All Things ANSYS 040: Live From the 2019 ASME Turbo Expo – CFD Applications for Turbomachinery

 

Published on: July 1st, 2019
With: Eric Miller, Robin Steed of ANSYS, & Chris Robinson of PCA Engineers Limited
Description:  

In this episode your host and Co-Founder of PADT, Eric Miller is joined by ANSYS CFX & Turbo Tools Lead Technical Product Manager Robin Steed, and Managing Director at PCA Engineers Limited, Chris Robinson, live at the 2019 ASME Turbo Expo in Phoenix Arizona, for a discussion on the past, present, and future of ANSYS CFD and its use in the realm of turbomachinery. Both Robin and Chris have multiple years of experience working in this industry, and their expertise provided some fascinating insight into what this tool is all about.

If you would like to learn more about what’s available in the latest CFD update check out PADT’s webinar on Fluids Updates in ANSYS 2019 R2 here: https://bit.ly/2J6l5We

If you have any questions, comments, or would like to suggest a topic for the next episode, shoot us an email at podcast@padtinc.com we would love to hear from you!

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Major Milestone Achieved: 3D Printing of a Full Turbine Engine

3d-printed-jet-engine

Not long ago the sages in the additive manufacturing world said "Someday in the future we will be able to print a complete Turbine Engine."  That someday is now, much sooner than many of us predicted.  Researchers at Monash University in Australia recently created a modified version of a Safron Microturbo Auxiliary Power Unit using 3D Printing.  The whole thing.  Milestone Achieved.

The best article on this amazing story is on the Melbourne Examiner page:
www.smh.com.au/technology/sci-tech/3d-printing-melbourne-engineers-print-jet-engine-in-world-first-20150226-13pfv1.html 

Turbine Engines are really the peak of machine design. They contain every nasty thing you might run into in other machines, but spin faster and run hotter.  It's hard stuff. The geometry is difficult, lots of small features and holes, and significant assembly and tolerance constraints.  Getting a demonstrator built like this is a huge deal.  As a former turbine engine engineer and a long time user of additive manufacturing, I'm amazed. 

Check out their video:

The "3d Printer" they used was a huge Concept Laser Direct Laser Melting system.  The technology uses a laser to draw on the top of a bed of powder medal, melting the medal in small pools the bind and create a fully dense part with cast like properties.  They used three different metals: nickel alloy, titanium, and aluminum.

Concept-Laser-3d-printed-turbine-enginePADT has chosen to partner with Concept Laser for our metal 3D Printing strategy, which gives us additional excitement for this sucessful project.  

Now that someone has achieved this milestone, the industry can move forward with confidence that even more can be done with metal 3D Printing.  Much was learned in the creation of this advanced device that we can build on and apply to other industries and applications. 

Much is said in the twittersphere and press about printing food or custom dog tags, but this sort of high value industrial application is where the real impact of 3D Printing will be felt. It shows that companies can develop new more efficient products in less time and that are not constrained by traditional manufacturing methods.