Pictures and Impressions from the 2018 Colorado Additive Manufacturing Day

Someone in the business of giving advice on social situation once said that you need four ingredients for an event to be a success: great conversation with the right people at the right location with the right food and beverage.  All of that came together last week in Littleton Colorado for PADT’s third annual Colorado Additive Manufacturing Data. The weather cooperated and we were able to gather under a tent at the St Patrick’s Brewing Company right on the Platte River to spend the afternoon talking about 3D Printing.

PADT’s very own Norm Stucker hosted, kicking off the event with a welcome from Littleton’s Mayor, Debbie Brinkman.  This was followed by presentations:

  • PADT’s Co-Owner Rey Chu shared his thoughts on being successful with AM
  • Scott Sevcik, VP of Manufacturing Solutions at Stratasys went over the Stratasys Product Roadmap
  • I gave a high-level overview on Design for Additive Manufacturing
  • The ANSYS Additive Manufacturing simulation tools were reviewed by PADT engineer Doug Oatis

After a break, that involved getting more pints of beer, eating an amazingly large amount of pizza, and networking; we returned to the tent for our keynote addresses and a panel.

The first Keynote was from William Carver of Sierra Nevada Corporation (SNC) on how they are using AM for their Dream Chaser spacecraft.  This was followed by Ryan Bocook taking a look at Boom Supersonic‘s use of the technology for the development of their brand new supersonic airplane. For many of us, seeing how these two companies make 3D Printing a part of their design, test, and manufacturing processes was very informative. It was real world, real issues, and real solutions.

The day was capped by a fascinating panel on that very topic: Making Additive Manufacturing Real.  The speakers consisted of:

The panel was moderated by Maj. General Jay Lindell (USAF, Ret) who serves as the Aerospace and Defense Industry Champion for the Colorado Office of Economic Development and International Trade.  Not only does he have the longest and coolest title, he did a great job of getting the panel to share their experiences to the benefit of all who were there.

For me, the best part (the Dark Lager does not count) of the event was the interaction between users across industries.  So many great examples and stories.  Bad nerd jokes were told, advice was shared, stories about challenges were told, and business cards were exchanged. We live in an online world and you can have some community through the internet. But to build great relationships and to truly share knowledge, you need to get everyone together under a huge tent on a sunny day at a brewery by a river.

If you want to take part in our next Colorado Additive Manufacturing day, a 3D Printing user event in Arizona, Utah, or New Mexico, any of our online webinars, or any other PADT event make sure you sign up for the PADT Additive & Advanced Manufacturing Email List or the PADT General Information Email List on our OptIn page. If you have any questions about any of the content or 3D Printing in general, do not hesitate to contact us.

Please enjoy the pictures we captured of the day below and we hope to see you at our next event.

 

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MSU Denver Shows off their Additive Manufacturing Lab

In November of last year we did a press release on new Additive Manufacturing Laboratory at Metropolitan State University in Denver. Since then all of the partners have been hard at work getting the lab up and running.  Last week MSUD released an interview with the University President about the lab as well as a tour of the lab.  It is a great look at how academia and industry are working together to push advanced manufacturing forward. Not just on equipment, but also with internships and value added engineering at the university.

Take a look:

PADT is proud to have been a key member of the team  and a continued partner for the lab along with Stratasys.

If you want to learn more about how PADT can help your company or university create partnerships like this or leverage 3D Printing in other ways, please contact PADT.  We love this stuff!

Getting to Know PADT: Our Offices in Four Other States

This is the fourth installment in our review of all the different products and services PADT offers our customers. As we add more, they will be available here.  As always, if you have any questions don’t hesitate to reach out to info@padtinc.com or give us a call at 1-800-293-PADT.

Updated on 4/6/2018: Added a paragraph on our efforts in Austin, Texas and modified California to reflect our growth there. 

Based in the ASU Research Park in Tempe Arizona, PADT has thrived and grown in the technologically oriented East Valley of the Phoenix Metro area. When people think about the company, they think about Phoenix and Arizona. Phoenix is even in the company name. What many people do not realize is that PADT has thriving sales and support offices in four other states. If we updated our name, it would be Southwest Simulation, Design, and Additive Technologies. However, SWSDAT is even worse than PADT! Worse yet, people might think we are from Switzerland.

As the company has grown so has our sales and support territory for the products we sell. And the best way to provide outstanding support to their high-technology customers is to be part of the local technology community. So starting with Colorado in 2010, the company has been investing in the communities that are allowing it to grow. Below is a brief overview of each office and what makes them unique.

PADT Colorado

Arizona and Colorado are like siblings, so alike in some ways, totally different in others. The Rocky Mountain state was the first state that saw significant growth for PADT outside of Arizona, so it was an obvious place to start growing. The bulk of our business there is around selling and supporting Stratasys Additive Manufacturing equipment. And to be blunt, it has been a great location for our engineering staff who literally could not take the heat of Arizona. Located in Littleton just south of Denver, we are close to our large Aerospace customers, and a quick drive to Boulder, Fort Collins, Colorado Springs, and Golden where we also have clusters of customers.

The high-tech nature of the industry in the state fit perfectly with PADT’s strengths. From launch vehicles to mining, to cell phone cases, we have fit right in with our growing customer base. And part of our fitting there is the fantastic location on Littleton Blvd right next to the Arapahoe County courthouse. We rent a suite on the second floor a cool mid-century building that is walking distance from light rail and restaurants – a great location. If you ever visit, ask to see the bathroom and kitchen, both are a blast from the past.

PADT New Mexico

Our largest customer outside of the Phoenix area is the combined Sandia National Lab, and Los Alamos National Lab, and Kirtland’s Air Force Research Lab. All are located in New Mexico and are a major focus for us for Additive Manufacturing and ANSYS sales and support. That is why our New Mexico office is so important. It is located in the Sandia Research Park, right outside the Eubank entrance to Sandia National Lab.

The office provides a nice space for training as well as a location to hold office hours and meet with users who may be in locations we are not authorized to visit. Many of our non-lab customers are in that same park or nearby. This office has been a great base of operations for our continued growth in the state. This office may have the best views of any in the PADT family. Many of us also feel it also offers the best Mexican food options.

PADT Utah

Utah has a small but very active technology community, and PADT’s presence in the state is growing quickly. Our office in Murray at the I-15 and 5300S is only 9 miles due south of downtown Salt Lake City. If you have not visited, the space is actually one of our more enjoyable offices to work in. One large room houses the sales and engineering team as well as a host of 3D Printers, supplies for maintenance, and a cool sitting area.

Working with so many customers in Utah leads to a lot of driving, tech companies seem to be evenly distributed along the I-15 corridor, so the local team does a lot of driving. However, the office is a great central location for meeting with customers and seminars and as a starting point for those drives to Provo, Park City, and Ogden as well as destinations in-between. As our business in Utah continues to grow, we may soon have to expand this office.

PADT California

Our newest second most recent location is in Southern California, Torrance in particular. If New Mexico has the best views, this one probably has the worst… unless you like refineries. However, it is a central location that has served us well for almost two years now. Just down the street from our largest customer, Honeywell Aerospace, it is the ultimate home base for such a freeway dominated territory. Our local staff can get there fairly easily from their homes, and when the rest of us visit, its location near LAX is very convenient.

Our focus in that office right now is Simulation. Particularly ANSYS sales and support. Our SoCal customers like to drop by when they are in the neighborhood, and the PADT team there is constantly on the road out visiting them. It works great for our customers nearby, but since that office covers from San Diego North to San Luis Obispo, a random collection of coffee shops serve as an office for SoCal almost as much as our Torrance base.

Our growth in the region is quick, and we look forward to opening more satellite offices across an area that is larger in population and real estate than some countries.

Since publishing this article, we have added two new sales people to PADT California that will be working from home offices as well as dropping into Torrance as needed.  They are based in Pasadena and San Diego, giving us better coverage of the South and North part of the region.

PADT Texas

When people look at PADT and where we are located, they almost always say “You should open an office in Austin, the tech community there is a perfect fit for your skills and culture.” We finally listened and are proud to announce that our newest location is in Austin Texas. This new office will be initially focused on ANSYS Sales and Support across the great state of Texas. We have had customers for other products and services in the state for decades and are pleased to have a permanent local presence now.

We have hit the ground running.and have a growing group of customers who are now enjoying PADT’s famous support. We hope to add engineers and more salespeople as we increase our efforts in Texas.  Right now we are trying to get them to understand that Arizona Cowboys are real cowboys.

 

Serving our Customers Better

Sometimes technology allows people to connect fairly well. However, nothing beats being local. The best way for PADT to support our customers is to not just be there for them technically, but also to be part of the communities they reside in. And that community spreads across the Southwestern United States, and we are proud to be members of the Colorado, New Mexico, Utah, and Southern California technical communities. People innovate everywhere, so we are there, local, to make innovation work for them.

Full Color 3D Printer Road Show: First Stop a Success Including Radio Broadcast

ICOSA_07169Denver was the first stop on a trip around the Southwest for Stratasys’ new J750 Full Color 3D Printer.  We are showing this machine that is reinventing 3D printing off in person so people can see the device up close and hold the incredible parts it makes in their hands.

You can still sign up for the Salt Lake City or Phoenix events.

ICOSA_70965The Denver event was hosted by St. Patrick’s Brewery in Littleton, right down the street from PADT’s Colorado Office. Several customers and PADT employees gave talks on how to better use 3D Printing, including a presentation from Mario Vargas on the new Stratasys J750.

On top of all of that, local radio station KDMT, Denver’s Money Talk 1690, did a live broadcast from the event.  You can listen in here. Again, PADT employees and customers talked about 3D Printing as well as the new Stratasys J750.

ICOSA_30368We also made the local paper, check that out here.

Denver’s Money Talk 1690: Interview on State of Manufacturing in Colorado

kdmt-logo-1PADT’s Norman Stucker joins Nathan Morimitsu from Manufacturer’s Edge to discuss the current and future state of manufacturing in Colorado.  Norman speaks to the impact of 3D Printing and how it is changing manufacturing. It is a great discussion that looks beyond the hype and shares where Additive Manufacturing is today and how it is being applied in the real world.

Listen here:

Want to learn more, email us at info@padtinc.com

Denver Business Journal: Colorado Companies Bringing Space Costs Down to Earth

dbj-Denver-Business-Journal-logoColorado is a major contributor to the space industry, and they are quickly adopting 3D Printing to keep costs down and get to space faster.  In this article, “Colorado Companies Bringing Space Costs Down to Earth” the DBJ explores how automation and 3D Printing can have a big impact on cost and schedule.  Many of the companies sighted in the article are PADT customers, and PADT’s very own Norman Stucker was quoted extensively for the article.

Beyond the Hype – Additive Manufacturing and 3D Printing Worldwide, A Summary of Terry Wholers’ Thoughts

3d-printing-terry-wholers-padt-1Terry Wholers is the founder and principal consultant of Wohlers Associates Inc., an independent consulting firm that was launched 28 years ago. Wohlers and his team have provided consulting work to over 240 organizations in 24 countries as well as to 150 companies in the investment community. He has authored over 400 books, articles, and technical papers. Terry has twice served as a presenter at the White House. For the past 20 years hes has been the principal author for the Wohlers Report which is an annual worldwide publication focused on Additive Manufacturing and 3D Printing. In 2007 more than a 1,000 industry professionals from around the world selected Terry as the most influential person in Rapid Prototyping Development and Additive Manufacturing.

PADT was fortunate enough to sponsor, with the local SME group, an event in Fort Collins, Colorado where Terry came and shared his views on the industry. What follows is a summary of what we learned. They are basically notes and observations.  Please contact us for any clarification or details: 

Terry Wohlers started his talk by asking: How many people have heard of 3D printing?

He noted that these days it was pretty much everyone and if you haven’t then you must be living in a cave. It is like everyone can’t get enough of it.

There has been a lot of growth. In the last 5 years the industry has quadrupled. Last year it was a 4.1 billion industry and this year 5.5 billion. Terry doesn’t own any stock in any of the different 3D printing companies. He cautioned everyone to not confuse the share prices with the growth and the expansion within this industry.

After this introduction, Terry stated that there were really two things in the industry that really excited him.  3D Printing for Manufacturing and for Production Parts.

3D Printing in Manufacturing.

The first area to watch is the use of this technology for manufacturing applications. The team looking at the sales data drew a line in the sand for the low cost hobbyist printers at $5,000. There were 140,000 of them sold last year compared to under 13,000 above $5k. However, they don’t cost much so the money is still in the industrial machines. Here are the revenues for 2014:

Industrial: 1.12 Billion, or 86.6%.
Hobbyist: 173.3 Million, or 13.4%

There are FDM clones everywhere. 300 or more brands. There is a lot of open source software out there to develop your own FDM printer.

One thing to watch in the industry is expiring patents. This opens up competition and lowers prices and sometimes brings better machines to market.  Right now, the SLS patent expired in June of last year so we are seeing new Selective Laser Sintering devices coming to market.

An exciting example of using 3D printing in manufacturing is the landing gear created by Stratasys. It was built and assembled with a Stratasys FDM printer and used for a fit check. Very Cool!

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www.makepartsfast.com/2008/06/523/how-to-make-accurate-cad-to-stl-file-transitions

In medical, some great examples of tooling are jigs, fixtures, drill press, and custom cutting guide for knee replacement. You can take scanned data and create a custom cutting guide for replacing your knee. Tens of thousands of those have been done.

Lots of work is being done on test fixtures as well.

In tooling, with additive manufacturing you can do things that are highly complex. Instead of just straight gun drilled cooling channels you can make the cooling channels conform to the purpose of the part. You can reduce 30-300% cycle time by improving the cooling channels for injection molding dies.  It turns out that Lego is printing their molds! They are using conformal cooling to increase their cycle times.

On the aerospace side of things, end use parts are literally taking off.  Airbus is flying today 45,000 to 60,000 Ultem plastic parts. Both passenger and non-passenger planes have Ultem parts on them.

3D Printing for Final Production Parts

The second area to watch is the next frontier, and that is what excites him. You can do structural ribs in 3D printed parts. You need to make sure there are places in your parts to remove the support material used if you are going to use structural ribs. Design is absolutely critical. When he was at Solidworks world in Orlando a few years ago, there was a 3D printed bird that was flapping its wings.

This is a part of that bird that was being flown.

3d-printing-terry-wholers-padt-4 3d-printing-terry-wholers-padt-3
Two weeks ago Terry did a four day course at NASA on Design for Additive Manufacturing. The importance of the subject now is that companies and organizations are paying a lot of money to host people to teach them how to design for additive manufacturing. It was a great learning experience and NASA has already signed up for a second course that is focused on metals. NASA 3D printed a turbopump with 45%fewer parts that runs at 90,000 rpm, and creates 2,000 hp. This turbopump manufactured with conventional methods costs $220,000 for one, they can 3D print 2 of them in Inconel for $20,000.

A big part of Design for Additive Manufacturing is using the correct thinking but also using the right tools. There is a lack of both. We are taught to design for the conventional method of manufacturing. Now we have to undo some of that and think, hey there can be a better way to design this part.

One of those ways is Topology Optimization (let mathematics decide where to place the support structure so there is a increased strength to weight ratio). Another is the use of lattice structure (mesh and cellular). Ever since the beginning of time, man would make parts out of a solid material. Well now you can have a thin skin and a lattice structure on the interior to produce something superior in some cases.

We need these kind of tools integrated into the different CAD software’s so that we can design better parts.  This bracket is flying on a Airbus. This cabinet bracket is made out of titanium and is flying on the A35 Airbus. It was designed for 2.3 tons and actually holds up to 12.5-14 tons depending on the test. Peter Zander at Airbus believes that in 2 years they will be printing 30 tons of metal per month!

3d-printing-terry-wholers-padt-5

GE Aviation is building fuel nozzles for the new leap engine. The new design is 25% lighter and five times more durable than the previous design that took 20 different parts to assemble to make one fuel nozzle. The will be printing 40,000 fuel nozzles per year.

Consumer Products:
It is going to be very big. Terry thinks this is going to be a sweet spot in the industry. Once example is this guitar called the Hive Bass. It is built out of Nylon and would cost you $3,500. You can have a custom guitar made for that price.

3d-printing-terry-wholers-padt-6
There is a Belgium company that creates custom frames for eyewear.

3d-printing-terry-wholers-padt-7

There is also a lot of Jewelry available for consumers along with many other products.

For metal part production there are many steps needed to finish the part. About 9 steps that Terry counted so it can be a long process.

Myth: Additive Manufacturing is fast! Well that depends on Polymers versus Metals and the size and complexity of the parts. Airbus had one build that took 14 days to print with their metal printer! GE mentioned that they have to print the same part twice before they get it right because they will have to reorient the part or change the build parameters to get the best quality build possible.

According to some estimates the global manufacturing economy is in the range of $13 trillion. If this technology were to penetrate 2% of it then that is over a quarter of a trillion dollars. 5% is approaching two thirds of a trillion!

Terry finished by asking: How many of you think this will be North of the 5% estimate?

We want to thank Terry for giving such an informative talk, and New Belgium Brewing for hosting. The networking afterwords was fantastic. 

If you would like to stay up to date on 3D Printing, we recommend the Wohlers Report. It is our primary reference document here at PADT.  

Press Release: PADT Acquires Stratasys Business from CADCAM Systems

PADT_Logo_Color_100x50At the beginning of this month, CADCAM Systems agreed to sell their Stratasys 3D Printer sales and support business to PADT.  With customers in Colorado, New Mexico, and Utah this acquisition will increase PADT’s presence and investment in those states. This is PADT’s first acquisition in our 21 year history and we are very excited about the whole thing.  If you have worked with us in the past you know we are all about win-win situations.  We feel that this move will be a win for our customers, CADCAM System’s customers, and Stratasys.

We would like to begin by welcoming all of CADCAM System’s customers to the PADT family. Over the coming months we will be working to get to know you and to show you the variety of products and services that PADT offers.  although a few of you are already customers for other things PADT does, we really look forward to meeting the rest of you and understanding how we can help you bring your products to market better and faster.

Secondly, we want to let our existing customers know that this will give us additional customers and revenue that we  will use to fund expanded services in Utah, Colorado, and New Mexico.  Once we have time to get a feel where these new customers are and what they need, we will plan our sales and support staff to better serve everyone. A larger and stronger community will be one of the key ways this will be a win-win for everyone.

You can read more about the acquisition in the press release below or view a PDF version here.

The new customers will grow PADT’s customer base for 3D Printing systems by around 20% to 40%  depending on how you count things. About half of the new customers are in Colorado and the rest are split between Utah and New Mexico; with a few single customers in other states in the west.  Our staff in those states (Littleton, CO, Albuquerque, NM, and Murray, UT) have already started reaching out to the new customers.  As an example of our growing commitment, we recently moved to a new larger suite in the Utah office to make room for a new Application Engineer, more demo machines, and additional space for training and meetings.

We are usually pretty bad about documenting these things for posterity, but fortunately someone remember to snap a picture on their phone during the signing.  From left to right are Ward Rand (PADT Co-Owner), Gloria Ontiveros (CADCAM Co-Owner), John D. Clark (PADT’s Council), and Mario Vargas (PADT’s Sales Manager for 3D Printing):

Official-Signing-CADCAM-Acquisition

 

Customers who have existing support contracts with CADCAM Systems, will continue to be supported by them until those contract expire, including the purchase of their consumables and materials.  When the contracts are up for renewal, they have the option to renew with PADT and we will be the source for their consumables and materials.  Customers who are not on maintenance can contact PADT now for support:

Repair and Maintenance:  480.813.4884 or 3dps@padtinc.com

Those who wish to purchase material and consumables can do so over the phone, via email, or at our online store: padtmarket.com.

Material: 480.813.4884, sales@padtmarket.com, or www.padtmarket.com.

This is an exciting time and we look forward to the growth and mutual success that this acquisition will bring.

Press Release:

PADT Expands 3D Printer Activities with Acquisition of the Stratasys Reselling Business of CADCAM Systems

Strategic move positions PADT as the largest provider of industrial 3D Printing solutions in the Four Corners region.

Tempe, Ariz., May 13, 2015 Phoenix Analysis & Design Technologies, Inc. (PADT) the Southwest’s largest provider of Numerical Simulation, Product Development, and 3D Printing services and products, is pleased to announce the acquisition of the Stratasys Reseller business of CADCAM Systems, based in Boulder Colorado. This move immediately boosts PADT’s existing 3D Printer sales and support customer base by approximately 30%, adding clients in Colorado, Utah, and New Mexico, making PADT the largest distributor of 3D Printing systems to commercial customers in the Four Corners region.

PR-Stratasys_profesional_serires-1

CADCAM Systems, like PADT, has been a leader in 3D Printing sales and support, working with global manufacturer Stratasys to help build usage in the Rocky Mountain States. Throughout the course of its history, CADCAM Systems has built a reputation for outstanding technical ability and customer service. As customers transition to PADT for system support, consumables and future machines, they will receive the same exceptional service they are used to, now from PADT’s offices in Littleton, Colorado, Murray, Utah, and Albuquerque, New Mexico. Additional support will come from PADT’s headquarters in Tempe, Arizona. Customers will have the added advantage of access to PADT’s other products and services, including 3D Printing services, ANSYS simulation software, product development, and simulation services.

“When we heard that CADCAM Systems was interested in selling their Stratasys business, we were immediately interested. Said Rey Chu, co-owner at PADT and a recognized expert in the Additive Manufacturing industry. “We knew they took excellent care of their customers and had strong client bases in Colorado, New Mexico, and Utah, three states that we’ve been growing aggressively in. It was an obvious fit for both companies.”

The acquisition will have no impact on the number of people employed at either company. During the transition, customers who purchased maintenance agreements from CADCAM Systems will be serviced by them until they expire, at which time they have the option to renew with PADT. Some 3D Printing material supplies will be available from CADCAM Systems as well during the transition, with PADT taking over that service in the coming months.

This acquisition was made as part of PADT’s long term strategy to strengthen their position as the premier supplier of mechanical engineering products and services in the Southwest. The company continues to make investments in staff, services offered, and products represented to meet the demands of existing and future customers, continuing to prove a commitment to the company’s motto “We Make Innovation Work.”

To learn more about this exciting expansion visit http://www.padtinc.com/cadcam, email sales@padtinc.com or call 480.813.4884.

About Phoenix Analysis and Design Technologies
Phoenix Analysis and Design Technologies, Inc. (PADT) is an engineering product and services company that focuses on helping customers who develop physical products by providing Numerical Simulation, Product Development, and Rapid Prototyping solutions. PADT’s worldwide reputation for technical excellence and experienced staff is based on its proven record of building long term win-win partnerships with vendors and customers. Since its establishment in 1994, companies have relied on PADT because “We Make Innovation Work.” With over 75 employees, PADT services customers from its headquarters at the Arizona State University Research Park in Tempe, Arizona, and from offices in Littleton, Colorado, Albuquerque, New Mexico, and Murray, Utah, as well as through staff members located around the country. More information on PADT can be found at http://www.PADTINC.com.

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Colorado Cleantech Open Launch on Thursday, February 28, 2013

CleanTech Open Logo

PADT is honored to be the sponsor for the Cleantech Startup Launch & Learn that is being held at the South Denver Chamber of Commerce.

Here are the details:

Come join us for refreshments and networking with the cleantech community at the South Denver Metro Chamber as we launch the Cleantech Open 2013 Business Accelerator in the Rocky Mountain Region.

This is a great opportunity for entrepreneurs, volunteers and sponsors to learn more about the organization and help lead the Cleantech revolution in the Rockies.

Overview of Evening:

5:00 – Networking, Food and Beverages 

6:00 – Overview of 2013 Cleantech Open 
       – Hear from Past Alumni 
       – 2012 Accomplishments & Volunteer Appreciation         

It is FREE, but please register so they can get a good count and have a name tag ready for you:

http://cleantechlaunch.eventbrite.com/

Spaceport Colorado

HDR Chosen for Feasibility Studies for Spaceport Colorado

Spaceport ColoradoWe received great news last night that the team PADT has been working with, HDR, has been chosen to do the feasibility study on developing the Front Range Airport into Spaceport Colorado.  The Denver Post has a good summary of the effort.

Norman Stucker, our General Manager for Colorado Operations, has been a contributor to this effort to grow commercial space in Colorado. PADT has been very pleased with the support of the local business community, the governor’s office, and the legislature on this effort.

This is another important and successful step in a long but very exciting journey. Stay tuned for more!