Efficient Engineering Data, Part 1: Creating and Importing Material Properties in Workbench

Note: This is part 1 of a two-part series in Engineering Data customization and default settings. This article essentially serves as a foundation for my next one, which will cover how to set up default material choices and assignments in Workbench.

As you’ve probably noticed, the Workbench installation comes with an extensive set of material libraries. If you haven’t noticed, then open a Workbench session, go into Engineering Data, and click that button on the upper right that looks like a stack of books: image

Click on one of the libraries, say, General Materials, and take a look at the selection of materials.

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So you see things like Stainless Steel, Aluminum Alloy, Titanium Alloy, etc. but which alloys exactly? 301 1/2-hard steel? 17-4PH? 6061-T6 aluminum? Or cast C355? Titanium 6-4? Or 6-2-4-2? Obviously you’re going to have your own material properties in mind, and you’ll probably use them frequently enough to where you’d like to have them readily accessible. Maybe store them in a library, or something.

As it turns out, you’re not confined to the libraries ANSYS provides with the Workbench installation. You can create your own libraries too. To start this off, first click in the first blank line in the top Engineering Data Sources section, where it says, “Click here to add a new library” (seems pretty straight-forward, doesn’t it?) and type a unique name for the library. I’ll call mine “Jeff’s Materials” because I’m incredibly original that way. Then hit Enter.

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You’ll be prompted for a location and xml file name for the library. Specify these and click Save. All of your material names and properties will be stored in this file.

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Notice that the new library is checked. That means it is unlocked and able to be edited.

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At that point you can add material names, insert properties from the left side Toolbox, etc.

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Type in some material names

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Then define their properties

Once you’re finished adding and editing materials, uncheck the column B box of the library to lock it up. Click Yes to accept changes. If you want to add or edit materials to your library at a later date, simply unlock it by checking the column B check box again.

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Now, let’s say you want to share your awesome material library with your co-workers, or maybe you’ve installed a new version of ANSYS and you want to include it, or maybe your library was deleted by gnomes during the night. How do you bring it back into Workbench? Simple. First make sure the xml file is available (you’ll want to email it to your co-workers and have them save it to their disks if you’re sharing it with them). Toggle the libraries on by clicking on the stack of books button. Then simply click the little ellipsis button on the “Click here to add a new library” line.

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Browse to the appropriate xml file and open it.

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And now you have your library back.

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I was too lazy to define all the materials for this article, hence the question marks

This is all well and good, but wouldn’t it be nice if we could change the materials that are immediately available in Engineering Data upon opening Workbench, and set the default material assignment to something besides Structural Steel? As it turns out, you can do both of these, and I’ll show you how in the next installment of Efficient Engineering Data.

4 Replies to “Efficient Engineering Data, Part 1: Creating and Importing Material Properties in Workbench”

  1. thanks for sharing this with us. I usually work on simulations of chopped fibers and I usually have a material model defined for each element. I do these sort of simulations in MAPDL. Is there any way i can import such data into workbench?

    Thanks