Press Release: New Digital Manufacturing Facility for On-Demand Delivery of Production Quality Parts Opened at PADT

PADT is very proud to announce that our new manufacturing facility that uses 3D Printing technology to make production parts in volume, is open for business.  When we bought our first Additive Manufacturing machine in 1994 we dreamed of the day when we could have several machines quickly making complete plastic parts in one step. Carbon’s Carbon’s Digital Light Synthesis™ (DLS) was the technology we were waiting for. It is here now, and we are now making real parts with injection molded quality.

We chose to leverage Carbon’s technology because of the three key differentiators in their system:

  1. Digital light projection is much faster than a laser or print head.
  2. Oxygen permeable optics enables accurate project while keeping the part from sticking to the optics.
  3. Programmable liquid resins produce parts with excellent mechanical properties, resolution and surface finish.

What every engineer wants: fast, strong, and accurate.  And because it is Additive Manufacturing, no tooling is required and shapes that can be created that are impossible to manufacture with traditional methods.  This is the promise of 3D Printing for production, and we can’t wait to see what our customers do with it.

Please read the press release below for more details on the opening of our facility.

You can also find more information here:

Please find the official press release on this new partnership below and here in PDF and HTML

Now is the time to explore production using Additive Manufacturing.  If you have plastic parts that you want to manufacture using 3D Printing, contact Renee Palacios at renee@padtinc.com or 480.813.4884.

Press Release:

New Digital Manufacturing Facility for On-Demand Delivery
of Production Quality Parts Opened at PADT

A Carbon Certified Production Partner, PADT Enables Customers to Make Cost-Effective Parts Quickly with Near-Injection Molded Material Properties

TEMPE, Ariz., June 21, 2018 ─ Realizing the long-term promise of 3D Printing to replace traditional manufacturing as a way to make production parts, Phoenix Analysis and Design Technologies (PADT) today announced the launch of On-Demand Manufacturing with Carbon. As a certified Production Partner of Silicon Valley-based Carbon, PADT can now deliver to its customers cost-effective, quality parts in volumes of between 2,000–5,000 in about one week, using Carbon’s Digital Light Synthesisä (DLS) technology and the Carbon production system.

“Since we started in 3D Printing almost 25 years ago, we have dreamed of the day that we could use additive manufacturing to move beyond prototyping and deliver production parts to our customers when they need them, the way they need them,” said Rey Chu, co-founder and principal, PADT. “Carbon’s DLS technology has made this possible by giving us a faster process that creates parts with the same properties as injection molding.”

Core to On-Demand Manufacturing with Carbon is Carbon’s proprietary DLS technology, which changes the way companies design, engineer, make and deliver products. Carbon’s novel approach uses digital light projection, oxygen permeable optics, and programmable liquid resins to produce parts with excellent mechanical properties, resolution and surface finish. A significant advantage of using the approach is that no tooling is required. High-quality parts are produced without the time or expense of creating molds, and shapes that cannot be made with injection molding can be created using Carbon’s DLS technology.

“Our goal is to deliver true, scalable digital fabrication across the globe, enabling creators to design and produce previously unmakeable products, both economically and at scale,” said Dana McCallum, head of Production Partnerships at Carbon. “PADT has a long history in the industry and a strong reputation for engineering excellence. We’re thrilled to have them as a certified Carbon production partner.”

PADT’s on-demand manufacturing is backed up by in-house product development, inspection, simulation and injecting molding expertise. All parts are produced under its quality system, and its in-house Computer Numeric Control (CNC) machining lets the company complete any critical feature creation on-site with no delays.

PADT’s Digital Manufacturing Facility, the Southwest’s first true “3D Printing factory,” is now open to customers. For more information about On-Demand Manufacturing with Carbon, please visit PADT’s site here or call 1-800-293-PADT. For more information about Carbon, visit www.carbon3d.com.

About Phoenix Analysis and Design Technologies

Phoenix Analysis and Design Technologies, Inc. (PADT) is an engineering product and services company that focuses on helping customers who develop physical products by providing Numerical Simulation, Product Development, and 3D Printing solutions. PADT’s worldwide reputation for technical excellence and experienced staff is based on its proven record of building long-term win-win partnerships with vendors and customers. Since its establishment in 1994, companies have relied on PADT because “We Make Innovation Work.” With over 80 employees, PADT services customers from its headquarters at the Arizona State University Research Park in Tempe, Arizona, and from offices in Torrance, California, Littleton, Colorado, Albuquerque, New Mexico, Austin, Texas, and Murray, Utah, as well as through staff members located around the country. More information on PADT can be found at www.PADTINC.com.

# # #

Media Contact
Alec Robertson
TechTHiNQ on behalf of PADT
585-281-6399
alec.robertson@techthinq.com
PADT Contact
Eric Miller
PADT, Inc.
Principal & Co-Owner
480.813.4884
eric.miller@padtinc.com

 

Phoenix Business Journal: A ping pong-playing robot? The world has just changed

While wandering through a maze of booths at a recent trade show, I stumbled upon something quite amazing. “A ping pong-playing robot? The world has just changed” explores how sensors, the cloud, and artificial intelligence is leaping forward and making science fiction real.

Phoenix Business Journal: ​Automation is here and we need to pay attention

People talk about automation, mostly with respecte to manufacturing, like it is something that is comming.  But “Automation is here and we need to pay attention.” If you don’t understand how computer software, robotics, and sensors are changing every aspect of our lives, odds are you will miss how it will change your business.

ANSYS 18 – SpaceClaim Webinar

In its latest release, ANSYS SpaceClaim further integrates its ease of use and rapid geometry manipulation capabilities into common simulation workflows. From large changes to behind the scenes enhancements, you’ll notice efficiency improvements across the board. You’ll save time automating geometry tasks with the expanded recording and replay capabilities of SpaceClaim’s enhanced scripting environment.

Join PADT’s Application Engineer Tyler Smith  for this webinar and learn about several improvements that are guaranteed to save time, enhance your designs and improve overall usability. We’ll cover:

  • Continued development of SpaceClaim’s scripting environment. With expanded recording capabilities and replayability of scripts on model versions, you’ll save time in the steps needed to automate geometry tasks.

  • Faceted data optimization and smoothing enhancements. You can greatly simplify and smooth topology optimized STL data for downstream printing, while preserving the integrity of localized regions.

  • Lattice Infilling for additive manufacturing. The Infilling functionality has greatly expanded to include several lattice infill types, all with custom options to ensure your 3-D printed component has an ideal strength-to-weight relationship.

  • Exploration of inner details of a model with the new fly-through capability. Without hiding components or using cross sections, this capability provides graphical feedback at your fingertips while making it even more enjoyable to work in a 3-D environment.

ASU Polytechnique Deploys Robots in Project for 3D Printing Automation for Orbital ATK

Sometimes we run across some great exampls of industry and academia working together and like to share them as examples of win-win partnerships that can move technology forward and give studends a great oportunity.   A current Capstone Design Project by students at ASU Polytechnique is a great example.  It is also an early exmple of what can be done at the brand new Additive Manufacturing Center that was recently opened at the campus.

I’ll let ASU Mecanical Enginering Systems student Dean McBride tell you in his own words:

Orbital ATK in Chandler currently utilizes two Stratasys Dimension SST 1200es printers to prototype various parts with.  These printers print on parts trays, which must be removed and re-inserted into the printer to start new prints.  Wanting to increase process efficiency, Orbital had the desire of automating this 3D printing process during times when employees are not present to run the printers.  After the idea was born, Orbital presented this project to ASU Polytechnic as a potential senior capstone design project.  Shortly after, an ambitious team was assembled to take on the project.

 Numerous iterations of the engineering design process took place, and the team finally arrived at a final solution.  This solution is a Cartesian style robot, meaning the robot moves in linear motions, similar to the 1200es printer itself.  The mechanical frame and structure of the robot have been mostly assembled at this point.  Once assembly is achieved, the team will focus their efforts on the electrical system of the robot, as well as software coding of the micro-controller control system.  The team will be working to fine tune all aspects of the system until early May when the school semester ends.  The final goal of this project is to automate at least two complete print cycles without human interaction.

Here is a picture of the team with the robot they are building along side the Stratasys FDM printer they are automating.

 

Phoenix Business Journal: The next revolution in manufacturing is full automation

pbj-phoenix-business-journal-logoManufacturing is about to go through a major revolution, one that will have impact around the world. A new generation of automation will be changing the way things are made. In “The next revolution in manufacturing is full automation” I take a look at what it all means.

Video: Automated Test Fixture for Biopsy Device

biobsy-test-fixture-1How do you figure out when and why a product is failing?  When the failure is due to repetitive operation the only practical way is to build a machine that operates the product over and over again. Designing, building, and running this type of device is one of the many services that PADT offers its customers.

The video below is an example of how PADT’s Medical Device team developed an automated text fixture for a customer that needed to understand the failure mechanisms of a biopsy device. The fixture was designed to operate the device, repeating field operations, and capture behavior over time with the goal of capture which components failed, the nature of each failure, and the nature of each failure.

The apparatus repeats four operations that constitute one operation of the device. Video is used with a counter to determine when a failure occurred and how. The project brought together test, controls, and mechanical design engineers. It also utilized PADT’s in-house 3D Printing and machining capability.

This is also a perfect example of how a customer can hand over an entire project that they need done, but don’t have the resources to do in-house. PADT’s team created the test specification, designed the hardware, conducted the tests, and delivered actionable information to the customer.

If you have a project you do not have the resources to complete in-house, consider having our engineers take a look at it to see how we can help.

Serial and Parallel ANSYS Mechanical APDL Simulations

ANSYS-APDL-Macro-PeDALThere are times when you want to study the effects of varying parameters.  If you have an existing MAPDL script that is parameterized, the following procedure will allow you to easily run many variations in an organized manner. 

Let’s assume a parameterized MAPDL macro called build_solve that does something you want to simulate many times and has 2 variables called power and scale which are set with argument 1 and 2 respectively.  Running this macro with the classic interface, with power=30 and scale=2.5 would look like this:

build_solve,30,2.5

Next, create a MAPDL macro to launch all of the simulations.  This script could be named control.mac.  The first thing to do here is to create arrays of your parameters and assign values to them.  This example will vary power and scale.  Here are the arrays of values that will be passed to build_solve:

*dim,power,array,4

power(1)=10,20,40,80

*dim,scale,array,6

scale(1)=1,2,3,5,10,20

Most of the control.mac commands will be put inside of nested *do loops.  There will be a *do loop for each of parameters being varied.

*do,ii,1,4

*do,jj,1,6

Next, use *cfopen to set up the arguments to be passed to build_solve.  Each time through the *do loops will create a new run1.mac

*cfopen,run1,mac

  a=power(ii)

  b=scale(jj)

  *vwrite,a,b

  build_solve,%G,%G

*cfclose

One of the key features of this approach is to run anywhere and build directories below the working directory.  Use the /inquire command to store the current directory name.

/INQUIRE,dir_,DIRECTORY

Use *cfopen to create a string that will be used for the directory name.  By using the variables as part of the string, the directories will have unique names.  A time or date stamp could also be included in this string.  This macro is executed immediately to create the string dirnam for use in the commands subsequently.

*dim,power,array,4

*cfopen,temp1,mac

*vwrite,a,b

dirnam='power_%G_scale_%G'

*cfclose

/input,temp1,mac

Eventually, the resulting directory structure will look something like the image below.  Each directory will contain a separate simulation with the arguments of power and scale set respectively.

mapdl-script-automation

The last *cfopen creates a windows batch file which will (when executed)

  1. Create the new directory

  2. Copy all of the macro files from the working directory into the new directory (including run1.mac)

  3. Change into the new directory using CD

  4. Launch ansys in batch mode, in this case using a gpu and 12 cpus, using the run1.mac input and outputting to f.out

  5. Change back to the working directory (ready to do it all again)

The code for the windows batch file is:

*cfopen,rfile,bat

*vwrite,dir_(1),dirnam

MKDIR "%C\%S"

*vwrite,dir_(1),dirnam

COPY *.mac "%C\%S"

*vwrite,dir_(1),dirnam

CD "%C\%S"

*vwrite,

"C:\Program Files\ANSYS Inc\v150\ansys\bin\winx64\ansys150" -b -acc nvidia -np 12 -i run1.mac -o f.out

*vwrite,dir_(1)

CD "%C"

*cfclose

The last step is to run the windows batch file.  /sys is used to make this system call.  If the simulation is not well parallelized and you have enough licenses available, run the simulations in low priority mode immediately.  This will launch all of your simulations in parallel:

  • /sys,start /b /low rfile.bat

If the model is well parallelized (in other words, it will use your system’s gpu/cpus/RAM efficiently) or you only have 1 license available, launch the batch files in high priority mode and use the /wait option which will insure that windows waits for the job to finish before launching the next simulation.

  • /sys,start /b /high /wait rfile.bat

You can download and view the examples control.mac and build_solve.mac from this zip file: build_solve-control-macros.zip