All Things ANSYS 022 – Recap of the 2018 ANSYS Innovation Conference & Updates on ANSYS 19.2

 

Published on: October 8th, 2018
With: Eric Miller, Joseph Hanson, Maryam Khorshidi, & Dominic Kedelty
Description:  

In this episode your host and Co-Founder of PADT, Eric Miller is joined by Joseph Hanson of Intel, and Maryam Khorshidi & Dominic Kedelty of MTD Products for a discussion on the presentations they saw at last week’s ANSYS Innovation Conference, and how their companies are leveraging simulation tools today. All that, followed by an update on news and events in the respective worlds of ANSYS and PADT.

If you have any questions, comments, or would like to suggest a topic for the next episode, shoot us an email at podcast@padtinc.com we would love to hear from you!

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All Things ANSYS 020 – Modeling Flow & Heat Transfer with Flownex

 

Published on: September 10th, 2018
With: Eric Miller, Luke Davidson, Vincent Britz, and Farai Hetze
Description: In this episode your host and Co-Founder of PADT, Eric Miller is joined by Luke Davidson and Vincent Britz of M-Tech, and Farai Hetze from CFX-Berlin, for an interview on the what Flownex is, it’s capabilities for modeling flow and heat transfer, and how it works with ANSYS products. All that, followed by an update on news and events in the respective worlds of ANSYS and PADT.

If you have any questions, comments, or would like to suggest a topic for the next episode, shoot us an email at podcast@padtinc.com we would love to hear from you!

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ANSYS Discovery Live – Thermal Conduction Webinar Recording

If you have any other questions, feel free to contact us at sales@padtinc.com or contact PADT’s Lead Application Engineer Manoj Mahendran at manoj.mahendran@padtinc.com.

All Things ANSYS 015 – Using Nimbix to Realize HPC in the Cloud & ANSYS Discovery Live for Transient Thermal Conduction

 

Published on: February 26, 2018
With: Manoj Mahendran, Tom Chadwick, Ted Harris, Adil Noor, Eric Miller
Description: In this episode your host and Co-Founder of PADT, Eric Miller is joined by PADT’s Tom Chadwick, Ted Harris, Manoj Mahendran, and Special Guest Adil Noor from Nimbix, for a discussion on the transient thermal conduction capabilities available within ANSYS Discovery Live, along with an in depth look at how to use Nimbix to realize high performance computing in the cloud.
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Explore the thermal capabilities available in Discovery Live – Webinar

 

This free webinar will cover:

  • The basic functionality of Discovery Live
  • Applications specific to Thermal Conduction
  • A live demo of the thermal capabilities available in Discovery Live

Don’t miss this informative presentation – Secure your spot today!

Can’t make it? Register anyway, as a recording will be made available for on demand viewing.

If this is your first time registering for one of our Bright Talk webinars, simply click the link and fill out the attached form. We promise that the information you provide will only be shared with those promoting the event (PADT).

You will only have to do this once! For all future webinars, you can simply click the link, add the reminder to your calendar and you’re good to go!

ANSYS 18 – AIM Enhancements Webinar

We here at PADT are excited to share with you the updates that ANSYS 18 brings to the table for AIM: The easy-to-use, upfront simulation tool for all design engineers.

ANSYS AIM is a single GUI, multiple physics tool with advanced ANSYS technology under the hood. It requires minimal training and is interoperable with a wide range of ANSYS simulation products.

Join PADT’s application engineer Tyler Smith as he covers the new features and capabilities available in this new release, including:

  • Magnetic frequency response
  • One-way FSI for shell structures
  • Model transfer to Fluent
  • One-way magnetic-thermal coupling
  • and many more!

ANSYS AIM is a perfect tool for companies performing simulation with a CAD embedded tool, design engineers at companies using high end simulation, and even companies who have yet to take the plunge into the world of simulation.

Register for this webinar today and learn how you can take advantage of the easy-to-use, yet highly beneficial capabilities of ANSYS AIM.

The next webinar of the ANSYS Breakthrough Energy Innovation Campaign is now available!

 Register here to watch

Thermal Optimization for Energy Efficiency 

Nearly everything has an optimal operating temperature and thermal condition. Millions of dollars each year are spent generating and transporting thermal energy to achieve thermal goals. Thermal optimization not only improves the economy of transporting energy, maintaining building temperatures, manufacturing processes and products, it improves their efficiency as well. Engineers use simulation to reveal detailed pictures of thermal processes, providing a deep understanding of all aspects of thermal management.

Join our experts for this Webinar to learn how you can capture thermal processes in powerful simulations, seamlessly identify multiphysics interactions that impact performance, and quickly achieve thermal optimization using integrated design optimization tools.
Register Here – or Click Here for more information on Thermal Optimization

This webinar is presented by Richard Mitchell and Xiao Hu

Richard Mitchell is the Lead Product Marketing Manager for Structures. He joined ANSYS in 2006 working in pre-sales and support roles. Before this Richard was an ANSYS user working for a high tech company in the UK. He worked as an analyst on space and vacuum tube technologies.

 

Xiao is a principal engineer at ANSYS Inc. Xiao has spent a combined 12 years of his career at ANSYS and Fluent corporation working with customers in the modeling and simulation of powertrain related applications. Xiao spent his earlier years with Fluent working on engine CFD applications.

Keep checking back to the Energy Innovation Homepage for more updates on upcoming segments, webinars, and other additional content.

ANSYS Breakthrough Energy Innovation Campaign – Thermal Optimization

Information regarding the next topic in the Breakthrough Energy Innovation Campaign has been released, covering Thermal Optimization and how ANSYS simulation software can be used to help solve a variety of issues related to this topic, as well as capture all thermal processes.

Additional content regarding thermal optimization can be viewed and downloaded here.

This is the next topic of a campaign that covers five main topics:

  1. Advanced Electrification 
  2. Machine & Fuel Efficiency
  3. Thermal Optimization
  4. Effective Lightweighting
  5. Aerodynamic Design

Information on each topic will be released over the course of the next few months as the webinars take place.

Sign Up Now to receive updates regarding the campaign, including additional information on each subject, registration forms to each webinar and more.

We here at PADT can not wait to share this content with you, and we hope to hear from you soon.

Thermal Submodeling in ANSYS Workbench Mechanical 15.0

thermal-submodeling-18
If you've been following The Focus for a long time, you may recall my prior article about submodeling using ANSYS Mechanical APDL, which was a 'sub' model of a submarine.  The article, from 2006, begins on page 2 at this link:

Also, Eric Miller here at PADT wrote a Focus blog entry on the new-at-14.5 submodeling capability in ANSYS Workbench Mechanical.

Since both of those articles were about structural submodeling, I decided it was time we published a blog entry on how to perform submodeling in ANSYS Mechanical for thermal simulations.

Submodeling is a technique whereby we can obtain more accurate results in a small, detailed portion of a large model without having to build an incredibly refined and detailed finite element model of our complete system.  In short, we map boundary conditions onto a 'chunk' of interest that is a subset of our full model so that we can solve that 'chunk' in more detail.  Typically we mesh the 'chunk' with a much finer mesh than was used in the original model, and sometimes we add more detail such as geometric features that didn't exist in the original model like fillets.

The ANSYS Workbench Project Schematic for a thermal solution involving submodeling looks like this:

thermal-submodeling-1

Figure 1 – Thermal Submodeling Project Schematic

Note that in the project schematic, the links are automatically established when we setup the submodel after completing the analysis on the coarse model as we shall see below.

First, here is the geometry of the coarse model.  It's a simple set of cooling fins.  In this idealized model, no fillets have been modeled between the fins and the block.

thermal-submodeling-2

Figure 2 – Coarse Model Geometry, Idealized without Fillets

The boundary conditions consisted of a heat flux due to a  thermal source on the base face and convection to ambient air on the cooling fin surfaces.  The heat flux was setup to vary over the course of 3 load steps as follows:

Load Step        Heat Flux (BTU/s*in^2)

            1                      0.2

            2                      0.5

            3                      0.005

Thus, the maximum heat going into the system occurs in load step 2, corresponding to 'time' 2.0 in this steady state analysis.

thermal-submodeling-3

Figure 3 – Coarse Model Boundary Conditions – Heat Flux and Convection

The coarse model is meshed with relatively large elements in this case.  The mesh refinement for a production model should be sufficient to adequately capture the fields of interest in the locations of interest.  After solving, the temperature results show a max temperature at the base where the heat flux is applied, transitioning to the minimum temperature on the cooling fins where convection is removing heat.

thermal-submodeling-4

Figure 4 – Coarse Model Mesh and Temperature Results for Load Step 2

Our task now is to calculate the temperature in one of these fins with more accuracy.  We will use a finer mesh and also add fillets between the fin and base.  For this example, I isolated one fin in ANSYS DesignModeler, did some slicing, and added a fillet on either side of the base of the fin of interest.

thermal-submodeling-5

Figure 5 – Fine Model (Submodel) Isolated Fin Geometry and Mesh, Including Fillets at Base

 

ANSYS requires that the submodel lie in the exact geometric position as it would in the coarse model, so it's a good idea to overlay our fine model geometry onto the coarse model to verify the positioning.

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Figure 6 – Submodel and Coarse Model Overlaid

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Figure 7 – Submodel and Coarse Model Overlaid, Showing Addition of Fillet

The next step is to insert the submodel geometry as a stand-alone geometry block in the Project Schematic which already contains the coarse model, as shown in figure 8.  A new Steady-State Thermal analysis is then dragged and dropped onto the geometry block containing the submodel geometry.

thermal-submodeling-8

Figure 8 – Submodel Geometry Added to Project Schematic, New Steady-State Thermal System Dragged and Dropped onto Submodel Geometry

 

Next, we drag and drop the Engineering Data cell from the coarse model to the Engineering Data cell in the submodel block.  This will establish a link so that the material properties will be shared.

thermal-submodeling-9

Figure 9 – Drag and Drop Engineering Data from Coarse Model to Submodel

The final needed link is established by dragging and dropping the Solution cell from the coarse model onto the Setup cell in the submodel.  This step causes ANSYS to recognize that we are performing submodeling, and in fact this will cause a Submodeling branch to appear in the outline tree in the Mechanical window for the submodel.

thermal-submodeling-10

Figure 10 – Solution Cell Dragged and Dropped from Coarse Model to Submodel Setup Cell

After opening the Mechanical editor for the submodel block, we can see that the Submodeling branch has automatically been added to the tree.

thermal-submodeling-11

Figure 11 – Submodeling Branch Automatically Added to Outline Tree

After meshing the submodel I specified that all three load steps should have their temperature data mapped to the submodel from the coarse model.  This was done in the Details view for the Imported Temperature branch, by setting Source Time to All.

thermal-submodeling-12

Figure 12 – Set Imported Temperature Source Time to All to Ensure All Loads Steps Are Mapped

Next I selected the four faces that make up the cut boundaries in the submodel and applied those to the geometry selection for Imported Temperature.

thermal-submodeling-13

Figure 13 – Cut Boundary Faces Selected for Imported Temperature

 

As mentioned above, the Imported Temperature details were set to read in all load steps by setting Source Time to All.  The Imported Temperature branch can now be right-clicked and the resulting imported temperatures viewed.  I also inserted a Validation branch which we will look at after solving.

thermal-submodeling-14

Figure 14 – Setting Source Time to All, Viewing Imported Temperature on Submodel

Any other loads that need to be applied to the submodel are added as well.  For this model, it's convection on the large faces of the fin that are exposed to ambient air.

thermal-submodeling-15

Figure 15 – Submodel Convection Load on Fin Exposed Faces

Since there are three load steps in the coarse model and we told ANSYS to map results from all time points, I set the number of steps to three in Analysis Settings, then solved the submodel.  Results are available for all three load steps.

thermal-submodeling-16

Figure 16 – Submodel Temperature Results for Step 2 (Highest Heat Flux Value in Coarse Model)

Regarding the Validation item under the Imported Temperature branch, this is probably best added after the solution is done.  In my case I had to clear it and recalculate it.  Validation can display either an absolute or relative (percent difference) plot on the nodes at which loads were imported.  Figure 17 shows the relative difference plot, which maxes out at about 6%.  The validation information as well as mapping techniques are described in the ANSYS Help.

thermal-submodeling-17

Figure 17 – Submodel Imported Temperature Validation Plot – Percent Difference on Mapped Nodes

Looking at the coarse model and submodel results side by side, we see good agreement in the calculated temperatures.  The temperature in the fillets shows a nice, smooth gradient.

thermal-submodeling-18

Figure 18 – Coarse and Submodel Temperature Results Showing Good Agreement

Hopefully this explanation will be helpful to you if you have a need to perform submodeling in a thermal simulation in ANSYS.  There is a Thermal Submodeling Workflow section in the ANSYS 15.0 Help in the Mechanical User's Guide that you may find helpful as well.

 

 

 

Getting to know ANSYS – SIwave

This video is an introduction to ANSYS SIwave – an analysis tool for Integrated Circuits and PCBs