All Things ANSYS 041: Simulating Additive Manufacturing in ANSYS 2019 R2

 

Published on: July 15th, 2019
With: Eric Miller & Doug Oatis
Description:  

In this episode your host and Co-Founder of PADT, Eric Miller is joined by PADT’s Lead Mechanical Engineer Doug Oatis, to discuss the tools that make up the ANSYS Additive family of products (Additive Suite, Additive Print, & Additive Prep), and how those tools help to make 3D printing more effective and easier to navigate.

If you would like to learn more about what’s available in this latest release check out PADT’s webinar on Additive Manufacturing Updates Updates in ANSYS 2019 R2 here: https://bit.ly/2JHWYxn

If you have any questions, comments, or would like to suggest a topic for the next episode, shoot us an email at podcast@padtinc.com we would love to hear from you!

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3D Design Updates in ANSYS 2019 R2 – Webinar

When it comes to the exploration of rapid 3D design, simulation provides a more efficient and optimized workflow for design engineers looking to streamline product development and improve product performance. The toolkit of flagship ANSYS 3D design products made up of Discovery SpaceClaim, Discovery Live, and Discovery AIM allow users to build, and optimize lighter and smarter products with an interface easier to use than most other simulation products. 

Users can delve deeper into the details of a design with the same accuracy as other, more robust ANSYS tools, all while refining their concept and introducing multiple physics simulations to better account for real-world conditions.

Join PADT’s Simulation Support Manager Ted Harris, for a look at what’s new for this line of products with the release of ANSYS 2019 R2. Explore updates for these three tools including:

  • Shared Topology
  • Meshing
  • Navigation
  • Modal Supports 
  • Multi-physics Coupling
  • Topology Optimization 
  • And much more

Register Here

If this is your first time registering for one of our Bright Talk webinars, simply click the link and fill out the attached form. We promise that the information you provide will only be shared with those promoting the event (PADT).

You will only have to do this once! For all future webinars, you can simply click the link, add the reminder to your calendar and you’re good to go!

Meshing Updates in ANSYS 2019 R2 – Webinar

An intelligent, high-quality mesh is at the core of any effective simulation based model; creating the basis for what will help to drive valuable results for even the most complex engineering problems.

Among a variety of tools in ANSYS 2019 R2 are enhanced meshing capabilities that can help reduce pre-processing time and provide a more streamlined solution.

Join PADT’s Specialist Mechanical Engineer, Joe Woodward for a look at what new meshing capabilities are available in the latest release of ANSYS. This presentation will focus predominately on updates regarding:

ANSYS Mechanical Meshing
Batch Connections
Axisymmetric Sweep
Layered Tetrahedron Enhancements
Local Sizing Enhancements
SpaceClaim Meshing
Parameter Management
Direct Modeling/Meshing
Hex Meshing
Block Decomposition

And much more!

Register Here

If this is your first time registering for one of our Bright Talk webinars, simply click the link and fill out the attached form. We promise that the information you provide will only be shared with those promoting the event (PADT).


You will only have to do this once! For all future webinars, you can simply click the link, add the reminder to your calendar and you’re good to go!

All Things ANSYS 036 – Updates for Design Engineers in ANSYS 2019 R1 – Discovery Live, AIM, & SpaceClaim

 

Published on: May 6th, 2019
With: Eric Miller, Ted Harris, & Clinton Smith
Description:  

In this episode your host and Co-Founder of PADT, Eric Miller is joined by PADT’s Simulation Support Manager Ted Harris, and CFD Team Lead Engineer Clinton Smith for a round-table discussion regarding new capabilities for Design Engineers in the latest release of the ANSYS Discovery family of products (Live, AIM, & SpaceClaim). Listen as they express their thoughts on exciting new capabilities, long anticipated technical improvements, and speculate at what has yet to come for this disruptive set of tools.

If you would like to learn more about this update and see the tools in action, check out PADT’s webinar covering ANSYS Discovery AIM & Live in 2019 R1 here: shorturl.at/gyKLM

If you have any questions, comments, or would like to suggest a topic for the next episode, shoot us an email at podcast@padtinc.com we would love to hear from you!

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Introducing ANSYS 2019 R1

PADT is excited to announce the release of ANSYS 2019 R1, the first group of updates for the suite of ANSYS simulation software this year. The release features updates for a wide variety of applications, including simulation for fluids, structures, electronics, 3D design, and much more.

We will be hosting a series of live webinars over the course of 2019 that will allow you to learn about what’s new in this release, from PADT’s team of expert support engineers.

Take a look at the following upcoming product update webinars for 2019 R1 and register by clicking the links below.

There is more to come, so stay tuned


Fluent Updates in ANSYS 2019 R1
Wednesday, February 13th – 11:00 am – 12:00 pm MST AZ

Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is a tool with amazing flexibility, accuracy and breadth of application. Serious CFD, the kind that provides insights to help you optimize your designs, could be out of reach unless you choose your software carefully. Experienced engineers need to go further and faster with well-validated CFD results across a wide range of applications, and with ANSYS Fluent users are able to do just that; delivering reliable and accurate results.

Join Padt’s CFD Team Lead Engineer, Clinton Smith for a look at what new capabilities are available for the latest version of Fluent, in ANSYS 2019 R1.

Register Here


Mechanical Updates in ANSYS 2019 R1
Wednesday, March 13th – 11:00 am – 12:00 pm MST AZ

From designers and occasional users looking for quick, easy, and accurate results, to experts looking to model complex materials, large assemblies, and nonlinear behavior, ANSYS Mechanical enables engineers of all levels to get answers fast and with confidence. With applications for everything form strength analysis to topology optimization, it’s no wonder this comprehensive suite of tools continues to serve as the flagship mechanical engineering software solution.

Join PADT’s Simulation Support Manager, Ted Harris for a look at what new capabilities are available for ANSYS Mechanical, in the latest version; 2019 R1.

Register Here


High Frequency Electromagnetics Updates in ANSYS 2019 R1
Wednesday, April 10th – 11:00 am – 12:00 pm MST AZ

In today’s world of high performance electronics and advanced electrification systems, the effects of electromagnetic fields on circuits and systems cannot be ignored. ANSYS software can uniquely simulate electromagnetic performance across component, circuit and system design, evaluating temperature, vibration and other critical mechanical effects.

Join PADT’s Electrical Engineer, Michael Griesi for a look at what new capabilities are available with regards to High Frequency Electromagnetics, in the latest version of ANSYS; 2019 R1

Register Here


Discovery Updates in ANSYS 2019 R1
Wednesday, May 8th – 11:00 am – 12:00 pm MST AZ

The ANSYS 3D Design family of products enables CAD modeling and simulation for all design engineers. Since the demands on today’s design engineer to build optimized, lighter and smarter products are greater than ever, using the appropriate design tools is more important than ever.

Join PADT’s Simulation Support Manager, Ted Harris for a look at what exciting new features are available for design engineers in both Discovery Live and AIM, in ANSYS 2019 R1.

Register Here


If this is your first time registering for one of our Bright Talk webinars, simply click the link and fill out the attached form. We promise that the information you provide will only be shared with those promoting the event (PADT).

You will only have to do this once! For all future webinars, you can simply click the link, add the reminder to your calendar and you’re good to go!


All Things ANSYS 029 – Thoughts on The 2019 ANSYS Sales Kickoff & Exciting Applications for IcePak

 

Published on: January 23rd, 2019
With: Eric Miller
Description:  

In this episode your host and Co-Founder of PADT, Eric Miller is joined by some very special guests, to discuss how their company makes use of ANSYS IcePak, followed by PADT’s thoughts on the information delivered at this year’s ANSYS Sales Kickoff.

If you have any questions, comments, or would like to suggest a topic for the next episode, shoot us an email at podcast@padtinc.com we would love to hear from you!

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Meshing Enhancements in ANSYS 19.2 – Webinar

Don’t miss this informative presentation – Secure your spot today!

If this is your first time registering for one of our Bright Talk webinars, simply click the link and fill out the attached form. We promise that the information you provide will only be shared with those promoting the event (PADT).

You will only have to do this once! For all future webinars, you can simply click the link, add the reminder to your calendar and you’re good to go!

Explore the Latest Advancements in Design Engineering with ANSYS 19.2 – Webinar

Don’t miss this informative presentation – Secure your spot today!

If this is your first time registering for one of our Bright Talk webinars, simply click the link and fill out the attached form. We promise that the information you provide will only be shared with those promoting the event (PADT).

You will only have to do this once! For all future webinars, you can simply click the link, add the reminder to your calendar and you’re good to go!

From Ideation to Operation: The ANSYS Discovery Product Family in R19 – Webinar

Don’t miss this informative presentation – Secure your spot today!

If this is your first time registering for one of our Bright Talk webinars, simply click the link and fill out the attached form. We promise that the information you provide will only be shared with those promoting the event (PADT).

You will only have to do this once! For all future webinars, you can simply click the link, add the reminder to your calendar and you’re good to go!

Standard Roof Rack Fairing Mount Getting In Your Way?! Engineer it better and 3D Print it!

It is no mystery that I love my Subaru. I bought it with the intention of using it and I have continually made modifications with a focus on functionality.

When I bought my roof crossbars in order to mount ski and/or bike racks, I quickly realized I needed to get a fairing in order to reduce drag and wind noise. The fairing functions as designed, and looks great as well. However, when I went to install my bike rack, I noticed that the fairing mount was in the way of mounting at the tower. As a result, I had to mount the rack inboard of the tower by a few inches. This mounting position had a few negative results:

  • The bike was slightly harder to load/unload
  • The additional distance from the tower resulted in additional crossbar flex and bike movement
  • Additional interference between bikes when two racks are installed

These issues could all be solved if the fairing mount was simply inboard a few more inches. If only I had access to the resources to make such a concept a reality…. oh wait, PADT has all the capabilities needed to take this from concept to reality, what a happy coincidence!

First, we used our in-house ZEISS Comet L3D scanner to get a digital version of the standard left fairing mount bracket. The original bracket is coated with Talcum powder to aid in the scanning process.

The output from the scanning software is a faceted model in *.STL format. I imported this faceted CAD into ANSYS SpaceClaim in order to use it as a template to create editable CAD geometry to use as a basis to create my revised design. The standard mounting bracket is an injection molded part and is hollow with the exception of a couple of ribs. I made sure to capture all this geometry to carry forward into my redesigned parts, which would make the move to scaled manufacturing of this design easy.

Continuing in ANSYS SpaceClaim, as it is a direct modeling software instead of traditional feature-based modeling, I was able to split the bracket’s two function ends, the crossbar end and fairing end, and offset them by 4.5 inches, in order to allow the bike rack to mount right at the crossbar tower. I used the geometry from the center section CAD to create my offset structure. A mirrored version allows both the driver and passenger side fairing mount to be moved inboard to enable mounting of two bike racks in optimal positions. The next step is to turn my CAD geometry back into faceted *.STL format for printing, which can be done directly within ANSYS SpaceClaim.

 

After the design has been completed, I spoke with our 3D printing group to discuss what technology and material would be good for these brackets, as the parts will be installed on the car during the Colorado summer and winter. For this application, we decided on our in-house Selective Laser Sintering (SLS) SINTERSTATION 2500 PLUS and glass filled nylon material. As this process uses a powder bed when building the parts, no support is needed for overhanging geometry, so the part can be built fully featured. Find out more about the 3D printing technologies available at PADT here.

Finally, it was time to see the results. The new fairing mount offset brackets installed just like the factory pieces, but allowed the installation of the bike rack right at the tower, reducing the movement that was present when mounted inboard, as well as making it easier to load and unload bikes!!

I am very happy with the end result. The new parts assembled perfectly, just as the factory pieces did, and I have increased the functionality of my vehicle yet again. Stay tuned for some additional work featuring these brackets, and I’m sure the next thing I find that can be engineered better! You can find the files on GrabCAD here.

 

ANSYS 18 – SpaceClaim Webinar

In its latest release, ANSYS SpaceClaim further integrates its ease of use and rapid geometry manipulation capabilities into common simulation workflows. From large changes to behind the scenes enhancements, you’ll notice efficiency improvements across the board. You’ll save time automating geometry tasks with the expanded recording and replay capabilities of SpaceClaim’s enhanced scripting environment.

Join PADT’s Application Engineer Tyler Smith  for this webinar and learn about several improvements that are guaranteed to save time, enhance your designs and improve overall usability. We’ll cover:

  • Continued development of SpaceClaim’s scripting environment. With expanded recording capabilities and replayability of scripts on model versions, you’ll save time in the steps needed to automate geometry tasks.

  • Faceted data optimization and smoothing enhancements. You can greatly simplify and smooth topology optimized STL data for downstream printing, while preserving the integrity of localized regions.

  • Lattice Infilling for additive manufacturing. The Infilling functionality has greatly expanded to include several lattice infill types, all with custom options to ensure your 3-D printed component has an ideal strength-to-weight relationship.

  • Exploration of inner details of a model with the new fly-through capability. Without hiding components or using cross sections, this capability provides graphical feedback at your fingertips while making it even more enjoyable to work in a 3-D environment.

How-To: Creating Matching Faces on Touching Parts with ANSYS SpaceClaim

Sometimes you want to take two parts and and prepare them for meshing so that they either share a surface between them, or have identical but distinct surfaces on each part where they touch.  In this simple How-To, we share the steps for creating both of these situations so you can get a continuous mesh or create a matching contact surface in ANSYS Mechanical.

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How-To: Connecting Shells Elements in Surface Models with ANSYS SpaceClaim and ANSYS Mechanical

By using the power of ANSYS SpaceClaim to quickly modify geometry, you can set up your surface models in ANSYS Mechanical to easily be connected.  Take a look in this How-To slide deck to see how easy it is to extend geometry and intersect surfaces.

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Metal 3D Printing a Shift Knob

I have always had an issue with leaving well enough alone since the day I bought my Subaru. I have altered everything from the crank pulley to the exhaust, the wheels and tires to the steering wheel. I’ve even 3D printed parts for my roof rack to increase its functionality. One of the things that I have altered multiple times has been the shift knob. It’s something that I use every time and all the time when I am driving my car, as it is equipped with a good ol’ manual transmission, a feature that is unfortunately lost on most cars in this day and age.

prevknobs

I have had plastic shift knobs, a solid steel spherical shift knob, a black shift knob, a white shift knob, and of course some weird factory equipment shift knob that came with the car. What I have yet to have is a 3D printed shift knob. For this project, not any old plastic will do, so with the help of Concept Laser, I’m going straight for some glorious Remanium Star CL!

One of the great things about metal 3D printing is that during the design process, I was not bound by the traditional need for a staple of design engineering, Design For Manufacturing (DFM). The metal 3D printer uses a powder bed which is drawn over the build plate and then locally melted using high-energy fiber lasers. The build plate is then lowered, another layer of powder is drawn across the plate, and melted again. This process continues until the part is complete.

The design for the knob was based off my previously owned shift knobs, mainly the 50.8 mm diameter solid steel spherical knob. I then needed to decide how best to include features that would render traditional manufacturing techniques, especially for a one-off part, cost prohibitive, if not impossible.   I used ANSYS Spaceclaim Direct Modeler as my design software, as I have become very familiar with it using it daily for simulation geometry preparation and cleanup, but I digress, my initial concept can be seen below:2016-10-18_16-19-33

I was quickly informed that, while this design was possible, the amount of small features and overhangs would require support structure that would make post-processing the part very tedious. Armed with some additional pointers on creating self supporting parts that are better suited for metal 3D printing, I came up with a new concept.

2016-10-18_16-24-24

This design is much less complex, while still containing features that would be difficult to machine. However, with a material density of 0.0086 g/mm^3, I would be falling just short of total weight of 1 lb, my magic number. But what about really running away from DFM like it was the plague?

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There we go!!! Much better, this design iteration is spec’d to come out at 1.04 lbs, and with that, it was time to let the sparks fly!

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Here it is emerging as the metal powder that has not been melted during the process is brushed away.

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The competed knob then underwent a bit of post processing and the final result is amazing! I haven’t been able to stop sharing images of it with friends and running it around the office to show my co-workers. However, one thing remains to make the knob functional… it must be tapped.

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In order to do this, we need a good way to hold the knob in a vise. Lucky for us here at PADT, we have the ability to quickly design and print these parts. I came up with a design that we made using our PolyJet machine so we could have multiple material durometers in a single part. The part you need below utilizes softer material around the knob to cradle it and distribute the load of the vise onto the spherical lattice surface of the knob.

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We quickly found out that the Remanium material was not able to be simply tapped. We attempted to bore the hole out in order to be able to press in an insert, and also found out the High Speed Steel (HSS) was not capable of machining the hole. Carbide however does the trick, and we bored the hole out in order to press in a brass insert, which was then tapped.

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Finally, the shift knob is completed and installed!

Want to learn more, check out the article in “Additive Manufacturing Media.”

 

Nerdtoberfest: Printing a Beer Stein with Beer Filament

Noticed an interesting email in my inbox the other day with the subject line:

“Oktoberfest Time: 3D Print a Beer Stein in Beer Filament”

Marketing gold, you have my attention!

After reading the reviews from the filament manufacturer, I dove in and got some of the hoppy, malty filament on order from 3D Fuel. I was very excited when it came in and couldn’t wait to print PADT’s own beer stein for our upcoming Nerdtoberfest event. Meanwhile I found a nice starting point with a file from GrabCad and added my own additions and alterations.

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I quickly went to load the beer filament into one of our 3D printers, when I noticed that the roll size was not compatible with the spool holder on the printer. It was this disconnect that would have previously stopped this experiment in it’s track, however, the future is NOW!

I popped onto the Thingiverse, and alas, I was not alone in having this issue and a plethora of solution were populated before me. I was about to 3D print and adapter to allow my 3D printer to accept a new roll size that was found to be incompatible just moments before. Disaster averted, I was now cooking with gas, er, beer.

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The printing process was uneventful and the beer filament printed well. We now have a beer mug printed out of beer filament for PADT’s annual Nerdtoberfest!

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