Recommendations to Avoid ANSYS Mechanical Database Corruption

It’s late. The report for the project that you have spent over 140 hours on in the past two weeks is due in the morning. It is crunch time. Your computer resources are maxed out while you are running a final test scenario, post-processing another Workbench Mechanical module, and grabbing screenshots while you finish up your report formatting. Then, the unutterable occurs, ok, well maybe isn’t utter-able since I’m writing it, but, in short, your run is complete, you hit save, your computer locks up, you have to force quit, but you are sure that your save was successful. And it was…mostly.

Upon re-opening your project you find that all but one of your Mechanical databases are healthy and happy. But that one, the one that you needed a final image from, is corrupted. You know this because of the error messages that pop up with the slew of text that might look something like this:

image

Your frustration is building. You have already used results from that Mechanical model and reflected it in your report, so you do not want to lose it. I feel your pain.

Since this error message pin-points the SYS.mechdb file as the problem, it is unlikely that you can recover it. I know, not what you wanted to hear. But there is a chance that the database is not corrupt. To verify that, follow the steps Ted Harris outlined in a post he made earlier this year here.

If your Mechanical model is, indeed, corrupt and you were not able to recover it from steps outlined by Ted, make note of the following list of guidelines to help avoid database corruption in the future. I received this list of recommendations from ANSYS Inc. after one of our customers experienced a similar scenario as described above.

  1. Open your project from a Local mounted disk drive
  2. Do not work off of a network drive. It is OK to save to it after you are done
  3. Do not work off of a portable USB flash drive. It is OK to save to it after you are done
  4. Software backup programs can often lock a file and prevent WB from writing to the file
  5. Virus scan programs can also lock the file, and prevent WB from writing to the file
  6. Virus scan program can sometimes find a false positive in the file, and “disinfect” it, causing corruption
  7. Determine if the problem is related to the particular computer. ANSYS has seen bad memory or failing disk drives cause problems with saving files
  8. Use Windows Update regularly
  9. Update graphics drivers as needed

Bullet points 4, 5, and 6 are items that can possibly cause corruption while running, so be aware of the times they are generally run. In addition, ANSYS has recommended that disabling the Pre-Load of the Mechanical (and Meshing) editors can reduce the risk of database corruption. Here are the steps to do that:

  1. Reboot the computer (or Close/kill all AnsysFWW.exe and AnsysWBU.exe processes)
  2. Start a new instance of Workbench to change the settings:
    Tools > Options > Mechanical > Pre-Load the Mechanical Editor (disable)
    Tools > Options > Meshing > Pre-Load the Meshing Editor
    (disable)
  3. Exit Workbench
  4. Start a new instance of Workbench and work normally

As a disclaimer, even if you follow the above guidelines, there is still the chance of losing data. To avoid losing all of your data, follow the motto: save early, save often, and with backups! You can create backups by archiving your project as you make progress so that there is always a version to fall back on. Or, if you have the disk space to handle it, you can simply “Save As.” We hope following these recommendations will save you from headache down the road.

5 Replies to “Recommendations to Avoid ANSYS Mechanical Database Corruption”

    1. Hi Suresh, ACP (ANSYS Composites Prep/Post) is a better tool for what you’re trying to do. In Mechanical APDL, you’re basically stuck with splitting up the geometry so that you have at least one element along the drop-off length, and then assigning individual section properties to those split off volumes based on the ply drop-offs, which can get incredibly tedious and difficult

  1. Hi Suresh, ACP (ANSYS Composites Prep/Post) is a better tool for what you’re trying to do. In Mechanical APDL, you’re basically stuck with splitting up the geometry so that you have at least one element along the drop-off length, and then assigning individual section properties to those split off volumes based on the ply drop-offs, which can get incredibly tedious and difficult.