Nerdtoberfest: Printing a Beer Stein with Beer Filament

Noticed an interesting email in my inbox the other day with the subject line:

“Oktoberfest Time: 3D Print a Beer Stein in Beer Filament”

Marketing gold, you have my attention!

After reading the reviews from the filament manufacturer, I dove in and got some of the hoppy, malty filament on order from 3D Fuel. I was very excited when it came in and couldn’t wait to print PADT’s own beer stein for our upcoming Nerdtoberfest event. Meanwhile I found a nice starting point with a file from GrabCad and added my own additions and alterations.

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I quickly went to load the beer filament into one of our 3D printers, when I noticed that the roll size was not compatible with the spool holder on the printer. It was this disconnect that would have previously stopped this experiment in it’s track, however, the future is NOW!

I popped onto the Thingiverse, and alas, I was not alone in having this issue and a plethora of solution were populated before me. I was about to 3D print and adapter to allow my 3D printer to accept a new roll size that was found to be incompatible just moments before. Disaster averted, I was now cooking with gas, er, beer.

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roll-on-holder

The printing process was uneventful and the beer filament printed well. We now have a beer mug printed out of beer filament for PADT’s annual Nerdtoberfest!

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Phoenix Business Journal: ​3D printing takes a giant step forward toward production manufacturing

Just-Published-PBJ-1This year’s IMTS show in Chicago saw the introduction of some great new 3D Printing technology that makes the creation of end-use parts from additive manufacturing even more feasible. “3D printing takes a giant step forward toward production manufacturing” shares my observations on the subject.

Prototyping Today: Five Unique Considerations for 3D Printing Production Parts

prototype_today_logoAs 3D Printing makes it’s long awaited move from being dominated by prototyping to manufacturing production parts, companies need to consider a few key issues.  In “Five Unique Considerations for 3D Printing Production Parts” I share what we have learned at PADT as we have helped customers make this transition.

PADT Events – September 2016

PADT-Events-LogoSeptember is here and it is a jam packed month of events, many of them related to BioMedical engineering.  We are continuing with ANSYS webinars and talking about 3D Printing as well. See what we have below:


uma_new-sm2September 13: Salt Lake City, UT
Manufacturing Promotes Innovation Summit

The UMA Summit is a day long event filled with networking, guest speakers and informative information. In between speakers network with our vendor booths and see the latest products and services available for the Manufacturing Industry. PADT will be there with lots of example of 3D Printing and ready to engage on how manufacturing really does drive innovation. Check out the event page for times and an agenda.


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September 15: Scottsdale, AZ
ANSYS Arizona Innovation Conference

ANSYS and PADT are pleased to announce that we be holding a user meeting in Scottsdale for the entire ANSYS use community.  Join us for an informative conference on how to incorporate various productivity enhancement tools and techniques into your workflow for your engineering department. ANSYS Applications Engineers and local customers like Honeywell, Galtronics, On Semi, Ping, and Nammo Talley, will discuss design challenges and how simulation-driven product development can help engineers rapidly innovate new products.  See the agenda and register here.


September 19: Phoenix, AZ
Seminar: Medical Device Product Development for Startups – The Bitter Pill

We will be kicking off our Arizona Bioscience Week with this a free seminar at CEI in Phoenix with a sometimes brutally honest discussion on the reality of medical device product development.

No one wants to discourage a good idea, and entrepreneurs make it a long way before someone sits them down and explains how long and expensive the engineering of a medical device product is. In this one hour seminar PADT will share the hard and cold realities of the process, not to discourage people, but to give them the facts they need.

Get the details and register here.


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September 21-22: Minneapolis, MN
Medical Design & Manufacturing Minneapolis

PADT Medical will have a booth with our partner Innosurg at this premier event for medical device development.  For 22 years, Medical Design & Manufacturing Minneapolis has been the medtech innovation, communication, and solution epicenter of the Midwest. Now over 600 suppliers strong, and with more than 5,000 industry professionals in attendance, the event provides the solutions, education, and partnerships you simply won’t find anywhere else.  Learn more here. And if you are attending, please stop by and say hello, we are in booth 1643.


azbio-logo-1September 21: Phoenix, AZ
AZBio Awards

Join PADT and others for this annual event that recognizes those that contribute to the growing AZ BioTech community.  The awards will be made by PADT’s 3D Printing team again this year.  Stop by our table to say hello. Register here.


AZ-Bioscience-Week

September 21 & 22: Phoenix, AZ
White Hat Investor Conference

The West was won by innovators, investors, and prospectors who understood the value of discovery and accepted the challenge of investing in new frontiers.  PADT will be joining others in the investment community to meet with and hear from companies (32 are signed up to present right now) in the Bioscience space and to also share ideas and network.  Registration for this special event can be found here.


exerience_it_nmSeptember 30: Albuquerque, NM
New Mexico Tech Council: Experience IT NM Conference

Geek out on all things technology. The New Mexico Tech community will gather the best and the brightest entrepreneurs, technicians, hackers, and tech fans for presentations, talks, meet-ups, and parties; all to highlight the vibrant tech community in our city. The Conference takes place on the final day of a week of events, and will focus on HR, CRM, Manufacturing, and Creative concerns of the tech community with panels and presentations.  PADT’s Eric Miller will be presenting in two “MakeIT” sessions.

Learn more here.


PADT-Webinar-LogoThis month’s webinars look at Signal Integrity and 3D Printing for Production

Wednesday, September 7, 2016 – 1:00 PM AZ/PDT, 12:00 PM MDT
Investigating Signal Integrity: How to find problems before they find you
Register
Thursday, September 29, 2016 – 4:00 PM AZ/PDT, 3:00 PM MDT
SAE Webinar: Additive Manufacturing: From Prototyping to Production Parts
Register

Phoenix Business Journal: PADT wins grant to test viability of 3-D printed materials

pbj-phoenix-business-journal-logoA nice writeup in the Phoenix Business Journal by Hayley Ringle on PADT’s recent win of a America Makes grant to study how unique structures, called Lattice Structures, behave in 3D Printed parts.

“PADT wins grant to test viability of 3-D printed materials

Engineering a Better Pokemon Go Experience

padt-pikachu-1The other day, I saw a post on Engadget about a special case for Pokemon Go users to solve the problem of missing your prized Jigglypuff that you have happened across in the wild (or let’s face it, probably a CP 10 Rattata who is going to break out multiple times before disappearing in a puff of smoke…). The case is designed to give the user access to on screen controls and a nice channel to keep your Pokeball flinging finger straight and true.

Pokemon Go Photo 0
Original Device designed by Jon Clever

As pointed out in the article on Engadget, this case is only useful in the capture screen. This caveat aside, the other issue with the case is that it obscures the screen. Here at PADT, we are fortunate to sell a wide variety of 3D Printing machines, some of which are capable of multiple colors and material durometers. I decided to design my own take on the case from Jon Clever to be prototyped on our Stratasys Connex 3.

Pokemon Go Photo 1

Pokemon Go Photo 2

The case was made with black and clear material. The black material can be combined to produce a custom stiffness, so we made that part soft and rubber like and kept the clear portion rigid. The clear has good optical quality, which could be increased with a layer of “clearcoat.”

Pokemon Go Photo 3

If you have a Stratasys Connex 3 or J750 and an iPhone 6, you can make your own with these STL files, one for the rubber part and one for the clear part.

Iphone 6 Pokemon_Prod_R1-CLEAR

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  Pokemon Go stl 1

Other variations and additional possibilities would be made possible with the new Stratasys J750, the first true full color printer that can also mix clear and solid as well as hard and soft materials.  The J750 was just released and highlighted on our recent road show. Visit our blog article on the Scottsdale show to learn more about this incredible printer.

Additional information about PADT and our wide range of 3D Printing offerings here.

Full Color 3D Printer Road Show: J750 Wows in Scottsdale, Including Local TV Coverage

Stratasys-J750-Road-Show-partsOur loop around the Southwest with the new Stratasys J750 Full Color 3D Printer finished strong with a well attended gathering at ASU’s Skysong in Scottsdale.  The event was so popular, Channel 10 did a story on it. Over 130 people signed up to learn more about this fantastic device, get caught up on latest industry trends, and talk with other users of Additive Manufacturing.

Stratasys-J750-Road-Show-lectureThis event had a great mix of users from multiple industries as well as students and people wanting to just learn more about the technology.

The presentations were a big hit from every seminar, and Dhruv’s was especially popular in Arizona.  You can download the presentations here:

Eric Miller’s Presentation on Design for 3D Printing:
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Dhruv Bhate’s Overview of Additive Manufacturing:
PADT-Introduction-to-Additive-Manufacturing-2016_07_29-1

James Barker and Mario Vargas’s Introduction of the Stratasys J750:
PADT-Introduction-Stratasys-J750-2016_07_29-1

Stratasys-J750-Road-Show-group

During the breaks and after the presentations, we had a chance to interact one-on-one with customers, show off parts, and answer questions.  If you have any questions, please feel free to contact us at 480.813.4884 or info@padtinc.com.

Lastly, we were visited by local TV channel 10, KSAZ who did a short but really informative segment on the show and the Stratasys J750:

Full Color 3D Printer Road Show: Salt Lake City Event Focuses on Real World Applications

slc-i4The second stop on our trip around the Southwest for Stratasys’ new J750 Full Color 3D Printer was in fantastic downtown Salt Lake City. This device is reinventing 3D printing, and we are showing it off in person so people can see it up close along with holding incredible parts it makes in their hands.

Next stop if Phoenix – sign up here!

The 3D Printing community in Utah is very mature and the attendees were mostly very experienced users of many different additive manufacturing technologies.  So we focused on real world applications for the J750 as well as other Stratasys systems.

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slc-i2We were fortunate enought to have a customer, Ultradent, present the fantastic ways that they use their FDM and Polyjet printers to make prototypes, tooling, and production parts. slc-i3

As is usual in this type of an event, the discussion between and after presentations are the best part.  People from Aerospace, sporting goods, medical devices, and consumer products swapped stories, suggestions, and tips.

It was also a family affair. with Jame Barker’s latest family addition was in attendence to help spread the word on the value of 3D Printing with Stratasys solutions:slc-baby-1Beyond the little guy, the other hit of the afternoon was the J750.  As seasoned additive manufacturing profesionals they see the incredible leap forward this machine represents – truly reinventing 3D Printing and opening up a huge range of oportunities.

Full Color 3D Printer Road Show: First Stop a Success Including Radio Broadcast

ICOSA_07169Denver was the first stop on a trip around the Southwest for Stratasys’ new J750 Full Color 3D Printer.  We are showing this machine that is reinventing 3D printing off in person so people can see the device up close and hold the incredible parts it makes in their hands.

You can still sign up for the Salt Lake City or Phoenix events.

ICOSA_70965The Denver event was hosted by St. Patrick’s Brewery in Littleton, right down the street from PADT’s Colorado Office. Several customers and PADT employees gave talks on how to better use 3D Printing, including a presentation from Mario Vargas on the new Stratasys J750.

On top of all of that, local radio station KDMT, Denver’s Money Talk 1690, did a live broadcast from the event. Radio Waves have huge collection of radio stations. You can listen in here. Again, PADT employees and customers talked about 3D Printing as well as the new Stratasys J750.

ICOSA_30368We also made the local paper, check that out here.

Press Release: Innovative Additive Manufacturing Research Project Led by PADT Approved as Part of America Makes Multi-Million Dollar Grants

America-Makes-Logo-2We are pleased to announce that PADT has been awarded a grant from America Makes to further our research into combining our three favorite things:  Simulation, 3D Printing, and Product Development.  We will work with our partners at ASU, Honeywell Aerospace, and LAI International to study lattice structures created in 3D Printing, how to model them in ANSYS simulation software, and then how to use that information to drive product design.

A copy of the press release is below. Or read the official press release or download a PDF .

Press Release:

Innovative Additive Manufacturing Research Project Led by PADT Approved as Part of America Makes Multi-Million Dollar Grants

Arizona State University, Honeywell Aerospace and LAI International join PADT in technical research and educational outreach in 3D Printing

TEMPE, Ariz., July 25, 2016 — In one of the most critically needed areas of research in Additive Manufacturing, Phoenix Analysis & Design Technologies (PADT), the Southwest’s largest provider of numerical simulation, product development and 3D Printing services and products, today announced its project proposal titled “A Non-Empirical Predictive Model for Additively Manufactured Lattice Structures,” has been accepted as part of a multi-million dollar grant from the National Additive Manufacturing Innovation Institute, America Makes. PADT’s proposal was one of only seven selected, and one of only two where the leading organization was a small business.

IMG_0349To complete the deliverables, Arizona State University (ASU), Honeywell Aerospace and LAI International are assisting PADT in technical research with contributions from Prof. Howard Kuhn, a Professor at the University of Pittsburgh and a leading educator in Additive Manufacturing, for workforce and educational outreach.

“While there are several efforts ongoing in developing design and optimization software for lattice structures in additive manufacturing, there has been little progress in developing a robust, validated material model that accurately describes how these structures behave,” said Dhruv Bhate, PhD, senior technologist, PADT and author and principal investigator of the proposal. “We are honored to be chosen to research this important issue and provide the tools to enable entrepreneurs, manufacturers and makers to integrate lattice structures in their designs.”

One of the most definitive benefits of additive manufacturing is the ability to reduce weight while maintaining mechanical performance. A way to achieve this is by adding lattice structures to parts before manufacturing.  The advantages are crucial and can result in increased design flexibility, lower material costs and significant reductions in production time for industries such as aerospace and automotive.

Another aspect of PADT’s winning proposal is the development of a first-of-a-kind online, collaborative living textbook on Additive Manufacturing that seeks to provide comprehensive, up-to-date and structured information in a field where over 50 papers are published worldwide every day.  In addition, the team will develop a training class that addresses manufacturing, testing, theory and simulation as well as how they are combined together to deliver robust predictions of lattice behavior.

“We have identified Additive Manufacturing as a key lever of innovation in our company and recognize lattice structures as an important design capability to reduce mass, improve performance and reduce costs,” said Suraj Rawal, Technical Fellow, Advanced Technology Center at Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company – a leader in implementing Additive Manufacturing. “We also recognize the significance of this work in lattice behavior modeling and prediction as an important contribution to help implement the design, manufacturing, and performance validation of structures in our innovative designs.”

The award of this grant is another example of the leadership role that Arizona is playing in advancing the practical application of Additive Manufacturing, better known as 3D Printing.  PADT’s leadership role in the Arizona Technology Council’s Arizona Additive Manufacturing Committee, support of basic research in the area at ASU, and involvement with educating the next generation of users underscores PADT’s contribution to this effort and furthers the company’s commitment to “Make Innovation Work.”

About Phoenix Analysis and Design Technologies

Phoenix Analysis and Design Technologies, Inc. (PADT) is an engineering product and services company that focuses on helping customers who develop physical products by providing Numerical Simulation, Product Development, and Rapid Prototyping solutions. PADT’s worldwide reputation for technical excellence and experienced staff is based on its proven record of building long term win-win partnerships with vendors and customers. Since its establishment in 1994, companies have relied on PADT because “We Make Innovation Work.” With over 80 employees, PADT services customers from its headquarters at the Arizona State University Research Park in Tempe, Arizona, and from offices in Torrance, California, Littleton, Colorado, Albuquerque, New Mexico, and Murray, Utah, as well as through staff members located around the country. More information on PADT can be found at http://www.PADTINC.com.

Media Contact
Linda Capcara
TechTHiNQ on behalf of PADT
480-229-7090
linda.capcara@techthinq.com
PADT Contact
Dhurv Bhate, PhD
Senior Technologist, PADT
480.813.4884
dhruv.bhate@padtinc.com

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Be One of the First to Witness 3D Printing Reinvented

 

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According to some, the novelty of 3D printing has been wearing off — its mentioned in daily conversations, used on Grey’s Anatomy episodes, incorporated in high school and college classes. Most iPhone-wielding millennials know what it is and how it works. It’s not a “new thing” anymore, right?

Wrong.

Coming to Denver, Salt Lake City, and Phoenix — Phoenix Analysis & Design Technologies (PADT) invites you to be one of the first to meet the Stratasys J750 3D Printer: the latest introduction in the portfolio of PolyJet 3D Printers. The Stratasys J750 is the first-ever full-color, multi-material system, which finally addresses the frustration of designers who want realistic models but have to contend with inconsistent color results and rough finishes from current technology.

Ready to register now? Click here and jump right to it! Or keep reading . . .

Unlike other 3D printers currently in existence, the Stratasys J750 can operate with five different colors: cyan, magenta, yellow, black and white — all of the primary colors in the CMYK color process, just like day-to-day 2D full-color printers. The Stratasys J750 also achieves very fine layer thicknesses, enabling high surface quality and the creation of models and parts with very fine, delicate details, where current 3D printers usually result in relatively rough surface finishes.

What does this mean for those who use 3D J750_Hand2 - High Resolution JPGprinting? The Stratasys J750 not only delivers incredible realism but it’s also the most versatile 3D printer available. Designers and producers can say goodbye to the days of adopting multiple 3D-printing technologies and still resorting afterwards to extensive post-processing, such as sanding, painting and bonding.

Before the Stratasys J750, no single 3D printer could deliver full color, smooth surfaces and multiple materials. Now, however, you can print realistic prototypes, presentation models, Digital ABS injection molds, jigs, fixtures, educational and promotional pieces, production parts – or all of the above, with one system.

The Stratasys J750 even goes one step past versatile, simultaneously being the fastest, simplest, and easiest 3D printer to use. The printer includes several user-requested upgrades, such as server functionality, six-material capacity, and even three print modes that are suitable for different priorities: high speed, high mix and high quality. Additionally, where some 3D printing processes must run in a dedicated facility due to the possible hazard of the materials, chemicals and post-processing steps involved, the Stratasys J750 3D Printer uses a clean, easy process, with no hazardous chemicals to handle.

The Stratasys J750 is one choice among an ever-growing array of 3D printers in the marketplace. But its capabilities and versatility make it more than just a 3D printer; It’s a solution-maker.

In other words, Stratasys has just invented 3D printing. Again. PADT’s 3D Printing team can help you pick the best printer for your job and provide you with one-on-one engineering and prototype support.

If you’re at all interested in technology, you won’t want to miss this printer’s big coming-out day.

Check out times and locations below.

Denver – Monday, July 25th    J750 Shoes 1

Saint Patrick’s Brewing Company

3:00 pm to 6:00 pm

REGISTER

Salt Lake – Wednesday, July 27th

Hilton Salt Lake City Center

3:00 pm to 6:00 pm

REGISTER

Phoenix – Friday, July 29th

ASU SkySong

2:00 pm to 5:00 pm

REGISTER

   

 

Webinar on Demand: Make Functional Prototypes More Economically with 3D Printed Injection Molds

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Make Functional Prototypes More Economically

With 3D Printed Injection Molds

Arad Group
3D printed injection molds created by Arad Group

One of the most dramatic impacts of 3D printing on design and manufacturing is with injection molding. Companies such as Seuffer, Unilever, Arad Group and Whale report significant savings in molding costs and production time by 3D printing injection molds to test designs before mass production and produce small quantities of custom parts.

Learn more by viewing this 60-minute webinar as Gil Robinson, Stratasys senior application engineer, explains the what, why and how of 3D printed injection molding.

3D Printed Molds Save Time and Money for Specialty Lighting Company

Western Technology is a manufacturer of specialty lighting solutions that cater to a variety of highly specialized industries such as aviation, oil and gas, and maritime.  Their products are used in a variety of environments making it important that the design is both versatile and functional.

In their Utah office, they have been successfully utilizing a Stratasys PolyJet 3D Printer to create polyurethane molds.  By using 3D printed molds, they have been able to save both time and money over traditional manufacturing methods. You can visit bmtdesigntechnology and get to know more about uses of 3D printer.

Western Technology’s 3D Printed Toggle Mold

 “Below is a pictorial of how we’ve used our new 3D printer to develop and create polyurethane parts. The parts we are producing in this mold are used to trigger a magnetic sensor inside a sealed aluminum box. Each part has a magnet and aluminum insert cast inside.” Lyal Christensen at Western Technology

The mold was printed using a Stratasys Objet 500 Connex 1 printer in a Vero Blue material (standard plastic).  This is the final result after support material has been removed.

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The mold is comprised of two halves that each have 3 different parts to create this Polyurethane mold.  Below one side is shown in an un-assembled view.

WT2

Steel pins are press fit into the 3D printed part with ease to help with locating the magnets in the correct location.  Also you can see that the part has a gloss finish to it.  The parts were printed in the glossy mode which helps in minimizing the amount of support material needed to print the parts.

WT3

Inserts and Magnets are added to the mold along with a Urethane mold release agent.  The Aluminum inserts are held in the right place by screws that keep the inserts suspended so that the Urethane can engulf all sides of it.

WT4

The clamped mold then has the Urethane fed into it which is poured at room temperature.  Once all of the cavities are filled, the mold is left to cure at room temperature for just under one hour.  Using this technique, they are able to complete 6 or 7 sets per day.

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The following morning the screws and the insert bridge are removed.

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The mold is pried apart using a flathead screwdriver at specific cutout locations that were printed into the mold.  With a simple turn of the wrist, this mold is easily separated.

WT7

There is a little bit of flash which can easily be removed.  These parts are almost ready for the customer.

WT8

The parts are cut away and are ready for de-flashing and finishing.

WT9

At Western Technology, Lyal estimates this mold would have cost $2,000+ to manufacture in just man hours.  They were able to get 400+ parts out of this mold and are still using it.

If you would like to learn more about how to implement 3D Printing into your processes to save time and money, contact us at sales@padtinc.com.

Simulation Driven Product Development with Free Form Fabrication

am-topo-prezo-titleJoining Two of PADT’s Favorite Things: Simulation and 3D Printing

Recent advances in Additive Manufacturing (3D Printing) have removed barriers to manufacturing certain geometry because of constraints in traditional manufacturing methods. Although you can make almost any shape, how do you figure out what shape to make. Using ANSYS products you can apply topological optimization to come up with a free-form shape that best meets your needs, and that can be made with Additive Manufacturing.

A few months ago we presented some background information on how to drive the design of this type of part using ANSYS tools to a few of our customers.  It was a well received so we cleaned it up a bit (no guarantee there all the typos are gone) and recorded the presentation.  Here it is on YouTube

Let us know what you think and if you have any questions or comments, please contact us.

Selective Laser Sintering (SLS) Additive Manufacturing Service is Back on Line at PADT

sls-sinterstation-padt-2Everyone needs a vacation. After over 15 years of service our Sinterstation 2500Plus needed some facility upgrades  and machine updates. That work is now done and our SLS system is back up and running and better than ever, producing parts for customers who have come to count on its unique capabilities.

sls-housing-bracket-1Selective Laser Sintering (SLS) is a process that uses a high power laser to fuse a bed of powdered material together, sintering the loose powder into solid geometry. It is one of the more mature and robust 3D Printing processes available and is especially well suited for making large strong parts.

We currently run Nylon 11 and Glass Filled Nylon 12 in our machine which has a build volume of 13″ x 11″ x 16.5″ and a layer thickness of 0.004″

sls-sinterstation-cleaning-padt-1Few service providers have as much experience as PADT with this system, we have been using it for over 15 years. During that time we have upgraded almost every component and during the recent downtime, the system was fully calibrated and tuned for maximum precision and performance. We are also experts on how to post process the parts that come out of this machine, including painting and other coatings.

Just a Part of 3D Printing at PADT

PADT features 3D Printing services using Stratasys FDM and PolyJet technologies, making precision parts with a wide variety of materials and colors. We also offer Stereolithography (SLA) Additive Manufacturing services along with soft tooling and injection molding consulting.

 

Demo-Room-Pic-1If you are using a big impersonal 3D Printing “mill” or are not sure where to get your 3D Printing done, reach out to PADT. We have been doing it since 1994 and have hundreds of happy and loyal customers.

email: rp@padtinc.com

call: 480.813.4884

or visit our Rapid Prototyping Services pages at:

www.padtinc/com/rp

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