Experiences with Developing a “Somewhat Large” ACT Extension in ANSYS

With each release of ANSYS the customization toolkit continues to evolve and grow.  Recently I developed what I would categorize as a decent sized ACT extension.    My purpose in this post is to highlight a few of the techniques and best practices that I learned along the way.

Why I chose C#?

Most ACT extensions are written in Python.  Python is a wonderfully useful language for quickly prototyping and building applications, frankly of all shapes and sizes.  Its weaker type system, plethora of libraries, large ecosystem and native support directly within the ACT console make it a natural choice for most ACT work.  So, why choose to move to C#?

The primary reasons I chose to use C# instead of python for my ACT work were the following:

  1. I prefer the slightly stronger type safety afforded by the more strongly typed language. Having a definitive compilation step forces me to show my code first to a compiler.  Only if and when the compiler can generate an assembly for my source do I get to move to the next step of trying to run/debug.  Bugs caught at compile time are the cheapest and generally easiest bugs to fix.  And, by definition, they are the most likely to be fixed.  (You’re stuck until you do…)
  2. The C# development experience is deeply integrated into the Visual Studio developer tool. This affords not only a great editor in which to write the code, but more importantly perhaps the world’s best debugger to figure out when and how things went wrong.   While it is possible to both edit and debug python code in Visual Studio, the C# experience is vastly superior.

The Cost of Doing ACT Business in C#

Unfortunately, writing an ACT extension in C# does incur some development cost in terms setting up the development environment to support the work.  When writing an extension solely in Python you really only need a decent text editor.  Once you setup your ACT extension according to the documented directory structure protocol, you can just edit the python script files directly within that directory structure.  If you recall, ACT requires an XML file to define the extension and then a directory with the same name that contains all of the assets defining the extension like scripts, images, etc…  This “defines” the extension.

When it comes to laying out the requisite ACT extension directory structure on disk, C# complicates things a bit.  As mentioned earlier, C# involves a compilation step that produces a DLL.  This DLL must then somehow be loaded into Mechanical to be used within the extension.  To complicate things a little further, Visual Studio uses a predefined project directory structure that places the build products (DLLs, etc…) within specific directories of the project depending on what type of build you are performing.   Therefore the compiled DLL may end up in any number of different directories depending on how you decide to build the project.  Finally, I have found that the debugging experience within Visual Studio is best served by leaving the DLL located precisely wherever Visual Studio created it.

Here is a summary list of the requirements/problems I encountered when building an ACT extension using C#

  1. I need to somehow load the produced DLL into Mechanical so my extension can use it.
  2. The DLL that is produced during compilation may end up in any number of different directories on disk.
  3. An ACT Extension must conform to a predefined structural layout on the filesystem. This layout does not map cleanly to the Visual studio project layout.
  4. The debugging experience in Visual Studio is best served by leaving the produced DLL exactly where Visual Studio left it.

The solution that I came up with to solve these problems was twofold.

First, the issue of loading the proper DLL into Mechanical was solved by using a combination of environment variables on my development machine in conjunction with some Python programming within the ACT main python script.  Yes, even though the bulk of the extension is written in C#, there is still a python script to sort of boot-load the extension into Mechanical.  More on that below.

Second, I decided to completely rebuild the ACT extension directory structure on my local filesystem every time I built the project in C#.  To accomplish this, I created in visual studio what are known as post-build events that allow you to specify an action to occur automatically after the project is successfully built.  This action can be quite generic.  In my case, the “action” was to locally run a python script and provide it with a few arguments on the command line.  More on that below.

Loading the Proper DLL into Mechanical

As I mentioned above, even an ACT extension written in C# requires a bit of Python code to bootstrap it into Mechanical.  It is within this bit of Python that I chose to tackle the problem of deciding which dll to actually load.  The code I came up with looks like the following:

Essentially what I am doing above is querying for the presence of a particular environment variable that is on my machine.  (The assumption is that it wouldn’t randomly show up on end user’s machine…) If that variable is found and its value is 1, then I determine whether or not to load a debug or release version of the DLL depending on the type of build.  I use two additional environment variables to specify where the debug and release directories for my Visual Studio project exist.  Finally, if I determine that I’m running on a user’s machine, I simply look for the DLL in the proper location within the extension directory.  Setting up my python script in this way enables me to forget about having to edit it once I’m ready to share my extension with someone else.  It just works.

Rebuilding the ACT Extension Directory Structure

The final piece of the puzzle involves rebuilding the ACT extension directory structure upon the completion of a successful build.  I do this for a few different reasons.

  1. I always want to have a pristine copy of my extension laid out on disk in a manner that could be easily shared with others.
  2. I like to store all of the various extension assets, like images, XML files, python files, etc… within the Visual Studio Project. In this way, I can force the project to be out of date and in need of a rebuild if any of these files change.  I find this particularly useful for working with the XML definition file for the extension.
  3. Having all of these files within the Visual Studio Project makes tracking thing within a version control system like SVN or git much easier.

As I mentioned before, to accomplish this task I use a combination of local python scripting and post build events in Visual Studio.  I won’t show the entire python code, but essentially what it does is programmatically work through my local file system where the C# code is built and extract all of the files needed to form the ACT extension.  It then deletes any old extension files that might exist from a previous build and lays down a completely new ACT extension directory structure in the specified location.  The definition of the post build event is specified within the project settings in Visual Studio as follows:

As you can see, all I do is call out to the system python interpreter and pass it a script with some arguments.  Visual Studio provides a great number of predefined variables that you can use to build up the command line for your script.  So, for example, I pass in a string that specifies what type of build I am currently performing, either “Debug” or “Release”.  Other strings are passed in to represent directories, etc…

The Synergies of Using Both Approaches

Finally, I will conclude with a note on the synergies you can achieve by using both of the approaches mentioned above.  One of the final enhancements I made to my post build script was to allow it to “edit” some of the text based assets that are used to define the ACT extension.  A text based asset is something like an XML file or python script.  What I came to realize is that certain aspects of the XML file that define the extension need to be different depending upon whether or not I wish to debug the extension locally or release the extension for an end user to consume.  Since I didn’t want to have to remember to make those modifications before I “released” the extension for someone else to use, I decided to encode those modifications into my post build script.  If the post build script was run after a “debug” build, I coded it to configure the extension for optimal debugging on my local machine.  However, if I built a “release” version of the extension, the post build script would slightly alter the XML definition file and the main python file to make it more suitable for running on an end user machine.   By automating it in this way, I could easily build for either scenario and confidently know that the resulting extension would be optimally configured for the particular end use.

Conclusions

Now that I have some experience in writing ACT extensions in C# I must honestly say that I prefer it over Python.  Much of the “extra plumbing” that one must invest in in order to get a C# extension up and running can be automated using the techniques described within this post.  After the requisite automation is setup, the development process is really straightforward.  From that point onward, the increased debugging fidelity, added type safety and familiarity a C based language make the development experience that much better!  Also, there are some cool things you can do in C# that I’m not 100% sure you can accomplish in Python alone.  More on that in later posts!

If you have ideas for an ACT extension to better serve your business needs and would like to speak with someone who has developed some extensions, please drop us a line.  We’d be happy to help out however we can!

 

Connection Groups and Your Sanity in ANSYS Mechanical

You kids don’t know how good you have it with automatic contact creation in Mechanical.  Back in my day, I’d have to use the contact wizard in MAPDL or show off my mastery of the ESURF command to define contacts between parts.  Sure, there were some macros somewhere on the interwebs that would go through and loop for surfaces within a particular offset, but for the sake of this stereotypical “old-tyme” rant, I didn’t use them (I actually didn’t, I was just TOO good at using ESURF to need anyone else’s help).

Image result for old tyme

Hey, it gets me from point A to B

In Mechanical contact is automatically generated based on a set of rules contained in the ‘Connection Group’ object:

image

It might look a little over-whelming, but really the only thing you’ll need to play around with is the ‘Tolerance Type’.  This can either ‘Slider’ or ‘Value’ (or use sheet thickness if you’re working with shells).  What this controls is the face offset value for which Mechanical will automatically build contact.  So in the picture shown above faces that are 5.9939E-3in apart will automatically have contact created.  You can play around with the slider value to change what the tolerance

image image image

As you can see, the smaller the tolerance slider the larger the ‘acceptable’ gap becomes.  If you change the Tolerance Type to be ‘Value’ then you can just directly type in a number.

Typically the default values do a pretty good job automatically defining contact.  However, what happens if you have a large assembly with a lot of thin parts?  Then what you run into is non-sensical contact between parts that don’t actually touch (full disclosure, I actually had to modify the contact settings to have the auto-generated contact do something like this…but I have seen this in other assemblies with very thin/slender parts stacked on top of each other):

image

In the image above, we see that contact has been defined between the bolt head and a plate when there is clearly a washer present.  So we can fix this by going in and specifying a value of 0, meaning that only surfaces that are touching will have contact defined.  But now let’s say that some parts of your assembly aren’t touching (maybe it’s bad CAD, maybe it’s a welded assembly, maybe you suppressed parts that weren’t important).

image

The brute force way to handle this would be to set the auto-detection value to be 0 and then go back and manually define the missing contacts using the options shown in the image above.  Or, what we could do is modify the auto-contact to be broken up into groups and apply appropriate rules as necessary.  The other benefit to this is if you’re working in large assemblies, you can retain your sanity by having contact generated region by region.   In the words of the original FE-guru, Honest Abe, it’s easier to manage things when they’re logically broken up into chunks.

image

Said No One Ever

Sorry…that was bad.  I figured in the new alt-fact world with falsely-attributed quotes to historical leaders, I might as well make something up for the oft-overlooked FE-crowd.

So, how do you go about implementing this?  Easy, first just delete the default connection group (right-mouse-click on it and select delete).  Next, just select a group of bodies and click the ‘Connection Group’ button:

image image image

In the image series above, I selected all the bolts and washers, clicked the connection group, and now I have created a connection group that will only automatically generate contact between the bolts and washers.  I don’t have to worry about contact being generated between the bolt and plate.  Rinse, lather, and repeat the process until you’ve created all the groups you want:

image

ALL the Connection Groups!

Now that you have all these connection groups, you can fine-tune the auto-detection rules to meet the ‘needs’ of those individual body groups.  Just zooming in on one of the groups:

image

By default, when I generate contact for this group I’ll get two contact pairs:

image image

While this may work, let’s say I don’t want a single contact pair for the two dome-like structures, but 2.  That way I can just change the behavior on the outer ‘ring’ to be frictionless and force the top to be bonded:

image

I modified the auto-detection tolerance to be a user-defined distance (note that when you type in a number and move your mouse over into the graphics window you will see a bulls-eye that indicates the search radius you just defined).  Next, I told the auto-detection not to group any auto-detected contacts together.  The result is I now get 3 contact pairs defined:

image image image

Now I can just modify the auto-generated contacts to have the middle-picture shown in the series above to be frictionless.  I could certainly just manually define the contact regions, but if you have an assembly of dozens/hundreds of parts it’s significantly easier to have Mechanical build up all the contact regions and then you just have to modify individual contact pairs to have the type/behavior/etc you want (bonded, frictionless, symmetric, asymmetric, custom pinball radius, etc).  This is also useful if you have bodies that need to be connected via face-to-edge or edge-to-edge contact (then you can set the appropriate priority as to which, if any of those types should be preserved over others).

So the plus side to doing all of this is that after any kind of geometry update you shouldn’t have much, if any, contact ‘repair’ to do.  All the bodies/rules have already been fine tuned to automatically build what you want/need.  You also know where to look to modify contacts (although using the ‘go to’ functionality makes that pretty easy as well).  That way you can define all these connection groups, leave everything as bonded and do a preliminary solve to ensure things look ‘okay’.  Then go back and start introducing some more reality into the simulation by allowing certain regions to move relative to each other.

The downside to doing your contacts this way is you risk missing an interface because you’re now defining the load path.  To deal with that you can just insert a dummy-modal environment into your project, solve, and check that you don’t have any 0-Hz modes.

Importing Material Properties from Solidworks into ANSYS Mechanical…Finally!

Finally! One of the most common questions we get from our customers who use Solidworks is “Why can’t I transfer my materials from Solidworks? I have to type in the values all over again every time.”  Unfortunately, until now, ANSYS has not been able to access the Solidworks material library to access that information.

There is great news with ANSYS 18.  ANSYS is now able to import the material properties from Solidworks and use them in an analysis within Workbench.  Let’s see how it works.

I have a Solidworks assembly that I downloaded from Grabcad.  The creator had pre-defined all the materials for this model as you can see below.

Once you bring in the geometry into Workbench, just ensure that the Material Properties item is checked under the Geometry cell’s properties.  If you don’t see the panel, just right-click on the geometry cell and click on Properties.

Once you are in ANSYS Mechanical, for example you will see that the parts are already pre-defined with the material specified in Solidworks .

The trick now is to find out where this material is getting stored. If we go to Engineering Data, the only thing we will see is Structural Steel. However when we go to Engineering Data Sources that is where we see a new material library called CADMaterials.  That will show you a list of all the materials and their properties that were imported from a CAD tool such as Solidworks, Creo, NX, etc.

You can of course copy the material and store it for future use in ANSYS like any other material.  This will save you from having to manually define all the materials for a part or assembly from scratch within ANSYS.

Please let us know if you have any questions and we’ll be happy to answer them for you.

ANSYS 18 HPC Licensing Updates Webinar

PADT’s webinar covering Mechanical APDL & HPC available in ANSYS 18 will be going live tomorrow at 12:00 PM MST.

Don’t miss this opportunity, sign up today!

With the release of ANSYS 18 comes a plethora of new HPC product packages, each uniquely positioned at a competitive price to ensure that you receive the option that is right for you.

For more information, join us as PADT covers the specifics of the available licensing options, followed by a live Q & A session with simulation support manager Ted Harris.

By watching this webinar you will learn:

  • About the four main product packages available with ANSYS 18

  • What licensing options are available under each package

  • How price scaling works with ANSYS 18

  • The solving capabilities for each package and licensing option

ANSYS Video Tips: ANSYS SpaceClaim 18.0 Skin Surface Tool Changes

There were some changes in ANSYS SpaceClaim to the very useful tool that lets you create a surface patch on scan or STL data at 18.0.  In this video we show how to create corner points for a surface patch boundary and how to get an accurate measurement of how far the surface you create deviates from the STL or scan data underneath.

How-To: ANSYS 18 RSM CLIENT SETUP on Windows 2012 R2 HPC

We put this simple how-to together for users to speed up the process on getting your Remote Solve Manager client up and running on Microsoft Windows 2012 R2 HPC.

Download the step-by-step slides here:

padt-ansys-18-RSM-client-setup-win2012r2HPC.pdf

You might also be interested in a short article on the setup and use of monitoring for ANSYS R18 RSM.

Monitoring Jobs Using ANSYS RSM 18.0

If you are an ANSYS RSM (Remote Solve Manager) user, you’ll find some changes in version 18.0. Most of the changes, which are improvements to the installation and configuration process, are under the hood from a user standpoint. One key change for users, though, is how you monitor a running job. This short entry shows how to do it in version 18.0.

Rather than bring up the RSM monitor window from the Start menu as was done in prior version, in 18.0 we launch the RSM job monitor directly from the Workbench window, by clicking on Jobs > Open Job Monitor… as shown here:

When a solution has been submitted to RSM for solution on a remote cluster or workstation, it will show up in the resulting Job Monitor window, like this:

Hopefully this saves some effort in trying to figure out where to monitor jobs you have submitted to RSM. Happy solving!

Reveling in Speed and Technology – Tesla Test Drive Day at PADT

We have great customers.  The kind of cusomers that call up and ask “Hey, what do you think about having a Tesla test drive event for PADt employees”  Duh.  Yes.  Please provide contact information.

Then we thought this was an event better shared with other techno-speed-nerds. The Tempe Tesla show room people liked the idea so we put together an event for our ANSYS and Stratasys customers. (Just another reason to buy from us)

The basic idea was simple, stop on by the PADT parking lot in Tempe and drive a Tesla Model S or Model X, or both.  The Tesla people brought along their technical person and the test drive people were also very knowledgable about all the features in the three vehicles they let us drive. The course left the PADT parking lot, drove up to Elliot, then entred to 101, and then get off at Warner or Rey and head back, while the brave Tesla employee tried to keep cool. Especially when Oren was driving.

For many of us, this was the first time we had driven one.  Let me just say that the common factor across employees and cusotmers is that everyone had an ear-to-ear grin on their face when they got back from their test drive.  These cars are not just fast (large numbers of electrons pushed through big motors equals lots of torque right away) but they are brilliantly engineered. From the user interface, to the seats to, to the suspension. Everything is done right.  As a group of engineers that was almost as exciting as the raw power and impecable styling of the cars.

It was a true nerdfest.  We spent 10 minutes discussing regenerative breaking schemes and the idea of using regeneration all the time when you lift off the accerator instead of putting your foot on the break to slow down slightly.  This is the type of paradigm shift that disrupts around one hundred years of automotive legacy.  Why does the accelrator pedal have to be an accelerator pedal. Why can’t it be an input for acceleration and deceleration based on position?  We also spent even more time (I’m embarassed to say how long) talking about charging.  And then the topic turned to autonomous driving and the sensors used.  Good times.  Good times.

PADT’s relationships with Tesla actually goes way back. When they were first starting out and were just a handfull of engineers, we provided some ANSYS training and did a consulting job for them on thermal management for an early battery system.  So we proudly count them as a happy PADT customer.  And of course PADT worked on the large Blink chargers and has supported many companies that are suppliers to tesla.

Look for similar events in the future. No sales or seminars, just smart-people-fun type of events. 

 

Phoenix Business Journal: ​How do you get value out of Big Data? Simulation!

It’s all the rage. “Big Data!” fixes everything. There is a lot of hype around the value of knowing so much about so many things. The problem is very few people have figured out what to do with that data.  But leading technology companies like GE are using a proven tool to get value from all that great data.  In “How do you get value out of Big Data? Simulation!” I look at how numerical simulation can be used to create digital twins of what your products are doing in the real world, delivering huge benefits today.

Discover the Power of Pervasive Simulation – ANSYS R 18

Introducing the Release of ANSYS 18

Manufacturing is undergoing the most fundamental transformation since the introduction of the assembly line. Trends like the Internet of Things, additive manufacturing and machine learning are merging the physical and digital worlds, resulting in products that defy imagination.

Join the new CEO of ANSYS, Ajei Gopal, and visionary customers

CumminsNebia,OticonMetso, and GE Digital as they demonstrate the power of pervasive simulation, available in the release of ANSYS 18.

Attend this webinar to learn:

  • How you can use digital exploration to quickly evaluate changes in design, reducing development costs and preventing late-stage design changes
  • How digital prototyping enables you to provide insights into real-world product performance, test “what-if” scenarios and ensure optimal designs
  • How simulation is moving downstream of the product life-cycle through the use of digital twins to increase efficiency and to decrease unplanned downtime

Stay tuned as we will be covering the new additions in ANSYS 18 over the next few months.

PADT Named ANSYS North American Channel Partner of the Year and Becomes an ANSYS Certified Elite Channel Partner

The ANSYS Sales Team at PADT was honored last week when we were recognized four times at the recent kickoff meeting for the ANSYS North American Sales orginization.  The most humbling of those trips up to the stage was when PADT was recognized as the North American Channel Partner of the Year for 2016.  It was humbling because there are so many great partners that we have had the privilege of worked with for almost 20 years now.  Our team worked hard, and our customers were fantastic, so we were able to make strides in adding capability at existing accounts, finding new customers that could benefit from ANSYS simulation tools, and expanding our reach further in Southern California.  It helps that simulation driven product development actually works, and ANSYS tools allow it to work well.

Here we are on stage, accepting the award:

PADT Accepts the Channel Partner of the Year Award. (L-R: ANSYS CEO Ajei Gopal, ANSYS VP Worldwide Sales and Customer Excellence Rick Mahoney, ANSYS Director of WW Channel Ravi Kumar, PADT Co-Owner Ward Rand, PADT Co-Owner Eric Miller, PADT Software Sales Manager Bob Calvin, ANSYS VP Sales for the Americas Ubaldo Rodriguez

We were also recognized two other times; for exceeding our sales goals and for making the cut to the annual President’s Club retreat.   As a reminder, PADT sells the full multiphysics product line from PADT in Southern California, Arizona, New Mexico, Colorado, Utah, and Nevada.  This is a huge geographic area with a very diverse set of industries and customers.

In addition, ANSYS, Inc. announced that PADT was one of several Channel Partners who had obtained Elite Certified Channel Partner status. This will allow PADT to provide our customers with better services and gives our team access to more resources within ANSYS, Inc.

Once we made it back from the forests and hills of Western Pennsylvania we were able to get a picture with the full sale team.  Great job guys:

We could not have had such a great 2016 without the support of everyone at PADT. The sales team, the application engineers, the support engineers, business operations, and everyone else that pitches in.   We look forward to making more customers happy in 2017 and coming back with additional hardware.

Work for a startup or know someone who does? – Don’t miss this opportunity!

We here at PADT would like to remind you that our webinar covering the significance of simulation for startups is taking place soon!

Join us: Wednesday January 25, 2017

From 12 pm – 1 pm MST

PADT’s Co-owner and Principal, Eric Miller, will be presenting on the various benefits that simulation software can provide for startup companies and entrepreneurs alike. By attending this webinar you will learn:

  • The practical uses of simulation in product design
  • How simulation has driven innovation
  • Why simulation is the most effective tool for startups
  • How simulation can reduce time to market as well as production costs
  • And how you can take advantage of the discounts that the ANSYS Startup Program provides

While many startups tend to avoid using simulation due to cost or a lack of accessibility, this is a key aspect of the modern manufacturing process and should not be ignored.

As a partner in the Startup Program, you will gain instant access to ANSYS solutions so you can start building virtual prototypes of your new products. These virtual prototypes can be modified and tested with simulation hundreds of times in the same time it would take to build and test one physical prototype – saving you time and money as you work to perfect your product design. The partnership gives you access to the full portfolio of multiphysics simulation bundles, including the Structural and Fluids bundle and the Electromagnetics bundle.

Take advantage of this opportunity and register today!

ANSYS Startup Program – Webinar


Phoenix Analysis & Design Technologies Presents:

ANSYS Startup Program: The Significance of Simulation


Wednesday January 25th, from 12 pm – 1 pm MST

We here at PADT would like to remind you about our upcoming webinar covering the importance of simulation software for startups. Not only can the use of such programs help to shorten your company’s time to market, it is also beneficial for reducing manufacturing costs.   


 Click Here to register for this webinar 


While many startups tend to avoid using simulation due to cost or a lack of accessibility, this is a key aspect of the modern manufacturing process and should not be ignored.

As a partner in the Startup Program, you will gain instant access to ANSYS solutions so you can start building virtual prototypes of your new products. These virtual prototypes can be modified and tested with simulation hundreds of times in the same time it would take to build and test one physical prototype – saving you time and money as you work to perfect your product design. The partnership gives you access to the full portfolio of multiphysics simulation bundles, including the Structural and Fluids bundle and the Electromagnetics bundle.

Attend this webinar to discover how you and Phoenix Analysis and Design Technologies can take advantage of the numerous benefits that ANSYS simulation software has to offer, priced at a cost designed for you. 


 Click Here to register for this webinar 


This webinar is taking being held on Wednesday, January 25th from 12 pm – 1 pm MST, and is a can’t miss opportunity. Make sure to register to attend today, we look forward to seeing you there!

ANSYS Startup Program: The Significance of Simulation – Webinar


Phoenix Analysis & Design Technologies Presents:

ANSYS Startup Program: The Significance of Simulation 


Do you work for a startup of know someone who does?

PADT would like to invite you to attend our upcoming webinar in support of the ANSYS Startup Program.

Click Here to register for this webinar

Wednesday January 25th, from 12 pm – 1 pm MST

Join us as our own Co-Owner and Principal Eric Miller discusses how simulation software is helping new entrepreneurs and startup companies alike to shorten their time to market and reduce their manufacturing costs.

While many startups tend to avoid using simulation due to cost or a lack of accessibility, this is a key aspect of the modern manufacturing process and should not be ignored.

As a partner in the Startup Program, you will gain instant access to ANSYS solutions so you can start building virtual prototypes of your new products. These virtual prototypes can be modified and tested with simulation hundreds of times in the same time it would take to build and test one physical prototype – saving you time and money as you work to perfect your product design. The partnership gives you access to the full portfolio of multiphysics simulation bundles, including the Structural and Fluids bundle and the Electromagnetics bundle.

Click Here to register for this webinar

PADT Events – January 2017

Welcome to 2017. We are all very excited about what we have planned for events this year. As we travel around the country, and the world, we hope to have to chance to meet many of you who follow PADT. 2017 will look a lot like 2016 except that, based on your feedback, we will be trying more on-line webinars and events.  As always, contact us if you have any questions.


Launch of ASU Manufacturing Research and Innovation Hub

01/18/17
ASU Polytenic Campus
Mesa, AZ

PADT will be on-hand at ASU Polytechnic school for the launch of ASU’s new Manufacturing Research and Innovation Hub. Stop by to see their new facilities and meet the students and staff along with partners like PADT that helped make it happen.
Learn more

ANSYS Startup Program Webinar: The Significance of Simulation

01/25/17
Online

This seminar will discuss how ANSYS simulation software can be used by startups to shorten their time to market and reduce their manufacturing costs. We will discuss what simulation is and how to use it effectively, as well as go over the ANSYS Startup Program and how it gives early stage companies access to world class simulation.
Learn more

Invited Speaker at the 2017 Arizona Science Bowl (High School Event)

01/28/17
ASU West Campus
Glendale, AZ

PADT’s Dhruv Bhate, PhD will speak to students at the High School Science Bowl. This is a great event, and if you have never been, you should go. The level of technology and scientific rigour fo these Middle School and High School kids is amazing.
Learn more

Tesla Test Drive at PADT

01/30/16
PADT Tempe
Tempe, AZ

Yes, you read that right. We will be inviting customers to come to PADT and see how the simulation and 3D Printing technologin we sell, support, and use is applied to advanced automotive systems – Cool Cars! Tesla Motors has been kind enough to partner with us to allow a select few the oportunity to test drive a Tesla. Look for your invite via email and register quickly, space is limited.
Learn more