ANSYS 18 – Mechanical Ease of Use Webinar

We here at PADT are proud to present the ease of use and productivity enhancements that have been added to ANSYS Mechanical in release 18.

With this new release, ANSYS Mechanical focuses on the introduction of a variety of improvements that help save the users time, such as smarter data organization and new hotkeys, along with additions that can help you to better visualize specific intricacies in your models.

Join PADT’s Simulation Support & Application Engineer Doug Oatis for an overview of the current user friendly interfaces within ANSYS Mechanical, along with the numerous additions in this new release that help to improve efficiency tenfold, such as:

  • Hotkey Additions
  • Box Geometry Creation Within Mechanical
  • Free Standing Remote Points
  • Improved Status Bar Information
  • Pretension Beam Connection
  • Solver Scratch Directory Specification
  • Improved Probe Annotations

Register today to find out how you can use these enhancements to improve your throughput and stay ahead of the curve!

We look forward to seeing you there.

ANSYS 18 – AIM Enhancements Webinar

We here at PADT are excited to share with you the updates that ANSYS 18 brings to the table for AIM: The easy-to-use, upfront simulation tool for all design engineers.

ANSYS AIM is a single GUI, multiple physics tool with advanced ANSYS technology under the hood. It requires minimal training and is interoperable with a wide range of ANSYS simulation products.

Join PADT’s application engineer Tyler Smith as he covers the new features and capabilities available in this new release, including:

  • Magnetic frequency response
  • One-way FSI for shell structures
  • Model transfer to Fluent
  • One-way magnetic-thermal coupling
  • and many more!

ANSYS AIM is a perfect tool for companies performing simulation with a CAD embedded tool, design engineers at companies using high end simulation, and even companies who have yet to take the plunge into the world of simulation.

Register for this webinar today and learn how you can take advantage of the easy-to-use, yet highly beneficial capabilities of ANSYS AIM.

ANSYS 18 HPC Licensing Updates Webinar

PADT’s webinar covering Mechanical APDL & HPC available in ANSYS 18 will be going live tomorrow at 12:00 PM MST.

Don’t miss this opportunity, sign up today!

With the release of ANSYS 18 comes a plethora of new HPC product packages, each uniquely positioned at a competitive price to ensure that you receive the option that is right for you.

For more information, join us as PADT covers the specifics of the available licensing options, followed by a live Q & A session with simulation support manager Ted Harris.

By watching this webinar you will learn:

  • About the four main product packages available with ANSYS 18

  • What licensing options are available under each package

  • How price scaling works with ANSYS 18

  • The solving capabilities for each package and licensing option

Phoenix Business Journal: Why accurate prototypes are important to product development success

Cutting corners rarely pays off, and that is especially true in product development when you skimp on physical or virtual prototyping.  In “Why accurate prototypes are important to product development success” I take a look at why accurate prototyping is so important, with some real world lesson learned as examples.

Phoenix Business Journal: ​How do you get value out of Big Data? Simulation!

It’s all the rage. “Big Data!” fixes everything. There is a lot of hype around the value of knowing so much about so many things. The problem is very few people have figured out what to do with that data.  But leading technology companies like GE are using a proven tool to get value from all that great data.  In “How do you get value out of Big Data? Simulation!” I look at how numerical simulation can be used to create digital twins of what your products are doing in the real world, delivering huge benefits today.

Discover the Power of Pervasive Simulation – ANSYS R 18

Introducing the Release of ANSYS 18

Manufacturing is undergoing the most fundamental transformation since the introduction of the assembly line. Trends like the Internet of Things, additive manufacturing and machine learning are merging the physical and digital worlds, resulting in products that defy imagination.

Join the new CEO of ANSYS, Ajei Gopal, and visionary customers

CumminsNebia,OticonMetso, and GE Digital as they demonstrate the power of pervasive simulation, available in the release of ANSYS 18.

Attend this webinar to learn:

  • How you can use digital exploration to quickly evaluate changes in design, reducing development costs and preventing late-stage design changes
  • How digital prototyping enables you to provide insights into real-world product performance, test “what-if” scenarios and ensure optimal designs
  • How simulation is moving downstream of the product life-cycle through the use of digital twins to increase efficiency and to decrease unplanned downtime

Stay tuned as we will be covering the new additions in ANSYS 18 over the next few months.

Work for a startup or know someone who does? – Don’t miss this opportunity!

We here at PADT would like to remind you that our webinar covering the significance of simulation for startups is taking place soon!

Join us: Wednesday January 25, 2017

From 12 pm – 1 pm MST

PADT’s Co-owner and Principal, Eric Miller, will be presenting on the various benefits that simulation software can provide for startup companies and entrepreneurs alike. By attending this webinar you will learn:

  • The practical uses of simulation in product design
  • How simulation has driven innovation
  • Why simulation is the most effective tool for startups
  • How simulation can reduce time to market as well as production costs
  • And how you can take advantage of the discounts that the ANSYS Startup Program provides

While many startups tend to avoid using simulation due to cost or a lack of accessibility, this is a key aspect of the modern manufacturing process and should not be ignored.

As a partner in the Startup Program, you will gain instant access to ANSYS solutions so you can start building virtual prototypes of your new products. These virtual prototypes can be modified and tested with simulation hundreds of times in the same time it would take to build and test one physical prototype – saving you time and money as you work to perfect your product design. The partnership gives you access to the full portfolio of multiphysics simulation bundles, including the Structural and Fluids bundle and the Electromagnetics bundle.

Take advantage of this opportunity and register today!

ANSYS Startup Program – Webinar


Phoenix Analysis & Design Technologies Presents:

ANSYS Startup Program: The Significance of Simulation


Wednesday January 25th, from 12 pm – 1 pm MST

We here at PADT would like to remind you about our upcoming webinar covering the importance of simulation software for startups. Not only can the use of such programs help to shorten your company’s time to market, it is also beneficial for reducing manufacturing costs.   


 Click Here to register for this webinar 


While many startups tend to avoid using simulation due to cost or a lack of accessibility, this is a key aspect of the modern manufacturing process and should not be ignored.

As a partner in the Startup Program, you will gain instant access to ANSYS solutions so you can start building virtual prototypes of your new products. These virtual prototypes can be modified and tested with simulation hundreds of times in the same time it would take to build and test one physical prototype – saving you time and money as you work to perfect your product design. The partnership gives you access to the full portfolio of multiphysics simulation bundles, including the Structural and Fluids bundle and the Electromagnetics bundle.

Attend this webinar to discover how you and Phoenix Analysis and Design Technologies can take advantage of the numerous benefits that ANSYS simulation software has to offer, priced at a cost designed for you. 


 Click Here to register for this webinar 


This webinar is taking being held on Wednesday, January 25th from 12 pm – 1 pm MST, and is a can’t miss opportunity. Make sure to register to attend today, we look forward to seeing you there!

ANSYS Startup Program: The Significance of Simulation – Webinar


Phoenix Analysis & Design Technologies Presents:

ANSYS Startup Program: The Significance of Simulation 


Do you work for a startup of know someone who does?

PADT would like to invite you to attend our upcoming webinar in support of the ANSYS Startup Program.

Click Here to register for this webinar

Wednesday January 25th, from 12 pm – 1 pm MST

Join us as our own Co-Owner and Principal Eric Miller discusses how simulation software is helping new entrepreneurs and startup companies alike to shorten their time to market and reduce their manufacturing costs.

While many startups tend to avoid using simulation due to cost or a lack of accessibility, this is a key aspect of the modern manufacturing process and should not be ignored.

As a partner in the Startup Program, you will gain instant access to ANSYS solutions so you can start building virtual prototypes of your new products. These virtual prototypes can be modified and tested with simulation hundreds of times in the same time it would take to build and test one physical prototype – saving you time and money as you work to perfect your product design. The partnership gives you access to the full portfolio of multiphysics simulation bundles, including the Structural and Fluids bundle and the Electromagnetics bundle.

Click Here to register for this webinar

Metal AM Magazine Article: Modeling the Mechanical Behaviour of Additively Manufactured Cellular Structures

Fig 1. Metal AM Magazine Cover: Winter 2016 (Vol. 2, No. 4)

Metal AM Magazine publishes an article by PADT!

Our 10-page article on “Modeling the Mechanical Behavior of Cellular Structures for Additive Manufacturing” was published in the Winter 2016 edition of the Metal AM magazine. This article represents a high-level summary of the different challenges and approaches in addressing the modeling specific aspects of cellular structures, along with some discussion of the design, manufacturing and implementation aspects associated with AM.

Click HERE for link to the entire magazine, our article starts on page 51. Digital editions are free to download. Swing by PADT in the new year to pick up a hard copy or look for it at our table when you visit us at trade shows.

To stay in touch with the latest developments at the intersection of AM and Cellular Structures, connect with me on LinkedIn, where I typically post 1-2 blog posts every month on this, or related subjects in Additive Manufacturing.

Fig 2. Dimensional tolerances and how the influence models – one of the many concepts discussed in the article

The next webinar of the ANSYS Breakthrough Energy Innovation Campaign is now available!

 Register here to watch

Thermal Optimization for Energy Efficiency 

Nearly everything has an optimal operating temperature and thermal condition. Millions of dollars each year are spent generating and transporting thermal energy to achieve thermal goals. Thermal optimization not only improves the economy of transporting energy, maintaining building temperatures, manufacturing processes and products, it improves their efficiency as well. Engineers use simulation to reveal detailed pictures of thermal processes, providing a deep understanding of all aspects of thermal management.

Join our experts for this Webinar to learn how you can capture thermal processes in powerful simulations, seamlessly identify multiphysics interactions that impact performance, and quickly achieve thermal optimization using integrated design optimization tools.
Register Here – or Click Here for more information on Thermal Optimization

This webinar is presented by Richard Mitchell and Xiao Hu

Richard Mitchell is the Lead Product Marketing Manager for Structures. He joined ANSYS in 2006 working in pre-sales and support roles. Before this Richard was an ANSYS user working for a high tech company in the UK. He worked as an analyst on space and vacuum tube technologies.

 

Xiao is a principal engineer at ANSYS Inc. Xiao has spent a combined 12 years of his career at ANSYS and Fluent corporation working with customers in the modeling and simulation of powertrain related applications. Xiao spent his earlier years with Fluent working on engine CFD applications.

Keep checking back to the Energy Innovation Homepage for more updates on upcoming segments, webinars, and other additional content.

ANSYS Breakthrough Energy Innovation Campaign – Thermal Optimization

Information regarding the next topic in the Breakthrough Energy Innovation Campaign has been released, covering Thermal Optimization and how ANSYS simulation software can be used to help solve a variety of issues related to this topic, as well as capture all thermal processes.

Additional content regarding thermal optimization can be viewed and downloaded here.

This is the next topic of a campaign that covers five main topics:

  1. Advanced Electrification 
  2. Machine & Fuel Efficiency
  3. Thermal Optimization
  4. Effective Lightweighting
  5. Aerodynamic Design

Information on each topic will be released over the course of the next few months as the webinars take place.

Sign Up Now to receive updates regarding the campaign, including additional information on each subject, registration forms to each webinar and more.

We here at PADT can not wait to share this content with you, and we hope to hear from you soon.

Modeling 3D Printed Cellular Structures: Approaches

How can the mechanical behavior of cellular structures (honeycombs, foams and lattices) be modeled?

This is the second in a two-part post on the modeling aspects of 3D printed cellular structures. If you haven’t already, please read the first part here, where I detail the challenges associated with modeling 3D printed cellular structures.

The literature on the 3D printing of cellular structures is vast, and growing. While the majority of the focus in this field is on the design and process aspects, there is a significant body of work on characterizing behavior for the purposes of developing analytical material models. I have found that these approaches fall into 3 different categories depending on the level of discretization at which the property is modeled: at the level of each material point, or at the level of the connecting member or finally, at the level of the cell. At the end of this article I have compiled some of the best references I could find for each of the 3 broad approaches.

1. Continuum Modeling

The most straightforward approach is to use bulk material properties to represent what is happening to the material at the cellular level [1-4]. This approach does away with the need for any cellular level characterization and in so doing, we do not have to worry about size or contact effects described in the previous post that are artifacts of having to characterize behavior at the cellular level. However, the assumption that the connecting struts/walls in a cellular structure behave the same way the bulk material does can particularly be erroneous for AM processes that can introduce significant size specific behavior and large anisotropy. It is important to keep in mind that factors that may not be significant at a bulk level (such as surface roughness, local microstructure or dimensional tolerances) can be very significant when the connecting member is under 1 mm thick, as is often the case.

The level of error introduced by a continuum assumption is likely to vary by process: processes like Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM) are already strongly anisotropic with highly geometry-specific meso-structures and an assumption like this will generate large errors as shown in Figure 1. On the other hand, it is possible that better results may be had for powder based fusion processes used for metal alloys, especially when the connecting members are large enough and the key property being solved for is mechanical stiffness (as opposed to fracture toughness or fatigue life).

Fig 1. Load-displacement curves for ULTEM-9085 Honeycomb structures made with different FDM toolpath strategies

2. Cell Level Homogenization

The most common approach in the literature is the use of homogenization – representing the effective property of the cellular structure without regard to the cellular geometry itself. This approach has significantly lower computational expense associated with its implementation. Additionally, it is relatively straightforward to develop a model by fitting a power law to experimental data [5-8] as shown in the equation below, relating the effective modulus E* to the bulk material property Es and their respective densities (ρ and ρs), by solving for the constants C and n.

homogenizationeqn

While a homogenization approach is useful in generating comparative, qualitative data, it has some difficulties in being used as a reliable material model in analysis & simulation. This is first and foremost since the majority of the experiments do not consider size and contact effects. Secondly, even if these were considered, the homogenization of the cells only works for the specific cell in question (e.g. octet truss or hexagonal honeycomb) – so every new cell type needs to be re-characterized. Finally, the homogenization of these cells can lose insight into how structures behave in the transition region between different volume fractions, even if each cell type is calibrated at a range of volume fractions – this is likely to be exacerbated for failure modeling.

3. Member Modeling

The third approach involves describing behavior not at each material point or at the level of the cell, but at a level in-between: the connecting member (also referred to as strut or beam). This approach has been used by researchers [9-11] including us at PADT [12] by invoking beam theory to first describe what is happening at the level of the member and then use that information to build up to the level of the cells.

membermodeling
Fig 2. Member modeling approach: represent cellular structure as a collection of members, use beam theory for example, to describe the member’s behavior through analytical equations. Note: the homogenization equations essentially derive from this approach.

This approach, while promising, is beset with some challenges as well: it requires experimental characterization at the cellular level, which brings in the previously mentioned challenges. Additionally, from a computational standpoint, the validation of these models typically requires a modeling of the full cellular geometry, which can be prohibitively expensive. Finally, the theory involved in representing member level detail is more complex, makes assumptions of its own (e.g. modeling the “fixed” ends) and it is not proven adequately at this point if this is justified by a significant improvement in the model’s predictability compared to the above two approaches. This approach does have one significant promise: if we are able to accurately describe behavior at the level of a member, it is a first step towards a truly shape and size independent model that can bridge with ease between say, an octet truss and an auxetic structure, or different sizes of cells, as well as the transitions between them – thus enabling true freedom to the designer and analyst. It is for this reason that we are focusing on this approach.

Conclusion

Continuum models are easy to implement and for relatively isotropic processes and materials such as metal fusion, may be a good approximation of stiffness and deformation behavior. We know through our own experience that these models perform very poorly when the process is anisotropic (such as FDM), even when the bulk constitutive model incorporates the anisotropy.

Homogenization at the level of the cell is an intuitive improvement and the experimental insights gained are invaluable – comparison between cell type performances, or dependencies on member thickness & cell size etc. are worthy data points. However, caution needs to be exercised when developing models from them for use in analysis (simulation), though the relative ease of their computational implementation is a very powerful argument for pursuing this line of work.

Finally, the member level approach, while beset with challenges of its own, is a promising direction forward since it attempts to address behavior at a level that incorporates process and geometric detail. The approach we have taken at PADT is in line with this approach, but specifically seeks to bridge the continuum and cell level models by using cellular structure response to extract a point-wise material property. Our preliminary work has shown promise for cells of similar sizes and ongoing work, funded by America Makes, is looking to expand this into a larger, non-empirical model that can span cell types. If this is an area of interest to you, please connect with me on LinkedIn for updates. If you have questions or comments, please email us at info@padtinc.com or drop me a message on LinkedIn.

References (by Approach)

Bulk Property Models

[1] C. Neff, N. Hopkinson, N.B. Crane, “Selective Laser Sintering of Diamond Lattice Structures: Experimental Results and FEA Model Comparison,” 2015 Solid Freeform Fabrication Symposium

[2] M. Jamshidinia, L. Wang, W. Tong, and R. Kovacevic. “The bio-compatible dental implant designed by using non-stochastic porosity produced by Electron Beam Melting®(EBM),” Journal of Materials Processing Technology214, no. 8 (2014): 1728-1739

[3] S. Park, D.W. Rosen, C.E. Duty, “Comparing Mechanical and Geometrical Properties of Lattice Structure Fabricated using Electron Beam Melting“, 2014 Solid Freeform Fabrication Symposium

[4] D.M. Correa, T. Klatt, S. Cortes, M. Haberman, D. Kovar, C. Seepersad, “Negative stiffness honeycombs for recoverable shock isolation,” Rapid Prototyping Journal, 2015, 21(2), pp.193-200.

Cell Homogenization Models

[5] C. Yan, L. Hao, A. Hussein, P. Young, and D. Raymont. “Advanced lightweight 316L stainless steel cellular lattice structures fabricated via selective laser melting,” Materials & Design 55 (2014): 533-541.

[6] S. Didam, B. Eidel, A. Ohrndorf, H.‐J. Christ. “Mechanical Analysis of Metallic SLM‐Lattices on Small Scales: Finite Element Simulations versus Experiments,” PAMM 15.1 (2015): 189-190.

[7] P. Zhang, J. Toman, Y. Yu, E. Biyikli, M. Kirca, M. Chmielus, and A.C. To. “Efficient design-optimization of variable-density hexagonal cellular structure by additive manufacturing: theory and validation,” Journal of Manufacturing Science and Engineering 137, no. 2 (2015): 021004.

[8] M. Mazur, M. Leary, S. Sun, M. Vcelka, D. Shidid, M. Brandt. “Deformation and failure behaviour of Ti-6Al-4V lattice structures manufactured by selective laser melting (SLM),” The International Journal of Advanced Manufacturing Technology 84.5 (2016): 1391-1411.

Beam Theory Models

[9] R. Gümrük, R.A.W. Mines, “Compressive behaviour of stainless steel micro-lattice structures,” International Journal of Mechanical Sciences 68 (2013): 125-139

[10] S. Ahmadi, G. Campoli, S. Amin Yavari, B. Sajadi, R. Wauthle, J. Schrooten, H. Weinans, A. Zadpoor, A. (2014), “Mechanical behavior of regular open-cell porous biomaterials made of diamond lattice unit cells,” Journal of the Mechanical Behavior of Biomedical Materials, 34, 106-115.

[11] S. Zhang, S. Dilip, L. Yang, H. Miyanji, B. Stucker, “Property Evaluation of Metal Cellular Strut Structures via Powder Bed Fusion AM,” 2015 Solid Freeform Fabrication Symposium

[12] D. Bhate, J. Van Soest, J. Reeher, D. Patel, D. Gibson, J. Gerbasi, and M. Finfrock, “A Validated Methodology for Predicting the Mechanical Behavior of ULTEM-9085 Honeycomb Structures Manufactured by Fused Deposition Modeling,” Proceedings of the 26th Annual International Solid Freeform Fabrication, 2016, pp. 2095-2106

The next webinar of the ANSYS Breakthrough Energy Innovation Campaign is now available!

Turbocharge Rotating Machinery Efficiency with Simulation
 
Rotating machinery users demand increased efficiency, reliability and durability while expecting compliance with regulatory mandates to reduce emissions and noise. Simulation pinpoints solutions and guides trade-offs early in the design process before significant investments have been made. By reducing the need for expensive prototypes and test rigs, simulation delivers better performance at lower cost.
By watching this webinar you will:

● Understand the concept of a virtual prototype and how it reduces development costs while optimizing product performance.

● Identify seven essential features that must be included in a simulation in order to maximize the performance and efficiency.

● Learn how ZECO Hydropower used ANSYS simulation tools coupled with high performance computing to develop a new and optimal intake for a Kaplan turbine in half of the usual time. They were able to reduce civil engineering infrastructure costs to ensure they would be competitive in emerging markets.

● Walk through ZECO’s simulation process and results including CFD turbomachinery simulation, parallel computing, parametric modeling, and optimization tools.

Register here to watch – or Click Here for more information on Machine & Fuel Efficiency
This webinar is presented by Brad Hutchinson and Alessandro Arcidiacono.
Keep checking back to the Energy Innovation Homepage for more updates on upcoming segments, webinars, and other additional content.

SFF Symposium 2016 Paper: Predicting the Mechanical Behavior of ULTEM-9085 Honeycomb Structures

Our work on  3D printed honeycomb modeling that started as a Capstone project with students from ASU in September 2015 (described in a previous blog post), was published in a peer-reviewed paper released last week in the proceedings of the SFF Symposium 2016. The full title of the paper is “A Validated Methodology for Predicting the Mechanical Behavior of ULTEM-9085 Honeycomb Structures Manufactured by Fused Deposition Modeling“. This was the precursor work that led to a us winning an 18-month award to pursue this work further with America Makes.

Download the whole paper at the link below:
http://sffsymposium.engr.utexas.edu/sites/default/files/2016/168-Bhate.pdf

Abstract
ULTEM-9085 has established itself as the Additive Manufacturing (AM) polymer of choice for end-use applications such as ducts, housings, brackets and shrouds. The design freedom enabled by AM processes has allowed us to build structures with complex internal lattice structures to enhance part performance. While solutions exist for designing and manufacturing cellular structures, there are no reliable ways to predict their behavior that account for both the geometric and process complexity of these structures. In this work, we first show how the use of published values of elastic modulus for ULTEM-9085 honeycomb structures in FE simulation results in 40- 60% error in the predicted elastic response. We then develop a methodology that combines experimental, analytical and numerical techniques to predict elastic response within a 5% error. We believe our methodology is extendable to other processes, materials and geometries and discuss future work in this regard.

Figure
Fig 1. Honeycomb tensile test behavior varying as a function of manufacturing parameters
The ASU Capstone team (left to right): Drew Gibson, Jacob Gerbasi, John Reeher, Matthew Finfrock, Deep Patel and Joseph Van Soest.
Fig 2. The ASU Capstone team (left to right): Drew Gibson, Jacob Gerbasi, John Reeher, Matthew Finfrock, Deep Patel and Joseph Van Soest.