Introducing the ANSYS Discovery Marketplace

PADT is excited to introduce the latest innovation in ANSYS simulation tools, The ANSYS Discovery Marketplace.

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The offerings are divided into three bundles: Essentials, Standard, and Ultimate.

  

Each of these includes a different group of tools and capabilities, taken from the new ANSYS Discovery family of products, which includes Discovery Live, Discovery Space Claim, and Discovery AIM.

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New Tricks for an Old Dog: Eric Learns ANSYS SpaceClaim – Post 3

Adding Complexity and Moving

ANSYS-SpaceClaim-Learning-00-00
This post is the third in a series on learning ANSYS SpaceClaim. After over 31 years of CAD use, it has become difficult for me to learn new tools. In this series I will share my experience as I explore and learn how to use this fantastic tool.
If you have not read the previous post, start here.  A table of contents is here.

After playing with that block it seems like it may be time to try a more complex geometry.  For business banking, I’ve got this key fob that generates a number every thirty seconds that I use for security when I log in.  Might as well sort of model that.

keyfob

So the first thing I do is start up a new model and orient myself on to the sketch plane:

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Then I use the line and arc tools to create the basic shape. Play around a bit. I found that a lot of things I had to constrain in other packages are just assumed when you define the geometry.  A nice thing is that as you create geometry, it locks to the grid and to other geometry. ANSYS-SpaceClaim-Learning-03-02

I dragged around and typed in values for dimensions to get the shape I wanted. As I was doing it I realized I was in metric. I’m old, I don’t do metric. So I went in to File and selected SpaceClaim options from the bottom of the window.  I used the Units screen to set things to Imperial.

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This is the shape I ended up with:

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I took this and pulled it up and added a couple of radii:

ANSYS-SpaceClaim-Learning-03-05

But if I look at the real object, the flat end needs to be round.  In another tool, I’d go back to the sketch, modify that line to be an arc, and regen.  Well in SpaceClaim you don’t have the sketch, it is gone.    Ahhh. Panic. I’ve been doing it that way for 25 some years.  OK. Deep breath, just sketch the geometry I need. Click on the three point arc tool, drag over the surface, then click on the first corner, the second, and a third point to define the arc:

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Then us pull to drag it down, using the Up to icon to lock it to the bottom of the object.

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Then I clicked on the edges and pulled some rounds on there:

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OK, so the next step in SolidEdge would be to do a thin wall.  I don’t see a thin wall right off the top, but shell looks like what I want, under the Create group on the Design tab.  So I spinned my model around, clicked on the bottom surface I want to have open and I have a shell.  A thickness of 0.035″ looks good:

ANSYS-SpaceClaim-Learning-03-09

My next feature will be the cutout for the view window.   What I have not figured out yet is how to lock an object to be symmetrical. Here is why. I sketch my cutout as such, not really paying attention to where it is located.  Now I want to move it so that it is centred on the circle.

ANSYS-SpaceClaim-Learning-03-10

Instead of specifying constraints, you move the rectangle to be centered.  To do that I drag to select the rectangle then click Move. By default it puts the nice Move tool in the middle of the geometry.  If I drag on the X direction (Red) you can see it shows the distance from my start.

ANSYS-SpaceClaim-Learning-03-11

So I have a couple of options, to center it. The easiest is to use Up To and click the X axis for the model and it will snap right there.  The key thing I learned was I had to select the red move arrow or it would also center horizontally where I clicked.

If I want to specify how far away the edge is from the center of the circle, the way I did it is kind of cool.  I selected my rectangle, then clicked move. Then I clicked on the yellow move ball followed by a click on the left line, this snapped the move tool to that line. Next I clicked the little dimension Icon to get a ruller, and a small yellow ball showed up. I clicked on this and dragged it to the center of my circle, now I had a dimension from the circle specified that I could type in.ANSYS-SpaceClaim-Learning-03-13

After playing around a bit, if found a second, maybe more general way to do this.  I clicked on the line I want to position.  One of the icons over on the left of my screen is the Move Dimension Base Point icon. If you click on that you get another one of those small yellow balls you can move. I dragged it over to the center of the circle and clicked. then I can specify the distance as 0.75″

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I’ve got the shape I want, so I pull, using the minus icon to subtract, and I get my cutout:

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If you look closely,you will notice I put rounds on the corners of the cutout as well, I used Pull again.

The last thing I want to do is create the cutout for where the bank logo goes. It is a concentric circle with an arc on the right side.  Saddly, this is the most complex thing I’ve ever sketched in SpaceClaim so I was a bit afraid. It was actually easy.  I made a circle, clicking on the center of the outside arc to make them concentric. The diameter was 1″. Then I made another circle of 2″ centered on the right.  To get the shape I wanted, I used the Trim Away command and clicked on the curves I don’t want. The final image is my cutout.

ANSYS-SpaceClaim-Learning-03-16

Now I can do the same thing, subtract it out, put in some rounds, and whalla:

untitled.3

Oh, and I used the built in rendering tool to quickly make this image. I’ll have to dedicate a whole posting to that.

But now that I have my part, it is time to play with move in 3D.

Moving in 3D

Tyler, who is one of our in-house SpaceClaim experts (and younger) pointed out that I need to start thinking about editing the 3D geometry instead of being obsessed with controlling my sketches. So here goes.

If I wanted to change the size of the rectangular cutout in a traditional CAD tool, I’d go edit the sketch. There is no sketch to edit! Fear. Unknown. Change.

So the first thing I’ll do is just move it around. Grab one of the faces and see happens.

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It moves back and forth, pretty simple.  The same tools for specifying the start and stop points are available. Now, if I ctrl-click on all four surfaces the whole thing moves. That is pretty cool.

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Note: I’m using the undo all the time to go back to my un-moved geometry.

Another Note:  As you select faces, you have to spin the model around a lot. I use the middle mouse button to do this rather than clicking on the spin Icon and then having to unclick it.

Play with it some more. I was able to put draft by using the arcs on the Move gizmo, and if you pull far enough it adds material.ANSYS-SpaceClaim-Learning-03-19

That is enough for this post. More soon.

 

 

 

New Tricks for an Old Dog: Eric Learns ANSYS SpaceClaim – Post 2

Learning More About Pulling

ANSYS-SpaceClaim-Learning-00-00
This post is the second in a series on learning ANSYS SpaceClaim. After over 31 years of CAD use, it has become difficult for me to learn new tools. In this series I will share my experience as I explore and learn how to use this fantastic tool.
If you have not read the previous post, start here.  A table of contents is here.

As I explored ANSYS SpaceClaim in my first try, it became obvious that a lot of capabilities that are in multiple operations in most CAD systems, are all combined in Pull for SpaceClaim.  In this posting I feel like it would be a really good idea for me to really understand all the things Pull can do.

Start with the Manual

Not very exciting or adventurous. But there is so much in this operation that I feel like I will miss something critical if I don’t read up first.   It states:

“Use the Pull tool to offset, extrude, revolve, sweep, and draft faces; use it to round, chamfer, extrude, copy, or pivot edges. You can also drag a point with the Pull tool to draw a line on a sketch plane.”

Let’s think about that for a second.  What it is basically saying is if I pull on an object of a given dimension, it creates an object that is one higher dimension. Point pulls to a curve, a curve pulls to a face, and a face pulls to a solid. Kind of cool. The big surprise for me is that there is no round or fillet command. To make a round you pull on an edge. This is change.

Pull some Stuff

I started by reading my block with a hole back in.

ANSYS-SpaceClaim-Learning-02-01

This fillet pull thing scares me so I thought I’d confront it first. So selecte Pull, and selected an edge:

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Then I dragged it away from the block. Nothing. You can’t create a surface that way. Then I dragged in towards the center. A round was created.

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If anything, too simple. Back in my day, adding a round to an edge took skill and experience!

So next I think I want to try and change the size of something. Maybe the diameter of the hole. So I select the cylinder’s face. Is shows the current radius. I could just change that value:

ANSYS-SpaceClaim-Learning-02-04

Instead I drag, and while I do that I noticed that there are two numbers, the current radius and the change to the radius!  Kind of cool. No, really useful.

ANSYS-SpaceClaim-Learning-02-05

You use tab to go between them. So I hit tab once, typed 3 then tab again (or return) and I get a 8 mm diameter.  I like the visual feedback as well as the ability to enter a specific change number.

Next thing that I felt like doing was rounding a corner. Put a 5mm round on the corner facing out:

ANSYS-SpaceClaim-Learning-02-07

So I grabbed the point and dragged, and got a line.

ANSYS-SpaceClaim-Learning-02-07a

 

Remember, it only goes up one entity type – point to curve. Not point to surface. So I ctrl-clicked (that is how you select multiple entities) on the three curves that intersect at the corner:

ANSYS-SpaceClaim-Learning-02-08

Then I dragged and got my round.

ANSYS-SpaceClaim-Learning-02-09

Pulling Along or Around Something

This are all sort of dragging straight. After looking at the manual text it seems I can revolve and sweep as well with the Pull operation.  Cool. But what do I revolve or sweep around and along?  Looking at the manual (and it turns out the prompt on the screen) I use Alt-Clicking to define these control curves.  Let’s try it out by revolving something about that line I mistakenly made.

I click on one of the curves on the round. then Alt-Click the line – It turns blue. So there is a nice visual clue that it is different than the source curve.  Now I’ve also got spinny icons around the curve rather than pull icons.

ANSYS-SpaceClaim-Learning-02-10

So I drag and… funky revolved surface shows up. I had to spin the model to see it clearly:

ANSYS-SpaceClaim-Learning-02-11

Let me stop and share something special about this. In most other CAD tools, this would have involved multiple clicks, maybe even multiple windows. In SpaceClaim, it was Click, Alt-Click, Drag.  Nice.

Using the Pop=up Icons

As you play with the model you may start seeing some popup icons near the mouse when you select geometry while using pull. The compound round on the block is complicated, so I spun it around and grabbed just one edge and pulled it in to be a round.  Then I clicked on it and got this:

ANSYS-SpaceClaim-Learning-02-12

Not only can I put a value in there, I can drop ones I use a lot. I can also change my round to a chamfer, or I can change it to a variable radius. This is worth noting. In most other CAD tools you pick what type of thing you want to do to the edge. Here we start by dragging a round, then specify if it is a chamfer or a variable.

The variable radius is worth digging more in to.  I clicked on it and it was not intuitive as to what I should do. Let’s try help. Search on Variable Radius… duh. Click on the arrow that shows up and drag that. There are three arrows. The one in the middle scales both ends the same, the one on either end, well it sets the radius for either end.

ANSYS-SpaceClaim-Learning-02-13Reading more I see if I hold down the CTRL key and click on the arrow, I can drag a new control point along the edge. I can type in a percentage as well.  Very useful.

ANSYS-SpaceClaim-Learning-02-14

Clicking on a control point and hitting delete, gets rid of them.

That’s just one icon that pops up.  Playing some more it seems the other icons control how it handles corners and multiple fillets merging… something to look at as I do more complex parts.

The other popup I want to look at is the Up To one.  It looks like an arrow on a surface.  In other tools I extrude, cut, revolve all the time to some other piece of geometry.  This is the way to do it in Space Claim.  Let’s say I want to pull a feature to the middle of my hole. First I sketch the outline on a face:ANSYS-SpaceClaim-Learning-02-15

Then I select the outline, and get a popup. First thing I want to do is click on the + sign, because I want to add, not cut, then I click on the Up To and then select the axis of the hole:  ANSYS-SpaceClaim-Learning-02-16

That is enough for pulling and for today.  In the next session it may be time to explore the Move command.