3D Printing, with demos on our Stratasys prototyping systems.
Don’t miss out on “the” technology social events of the year!
These events are crowded, so we would really appreciate it if you would help us get a head count by registering for the open house you plan on attending:

Corrupt ANSYS Mechanical Database? You Might Be Able to Recover

Most of the time ANSYS Mechanical does a great job of keeping track of all our input and output files needed for a particular simulation. Every once in a while though, a glitch can happen which could lead to a corrupt database that gives you errors, say, if you try to reopen the ANSYS Mechanical editor. If you suspect that somehow your project database for a Mechanical model (or any other model that uses the same interface as ANSYS Mechanical) has been corrupted, you just might be able to recover it using these steps:

1. Copy any .mechdb files from the project directory to a different location. Rename them to a .mechdat extension. These will be named SYS.mechdb, SYS-1.mechdb, etc. The easiest way to find these files is to click on View > Files from the Workbench window, then scroll through the list until you find the .mechdb file or files. Then right click on each one and select “Open Containing Folder.” This will open Windows Explorer in the directory in which the file resides. You can then copy the files to a new location and rename them to .mechdat extensions.

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2. Copy any .agdb (DesignModeler) files or other geometry files from the project directory to a different location. These will be named SYS.agdb , SYS-1.agdb, etc. (for DesignModeler) and can be found using View > Files as I described above. No need to rename these.

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3. Start a new Workbench session.

4. Click File > Import. Set the type of file to import to “Importable Mechanical File”. Browse to the two .mechdat files created in step 1 (by renaming the copied .mechdb files) and import each.

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5. If needed for geometry files, in the resulting Project Schematic in the Workbench window, right click on the first block’s geometry cell and select Replace Geometry > Browse. Browse to the copied SYS.agdb file or other geometry file from step 2. Repeat any additional analysis block in similar fashion.

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6. Then save the project with a new name and directory. 

This should allow you to recreate a Workbench project that allows you to continue working. We hope this suggestion is helpful if the need ever arises to use it.

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(Artwork by Eric… Ted does much nicer smiley faces)

PADT Moves into Larger Colorado Office

If you visited our office in Littleton Colorado you will have noticed that we were kind of working on top of one another.  To alleviate the problem, we have moved down the street. Our new PADT Colorado office is still in historic downtown Littleton, we are actually on the main street now:

PADT-Littlteton-temp-pic

PADT Colorado
2009 W Littleton Blvd
Suite 200
Littleton CO 80120 

It is right next to the old Arapahoe County Court House. As you can see it is a “unique” building with a lot of character.  So we are looking forward to using some creativity in decorating the place to match the feeling of the building.  All staff members will be issued skinny ties and horn rimmed glasses. Engineers will be required to wear white short sleeved shirts and pocket protectors.

We are setting it up in stages, so we are still working on getting full Internet access, the company wide PADT phone system up and running, new furniture, and our demo machines.  Once all of that is done we will be announcing a “Grand Opening” open house.

But Norm, Patrick, Mike, and ManojPADT-Littleton-Satelite would be happy to have a visit anytime.  One of the nicer features is a balcony overlooking downtown and the Front Range. Stop by and enjoy the warm weather while it lasts. You can chat about Simulation, 3D Printing, or product development and we will call it work.

PADT Talks about 3D Printing on Channel 8’s Arizona Horizon

PADT-Horizon-PBS-PicOur latest journey into mass media was a real pleasure.  We were invited to come on to the local Phoenix PBS station to talk about 3D Printing.  The team of students from the Walter Cronkite School of Mass Communications at ASU that do most of the behind the scenes work were great. The host and producer were true professionals who asked some of the best questions we have ever been asked on this topic.

You can the full program here:

http://www.azpbs.org/arizonahorizon/play.php?vidId=6037

Eric’s interview is the second half.

Those of you who know 3D Printing know that they showed a CNC mill instead of one of our 3D printers.  We gave them a bunch of background video to use (from another interview) and they kind of picked the wrong one. But hey, Bob and Luis got on TV!  And all that really matters is that they spelled our name right.

A great opportunity and we look forward to evangelizing the promise of additive manufacturing in the future. You can learn more about the whole world of 3D Printing on our website by starting on our prototyping support page.

Watch PADT on Chanel 8’s Horizon Arizona this Wednesday at 5:30

arizona_horizon

 

PADT will be on the local Phoenix PBS station this Wednesday, July 10th at 5:30 PM talking about 3D Printing and PADT.  Here is the teaser from their website:

3D printing has been around for a while, but it is just starting to make a big impact on mainstream society. Tempe-based Phoenix Analysis and Design Technologies is a 3D printing company that was started in 1994 and offers a variety of services, including product simulation, design prototyping and medical devices. The company is also the largest distributor of 3D printing and manufacturing systems in the Southwest. Eric Miller of PADT will talk about his company and 3D printing.

Set your DVR or check watch our news feed to a link for the interview when it hits the web.

Arizona Horizon is the local news show where they talk about local events and activities, and also focus on community news. One recurring segment is their discussion of AZ Technology & Innovation, and PADT has been asked to contribute.  It is in HD… better comb my hair and iron my shirt.

Linearized Stress – Using Nodal Locations for Path Results in Workbench Mechanical 14.5

Postprocessing results along a path has been part of the Workbench Mechanical capability for several rev’s now. We need to define a path as construction geometry on which to map the results unless we happen to have an edge in the model exactly where we want the path to be or can use an X axis intersection with our model. You have the option to ‘snap’ the path results to nodal locations, but what if you want to use nodal locations to define the path in the first place? We’ll see how to do this below.

For more information on “picking your nodes”, see the Focus blog entry written by Jeff Strain last year: http://www.padtinc.com/blog/the-focus/node-interaction-in-mechanical-part-1-picking-your-nodes

The top level process for postprocessing result along a path is:

  • Define a Path as construction geometry
  • Insert a Linearized Stress result
  • Calculate the desired results along the path using the Linearized Stress item

The key here is to define the path using existing nodes. Why do that? Sometimes it’s easier to figure out where the path should start and stop using nodal locations rather than figure out the coordinates some other way. So, let’s see how we might do that.

  • First, turn on the mesh via the “Show Mesh” button so that it’s visible for the path creation

image

  • From the Model branch in Mechanical, insert Construction Geometry
  • From the new Construction Geometry branch, insert a Path

image

  • Note that the Path must be totally contained by the finite element model, unlike in MAPDL.
  • If you know the starting and ending points of the path, enter them in the Start and End fields in the Details view for the Path.
  • Otherwise, click on the “Hit Point Coordinate” button:

image

  • Pick the node location for the start point, click apply

image

  • Pick the node location for the end point, click apply

image

  • In the Solution branch, insert Linearized Stress (Normal Stress in this case); set the details:
  • Scoping method=Path
  • Select the Path just created
  • Set the Orientation and Coordinate System values as needed
  • Define Time value for results if needed

image

Results are displayed graphically along the path…

image

…as well is in an X-Y plot and a table

image

Besides normal stresses, membrane and bending, etc. results can be accessed using these techniques. So, the next time you need to list or plot results along a path, remember that it can be done in Mechanical, and you can use nodal locations to define the starting and ending points of the path.

PADT Welcomed to Sandia Science & Technology Park

Sandia-Science-and-Technology-park-newsletter-PADT

The folks at the Sandia Science and Technology Park welcomed PADT to the Neighborhood with a nice writeup in their monthly newsletter.  We are very excited about growing our New Mexico business from this location.

Duh! Three ANSYS Mechanical Features I Should Know But Didn’t

Selection Information, Manage Views, and Changing Settings on Multiple Load Steps

There is no way to hide the embarrassing reality. I am supposed to be an expert. I am introduced to people as such. People all over the world read stuff I write about how to use ANSYS products more effectively.  But last week and this week, humility has struck a devastating blow on my ego.  I found three very useful things in ANSYS Mechanical that I either didn’t know, or forgot about. I even mentioned one of them (Manage Views) in an update presentation as “cool and very important feature” then promptly forgot it was there.

As payment for my sins, I will share a brief description of each with all of you, in the hopes that I will: 1) make you feel better about yourself because you already knew this stuff, or 2) give you the knowledge you need to avoid the embarrassment, and lost productivity, that my ignorance has brought me. 

Selection Information

I mention this one first because it was pointed out to me by no less than the ANSYS Mechanical product manager at ANSYS, Inc. Yikes.  I believe he actually did a face palm when I asked him “What is Selection Information? There is an Icon with an i on the toolbar? Really?”

image

There it is, right next to the Worksheet icon, an icon I use all the time.  What it does is give you information about geometry, CAD and nodes, in your model.  There are three ways to get it, not just the icon on the toolbar:

  1. Click the Icon
  2. In the menu go to View>Windows>Selection Information
  3. Double-click on the Selection details at the bottom of the ANSYS Mechanical Window

image

However you use it, you will get a new window, embedded with the existing windows, that shows you information about the geometry entity of entities that you select. Normal selection options apply. You can pick vertices, edges, surfaces, or bodies. I like to drag it out as it’s own window so I can see it all.  (Notice how I talk like I do this all the time… yea, whatever.  I just figured out that it is a lot better if I drag it out and look at it by itself.) 

My sample model is just a cylinder, so If I pick the end and the cylinder I get:

image

See how it lists the two faces, and a summary. There is some internal info in there as well like ID’s that ANSYS mechanical uses to do stuff. The toolbar across the top lets you select a coordinate system to do the calculations in, set options (the green checkbox) or  control if you want individual info, summary info, or both. 

The options are useful because by default, everything is on. Turning some stuff off can reduce the clutter.

image

For nodes, I can get location, node number, and body information:

image

When you are in the window there are some useful things you can do with the list. The first is sort by clicking on the column headers.  What node is at your max X position in your cylindrical coordinate system?  Just set the Coordinate System and click on X(in) twice to sort from max o min:

image

If you select any of the cells, you can right mouse click and get a context menu that lets you reselect the entities being listed, export to a text or Excel file, Refresh, or copy to the clipboard:

image

Give it a shot next time your in a model and want to know some stuff.

Manage Views

One of the more useful capabilities in ANSYS Mechanical APDL is the ability to define views in a macro and call them back up again, getting the same standard views every time. Well you have been able to do that in Workbench when the introduced the “Scary Eye” icon at I think 14.5 (maybe 14):

image

Although it looks like a secret Masonic symbol, the icon actually represents a handy tool for saving views not only in your model but to files.  It is also available in View->Windows->Manage Views.

Not only that, it lets you save the view commands to an external file that you can use with other models or even go in and edit to create a very specific view.

When you start it up, it brings up its own little window as well, that has eye themed icons to control your view saving/recall experience.

image

  • “Spooky Eye Box with a Plus Sign” creates a view from the current view you are seeing
  • “X” deletes the currently selected view or views
  • “Guy with 80’s hair looking at a box” applies the currently selected view. Double-clicking on the view does the same thing.
  • “A-bar-B” is used to rename the selected view
  • “Spooky Eye Box with Green Blob” redefines the currently selected view with whatever the current view settings are in the graphics window. Think of it as an overwrite.
  • “Disk with arrow out” reads in a saved view file from disk.
  • “Disk with arrow in” saves the currently selected view to disk.

So, get your model positioned the way you want it using the mouse to control the view, then click the first icon to save it.  The program puts the window into “rename” mode so you can give it a descriptive name here. Just keep doing that till you have all your views defined.

If at some point you want to change view, no need to delete and recreate it. Simply Click on the view you want to redefine and then click on “Spooky Eye Box with Green Blob.”

Note: You can only select more than one view and delete it.  None of the other commands work for more than one view. But the save views command saves all the views, regardless of how many you have selected.

Here are some views I created:

image

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image

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Now it gets cool.  Click on a view and then click on the “Save” (last) icon.  It will save the views as an XML file.  Pop that into your handy-dandy XML editor and you can check out the view definitions:

image

This is where I get excited. Now you can go into this file and create your own view, or modify a view to be very specific.  I didn’t have enough time to figure out what all the options did, but if you get a view that is close to what you want, you should be able to modify it from there.

The last thing to talk about is what happens if you right mouse click on a view?  You get:

image

Yes, copy as MAPDL!  Not only is this useful for us old guys that just like to look at MAPDL, it lets you use the same view for any plots you may make with a code snippet as you used for the plots in ANSYS Mechanical.  So your views are consistent for all your plots!

image

Modifying Multiple Load Steps

This was one of those “there has to be a way to do this” moments. We were talking about different ways to speed up the solution of a transient thermal model and I suggested that instead of using automatic time step controls they put in some values. But for the life of me I couldn’t figure out how to change a bunch of load step settings at the same time, so I was changing them one at a time. For every step, change the step number, then change the value:

image

Yawn!  This started off a “well in ANSYS classic, I could write a script that would… blah… blah… blah…”

There has got to be a better way.  There is.  In the Graph window the load steps are shown on the X-axis. Simply multi-select the steps you want to change there:

image

In the example above I CTRL-Clicked steps 3, 5, and 7. Now my Analysis Settings details view looks like:

image

See how Current Step Number and Step End Time are “Multi Step”.  Any change I make to settings will now be applied to the selected steps.  A huge time savings.  And a big “Duh, I should have known that!”

PADT Expands Local 3D Printing, Support, and Simulation Services with New Albuquerque Office

Web-PADT-Front-Door-New-Mexico

We are very pleased to announce that PADT is opening new local office in Albuquerque, New Mexico in the Sandia Science and Technology Park. The office will focus on providing sales, technical support, 3D Printer maintenance, and a meeting space to better serve customers in New Mexico.

Some of PADT’s earliest customers came from the state of New Mexico, and the company provides products, support, and services to many organizations in the area, including all of the major universities, the National Labs, and dozens of commercial companies. The new office will allow the local team, and employees visiting from PADT’s Colorado or Arizona locations, the opportunity to work in a familiar location, have direct access to PADT’s infrastructure, and provide customers a location to view the 3D Printing, simulation, and product development technologies that PADT offers. The location at the Eubank entrance to Kirtland AFB and Sandia National Labs give direct access to the highest concentration of PADT customers in the state.

The sales team in the  PADT New Mexico office will focus on distributing three  products lines:  The first is the complete suite of simulation software from ANSYS, Inc. (ANSS) (www.ANSYS.com). These tools are used by companies around the world to simulate products before testing, resulting in better performance for less cost and in less time.  The second line of products are the 3D Printer and Direct Digital Manufacturing systems from Stratasys (SSYS) (www.STRATASYS.com).  Both ANSYS, Inc. and Stratasys are the world leaders in their respective markets, and PADT is proud to be one of their reselling partners for Colorado, Utah, Nevada, Arizona and New Mexico.  The third product line is PADT’s CUBE Systems, (www.padtinc.com/cube-hvpc) their own brand of High Value Performance Computers specifically designed and configured for the advanced simulation user.

Additionally, the office will serve as a place for PADT’s technical staff to work together at a single location, providing simulation consulting, training and technical support.  As the company grows, the area has sufficient expansion opportunities to allow for more employees and equipment.

You can read the official announcement on the press release:

Press_release

http://www.prlog.org/12158073.pdf

Here are some images of the new office:

PADT-New-Mexico-Building

The office is literally on the corner of Research and Innovation at:

PADT New Mexico
1451 Innovation Parkway
Suite 402
Albuquerque, NM  87123

2013-06-14 17.43.36

Still working on signage, but we used a large monitor to add a little touch to the entrance

Prarie_Dog_SSTP_Welcome(Note the little welcome creature in the lower right of the image)

The office is located at the Sandia Science and Technology Park on the east side of Albuquerque, just south of I-40 near the Eubank gate to Kirtland AFB and Sandia National Labs:

PADT-New-Mexico-Map

Why do my ANSYS jobs take days and weeks to finish? Well it depends…

Real World Lessons on How to Minimize Run Time for ANSYS HPC

Recently I had a VP of Engineering start a phone conversation with me that went something like this. “Well Dave, you see this is how it is. We just spent a truckload of money on a 256 core cluster and our solve times are slower now than with our previous 128 core cluster. What the *&(( is going on here?!”

I imagine many of us have heard similar stories or even received the same questions from our co-workers, CEO’s & Directors. I immediately had my concerns and I truly thought carefully as to what I should say next. I recalled a conversation I had with one of my college professors. He had told me that when I find myself stepping into gray areas that a good start to the conversation is to say. “Well it depends…”

Guess what, that is exactly what I said. I said “Well it depends…” followed by going into explaining to him two fundamental pillars of computer science that have plagued most of us since computers were created: I said “Well you may be, CPU bound (compute bound) or I/O bound. He told me that they had paid a premium for the best CPU’s on the market and some other details about the HPC cluster. Garnering some of other details about the cluster my hunch was that his HPC cluster may actually be I/O bound.

I/O Bound

Basically this means that your cluster’s $2,000 worth of CPU’s are basically stalled out and sitting idle. The CPU’s are waiting for new data to process and move on. I also briefly explained that his HPC cluster may be compute bound. I quickly reassured him that the likelihood of his HPC cluster being compute bound was about 10% possible and very unlikely. I knew the specifications on the CPU’s in this HPC cluster and the likelihood that they were the issue of his ANSYS slow run times was low on my radar. These literally were the latest and greatest CPU’s ever to hit this planet (at that moment in time). So, let me step back a minute, to refresh our memories on what it means when a system is compute bound.

Compute Bound

Being compute bound means that the HPC cluster’s CPU’s were sitting at 99 or 100% for long periods of time. When this happens very bad things begin to happen to your HPC cluster. CPU requests to peripherals are delayed or infinitely lost to the ether. The HPC cluster may become unresponsive and even lock up.

All I could hear was silence on the other end. “Dave, I get it, I understand, please find the problem and fix our HPC cluster for us. ” I happily agreed to help out! I concluded our phone conversation asking that he send me the specific details, down to the nuts and bolts of the hardware! I also requested operating system and software that was installed and used on the 256 core HPC cluster.

What NOT to do when configuring an ANSYS Distributed HPC cluster.

Seeking that perfect balance!

After a quick NDA signing, a few dollars exchange and a sprinkle of some other legal things that lawyers get excited about. I set out to discover the cause. After reviewing the information provided to me I almost immediately saw three concerns:

To interconnect what?

Let Merriam-Webster describe it:

Definition of INTERCONNECT

transitive verb
: to connect with one another
intransitive verb
: to be or become mutually connected

— in·ter·con·nec·tion noun
— in·ter·con·nec·tiv·i·ty noun

1. The systems are interconnected with a series of wires.
2. The lessons are designed to show students how the two subjects interconnect
3.  A series of interconnecting stories

First Known Use of INTERCONNECT: 1865

Concern numeral Uno!!! Interconnect me

Though the company’s 256 core HPC cluster had a second dedicated GigE interconnect. Distributed ANSYS is highly bandwidth and latency bound often requiring more bandwidth than a dedicated NIC (Network Interface Card) may provide. Yes, the dedicated second GigE card interconnect was much better than trying to use a single NIC for all of the network traffic which would also include the CPU interconnect. I did have a few of the MAPDL output files from the customer that I could take a peek at. After reviewing the customer output files it became fairly clear that interconnect communication speeds between the 16 core x 16 server in the cluster was not adequate. The master Message Parsing Interface (MPI) process that Distributed ANSYS uses requires a high amount of bandwidth and low latency for proper distributed scaling to the other processes. Theoretically the data bandwidth between cores solving local to the machine will be higher than the bandwidth traveling across the various interconnect methods (see below). ANSYS, Inc. recommends Infiniband for CPU interconnect traffic. Here are a couple of reasons why they recommend this. See how the theoretical data limits increase going from Gigabit Ethernet up to FDR Infiniband.

Theoretical lane bandwidth limits for:

  • Gigabit Ethernet (GigE): ~128MB/s
  • Signal Data Rate (SDR): ~ 328 MB/s
  • Double Data Rate (DDR): ~640 MB/s
  • Quad Data Rate (QDR): ~1,280 MB/s
  • Fourteen Data Rate (FRD): ~1,800 MB/s

GEEK CRED: A few years ago companies such as MELLANOX started aggregating the Infiniband channels. The typical aggregate modifiers are 4X or even a 12X increase. So for example the 4X QDR Infiniband switch and cards I use at PADT and recommended to this customer, would have a (4X 10Gbit/s) or 5,120 MB/s of throughput! Here is a quick video that I made of a MELLANOX IS5023 18-port 4X QDR full bi-directional switch in action:

This is how you do it with a CUBE HVPC! MAPDL output file from our CUBE HVPC w16i-GPU workstation. This is running the ANSYS industry benchmark V14sp-5. I wanted to show the communication speeds between the master MPI process and the other solver processes to see just how fast the solvers can communicate. With a peak communication speed of 9593 MB/s this CUBE HVPC workstation rocks!

Chassis Profile 4u standard depth or rackmountable
CPU 1 x One Dual Socket
Chipset INTEL 602 Chipset
Processors 2 x INTEL e5-2690 @ 2.9GHz
Cores 2 x 8
Memory 128GB DDR3-1600 ECC Reg RAM
OS Drives 2 x 2.5″ SATA III 256GB SSD Drives RAID 0
DATA/HOME Hard Disk Drives 4 x 3.5″ SAS2 600GB 15kRPM drives RAID 0
SAS RAID (Onboard, Optional) RAID 0 (OS RAID)
SAS RAID (RAID card, Optional) LSI 2208 (DATA VOL RAID)
Networking (Onboard) Dual GigE (Intel i350)
Video (Onboard) NVIDIA QUADRO K5000
GPU (Optional) NVIDIA TESLA K2000
Operating System Windows 7 Professional 64-bit
Optional Installed Software ANSYS 14.5 Release

imageStats for CUBE HVPC Model Number : w16i-KGPU

Learn more about this and other CUBE HVPC systems here.

Concern #2: Using RAID 5 Array for Solving Disk Volume

The hard drives that are used for I/O during a solve, the solving volume, were configured in a RAID 5 hard disk array. Some sample data below showing the minimum write speed of a similar RAID 5 array. These are speeds that are better off seen in your long-term storage volume not on your solving/working directory.

LSI 2008 HITACHI ULTASTAR 15K600
Qty / Type / Size / RAID Qty 8 x 3.5″ SAS2 15k 600GB RAID 5
TEST # p1
min Read 204 MB/s
max Read 395  MB/s
Avg Read N/A
min Write 106 MB/s
max Write 243.5 MB/s
Avg Write N/A
Access Time N/A

Concern #3: Using RAID 1 for Operating System

The hard drive array for the OS was configured in a RAID 1 configuration. For a number cruncher server having RAID 1 is not necessary. If you absolutely have to have RAID 1. Please spend the extra money and go to a RAID 10 configuration.

I really don’t want to get into the seemingly infinite details of hard drives speeds, latency. Or even begin to explain to you if I should be using an onboard RAID Controller, dedicated RAID controller or a software RAID configuration completed within the OS. There is so much information available on the web that a person gets overloaded. When it comes to Distributed ANSYS, think fast hard drives and fast RAID controllers. Start researching your hard drives and RAID controllers using the list provided below. Again, only as a suggestion! I have listed the drives in order based on a very scientific and nerdy method. If I saw a pile of hard drives, what hard drive would I reach for first?

  1. I prefer using SEAGATE SAVVIO or HITACHI enterprise class drives. (Serial Attached SCSI) SAS2 6Gbit/s 3.5”15,000 RPM spindle drives (best bang for your dollar of space, more read & write heads over a 2.5” spindle hard drive).
  2. I prefer using Micron or INTEL SSD enterprise class SSD. SATA III Solid State Drive 6 Gbit/s (SSD sizes have increased however you will need more of these for an effective solving array and they still are not cheap).
  3. I prefer using the SEAGATE SAVVIO 2.5” enterprise class spindle drives. SAS2 6Gbit/s 2.5” 15,000 RPM spindle drives (if you need a small form factor, fast and additional storage. But the 2.5” drives do not have as many read & write heads as a 3.5” drive. In a situation where I need to slam 4 or 8 drives into a tight location.
    Right now, SEAGATE SAVVIO 2.5” are the way to go!  Here is a link to a data sheet.
    Another similar option is the HITACHI ULTRASTAR 15k600.  It’s spec sheet is here.
  4. SATA II 3Gbit/s 3.5” 7,200 RPM spindle drives are also a good option.  I prefer Western Digital RE4 1TB or 2TB drives. There spec sheet is here.

LSI 2108 RAID Controller and Hard Drive data/details:

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How a CUBE HVPC System from PADT, Inc. balanced out this configuration and how much would it cost?

I quoted out the below items, installed and out the door (including my travel expenses, etc.) at: $30,601

The company ended up going with their own preferred hardware vendor. Understandable, one good thing is that we are now on the preferred purchasing supplier list. They were greatly appreciative of my consulting time and indicated that they will request a “must have” quote for a CUBE HVPC system the next refresh in a year. They want to go over 1,000 cores the next refresh.

I recommended that they install the following into the HPC cluster based: (note they already had blazing fast hard drives)

  • 16 – Supermicro AOC-S2208L-H8iR LSI 2208 RAID controller cards.
  • 32 – Supermicro CBL-0294L-01 cabling to connect the LSI RAID cards to the SAS2 hard drives.
  • 1 – MELLANOX IS5023 18-port 4X QDR Infiniband switch
  • 16 – Supermicro AOC-UIBQ-M2 Dual port 4X QDR Infiniband card
  • 16 – Supermicro QSFP Infiniband cables in a couple different lengths

A special thanks and shout out to Sheldon Imaoka of ANSYS, Inc. for inspiring me to write this blog article!

Video Tips: Automatic Cross-Sections in ANSYS DesignModeler

A quick video showing how to create a script that will automatically generate standard cross-sections in DesignModeler to be used for, as an example, line bodies.

ANSYS Help Link:  // DesignModeler User Guide // Scripting API // Script Features // Features within Script Features // Cross Section Feature

PADT In the News: Piece on 3D Printing Presentation in Southern New Mexico

PADT-Las-Cruces-3D-PrintingPADT and 3D printing got a great write up in the Las Cruces Bulletin last month.  Renee Palacios and John Wright were speaking at the High Tech Council of Southern New Mexico on May 17th and a local reporter attended and did a great interview.

With all the media attention focused on 3D Printing we have been bombarded with requests from the media to talk about the technology. This was one of the better articles that does a very good job explaining the technology and its applications.  Yes, it does lead off with the whole “printing a plastic gun” story, but that is the price of getting people’s attention these days.

We love sharing our experience and knowledge on this technology.  And Renee even got her picture in the paper:

Richard Majestic of the High Tech Council of Southern New Mexico and guest speaker Renee Palacios of PADT Inc. visit during lunch at the HTC meeting.

Learn more about the 3D Printing and Additive Manufacturing systems from Stratasys that PADT sells here. Learn about how PADT can make a 3D prototype for you here. And find useful information about 3D printing in general here.

Humbling Feedback from PADT’s Product Development Customers

Case-Studies-Screen-ShotWhen we decided to redo our website we were told by all of the experts that you need case studies and you need testimonials.  Being engineers, we immediately pushed back saying that none of our customers will give us the input we need.  We are happy to report that we were wrong. So wrong that we are humbled by the fantastic response.

Our initial effort is focused on documenting some of the projects we have done in our Product Development and Medical Device Development groups.  You can see the eleven case studies we currently have on our Successes page.  There is some good information there on how PADT helps companies develop their products.

But what we are most proud of are the awesome testimonials we have received directly from our customers.  We are usually not ones to brag and toot our own horn… but we were proud enough of these testimonials to where we felt it was OK to let them toot our horn for us.

“PADT did a great job translating our prototype ideas into a fully-designed, manufacturable product. From multi-disciplinary engineering to project management to fabrication, PADT did it all. PADT worked collaboratively with our team to understand requirements and to solve technical hurdles in order to deliver a product that best fit our expectations.”
– Garrett Beauregard, Senior VP of Engineering, ECOtality Inc.

“I found there to be great benefit in going through PADT’s disciplined steps for the development of an updated prototype of our device. Restarting with a more systematic approach, and analyzing each component fresh, made me feel confident about every aspect of the new design.”
– Neil R. Crawford, PhD Associate Professor, Spinal Biomechanics Barrow Neurological Institute

“PADT’s Design Team was instrumental in working with Orthosensor throughout the design and development activities of the Orthosensor Knee Balance. Their commitment and flexibility to our business needs allowed us to bring our product to market in a significantly shortened period of time.”
– Juan C Fernandez, COO, Orthosensor Inc

“SynCardia has chosen to work with PADT based on their ability to develop close personal relationships, to create and implement engineering solutions rapidly, and to support SynCardia’s innovative drive for our life-saving technology.”
— Douglas A Nutter, COO, SynCardia Systems, Inc.

“PADT has provided a number of valuable services for Ulthera ranging from design work and ergonomic improvements, to manufacturability and V&V testing. Over the past 18 months, PADT worked closely with our engineering staff to ensure the successful launch of our redesigned Deep See Handpiece. Our successful collaboration allowed us to focus our internal resources on our core competencies while leveraging PADT’s skill sets. Ulthera also benefited from PADT’s adaptable, customer-specific, Design Control process to minimize the QC documentation requirements on the Ulthera staff”
— Michael Peterson, Vice President, R&D, Ultherea, Inc

“For the last 2 years we have worked with PADT to develop our ClearView technology. Their team has helped us with many aspects of product development and commercialization. They have been a very valuable asset and I would highly recommend them to any startup that needs to navigate the pathway to market.”
— Tom Blondi, President, EPIC Research & Diagnostics

“PADT has demonstrated strong concept creation and development testing abilities – and have done so with very short time schedules. PADT was in charge of a key component development for our Fuel Cell System, and accomplished it as planned. Owing to PADT’s challenging spirit, Nissan was able to lease the 2005 model FCV’s to some customers in the early period of 2006. In addition, Nissan has been able to continue the FCV leasing program for five years with PADT’s reliable support.”
— Arai Takayuki, Senior Manager, EV Systems Laboratory, Nissan Motor Company

“The PADT experience was a positive one from my first phone conversation with them to the delivery of the end product. The engineers delivered a prototype that was exactly what I envisioned in a short 8 weeks. PADT will be my choice in the future.”
— Bob Rife, R.R.T.

“For the last 3 years I have worked with PADT Medical as a physician-inventor of medical devices. Their engineering team is professional, punctual, and responsible. Their management is exemplary. I recommend PADT Medical to any potential Client.”
— Charles J. Filipi M.D., Medical Director, SafeStitch Medical, Inc.

At PADT “We Make Innovation Work” and these fantastic testimonials give specific examples of how we have done that for others. If you would like to learn how PADT’s products and services can help you, please do not hesitate to contact us.