All Things ANSYS 013 – Lessons in simulation learned from Anaheim’s Pacific Design & Manufacturing Show

 

Published on: February 12, 2018
With: Joe Woodword, Tom Chadwick, Ted Harris, Eric Miller
Description: In this episode your host and Co-Founder of PADT, Eric Miller is joined by PADT’s Joe Woodword, Tom Chadwick, and Ted Harris, for a discussion on what they learned about the world of simulation by attending this year’s Pacific Design & Manufacturing show, North America’s largest Advanced Design and Manufacturing event. This talk includes tips for a variety of ANSYS tools, along with some general “how-to” points regarding overall process that will help to ensure your simulation runs smoothly.
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PADT’s 2018 AZ SciTech Festival Open House

Scientifically fun for the whole family
February 22nd, 5:00 PM – 8:00 PM MST
Once again, PADT Inc. is proud to partner with AZ SCITECH to promote and celebrate Arizona’s STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, and Math) programs!

As part of this event, we will be hosting an open house that will give you an inside look at what our engineers do all day, as well as a first hand display of the capabilities of innovative technology such as 3D Printing and Simulation.

This is a family friendly event, so don’t hesitate to bring the kids along.

Come see how we make innovation work!

Join us at 7755 S. Research Drive, Tempe AZ, 85284 from 5:00 pm – 8:00 pm. Food and drinks will be provided.

 
This event will be divided up into three main areas:

Come and see what additive manufacturing is capable of. Learn how 3D Printing continues to revolutionize the industry, and brings ideas to life, from concept to a functional part!

PADT prides ourselves in being on the forefront of innovation. Visit the Manufacturing Lab to learn about the latest cutting-edge technology that PADT has invested in, including 3D Scanning, Metal Printing from Concept Laser, and on-demand manufacturing from Carbon. 

Walk from booth to booth and check out a plethora of fun and exciting projects that our engineers here at PADT have been working on, Each showing the unique ways that PADT makes innovation work!

Explore the fluid flow capabilities available in Discovery Live – Webinar

This free webinar will cover:

  • How to gain early insights into trends of pressure drag, drop & drift
  • The capability of gathering qualitative information for flow dispersion & thermal mixing
  • Exploration of recirculation zones and experimentation with changing flow direction
  • And so much more!

Don’t miss this informative presentation – Secure your spot today!

Can’t make it? Register anyway, as a recording will be made available to be watched on-demand.

If this is your first time registering for one of our Bright Talk webinars, simply click the link and fill out the attached form. We promise that the information you provide will only be shared with those promoting the event (PADT).

You will only have to do this once! For all future webinars, you can simply click the link, add the reminder to your calendar and you’re good to go!

Press Release: New Expansion into Texas Grows PADT’s ANSYS Sales & Support Across the Entire Southwest

When people look at PADT and where we are located, they almost always say “You should open an office in Austin, the tech community there is a perfect fit for your skills and culture.” We finally listened and are proud to announce that our newest location is in Austin Texas.  This new office will be initially focused on ANSYS Sales and Support across the great state of Texas.  We have had customers for other products and services in the state for decades and are pleased to have a permanent local presence now.

As an Elite ANSYS Channel partner, we provide sales of the complete ANSYS product suite to any and all entities that can benefit from the application of numerical simulation. Across industries, we bring a unique technical approach to both sales and support that is focused on identifying need and then selecting the right toolset, training, and support to deliver a return on the customer’s investment as soon as possible.  And the initial product purchase is just the start. Our ANSYS customers are our partners that we grow with, always ready to help them be better at whatever it is what they do.  Customers in Southern California, Nevada, Arizona, Utah, New Mexico, and Colorado already know this, and it is time for the engineering community in Texas to benefit from the experience.

Because we will be there for the long term, we are taking our time to look around the area.  Our new salesperson, Ian Scott, is an Austin native and who has worked in the engineering software space for some time. He will be working with existing customers and partners in the area to find the right location for us long-term. But we are already putting plans in place to deliver outstanding training, hold meetings, and maybe even a celebration or two while we settle in.

Over time we will add local engineers and additional sales staff to meet the needs of the state, which as you know is big.  And we have big plans for PADT and Texas starting with this ANSYS Sales and Support role, it is just the beginning.

Make sure you watch this blog, social media, or our newsletter for announcements on a celebration for our new office as well as technical events we will start holding very soon.

We look forward to reconnecting with old friends and making new ones.  If you are in Texas, please reach out to us and send us any suggestions or recommendations you may have.  We are really looking forward to growing in Austin and across the Lone Star State.

Please find the official press release on this expansion below as well as versions in PDF and HTML.

Press Release:

Simulation, Product Development and 3D Printing Services Leader, PADT, Opens New Office in Austin, Texas

PADT Becomes the Only ANSYS Elite Channel Partner to Serve the Entire Southwest Region

TEMPE, Ariz., Austin, Texas, February 6, 2018

Phoenix Analysis and Design Technologies (PADT), the Southwest’s largest provider of simulation, product development, and rapid prototyping services and products, today announced it has opened an office in Austin, Texas. With this move, PADT is expanding its sales and support for ANSYS simulation software, becoming the only ANSYS Elite Channel Partner to cover the entire Southwest region.

“This is a major expansion for PADT with the opportunity to significantly grow our customer base,” said Ward Rand, co-owner and principal, PADT. “We have worked with Texas companies on and off since we founded the company in 1994, our success over the last decade has provided the opportunity to become a full-time resident in the vibrant and growing Austin business and technology community.”

Although the initial focus for the PADT Austin office will be on ANSYS sales and support, the company plans to offer its wide array of other products and services in the future. PADT will host a grand opening celebration for customers, partners and media in March, 2018. Ian Scott an Austin native, will be launching the new office and leading the sales effort in the region.

“PADT’s expertise in simulation-driven product development will be a welcome addition to the Austin community,” said Scott. “Our focus at launch will be on educating the Austin technology scene on how to derive the best value from their engineering simulation software investment and building stronger relationships with our new neighbors.”

In 2017, PADT experienced a very successful year in regards to growing its capabilities, as well as in public recognition. PADT was named an ANSYS Elite Channel Partner for North America, partnered with Desktop Metal and Carbon to upgrade 3D printing capabilities and services and was named to Entrepreneur Magazine’s list of the top small businesses in the nation, the Entrepreneur 360 List. The success of the company has enabled PADT to take this step towards further expansion.

To learn more about PADT, visit www.padtinc.com or call 1-800-293-7238.

About Phoenix Analysis and Design Technologies
Phoenix Analysis and Design Technologies, Inc. (PADT) is an engineering product and services company that focuses on helping customers who develop physical products by providing Numerical Simulation, Product Development, and 3D Printing solutions. PADT’s worldwide reputation for technical excellence and experienced staff is based on its proven record of building long-term win-win partnerships with vendors and customers. Since its establishment in 1994, companies have relied on PADT because “We Make Innovation Work.” With over 80 employees, PADT services customers from its headquarters at the Arizona State University Research Park in Tempe, Arizona, and from offices in Torrance, California; Littleton, Colorado; Albuquerque, New Mexico; Murray, Utah, and Austin, Texas, as well as through staff members located around the country. More information on PADT can be found at www.PADTINC.com.

Media Contact
Alec Robertson
TechTHiNQ on behalf of PADT
585-281-6399
alec.robertson@techthinq.com
PADT Contact
Eric Miller
PADT, Inc.
Principal & Co-Owner
480.813.4884
eric.miller@padtinc.com

All Things ANSYS 012 – Live From New Mexico: A Look at What’s New in ANSYS 19

 

Published on: January 30, 2018
With: David Mastel, Joe Woodword, Manoj Mahendran, Matt Sutton, Michael Griesi, Tom Chadwick, Ted Harris, Eric Miller
Description: In this episode your host and Co-Founder of PADT, Eric Miller is joined by PADT’s David Mastel, Joe Woodword, Manoj Mahendran, Matt Sutton, Michael Griesi, Tom Chadwick, and Ted Harris, for a discussion on what is new and improved in the recently released ANSYS 19.
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Finding curve directions in ANSYS SpaceClaim   

As it so often does, another blog article idea came from a tech support question that I received the other day. “How do you view edge directions in ANSYS SpaceClaim?

You can do it in Mechanical, on the Edge Graphics Options Toolbar:

This will turn on arrows so that you can see the edge directions. The directions of the edges or curves affects things like mesh biasing factors and mass flow rate boundary conditions. You need to make sure that all your pipes in a thermal analysis, for instance, are flowing in the same direction.

(I have also had three tech support calls about weird spikes showing up in customers’ geometry. The Display Edge Direction is also how you turn those off.)

In ANSYS SpaceClaim, there is no way to just display the edge directions. The directions are controlled by which point you pick first while sketching, so if you are careful, you can make sure they are all consistent. But that doesn’t help when you read in CAD files.  So I thought I would share with you what I found, after a little bit of digging and playing. I discovered that the Move Tool behaves in a very specific way, a way that we can use for our need.

When you pick on the edge of a surface or solid, or even a straight sketched line, the red arrow of the Move Tool will point in the direction of the curve. These directions match what gets shown in Mechanical.

For splines, it’s a little bit different. If you just pick a spline with the Move Tool, the triad will align with the global coordinate system.

To see the spline direction, you first have to hover over the spline, to show the vertices of the spline.

Then you can pick an interior vertex, and the Blue arrow of the Move Tool will follow the spline direction.

This only works at the interior vertices, and not at the ends. At the ends, the Blue tool arrow will always point outward from the spline endpoints, so you won’t really know which is the correct spline direction.

I have also found that this technique does not work on sketched circles or arc because the tool always anchors to the center of the curve, and not to the curve itself.  You can, however, use the Repair>Fit Curves tool to convert arcs to splines, using only the Spline option. Then the Move tool will show those directions as described above.  For circles, you have to make one more step, and first, use the Split tool to split the circle into two arcs.  All that though is, in my opinion, more work than it’s worth.

I hope this helps make your lives just a little easier. Have a great day.

All Things ANSYS 011 – New Years Resolutions & how Metldown and Spectre Hardware vulnerability Impacts Simulation Users

 

Published on: January 15, 2018
With: Ted Harris, Joe Woodward, Doug Oatis, Jim Peters, Ahmed Fayed, Eric Miller
Description: In this episode your host and Co-Founder of PADT, Eric Miller is joined by PADT’s Jim Peters, Joe Woodword, Ahmed Fayed, Doag Oatis and Ted Harris, for a discussion on new and ongoing simulation-related resolutions, as well as a look at how the newly discovered Meltdown and Spectre Hardware vulnerability impact simulation users.
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Getting to Know PADT: ANSYS Sales and Support

This post is the eighth installment in our review of all the different products and services PADT offers our customers. As we add more, they will be available here.  As always, if you have any questions don’t hesitate to reach out to info@padtinc.com or give us a call at 1-800-293-PADT.

When we tell people that “We Make Innovation Work” one of the key ways that we actually make innovation work is through the sales and support of ANSYS Simulation Software.  Few toolsets have changed the way products are designed and manufactured as the structural, thermal, fluid, electromagnetic, and multiphysics simulation programs written by ANSYS, Inc. Outside of the world of mechanical engineering, simulation is not as well known as 3D Printing, but in reality, it plays a larger role in product development with more users and a larger return on investment to companies that make simulation part of their process.

If you are not familiar with simulation, it is a process where a mathematical model is constructed on a computer to represent the physical behavior of a product. Once the model is made, an engineer can do “virtual testing” on the model to understand, improve and optimize the design.  The majority of innovative companies now make simulation a part of their product development process, and ANSYS is the largest provider of simulation tools.

Customers choose ANSYS products for one simple reason, they deliver.  ANSYS only does simulation, they are not a CAD or PLM company trying to add simulation.  With close to $1 Billion in sales, and 2017 should cross that threshold, no other provider is as large either.  They are the biggest provider because their software works. Many other companies offer much cheaper solutions, but time after time companies invest in ANSYS technology because they get their money back quickly in better products that get to market faster.

PADT is not just a reseller of software, we are an ANSYS Elite Channel Partner who dedicates a significant part of our staff, over twenty people, to selling, supporting, and training around the complete ANSYS Product line.  Our territory is the Southwestern United States; including Arizona, New Mexico, Colorado, Utah, Nevada, and Southern California. We have been setting the standard for win-win sales and outstanding support for over twenty years and have a worldwide reputation for technical excellence not just with ANSYS tools, but in how to efficiently use those tools to drive the design of products.

Our sales process starts with understanding our customer’s complete simulation needs; what they have now, what the skill set is of their users, and what they want to achieve with simulation. We then work cooperatively with the customer to design a long-term plan to bring the right ANSYS tools to the right users and to train as needed.   Once a company adds the ANSYS tools, they then have PADT to call directly for technical support.

Our technical support is unique in the industry because it goes beyond the installation and error tracking that most software companies provide. When you call PADT for technical support you get an Engineer with real-world experience using the same tools you use every day. They also know engineering and how simulation fits into the process so we can go beyond what options to use and dig deep into how to apply the products properly. Our outstanding technical support is reflected in our extremely high customer satisfaction rating.

You can learn more about ANSYS by visiting that part of our website, or better, by contacting us and learning why customers who have a choice on who they buy their ANSYS from, chose PADT.

 

 

Save, Save, Save! Setting up a Save after Solution in ANSYS Mechanical

NOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!!!!

Is this the reaction you have when you come in on Monday morning, and realize that another Windows update has, once again, rebooted your PC before you had a chance to save the 30-hour run that should have finished over the weekend? There a Workbench setting that can help relieve some of that stress.

The “Save Project After Solution” option will save the entire project as soon as the solution has finished. So when your model runs for 30 hours over the weekend, it gets saved before a Windows update shuts everything down.  These settings are persistent, so once you’ve changed them to ‘Yes’, then you are all set for next time. You just need to make sure that you change them for each ANSYS version if you have more than one installed.

Now on to my next blog… “How to recover a run if you forgot to change the settings above.” (Grumble Grumble!)

All Things ANSYS 010 – What the future holds for ANSYS & simulation

 

Published on: December 19, 2017
With: Ted Harris, Joe Woodward, Alex Grishin, Jim Peters, Tom Chadwick, Ahmed Fayed, Eric Miller
Description: In this episode your host and Co-Founder of PADT, Eric Miller is joined by PADT’s Alex Grishin, Jim Peters, Joe Woodword, Tom Chadwick, Ahmed Fayed, and Ted Harris, for a discussion on predictions of what the future holds for ANSYS and simulation in general, covering topics such as 3D Printing, Acquisitions, The Cloud, IOT, and Artificial Intelligence.
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Transitioning to ANSYS

Before joining PADT last July, I have worked on FEA and CFD analyses but my exposure to ANSYS was limited and I was concerned about the transition. To my delight, the software was very easy to learn; most often than not intuitive and self-explanatory (e.g. mechanical wizard), the setup time was minimized after learning couple simple features (e.g. named selection, object generator etc.) and the resources on the ANSYS portal were very instrumental in the learning process. Furthermore, the colleagues at PADT proved to be very knowledgeable and experienced and more importantly responsive and eager to jump for help.

One of the most attractive features that caught my attention was the streamline of the Multiphysics nature that ANSYS has. I have been satisfied with the performance of standalone CFD packages in the past, and same goes for structural ones. But never have I dealt with an extensive software that maintained the quality of a specialized one. The importance of this attribute is showing more and more its powers in recent years given the development of new convoluted products of Multiphysics nature e.g. medical applications.

Using ANSYS to simulate medical applications is one of the most rewarding experience I personally enjoy. Even though, it is definitely satisfying to be able to help accelerate innovation in the aerospace, automotive, and a myriad of other industrial areas…the experience in the medical area has a more refreshing taste, probably due to the clear and direct link to human lives. From intravascular procedures to shoulder implants and microdevices, there is one common factor: ANSYS is decreasing the risks of catastrophic failures, improving the product capabilities and shortening the innovation cycle.

Editors Note: Ziad is part of PADT’s team in Southern California.   He is a graduate of USC and has worked at Boeing, Meggit, and Pacific Consolidated Industries before joining PADT.  He works with the rest of our ANSYS technical staff to make sure our users are getting the most from their ANSYS investment. 

 

 

All Things ANSYS 009 – How to get your Models to run Faster & Modeling 3D Printing with ANSYS

 

Published on: December 4, 2017
With: Ted Harris, Joe Woodward, Eric Miller
Description: In this episode your host and Co-Founder of PADT, Eric Miller is joined by PADT’s Senior Mechanical Engineer Joe Woodward, and Simulation Support Manager Ted Harris for a look into recent announcements regarding simulating 3D Printing with ANSYS and 3DSIM as well as a discussion about what users can do when their models are taking too long to solve.
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Estimating Structural Response to Random Vibration in ANSYS Mechanical: Reaction Forces

One of the key outputs from any random vibration analysis is determining the response of the object you are analyzing in terms of reaction forces.  In the presentation below. Alex Grishin shares the theory behind getting accurate forces and then how to do so in ANSYS Mechanical.

PADT-ANSYS-Random-Vib-Reaction-Forces-2017_11_22-1

As always, please contact PADT for your ANSYS simulation, training, and customization needs.

 

 

IEEE Day 2017: Smart Antennas for IoT and 5G

IEEE Day celebrates the first time in history when engineers worldwide and IEEE members gathered to share their technical ideas in 1884. Events were held around the world by 846 IEEE Chapters this year. So, to celebrate, I attended a joint chapter meeting in at The Museum of Flight in Seattle with technical presentations focused on “Smart Antennas for IoT and 5G”. There were approximately 60 in attendance, so assuming this was the average attendance globally results in over 50,000 engineers celebrating IEEE Day worldwide!

The Seattle seminar featured three speakers that spanned theory, design, test, integration, and application of smart antennas. There was much discussion about the complexity and challenges of meeting the ambitious goals of 5G, which extend beyond mobile broadband data access. Some key objectives of 5G are to increase capacity, increase data rates, reduce latency, increase availability, and improve spectral and energy efficiency by 2020. A critical technology behind achieving these goals is beamforming antenna arrays, which were at the forefront of each presentation.

Anil Kumar from Boeing focused on the application of mmWave technology on aircraft. Test data was used to analyze EM radiation leakage through coated and uncoated aircraft windows. However, since existing regulations don’t consider the increased path loss associated with such high frequencies, the integration of 5G wireless applications may be restricted or delayed. Beyond this regulatory challenge, Anil discussed how multipath reflectors and absorbers will present significant challenges to successful integration inside the cabin. Although testing is always required for validation, designing the layout of the onboard transceivers may be impractical to optimize without an asymptotic EM simulation tool that can account for creeping waves, diffraction, and multi-bounce.

Considering the test and measurement perspective, Jari Vikstedt from ETS-Lindgren focused on the challenges of testing smart antenna systems. Smart or adaptive antenna systems will not likely perform the same in an anechoic chamber test as they would in real systems. Of particular difficulty, radiation null placement is just as critical as beam placement. This poses a difficult challenge to the number and location of probes in a test environment. Not only would a large number of probes become impractical, there is significant shadowing at mmWave frequencies which can negatively impact the measurement. Furthermore, compact ranges can significantly impact testing and line of sight measurements become particularly challenging. While not a purely test-oriented observation, this lead to considering the challenge of tower hand off. If a handset and tower use beamforming to maintain a link, if is difficult for an approaching tower to even sense the handset to negotiate the hand-off.

In contrast, if the handset was continuously scanning, the approaching tower could be sensed to negotiate the hand-off before the link is jeopardized.

The keynote speaker, who also traveled from Phoenix to Seattle, was ASU Professor Dr. Constantine Balanis. Dr. Balanis opened his presentation by making a distinction between conventional “dumb antennas” and “smart antennas”. In reality, there are no smart antennas, but instead smart antenna systems. This is a critical point from an engineering perspective since it highlights the complexity and challenge of designing modern communication systems. The focus of his presentation was using an adaptive system to steer null points in addition to the beam in an antenna array using a least mean square (LMS) algorithm. He began with a simple linear patch array with fixed uniform amplitude weights, since an analytic solution was practical and could be used to validate a simulation setup. However, once the simulation results were verified for confidence, designing a more complex array with weighted amplitudes accompanying the element phase shift was only practical through simulation. While beam steering will create a device centric system by targeting individual users on massive multiple input multiple output (MIMO) networks, null steering can improve efficiency by minimizing interference to other devices.

Whether spatial processing is truly the “last frontier in the battle for cellular system capacity”, 5G technology will most certainly usher in a new era of high capacity, high speed, efficient, and ubiquitous means of communication. If you would like to learn more about how PADT approaches antenna simulation, you can read about it here and contact us directly at info@padtinc.com.