ASU Polytechnique Deploys Robots in Project for 3D Printing Automation for Orbital ATK

Sometimes we run across some great exampls of industry and academia working together and like to share them as examples of win-win partnerships that can move technology forward and give studends a great oportunity.   A current Capstone Design Project by students at ASU Polytechnique is a great example.  It is also an early exmple of what can be done at the brand new Additive Manufacturing Center that was recently opened at the campus.

I’ll let ASU Mecanical Enginering Systems student Dean McBride tell you in his own words:

Orbital ATK in Chandler currently utilizes two Stratasys Dimension SST 1200es printers to prototype various parts with.  These printers print on parts trays, which must be removed and re-inserted into the printer to start new prints.  Wanting to increase process efficiency, Orbital had the desire of automating this 3D printing process during times when employees are not present to run the printers.  After the idea was born, Orbital presented this project to ASU Polytechnic as a potential senior capstone design project.  Shortly after, an ambitious team was assembled to take on the project.

 Numerous iterations of the engineering design process took place, and the team finally arrived at a final solution.  This solution is a Cartesian style robot, meaning the robot moves in linear motions, similar to the 1200es printer itself.  The mechanical frame and structure of the robot have been mostly assembled at this point.  Once assembly is achieved, the team will focus their efforts on the electrical system of the robot, as well as software coding of the micro-controller control system.  The team will be working to fine tune all aspects of the system until early May when the school semester ends.  The final goal of this project is to automate at least two complete print cycles without human interaction.

Here is a picture of the team with the robot they are building along side the Stratasys FDM printer they are automating.

 

Engineering.com: Metal Additive Manufacturing Keeps Legend Flying

What do you do when you want to replace the exhaust on a 1944 P-51D Mustang warbird and you also happen to be a pioneer in additive manufacturing?  You work with Concept Laser and PADT to can and print a replacement stainless steel part.  In “Metal Additive Manufacturing Keeps Legend Flying” Engineering.com details the project that involved blue light scanning and 3D Printing of new metal part in modern Stainless Steel, replacing the three-piece weldment with a single part.

They also did a fantastic video about the effort:

If you would like to learn how PADT can help you reverse engineering your legacy geometry and recreate it using Additive Manufacturing, contact us.

Phoenix Business Journal: Installing a metal 3-D printer was a lesson on working with regulators

While installing our new metal 3D Printer we learned a couple of important lessons on working with local inspectors.  In “Installing a metal 3-D printer was a lesson on working with regulators” we share what we captured.

Tour ConceptLaser’s Metal 3D Printing lab at AeroDef

Attending AeroDef this year in Fort Worth? Make sure you register to tour Concept Laser on March 6th before AeroDef! You’ll hear an update on the GE acquisition and presentations on customer applications and machine safety. Registration ends February 24th, 2017, so don’t miss this opportunity!

Register now: http://aerodefevent.com/sessions/concept-laser-tour/

Speed, superior quality monitoring, and an open architecture that enables innovation – that is what makes Concept Laser’s Direct Metal Laser Melting (DMLM) technology a leader in the metal additive manufacturing industry. Come and hear about how Concept Laser is investing to bring you innovation through new products and processes that will lead to revenue-generating opportunities for your business.

The Tour is March 6th from 8:30am to 11:30pm and includes round trip transportation from the conference and more.

What you will see on the tour:

  • Direct Metal Laser Melting
  • In-situ Quality Assurance
  • Best-in-class safety guidelines when interacting with reactive and non-reactive materials
3D Printed Exhaust Gas Probe (RSC Engineering and Concept Laser Inc.)
Titanium implant leveraging lattice designs (Concept Laser)

Learn About the New Stratasys 3D Printers and New Orleans

It was my first time visiting New Orleans. I have heard many stories of how good the food is and how everyone is really nice there so I was excited to visit this city for a business trip. Stratasys Launch 2017! There was some buzz going on about some new FDM printers that Stratasys has been working on and I was really excited to see them and hear what sets them apart from the competition. Rey Chu (Co-Owner of PADT), Mario Vargas (Manager of 3D Printer Sales), Norman Stucker (Account Executive in Colorado), and I (James Barker, Application Engineer) represented PADT at this year’s Launch.

The city did not disappoint! I ate the best gumbo I’ve ever tried. Below is a picture of it with some Alligator Bourbon Balls. The gumbo is Alligator Sausage and Seafood. Sooooo Good!!


My last night in New Orleans, Stratasys rented out Mardi Gras World. That is where they build all the floats for Mardi Gras. They had a few dancers and people dressed up festive. I was able to get a picture of Rey in a Mardi Gras costume.

After dinner at Mardi Gras World, I took Rey and Mario down Bourbon Street one last time and then we went to Café Du Monde for their world famous Beignets. Everyone told me that if I come home without trying the Beignets, then the trip was a waste. They were great! I recommend them as well. Below is picture of Mario and me at the restaurant.

As you can see we had a fun business trip. The best part of it was the unveiling of the new FDM printers! Mario and I sat on the closest table to the stage and shared the table with Scott Crump (President of Stratasys and inventor of FDM technology back in 1988). These new printers are replacing some of Stratasys entry level and mid-level printers. What impressed me most is that they all can print PLA, ABS, and ASA materials with the F370 being able to print PC-ABS. You also can build parts in four different layer heights (.005, .007, .010, and .013”), all while utilizing new software called GrabCad Print.

GrabCad Print is exciting because you can now monitor all of you Stratasys FDM printers from this software and setup queues. What made me and many others clap during the unveiling is that with GrabCad Print you no longer have to export STL files! You can import your native CAD assemblies and either print them as an assembly or explode the assembly and print the parts separately.

      

Everyone wants a 3D Printer that can print parts faster, more accurately and is dependable. You get that with the family of systems! Speed has increased big time, they are twice as fast as the Dimension line of FDM printers. Stratasys has published the accuracy of these new printers to be ±.008” up to a 4 inch tall part and then every inch past 4 inches, you add another .002”. These machines are very dependable. They are replacing the Uprint (Uprint SE Plus is still current), Dimension, and Fortus 250 machines that have been workhorses. Many of our customers still have a Dimension from 2002 when they were first launched. In addition to the 43 existing patents that Stratasys has rolled into this phenomenal product, they have an additional 15 new patents that speaks volumes as to the innovation in these 3D printers.

Stratasys Launch was a blast for me. Seeing these new printers, parts that were printed from them, and understanding why these are the best FDM printers on the market was well worth my time! I look forward to helping you with learning more about them. Please contact me at james.barker@padtinc.com for more information. If you would like to hear my recorded webinar that has even more information about the new F170, F270, and F370, here is the link.  Or you can download the brochure here.

Metal 3D Printed Shift Knob: Is It Cool(er)?

I had a really great time designing the Metal 3D printed shift knob from my previous blog post. I was curious what the other benefits of the knob may be besides being cool to look at and show off. What better way than to use the simulation software that we use here at PADT every day!

One of the clear differences between my solid spherical knob and the Metal 3D printed version is surface area. Being that PADT is based in Tempe, AZ, some may say that we have “warm” summers down here. Couple the 120F days with a black car, and the interior can get very hot, at some points feeling like the sun itself has taken up residence inside the back seat. With modern A/C, this heat can be mitigated fairly quickly, only to attempt to shift into gear to be scalded by the shift knob!

I wanted to see what the rate of cooling for the two knobs would be in a basic situation with some basic assumptions. Using ANSYS transient thermal, I initialized the knobs to 150F, temperatures that can be quickly reached in parked cars here in AZ. I added a convection heat transfer boundary condition on the outer surface of each shift knob, assuming a film coefficient of 50 W/m^2C, and that the ambient temp in the car is at a cool 70F.

 

I ran the simulations for 5 minutes, and the results were in line with what I expected. As the 3D printed knob has more surface area for cooling, it’s final temperature was ~84F, compared to the solid spherical knob at a final temperature of 115F!

 

Want to learn more, check out the article in “Additive Manufacturing Media.”

Part Scanning – An Update

3d-optical-scanner-1Did you know that PADT does scanning of parts?  No? You are not alone. We recently ran into several customers who were sending their scanning out of state and didn’t know that they could have it done by PADT, someone who is already a trusted partner. So we thought it would be a good time to do an update on our Scanning services and provide some additional background on what it is.

Part Scanning 101

The idea behind part scanning is that you want to take a part in the real world, and get an accurate model in a computer. To do this you somehow measure the part with a computer, getting a three dimensional representation of the parts surface.  Today, there are six basic ways to do this:


Physical Measurement (CMM)
Measure points on the part relative to some reference. This is great for measure simple geometry where you can reconstruct it by knowing key dimensions.
scanning-laser-scanningLaser Scanning
This process shines a laser on an object and measures the distance to the object. It does this thousands of times to build up a point array of the surface


scanning-structured-lightStructured Light Scanning
This process puts down a series of parallel lines, or a grid of lines, and measures how far they distort from a flat pattern. With this information it can create a massive amount of points on the objects surface.

scanning-cssCross Sectional Scanning
If you need to see inside, light based scanning does not work. In cross sectional scanning you machine away thin slices of an object and take an accurate picture of each layer as you go. This can then be turned in to an accurate representation of both the inside and outside of the object.
scanning-ct-scannerVolumetric Scanning
Another way around the fact that light can not penetrate an object is to use various types of radiation, like X-Rays, that go inside an object. Although new for industrial applications this method is growing for complex parts with internal geometry.
scanning-photometric-scanningPhotometric Scanning
If accuracy is not critical, then software can take pictures taken from dozens of views and reconstruct a 3D shape.  This is used most often for art and entertainment, but is not precise enough for engineering yet.

PADT offers Structured Light and Cross Sectional Scanning

scanning-point-cloud-surfaceAll of these methods create points in space.  The more sophisticated the software, the more automatic the process of assembling the points to define the surfaces of the full object. These points are sometimes called a “point cloud.”

The Point cloud can them be turned in to a faceted representation of the object.  For many people, this is all they need. This faceted representation can be rendered on a computer screen or 3D Printed.  It can also be used with inspection software to determine the accuracy of the part relative to its original specification as well as variations across multiple copies of the same geometry.

scanning-CAD-modelIf users need more, like a full CAD model, that can be created from the point cloud using specialized software.  PADT uses Geomagic DesignX.  This tool not only creates usable geometry, but it can export in the customer’s native CAD format.

To do accurate part scanning you need:

  1. A precision scanning device
  2. Software to take the measured data and create an accurate point cloud. This includes repair and cleanup tools.
  3. Software to convert the point cloud into a usable 3D CAD model
  4. or, Software to conduct accurate inspection on the measured geometry.

All of these tools require some training and practice to use efficiently.  It is fairly easy to get ball park computer models using consumer level tools. But to get accurate, engineering quality results the right tools and processes must be applied.

Why does Part Scanning Take so Long and Cost So Much?

When people ask for their first part scanning quote, they can often be surprised by the cost. The scanning process doesn’t look that hard. And to be honest, the amount of time you actually spend scanning most parts is pretty short.  The time is spent on the preparation, scanning hard-to-reach areas, the clean up, and then converting the data in to usable formats.

scanning-doing-the-workIf we are working with a light based scanner, we have to prepare the parts so that they reflect the light properly. Sometimes we have to cover the part with a find powder, sometimes we may even have to paint it.  What we need is for the reflection and color of the part to not interfere with the scanning.

If we are using cross sectional scanning, the part needs to be cast inside a rigid material, so the part we are scanning does not distort as we remove layers.  In addition, if the part is not a solid light or dark color, it may need to be died to provide contrast for the camera.

Both processes also require some study to determine the orientation of the part relative to the scanner and how the scanning process will take place. Once all this is worked out, the scanning often goes very fast. If there are nasty little parts that are hard to get to or that confuse the device, the engineer may have to modify things, do some special localized scanning, or even make castings that are then scanned.  As is usual with technical processes, a very small portion of the surface being scanned may take up the vast majority of the scanning time.

Once the scanning is done, the real hard work begins. Although software is much better than it was in the past, the resulting point cloud needs to be massaged and cleaned. Stray data is removed, and points from different scans need to be positioned and combined.  Then everything must be checked. If a CAD solid model is needed, then the engineer must spend considerable time dealing with complex features and transition areas. As with the scanning, the bulk of the time spent creating a CAD model is spent on a relatively small percentage of the geometry.

All of this adds up.  Plus, to be honest, things rarely go as planned and unexpected issues arise that need to be dealt with.

Part Scanning Services at PADT

scanning-geomagic-1Now we get to the important part of this post: hiring PADT to do your scanning.  We added this capability to support our 3D Printing customers that wanted copies of physical parts.  But as we looked at it, we found that we also had customers who needed inspection and reverse engineering of legacy parts. We studied the problem for some time and found the right tools and people to make it happen.

Our primary scanner is a Zeiss Comet L3D 5M STructured light scanner.  It used to be called a Steinbichler, till Zeiss bought them in 2015.  Although it is portable and easy to manipulate, the Comet L3D 5M is highly accurate.  It allows us to scan everything from small medical devices to the front end of acar, and to know that the resulting geometry will be accurate and usable. This is the best option for inspection and reverse engineering of high-precision parts.

scanning-padt-partsWe also have a Geomagic Capture scanner. Although less accurate it is more portable and simpler to operate. It is ideal or taking to a customer and getting geometry for reverse engineering or part copying.

If parts have internal features, and are made of plastic, we use our Cross Sectional Scanners. These high precision devices do a fantastic job and are really the best way to capture inside surfaces. Our customers love it to see how injection molded parts are coming out on well used molds.

If anything else is needed, our experts can outsource to a niche supplier.

Want to do it Yourself?

If you need to do your own scanning, no worries. PADT also sells all the tools we use inhouse to customers that need the capability internally.

Next Steps

scanning-inspection-softwareHopefully this posting has answered most of your questions and you are eager to try 3D Part Scanning.  The best place to start is to get a quote from PADT.  However, if you still have questions then feel free to contact us and fire away. We are passionate bout this capability and love talking about it.

Download our brochure here.

Either way, you can email rp@padtinc.com or call 480.813.4884 and ask to talk about Part Scanning. We also have some information on our website at www.padtinc.com/scanning.

Stratasys Release Webinar 2017

We here at PADT are excited to share information on the next big release from Stratasys, the global leader in 3D printing, additive solutions, materials and services.

The name Stratasys has always been synonymous with top of the line machines that meet even the most advanced rapid prototyping needs, and excel at every stage of the design prototyping process.

This new release is no exception.

Keep an eye out for more information on February 6th

Update on ASU 3D Printing Research and Teaching Lab

Two weeks ago we were part of a fantastic open house at the ASU Polytechnic campus for the grand opening of the Additive Manufacturing Research center, a part of the Manufacturing Research and Innovation Hub.  What a great event it was where the Additive Manufacturing community in Arizona gathered in one place to celebrate  this important piece in the local ecosystem.  A piece that puts Arizona in the lead for the practical application of 3D Printing in industry.

I could go on and on, but better writers by far have penned some great stories on the event and on the lab.

ASU’s article is here: New hub’s $2 million in cutting-edge 3-D printing equipment will allow students to stay on forefront of rapidly growing sector

And Hayley Ringle of the Phoenix Business Journal summed it all up, with some great insight into the impact on education and job growth in “See inside the Southwest’s largest 3D printing research facility at ASU

And last but not least, here are some pictures related to PADT that ASU provided:

Be Alert and Always Inert – The importance of an inert environment with Metal 3D Printing (Video)

Metal 3D Printing is one of the more exciting areas of additive manufacturing, and we are learning a lot about how to safely operate our new system.  Our very own Dhruv Bhate, PhD shared those lessons learned in this new video:

The video stresses the importance of keeping an inert environment to keep part quality and to ensure a safe operating environment. Our Concept Laser Metal 3D Printer uses high powered lasers to melt metal powder one layer at a time to build 3D Parts. This process produces soot that is highly flammable.

Dhruv shows the process we use to break the part from the machine, clean the chamber of soot, and replace the filter that captures the soot.

To learn more about PADT and how we can help you with your 3D Printing, product development, or Numerical Simulation needs, please visit www.padtinc.com

Use this link to see all of our blog posts on Metal 3D Printing

Press Release: Concept Laser, Honeywell, and PADT Build Largest Additive Manufacturing Center in Southwest at Arizona State University

PADT-Press-Release-IconOn January 18th, ASU will officially Launch their Manufacturing Research and Innovation Hub, the Largest Additive Manufacturing  research and teaching center in the Southwestern US.  PADT is proud to have partnered with ASU as well as with Concept Laser and Honeywell to get this important piece of the local manufacturing ecosystem started and to keep it growing.

Located on the Polytechnic School at ASU in Mesa, Arizona, this facility is amazing.  And you can see it for yourself, the public is invited to the launch on January 18th, 2017 at 9:00 am.  ASU Polytechnic Dean Kyle Squires and the Director Ann McKenna will be speaking as will our very own Rey Chu, John Murray from Concept Laser, and Don Godfrey from Honeywell.  Tours will follow. Learn more and register for this free event that will bring together the local 3D Printing community here.

You can also learn more by reading the official press release from Concept Laser that outlines what the center does and the partnerships that make it possible:

Press Release:

Concept Laser, Honeywell, and PADT Build Largest Additive Manufacturing Center in Southwest at Arizona State University

GRAPEVINE, Texas, January 11, 2017 – The Polytechnic School at Arizona State University (ASU) offers the only manufacturing engineering undergraduate degree in Arizona; it is also one of only 22 ABET accredited manufacturing engineering programs in the United States. By forming a partnership with Concept Laser, Honeywell Aerospace, and PADT, Inc. the largest additive manufacturing research facility in the Southwest is now on the Polytechnic campus. The 15,000 square foot center holds over $2 million of plastic, polymer, and 3D metal printing equipment.

The lab has a Concept Laser M2 cusing and Mlab cusing machine which are dedicated to 3D metal printing, also known as metal additive manufacturing. Unlike conventional metal fabrication techniques, additive manufacturing produces fully-dense metal parts by melting layer upon layer of ultra-fine metal powder. The Polytechnic School is using the machines for a wide range of research and development activities including materials development and prototyping complex mechanical and energy systems.

Supporting quotes:

Don Godfrey, Engineering Fellow at Honeywell: “Honeywell is thrilled to be participating in the opening of the new additive manufacturing laboratory at the Arizona State University Polytechnic campus.  For many years, we have worked with ASU seniors on their capstone projects with three of these projects this school year additive manufacturing focused. In addition to our own additive manufacturing operations, we have provided mentorship to students in the program and assisted in the procurement of one machine for the schools’ new lab.  We look forward to growing our relationships with the university in developing brilliant minds to tackle and overcome industry challenges associated with aviation and additive manufacturing.”

John Murray, President and CEO of US-based subsidiary Concept Laser Inc: “Changing the future of metal additive manufacturing begins with educated teachers and curious students. The educational leadership that the ASU Polytechnic School provides to the Southwest region and the industry will certainly be impactful. Concept Laser is proud to be a partner in this initiative.”

Rey Chu, Principal, Manufacturing Technologies at PADT, Inc: This partnership is the next and obvious step in the progression of additive manufacturing in the Southwest.  With Concept Laser’s outstanding technology, Honeywell’s leadership in applying additive manufacturing to practical Aerospace needs, PADT’s extensive network of customers and industry experience, and ASU’s proven ability to educate and work with industry, the effort will establish a strong foundation for the entire regional ecosystem.

Ann McKenna, Director of ASU’s Polytechnic School: “Partnering with these industry leaders provides us the capability to do additional research and enhance our education programs. With so few of these types of centers, this makes ASU more attractive among academic partners, federal agencies and corporations to advance additive manufacturing.

The ASU Polytechnic School will be hosting an open house to celebrate the launch of their Manufacturing Research and Innovation Hub on January 18, 2017 at 9am. There will be guided tours showcasing student projects. Honeywell, Concept Laser, and PADT will be in attendance. Please register your attendance at  www.mrihlaunch.eventbrite.com.

About Concept Laser  

Concept Laser GmbH is one of the world’s leading providers of machine and plant technology for the 3D printing of metal components. Founded by Frank Herzog in 2000, the patented LaserCUSING® process – powder-bed-based laser melting of metals – opens up new freedom to configuring components and also permits the tool-free, economic fabrication of highly complex parts in fairly small batch sizes.

Concept Laser serves various industries, ranging from medical, dental, aerospace, toolmaking and mold construction, automotive and jewelry. Concept Laser machines are compatible with a diverse set of powder materials, such as stainless steel and hot-work steels, aluminum and titanium alloys, as well as precious metals for jewelry and dental applications.

Concept Laser Inc. is headquartered in Grapevine, Texas and is a US-based wholly owned subsidiary of Concept Laser GmbH. For more information, visit our website at www.conceptlaserinc.com

LaserCUSING® is a registered trademark of Concept Laser.

About Phoenix Analysis and Design Technologies

Phoenix Analysis and Design Technologies, Inc. (PADT) is an engineering product and services company that focuses on helping customers who develop physical products by providing Numerical Simulation, Product Development, and 3D Printing solutions. PADT’s worldwide reputation for technical excellence and experienced staff is based on its proven record of building long term win-win partnerships with vendors and customers. Since its establishment in 1994, companies have relied on PADT because “We Make Innovation Work.” With over 80 employees, PADT services customers from its headquarters at the Arizona State University Research Park in Tempe, Arizona, and from offices in Torrance, California, Littleton, Colorado, Albuquerque, New Mexico, and Murray, Utah, as well as through staff members located around the country. More information on PADT can be found at www.PADTINC.com.

 About Arizona State University

The Ira A. Fulton Schools of Engineering at Arizona State University include nearly 19,000 students and more than 300 faculty members who conduct nearly $100 million in research, spanning a broad range of engineering, construction and technology fields. Across the six schools contained within the Fulton Schools, 24 undergraduate and 32 graduate programs are offered on ASU’s Tempe and Polytechnic campuses and online. The schools’ educational programs emphasize problem solving, entrepreneurship, multidisciplinary interactions, social context and connections. Arizona State University includes more than 80,000 students and 1,600 tenured or tenure-track faculty on multiple campuses in metropolitan Phoenix as well as online. For more information, please visit www.asu.edu or asuonline.asu.edu.

Press contact:
Joyce Yeung, Director of Marketing
Concept Laser
Phone: (817) 328-6500
E-mail: j.yeung@conceptlaserinc.com

PADT Contact
Eric Miller
PADT, Inc.
Principal & Co-Owner
480.813.4884
eric.miller@padtinc.com

Metal 3D Printing a Shift Knob

I have always had an issue with leaving well enough alone since the day I bought my Subaru. I have altered everything from the crank pulley to the exhaust, the wheels and tires to the steering wheel. I’ve even 3D printed parts for my roof rack to increase its functionality. One of the things that I have altered multiple times has been the shift knob. It’s something that I use every time and all the time when I am driving my car, as it is equipped with a good ol’ manual transmission, a feature that is unfortunately lost on most cars in this day and age.

prevknobs

I have had plastic shift knobs, a solid steel spherical shift knob, a black shift knob, a white shift knob, and of course some weird factory equipment shift knob that came with the car. What I have yet to have is a 3D printed shift knob. For this project, not any old plastic will do, so with the help of Concept Laser, I’m going straight for some glorious Remanium Star CL!

One of the great things about metal 3D printing is that during the design process, I was not bound by the traditional need for a staple of design engineering, Design For Manufacturing (DFM). The metal 3D printer uses a powder bed which is drawn over the build plate and then locally melted using high-energy fiber lasers. The build plate is then lowered, another layer of powder is drawn across the plate, and melted again. This process continues until the part is complete.

The design for the knob was based off my previously owned shift knobs, mainly the 50.8 mm diameter solid steel spherical knob. I then needed to decide how best to include features that would render traditional manufacturing techniques, especially for a one-off part, cost prohibitive, if not impossible.   I used ANSYS Spaceclaim Direct Modeler as my design software, as I have become very familiar with it using it daily for simulation geometry preparation and cleanup, but I digress, my initial concept can be seen below:2016-10-18_16-19-33

I was quickly informed that, while this design was possible, the amount of small features and overhangs would require support structure that would make post-processing the part very tedious. Armed with some additional pointers on creating self supporting parts that are better suited for metal 3D printing, I came up with a new concept.

2016-10-18_16-24-24

This design is much less complex, while still containing features that would be difficult to machine. However, with a material density of 0.0086 g/mm^3, I would be falling just short of total weight of 1 lb, my magic number. But what about really running away from DFM like it was the plague?

2016-10-18_16-23-31

There we go!!! Much better, this design iteration is spec’d to come out at 1.04 lbs, and with that, it was time to let the sparks fly!

img_7602

Here it is emerging as the metal powder that has not been melted during the process is brushed away.

untitled

The competed knob then underwent a bit of post processing and the final result is amazing! I haven’t been able to stop sharing images of it with friends and running it around the office to show my co-workers. However, one thing remains to make the knob functional… it must be tapped.

img_7762

In order to do this, we need a good way to hold the knob in a vise. Lucky for us here at PADT, we have the ability to quickly design and print these parts. I came up with a design that we made using our PolyJet machine so we could have multiple material durometers in a single part. The part you need below utilizes softer material around the knob to cradle it and distribute the load of the vise onto the spherical lattice surface of the knob.

img_7765img_7764

We quickly found out that the Remanium material was not able to be simply tapped. We attempted to bore the hole out in order to be able to press in an insert, and also found out the High Speed Steel (HSS) was not capable of machining the hole. Carbide however does the trick, and we bored the hole out in order to press in a brass insert, which was then tapped.

img_7873

Finally, the shift knob is completed and installed!

Want to learn more, check out the article in “Additive Manufacturing Media.”

 

Press Release: New 3D Printing Support Cleaning Apparatus Features Large Capacity for Stratasys FDM Systems

PADT-Press-Release-IconBuilding on the worldwide success of previous products in the family, PADT has just released the new SCA 3600, a large capacity cleaning system for removing the support material from Stratasys FDM parts.  This new system adds capacity and capability over the existing benchtop SCA-1200HT System.

A copy of the press release is below.
At the same time, we are also launching a new website for support removal: www.padtinc.com/supportremoval.

The SCA 3600 can dissolve support from all the SST-compatible materials you use – ABS, PC, and nylon. A “no heat” option provides agitation at room temperature for the removal of Polyjet SUP706 material as well. The SCA 3600’s versatility and efficient cleaning performance are built on the success of earlier models with all the features you have come to expect, in a larger and more capable model.sca_3600-3pics

Since the launch of the original SCA-1200 in 2008, PADT has successfully manufactured and supported the SCA family of products for users worldwide. Common requests from desktop SCA users were for a larger system for bigger parts, the ability to clean many parts at the same time, and the option to remove supports from PolyJet parts. The SCA 3600 is the answer: Faster, larger, and more capable.

sca-logo3-web7SCA 3600 Key Features are:

  • Removes soluble support from ABS, PC, and nylon 3D printed FDM parts
  • Removes soluble support from PolyJet 3D Printed parts
  • User-selectable temperature presets at 50, 60, 70, and 85°C and “No Heat” for PolyJet
  • User-controlled timer
  • Uses cleaning solutions from Stratasys
  • Unique spray nozzle optimizes flow coverage
  • 230 VAC +/- 10%, 15A
  • Whisper-quiet operation
  • Includes rolling cart for easy movement, filling, and draining.
  • Capacity: 27 gal / 102 L
  • Size: 42.8″ x 22.8″ x 36.5″/ 1,086 x 578 x 927 mm
  • 16” x 16” x 14” / 406 x 406 x 356 mm removable large parts basket
  • Integral hinged lid and small part basket
  • Stainless steel tub and basket
  • Over temperature and water level alarms
  • Automatic halt of operation with alarms
  • Field replaceable sub-assemblies
  • Regulatory Compliance: CE/cTUVus/RoHS/WEEE

You can download our new brochure for both systems:

SCA 3600 Spec Sheet

SCA-1200HT Spec Sheet

If you are interested in learning more or adding an SCA 3600 to your additive manufacturing lab, contact your Stratasys reseller.

Official copies of the press release can be found in HTML and PDF.

Press Release:

New 3D Printing Support Cleaning Apparatus Features Large Capacity for Stratasys FDM Systems

Offered Worldwide, the SCA 3600 is Big Enough to Handle Large 3D Printed Parts, Effortlessly Dissolving Support Material

TEMPE, Ariz., November 17, 2016 – Phoenix Analysis & Design Technologies, Inc. (PADT), the Southwest’s largest provider of simulation, product development, and rapid prototyping services and products, today introduced its new SCA3600 3D Printing Support  Cleaning Apparatus (SCA). The systems are sold exclusively by Stratasys, Ltd. (SSYS) for use with its FORTUS line of 3D Printers. The hands-free support removal technology is a huge advantage to people who use Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM) systems for their 3D Printing.

“With more than 10,000 of our benchtop SCA units in the field, we gathered a wealth of knowledge on performance and reliability,” said Rey Chu, Co-owner and Principal of PADT. “We used that information to design and manufacture a system that cleans larger parts, or multiple small parts, while keeping the speed, easy maintenance and great user experience of the benchtop system.”

A powerful upgrade over PADT’s successful SCA-1200HT and SCA-1200 support removal products that have been in use around the world since 2008, the SCA 3600 features a simpler, more user-friendly design. The new versatile SCA offers temperature choices of 50, 60, 70 and 80 degrees Celsius, as well as no-heat, that readily cleans supports from all SST compatible materials – ABS, PC and Nylon. The SCA 3600 also features a large 16” x 16” x 14” parts basket, 3400 watts of heating for faster warm-up and a wheeled cart design for mobility.

The advantages of the system were highlighted by Sanja Wallace, Sr. Director of Product Marketing and Management at Stratasys, Ltd. when she commented, “the addition of the SCA 3600 as an accessory to our very successful FORTUS systems simplifies the support removal process with increased speed and capacity for multiple large parts.”

Once parts are printed, users simply remove them from their Stratasys FDM system, place them in the SCA 3600, set a cleaning cycle time and temperature, and then walk away.  The device gently agitates the 3D printed parts in the heated cleaning solution, effortlessly dissolving away all of the support material. This process is more efficient and user friendly than those of other additive manufacturing systems using messy powders or support material that must be manually removed.

More information on the systems available at www.padtinc.com/supportremoval. Those interested in acquiring an SCA 3600 should contact their local Stratasys reseller.

About Phoenix Analysis and Design Technologies

Phoenix Analysis and Design Technologies, Inc. (PADT) is an engineering product and services company that focuses on helping customers who develop physical products by providing Numerical Simulation, Product Development, and Rapid Prototyping solutions. PADT’s worldwide reputation for technical excellence and experienced staff is based on its proven record of building long term win-win partnerships with vendors and customers. Since its establishment in 1994, companies have relied on PADT because “We Make Innovation Work.” With over 80 employees, PADT services customers from its headquarters at the Arizona State University Research Park in Tempe, Arizona, and from offices in Torrance, California, Littleton, Colorado, Albuquerque, New Mexico, and Murray, Utah, as well as through staff members located around the country. More information on PADT can be found at http://www.PADTINC.com.

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Media Contact
Alec Robertson
TechTHiNQ on behalf of PADT
585-281-6399
alec.robertson@techthinq.com
PADT Contact
Eric Miller
PADT, Inc.
Principal & Co-Owner
480.813.4884
eric.miller@padtinc.com

 

AZ Big Media: How 3D Printing is Changing Manufacturing

azbusinessleaders-1Rey Chu, one of PADT’s owners and our head of Manufacturing Technologies, is featured in the 2017 issue of AZ Business Leaders with his article “How 3D Printing is Changing Manufacturing” It is a great overview of 3D printing and how it is impacting the way we make things.

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Students 3D Print and Assemble Prosthetic Hands for School Project

hand1What do you get when you combine a motivated student leader, enthusiastic classmates, a worldwide online community, and the latest 3D Printing technology from Stratasys? You give children around the world a cool way to hold things again.  That is what happened when high school student Rahul Jayaraman of Basis Chandler decided to take part in a project called Enabling The Future. They describe themselves as “A global network of passionate volunteers using 3D Printing to give the world a ‘helping hand'” by designing a wide variety of prosthetic hands for kids that can be printed and assembled by volunteers.

Local news station, KSAZ FOX 10 Phoenix stopped by PADT while we were printing three hands in our Stratasys FORTUS 450 to interview Rahul and talk to us about the project.  It gives a great summary:

And Channel 3, KTVK, came to the assembly event at Basis Chandler:>

azfamily.com 3TV | Phoenix Breaking News, Weather, Sport

 

As did Channel 12, KPNX:

3D Printing is a fantastic technology for one simple reason, it enables almost anyone to manufacture parts. All you need is a good design. And that is where the people at Enabling the Future come in.  Check out their website to see some great examples of how their volunteer work changes so many lives. Have a box of tissue handy if you watch the videos…

This is how the project works.  A leader like Rahul takes the initiative to sign up for the project. He then chooses which of the many designs he wants to make.  For this first go around, he picked a general design from Thingiverse called the Raptor Reloaded.  Next they needed the hardware you could not 3D Print – screws springs, velcro, and bits and pieces that hold the design together.  For this they needed to raise $25 per hand so Rahul was given the opportunity to learn how to raise money, a very useful skill.

hand2PADT’s Dhruv Bhate and the rest of our 3D Printing team worked with Rahul to get the design just right and then 3D Print the hands.  That will be done this week and this weekend the next phase will take place. Rahul and a large number of his classmates from Basis Chandler will get together at the school this weekend to put thirty or so hands together.  They will then box them up and another volunteer group, www.HandChallenge.com, will ship them to kids in the developing world that need them.

Here is a video from Tom Fergus from Fox10 showing a closeup of the hand in action:

We at PADT love projects like this because it is win-win-win.  The students get a chance to run a complicated project by themselves, learning the skills they will need later in life to organize, manage, and finish a project. PADT wins because we can contribute to our chosen area of charity, STEM education, in a way that benefits others beyond a given school. And the big winners are the kids around the world that receive a new and cool way to grab hold of life.

We will have sample hands at our open house next Thursday: Nerdtoberfest as well as an update when we get feedback from the distribution of the hands.