Recently Published: The Company is the Product, Tech is Rotting our Brains, July Doldrums, Picking a University, and Loyalty Programs

It’s been a varied couple of weeks when it comes to blog posts in the Phoenix Business Journal. Here is what we have put out there since the last update on the PADT blog:

The company itself is the now the product” takes a look at the shift in business towards the management of a company being incentivized to focus on the value of the company and not the product or service the company makes. This fundamental shift is changing the way business is done.

We have amazing technology at our beck and call every day that gives us information and helps us make decisions about everything from where to eat to where to go to college. The information and technology are so good that we barely need to think for ourselves. This begs the question “Is technology killing our ability to make decisions?

Every year the same thing happens. All the momentum that had been building for the first half of the business year comes to a halt and we drift unproductive through July. I call this time “The July Doldrums

Most of us spend a lot of time worrying about what university our kid should go to. After hiring college graduates for almost twenty-five years I’ve come to the conclusion that “What university should my kid go to is the wrong question.”

I recently found myself wanting to spend a lot more money on a business trip so I could get more points from the hotel’s point program. Silly. But that had me wondering “The power of loyalty programs: How awarding perks can boost your business

Introducing the Stratasys J750 – Webinar

Introducing the Stratasys J750 – Webinar

August 30th, 2017 – 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM MST

The Stratasys J750 3D printer delivers unavailed aesthetic performance including true, full-color capability with the texture mapping and color gradients. Create prototypes that look, feel and operate like finished products, without the need for painting or assembly, thanks to the Stratasys J750’s wide range of material properties.

With this, students can easily experience both the prototyping and testing stages of the manufacturing process, helping to prepare them for what they will experience once they enter the workforce. The high quality materials available with the J750 also allow for the creation of highly intricate and realistic models, perfect for helping medical students with research.

The wide color spectrum, combined with the fine-finish, multi-material capability, let’s the Stratasys J750 produce parts with an incredible array of characteristics. Prototypes that need to look, feel and function like future products are possible in a single print operation, with minimal to no finishing steps, like painting, sanding or assembly.

With such an innovative machine comes a variety of user applications, such as:

  • Image Rapid Prototyping
  • Concept Models
  • Medical Models
  • Jigs & Fixtures
  • Colored Textures

Join PADT’s Sales executive Jeff Nichols and 3D Printing Application Engineer James Barker from 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM MST AZ for an in depth look at how the Stratasys J750 stacks up against it’s competition, and how it’s various attributes help to make it the perfect fit for institutions such as yours!

 

Don’t miss this unique opportunity to bring the future of manufacturing into your classroom or workplace, secure your spot today!

  

Upgrade to the future of 3D printing – Stratasys F 123 Webinar

Take the Next Step!

Upgrade to the future of 3D Printing

Performance so good, you won’t believe it’s so easy to use!
The Stratasys F123 3D Printer Series demands less knowledge and experience, while meeting even the most advanced rapid prototyping expectations and needs, helping to make it the perfect machine for the classroom. This Series excels at all stages of the design prototyping process, from draft-concept iterations – to complex design verification – to high-quality functional prototypes.
Enhanced 3D printing capabilities of the F123 series include: 
  • New user interface
  • Remote print monitoring
  • Built-in camera
  • Auto calibration
  • Improved software experience with GrabCAD Print
  • Easy material change out
  • Auto material changeover

Join PADT’s Application Engineer James Barker and Sales Executive Jeff Nichols for a webinar that will provide an in depth look at all three machines that make up the all new F123 3D Printer Series (F170, F270, & F370).

Phoenix Business Journal: How universities can be a needed catalyst and safe place for cooperation


How do competitors work together in a mutually beneficial way?  In “How universities can be a needed catalyst and safe place for cooperation” I take a look at the important role Universities can play in enabling this type of cooperation.  Based on our own experience in such partnerships, I talk about what Universities can do to take a leadership role in this area.

3D Printing Student Projects at PADT: Visit our Open House to Learn More (Thursday, March 2, 5pm)

Thursday, March 2 is PADT’s annual SciTech Festival Open House, from 5-8pm (click HERE to register). This year, three student groups working on a range of projects will be present to showcase their work, all of which involved some level of 3D printing. Please bring friends and families to meet and discuss ideas with these students from our community.

Formula SAE Team (Arizona State University)

ASU’s Formula SAE team will be onsite with their 2016 cardemonstrating specifically how they used 3D printing to manufacture the functional intake manifolds on these cars. What is specifically interesting is how they have modified their manifold design to improve performance while leveraging the advantages of 3D printing, and also they have evaluated multiple materials and processes over the recent years (FDM, SLS).

Prosthetic Arm Project (BASIS Chandler)

Rahul Jayaraman will be back to discuss how he and 30 students at BASIS Chandler manufactured, assembled and delivered about 20 prosthetic hands to an organization that distributes these to children in need across the world. Rahul and PADT were featured in the news for this event.

Cellular Structures in Nature (BASIS Chandler)

A BASIS Chandler High School senior, Amy Zhang, just started her Senior Research Project with PADT, focusing on a project at the intersection of biology and 3D printing, investigating cellular structures that occur on surfaces in nature, like the wing of a dragonfly or the shell on a turtle or the encasing of a pineapple – all of which are comprised of cellular geometries. Using 3D scanning, image analysis and mathematical methods, Amy hopes to develop models for describing these structures that can then be used in developing design principles for 3D printing. You can learn more on Amy’s blog: http://shellcells.blogspot.com/

 

 

PADT and ASU Collaborate on 3D Printed Lattice Research

The ASU Capstone team (left to right): Drew Gibson, Jacob Gerbasi, John Reeher, Matthew Finfrock, Deep Patel and Joseph Van Soest.
ASU student team (left to right): Drew Gibson, Jacob Gerbasi, John Reeher, Matthew Finfrock, Deep Patel and Joseph Van Soest

Over the past two academic semesters (2015/16), I had the opportunity to work closely with six senior-year undergraduate engineering students from the Arizona State University (ASU), as their industry adviser on an eProject (similar to a Capstone or Senior Design project). The area we wanted to explore with the students was in 3D printed lattice structures, and more specifically, address the material modeling aspects of these structures. PADT provided access to our 3D printing equipment and materials, ASU to their mechanical testing and characterization facilities and we both used ANSYS for simulation, as well as a weekly meeting with a whiteboard to discuss our ideas.

While there are several efforts ongoing in developing design and optimization software for lattice structures, there has been little progress in developing a robust, validated material model that accurately describes how these structures behave – this is what our eProject set out to do. The complex internal meso- and microstructure of these structures makes them particularly sensitive to process variables such as build orientation, layer thickness, deposition or fusion width etc., none of which are accounted for in models for lattice structures available today. As a result, the use of published values for bulk materials are not accurately predictive of true lattice structure behavior.

In this work, we combined analytical, experimental and numerical techniques to extract and validate material parameters that describe mechanical response of lattice structures. We demonstrated our approach on regular honeycomb structures of ULTEM-9085 material, made with the Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM) process. Our results showed that we were able to predict low strain responses within 5-10% error, compared to 40-60% error with the use of bulk properties.

This work is to be presented in full at the upcoming RAPID conference on May 18, 2016 (details at this link) and has also been accepted for full length paper submission to the SFF Symposium. We are also submitting a research proposal that builds on this work and extends it into more complex geometries, metals and failure modeling. If you are interested in the findings of this work and/or would like to collaborate, please meet us at RAPID or send us an email (info@padtinc.com).

Our final poster and the Fortus 400mc that we printed all our honeycomb structures with
The final poster summarizing our work rests atop the Stratasys Fortus 400mc that we printed all our honeycomb structures on

Ovid: A Teaching Tool for 3D Printing

ovid-1-1Meet Ovid.  He is a very simple character that we use to explain 3D Printing to kids. Explaining how 3D Printing works to anyone without a technical background can be tough. To help out PADT has created a collection of resources that shows how it is done, including a hands on model for younger kids, that feature Ovid as the object being printed.

Let’s start by getting technical.  3D Printing is a common term for a class of manufacturing methods referred to as Additive Manufacturing.  In 3D Printing you take a computer model and you print it out to get a real world three dimensional object. The way we do it is that we slice the computer model into thin layers, then build up material in the 3D printer one layer at a time.  Here is a simple GIF showing the most common process:

FDM-Animation.gif

This is Fused Deposition Modeling, or FDM. If a classroom has a 3D Printer it is most likely an FDM printer.

The idea behind these resources is to show the process:

  1. Start with a 3D Computer model
  2. Slice it
  3. Build it one layer at a time

The materials below can be used by parents or teachers to explain things to kids, K-8. Please use freely and share!

Presentation

This PowerPoint has slides that explain the 3D Printing process and the video is of the slides being presented, with our narration.

PowerPoint: Ovid-Presentation-3D_Printing

Making a Hands-On Ovid

ovid-model-3Our fun little plexiglass model of Ovid is an example of a manual 3D printing process. Students can stack up the layers to “3D Print” their own Ovid by hand, reinforcing the layered manufacturing process.

We did everything the same as a real 3D Printer, but instead of automatically stacking the layers, we cut each layer on a laser cutter and the students do the cutting.

Here is a video showing the laser cutting.

And this is a zip file containing the geometry we used to make Ovid in STEP, IGES, Parasolid, and SAT.

To put it all together we created a triangular rod with a base and height that are identical.  Figure out the size you need once you have scaled the geometry for your version of Ovid. we glued the rod to a base.

ovid-model-1 ovid-model-4 ovid-model-2

Files for 3D Printing and Other Information

If you have access to a 3D Printer, you can print your own Ovid.  Here is an STL and a Parasolid: Ovid-PADT-3D_Printing-1

We also have a video showing how the software for the printer slices the geometry and makes the tool path for each layer:

And to round things out, here is a few minutes of Ovid being made in one of our Stratasys FDM printers:

Bring the kids for an evening of STEM fun at PADT’s AZ SciTech Festival Open House

Scitech Logo

PADT is excited to open our doors to the community and show you and your families what engineering is all about.  Bring the family down for a tour of PADT’s Tempe office and we will show them why engineering rocks. This family friendly event is a great way for kids to see what engineers really do all day.  Tour our 3D printing lab and check out how “We Make Innovation Work”.          Register Here

WHEN: Wednesday, February 24th from 6:00pm to 7:30pm
WHERE: PADT Headquarters
  7755 S. Research Drive, Suite 110
  Tempe, AZ 85284

The Arizona SciTech Festival is a state-wide celebration of science, technology, engineering and math held annually in February and March.  Through a series of over 1,000 expos, workshops, conversations, exhibitions and tours held in diverse neighborhoods throughout the state, the Arizona SciTech Festival excites and informs Arizonans from ages 3 to 103 about how STEM will drive our state for next 100 years. Spearheaded by the Arizona Commerce Authority, Arizona Science Center, the Arizona Technology Council Foundation, Arizona Board of Regents, the University of Arizona and Arizona State University, the Arizona SciTech Festival is a grass roots collaboration of over 700 organizations in industry, academia, arts, civic, community and K-12.

First Stop on Arizona SciTech Festival Events: Carl Hayden High School

The next couple of weeks are going to be busy ones for our team as we shuttle equipment around the valley to take part in a couple of events.

Tonight we set up shop at Carl Hayden High School for their open house featuring their robotics efforts:

Carl-Hayden-3d-printing

 

 

 

 

 

Tomorrow we will be at 48-West in Chandler talking about 3D Printing and also showing off the Mojo.

Then on the 26th we will be having an Open House as part of the SciTech Festival and “How it is Made, Arizona”.

We hope to see some of you at one of the events!