Optimize Materials Knowledge and Applications with ANSYS Granta – Webinar

Every product is made from materials, and in order to correctly select and apply said materials, decisions need to be based on analysis on the right information. ANSYS Granta software ensures accurate, consistent, traceable materials information every time and provides the tools you need to support design, research and teaching.

This toolkit is divided into three main products, each designed to accomplish a variety of different tasks when it comes to enabling smart material choices:

ANSYS GRANTA MI is the leading system for materials information management in engineering enterprises. A single “gold source” for your organization’s materials IP saves time, cuts costs and eliminates risk.

ANSYS CES Selector is the standard tool for materials selection and graphical analysis of materials properties. A comprehensive materials data library, plus unique software tools enable you to use materials to innovate and evolve your products.

ANSYS Materials Data allows users to gain easy access to the material property data you need for structural analysis, from within ANSYS Mechanical. Find coverage of many important materials classes, save time wasted searching for and converting data and gain greater confidence in your data inputs.

Join PADT’s Application Engineer and ANSYS Granta expert, Robert McCathren for a deep dive into the capabilities of this new release and how you can benefit from applying it in your organization.

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All Things ANSYS 042: Mechanical Updates in ANSYS 2019 R2

 

Published on: July 30th, 2019
With: Eric Miller, Ted Harris, & Joe Woodward
Description:  

In this episode your host and Co-Founder of PADT, Eric Miller is joined by PADT’s Simulation Support Manager & Specialist Mechanical Engineer Joe Woodward to discuss the latest additions and improvements made for structural analysis in ANSYS Mechanical 2019 R2.

If you would like to learn more about what’s available in this latest release check out PADT’s webinar on Mechanical Updates Updates in ANSYS 2019 R2 here: https://bit.ly/2OuGmyP

If you have any questions, comments, or would like to suggest a topic for the next episode, shoot us an email at podcast@padtinc.com we would love to hear from you!

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Mechanical Updates in ANSYS 2019 R2 – Webinar

With ANSYS structural analysis software, users are able to solve more complex engineering problems, faster and more efficiently than ever before. Customization and automation of structural solutions is much easier to optimize thanks to new and innovative finite element analysis (FEA) tools available in this product suite. 

Once again, ANSYS is able to cement their role as industry leaders when it comes to usability, productivity, and reliability; adding innovative functionality to an already groundbreaking product offering. ANSYS structural analysis software continues to be used throughout the industry, and for good reason as it enables engineers to optimize their product design and reduce the costs of physical testing. 

Join PADT’s Specialist Mechanical Engineer Joe Woodward, for an in-depth look at what’s new in the latest version of ANSYS Mechanical, including updates regarding: 

  • Software User Interface
  • Topology Optimization
  • Rigid Body Dynamics
  • Post Processing
  • And much more
Natural frequency study of engine block in ANSYS Mechanical

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If this is your first time registering for one of our Bright Talk webinars, simply click the link and fill out the attached form. We promise that the information you provide will only be shared with those promoting the event (PADT).

You will only have to do this once! For all future webinars, you can simply click the link, add the reminder to your calendar and you’re good to go!

All Things ANSYS 041: Simulating Additive Manufacturing in ANSYS 2019 R2

 

Published on: July 15th, 2019
With: Eric Miller & Doug Oatis
Description:  

In this episode your host and Co-Founder of PADT, Eric Miller is joined by PADT’s Lead Mechanical Engineer Doug Oatis, to discuss the tools that make up the ANSYS Additive family of products (Additive Suite, Additive Print, & Additive Prep), and how those tools help to make 3D printing more effective and easier to navigate.

If you would like to learn more about what’s available in this latest release check out PADT’s webinar on Additive Manufacturing Updates Updates in ANSYS 2019 R2 here: https://bit.ly/2JHWYxn

If you have any questions, comments, or would like to suggest a topic for the next episode, shoot us an email at podcast@padtinc.com we would love to hear from you!

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Five Takeaways from the New User Interface in ANSYS Mechanical 2019 R2

Ten years is a long time in the life of a software product.  While ANSYS itself has been around since the early 1970’s and what is now known as ANSYS Mechanical is approaching 20 years old, the user interface for ANSYS Mechanical maintained the same look and feel from version 12.0 in 2009 through version 2019 R1 in 2019.  That’s 10 years.  Certainly, there were many, many enhancements over that 10 year period, but the look and feel of the Mechanical window remained the same.

With the release of version 2019 R2, the Mechanical user interface has changed to a more modern ‘ribbon’ window, as shown in the red region here:

After having used the new interface for a while, here are 5 takeaways that are hopefully useful:

  1. It’s easy to use.  Sure, it’s different but the overall process is the same with a simulation tree on the left, details to enter and adjust at lower left, graphics in the middle, message, and graphs at the bottom, and the main menus across the top.
  2. ANSYS, Inc. has helped by providing a 12-slide (some animated) usage tips guide which pops up automatically when you launch ANSYS Mechanical 2019 R2.
  • As in the old menu, the ‘Context’ menu changes based on what you have clicked on in the tree.  For example, if you have clicked on the Mesh branch, the Context menu will display meshing controls across the top of the window.
  • As intuitive as the new ribbon interface is, there are some functionalities that you may have trouble finding.  Not to worry, though, as there is a new Search field at upper right that will likely take you to the right place.  Here I am interested in making a section plane for plotting purposes.  My first thought was that it would appear in the Display menu.  When I didn’t find it there, I simply typed in ‘section’ in the search field and the first hit was the right one.

After clicking “Take me there”:

And the resulting section plot:

  • Some capabilities show up in the File menu other than the expected Save and Save As functionality.  For example, Solve Process Settings is now in the File menu.  However, the main functionality is in the Solution context menu, such as using Distributed solutions and specifying the number of cores.

In short, the 2019 R2 improvements to ANSYS Mechanical allow for easier and faster setup of our simulations.  If you haven’t given it a try, we encourage you to do so.

Talking Hydrogen Fuel Cell Blowers for Trucking at the Governor’s House

As we shared in our recent press release, PADT was invited to be one of nine companies presenting at the 2019 Commercial Vehicle Cleantech Challenge. We happily spent the day at the Colorado Governor’s mansion talking and learning about how to make the road transportation of goods with large and small vehicles cleaner and more efficient. As one of nine companies presenting, PADT talked about our custom blower technology for hydrogen fuel cells.

We want to thank both the Colorado Cleantech Industries Association (CCIA) and the North American Council for Freight Efficiency (NACFE) for hosting such an informative event. We were able to meet people from across the energy and learn about their needs, and give them an opportunity to learn more about PADT.

You can find their blog post here.

Here are some pictures describing how our day went.

The building and grounds at the Colorado Governor’s Mansion are truly beautiful. We spent most of the day in the carriage house in the garden… which I failed to get a picture of.

It was a packed day as can be seen from the agenda. And the list of sponsors was fantastic. We were able to talk with key industry visionaries for more efficient and cleaner commercial vehicle fleets.

One of my favorite things about the site were these very cool napkins they gave us. Nice seal. And, “Executive Residence” sounds so much classier than “the Gov’s House”

We spent most of our day in the green room where they gave us wifi, coffee, power, and a flat surface. So Rob and I set up a portable office. The three blowers we brought with us helped decorate the place.

We can’s share the full presentation, but we can discuss some key slides. They gave us 10 minutes to talk about our solution, then 10 for questions.

The problem is fairly simple. People designing stacks need custom blower solutions because of the hydrogen and the pressure/flow requirements on the air side of a hydrogen fuel cell.

PADT’s proven solution is to design custom blowers to meet very specific needs.

In the end, we just wanted to know that we are excited to see that Hydrogen fuel cells are seeing a resurgence, our blowers are perfect for most applications, and that we would love connections to people who need our solution.

When we were done we went inside the house. Room after room was stunning.

We gave a 2-minute short presentation with this great view behind us.

A great day where we met a lot of great people from around the country. Sadly, PADT didn’t win the competition. The truth is that the challenge was for new and disruptive technology and we talked about proven and enabling solutions. Useful to the sponsors, but not what they were looking for when handing out prizes.

Visiting Colorado in the summer is always a nice break for those of us from Phoenix. We hope to participate in this and related events in the future.

If you have any needs for air our hydrogen blowers for your fuel cell, or any complex engineering for your product, please contact us and we would love to learn how we can help.

History for the future: PADT seals time capsule as part of 25th-anniversary celebration

The past is a tricky thing to remember. When we started preparing for PADT’s 25th anniversary celebration we spent a lot of time thinking about the past, about our journey from an idea to the thriving business we are today. And one though kept coming back to us, “we really should have captured and stored more.”

We can’t change that past but we can preserve our history for the future with a Time Capsule. On July 1st of 2019, we took 49 items and crammed them into a sealed box that we embedded into the wall of PADT’s Tempe headquarters.

You can see a list of all the items at the bottom of this post. Some of the highlights are a copy of our different business card designs over the past 25 years, a collection of PADT logo’d shirts, bits and pieces from our SCA product, parts from various fuel cell blowers, samples of 3D Printed parts, and some old manuals. We also included a collection of tech from the past 25 years including four cell phones of various types.

The most interesting object we stored from our perspective was a binder with documents and images from the past 25 years. Here are some of the items in that binder that are interesting today:

A timeline of PADT Business Cards over the past 25 years. We did think they looked cool back then.
We didn’t take any early photos, but we do have pictures of most of our employee for almost every year since 2000.
Our first report to a customer was a stress analysis for a sprinkler valve housing.
Our staff took a look at the way things were in 1994 and in 2019. Technology, politics, entertainment, and news. A great look back at then and now.

It was a lot of fun gathering the items and thinking about the impact they all had on PADT over the years.

All of that stuff we wanted to save is piled on the cart. A lot of memories.

On Monday we crammed it all in and sealed it up. In 25 years, July 1, 2044, PADT employees, customers, and partners of the future will open it up to see what is inside. That is not too far into the future and with luck, many of us will be around to witness it.

PADT’s founders… 25 years older… Eric Miller, Ward Rand, and Rey Chu
Jeff expertly filled the box full
Co-Founder, Rey Chu puts in the first screw.
Ward Rand adds the second fastener.
Eric Miller tightens everything up.

We wonder what they will make of our past, some of which will be fifty years old by then. Will they laugh? Or scratch their head wondering what the heck a cell phone was? We can’t wait to find out.

Sealed and ready for the future

List of Items in PADT’s Time Capsule

1First official printed PADT Brochure
2Business Card designs - 1994 to present
3Service Partnership Guide - 2000 ver. 1
4Employee Handbook 2019
5Business Journal - Issue: March 1, 2019
6Eric's Honeywell Contractor Badge (2000) - Transition period from Allied Signal to Honeywell
7One of the early company polo shirts - Late 1990's
8PADT Baseball Jersey - 2011 Company Photo
92014 PADT 20th Anniversary t-shirt
1025th Anniversary paper "Swag Bag" - Pen (bamboo), Mousepad (retreaded tire), Sticky Pad, Anniversary t-shirt
11PADT Cap - our most popular swag item. Given to customers and employees started placing in photos of their world travels.
12Ruler giveaways - Clear acrylic from Gilbert office days (1990's) / White magnetic 6" from the mid-2010's
13YoYo - PADT's first swag item - distributed at the Ansys Worldwide User Conference
14Brass PADT logo used for Service Awards (mid-2000's)
1515th PADT Anniversary Cup
16PADT flash drive - 8 GB. Given to customers pre-loaded with files and also blank ones included in our New Hire Kit
17SCA 1200 Users Manual - 2012 rev 3
18SCA Pump Assembly
19SCA Impeller
20APDL Guide - written by the Tech Support Team (2nd Edition) 1st Edition was 2010
21Ansys 5.2 Complete Software Package - 1996
22Cathode air blower housing for fuel cell in municipal buses
23Mixed flow impeller for fuel cell in municipal buses
24Radial Impeller - cathode air blower for fuel cell powered aircraft application
25Roots Blower Rotor - cathode air delivery for a fuel cell
26Regenerative flow impeller - Hydrogen Recycle Blower for fuel cell car
27Fuel Cell Test Block circa 2003 while Rob Rowan was at ASM. History Unknown.
28OrthoSensor - knee replacement alignment sensor designed and developed by PADT
29The Spot - personal location and communication device designed by PADT, which talks directly to a satellite. Case Study Included.
30SLS model of Ward Rand's heel. Broken from ladder fall. (2001)
313D Printed Business Card
32FDM part - Roots Blower Housing - designed by Eric Miller. (1999)
33SLA part - Ryobi Weed Wacker spool (1997)
34Protoype Diffuser in a compressor - designed for the Air Force Research Lab
35PolyJet demo part - the introduction of water PolyJet using various materials printed simultaneously
36PolyJet employee name tag printed for 25th Anniversary event
37First 3D Metal printed part. We were the beta test. (2001)
38Pro-Engineer Manual (1997) - PADT's first CAD package
39Event photo posters made to commemorate PADT25 - originals are 24"x36", gallery framed and hung in office
403" Floppy Disk with Honeywell Ansys Thermal Model files (1996)
41CD Rom - Honeywell Impeller Stress & Vibration Analysis (2002)
42Materialise - Early version of software used to send parts to SLA Machine (1999'ish)
43Motorola i530 Nextel Flip Phone - iDEN's original Push-To-Talk walkie, speakerphone, voice dialing (2004)
44PADT's first Smart Phone - Blackberry 71001 / International with internet access (2005)
45Rey's Blackberry Curve 8310 (2007)
46An employee's old iPhone 6 (2014)
47Macintosh IIVX (Photo) - PADT’s original computer. It was used to create early brochures, design the PADT logo, write letters and reports, and ran our first accounting system for many years.
48Binder of documents
49Team Building Event t-shirts - 2014 & 2015

How to use APDL Command Snippets in your ANSYS Mechanical Model

One of the most powerful features in ANSYS Mechanical is the fact that it leverages the ANSYS Mechanical APDL solver. This modern and ever-improving interface allows users to create, run, and post-process models with power and ease. But it also allows users to access the power of the underlying solver through the native language it uses, APDL. You can have your cake and eat it too.

A lot has changed since we did our last seminar on this topic, back in May of 2011. ANSYS Mechanical has grown and scores of features have been added, removing the need for a lot of the functions and features that people needed APDL scripts for. But again and again our tech support people find that users push the envelope with their tools and to do what they need to do, they need to get inside the solver tool using the APDL scripting language.

That is why we decided to update that seminar as a blog article, making it more searchable while we bring it up to date. There is a lot to cover, so get comfortable.

Background and Foundations

If you have never used ANSYS Mechanical APDL a lot of what we are going to talk about may sound like another language. That is because it is. The key thing to remember is that when you click Solve in ANSYS Mechanical, it generates an input file that is then read into ANSYS Mechanical APDL in batch mode.

This is the original ANSYS product that Johns Swanson wrote in the early 70’s. It was released in 1971. (if you want to learn more about the history of ANSYS, please check out our interview with Dr. Swanson.) Over the following decades, the program grew to become a fully featured FEA program that could do almost anything. However, the user interface, and especially the embedded geometry tool, could not keep up and much of the pre- and post-processing was replaced by ANSYS Mechanical. But all of those capabilities are still there and accessible to the user.

Before we go further, let’s talk about the simple model we will be using for this post. It is what we call a “Towers of Test” model. Two beams held at their base that are loaded in various ways. Small, fast, and a great way to experiment with new fet

What is APDL and why do we need it?

APDL stands for ANSYS Parametric Design Language. One of the key breakthroughs that ANSYS introduced in the late 80’s was converting their input file from a formatted text file that simply specified the model being solved with a simple text command language that could also define the model fully. In addition, it allowed:

  • Every user-supplied value in the file, numbers or text, to become a parameter. The parameters can be numbers, strings, or multi-dimensional arrays of numbers or strings.
  • Flow control of the text file by introducing if-then-else statements and do-loops.
  • Functions to interrogate the database at any point during the model creation, solve, or post-processing. The values returned by the function could be stored as parameters.
  • Operators to modify the parameters. This includes math operators, common numerical functions, and string tools.

If you have only used fully interactive engineering software, then the power of these capabilities may not be apparent. But as you add small snippets to ANSYS mechanical, the openness full capability of the ANSYS Mechanical APDL solver will become apparent.

To see the APDL that ANSYS Mechanical write out, just look in the ds.dat file. That is the “Input File” that the program generates and sends to the solver.

You can find it with the “File” viewer on the project page.

Or you can write out the file wherever you want from within ANSYS Mechanical by selecting what you want to solve, and click the Environment > Tools > Write Input File command. >>>>>>> NOT WORKING

What is a Snippet/Command Object?

How do you add Snippets to your ANSYS Mechanical Model?

What else do you need to know before you dive in?

Item Snippets

Pre-Processing Snippets

Post Processing Snippets

Suggestions, Resources, and Final Thoughts

Automating Subsea Design (or How I Learned to Love Parameters)

In a previous life, I worked in the maritime and offshore energy industries and used ANSYS as part of my daily routine in structural design. I eventually discovered myself in a position where I was designing subsea equipment for use in offshore oil and gas fields. One thing I quickly discovered was that although subsea structures tend to be fairly simplistic looking (think playground equipment…but 10000 feet underwater) there are multiple design factors that can easily cause a domino effect that would require redesign(s). Whether it was a change brought upon by the client, tool manufacturer, or to satisfy the whims of marine warranty companies, there was always a need to evaluate multiple variants of any subsea structure.

Sounds like a very reactive process, right? So how can we bring this process into a more streamlined analysis workflow within ANSYS? Just use parameters with SpaceClaim and ANSYS Mechanical!

So what can parameters do to aid in this process?

  • Remove repetitive tasks
  • Account for geometric changes to CAD models
  • Use a range of values for material properties
  • Create associative connections between CAD models and ANSYS results
  • Allow for automatic goal driven design exploration

Now let’s look at some common use cases for parameters that I’ve run into in the past:

Accelerations for Onboard Equipment and Cargo

Cargo transported on the ocean is subject to the same accelerations that affect the vessel transporting it (surge, sway, heave, pitch, roll, and yaw). These accelerations are then combined into three representative accelerations and applied in multiple loadcases.

Typically, these loadcases are resolved in independent analysis systems but we can remove all that fluff with a simple parameter driven analysis. All one has to do is tag inputs and result items as parameters and then input values for each load case (or Design Point). In this case I have selected the XYZ components of an acceleration input applied to a mass point as well as the total deformation and maximum equivalent stress. With the push of a button ANSYS will then solve all of these design points and will amend the table to show the selected results corresponding with each design point. Results from the Design Points can be uploaded individually but this parametric analysis has made it very easy for us to determine which Design Points / load cases have the greatest influence on the design.

Geometry Influence Study

So one of the questions often asked during the design process is “Will the design work after we change this dimension to compensate for X?” which is often followed by a discussion on robustness (which is then followed by a change order). So let’s skip the discussion middle-man and move to be proactive by using parameters to quantify just how much we can change our geometry before a problem arises.

Here we have an example subsea Pipeline End Termination (PLET) structure and let’s say a client has asked us to verify if this design can work for various pipeline sizes. The PLET has some major parts that can be influenced by this change: The pipeline clamp, cradle, flanges, ball valve, and bulkhead.

Because we can use parameters there’s no need to make a new model. Merely tag items you wish to create parameters for in SpaceClaim:

Then ANSYS Workbench will start to populate its parameter tables accordingly:

We can then make certain parameters dependent on others, or define them via simple expressions. In this way we can enforce clearances and relations between the various bodies in our model.

From here all we have to do is define our variables for our future analyses:

Then tell ANSYS to solve all the design points with a single click. Note that users can create charts and tables before the solve and ANSYS will populate these live during the solution process. Individual design point results and geometries can also be reviewed at any time.

For this particular analysis we provided the same load to each Design Point but a good next step would be to set a goal driven analysis and have a range of loadings on the pipeline end of the PLET to represent various installation conditions.

Parameters are a very powerful tool within the ANSYS toolbox. They can remove repetitive tasks within FEA, easily create loadcases, and address concerns about design robustness by letting ANSYS and SpaceClaim handle CAD model rework.

That’s it for this blog post! I’ll be creating a few offshore industry-specific posts in the future as well so stay tuned!

Simulation for Additive Manufacturing In ANSYS 2019 R2 – Webinar

Additive manufacturing (3D Printing) has been rapidly gaining popularity as a true manufacturing process in recent years. ANSYS’ best-in-class solution for additive manufacturing enables simulation at every step in your AM process, and helps to optimize material configurations, and machine & parts setup before printing begins. 

Through the use of ANSYS tools such as Additive Suite & Additive Print, paired with topology optimization capabilities in ANSYS Mechanical Workbench, the need for physical process of trial-and-error testing has been greatly reduced. 

Join PADT’s Simulation Support and Application Engineer Doug Oatis for an exploration of the ANSYS tools that help to optimize additive manufacturing, and what new capabilities are available within them when upgrading to ANSYS 2019 R2. This presentation includes updates regarding:

  • Archiving materials no longer in use
  • Visualization of AM process
  • AM overhang angles
  • Preview part & support
  • And much more

Register Here

If this is your first time registering for one of our Bright Talk webinars, simply click the link and fill out the attached form. We promise that the information you provide will only be shared with those promoting the event (PADT).

You will only have to do this once! For all future webinars, you can simply click the link, add the reminder to your calendar and you’re good to go!

All Things ANSYS 040: Live From the 2019 ASME Turbo Expo – CFD Applications for Turbomachinery

 

Published on: July 1st, 2019
With: Eric Miller, Robin Steed of ANSYS, & Chris Robinson of PCA Engineers Limited
Description:  

In this episode your host and Co-Founder of PADT, Eric Miller is joined by ANSYS CFX & Turbo Tools Lead Technical Product Manager Robin Steed, and Managing Director at PCA Engineers Limited, Chris Robinson, live at the 2019 ASME Turbo Expo in Phoenix Arizona, for a discussion on the past, present, and future of ANSYS CFD and its use in the realm of turbomachinery. Both Robin and Chris have multiple years of experience working in this industry, and their expertise provided some fascinating insight into what this tool is all about.

If you would like to learn more about what’s available in the latest CFD update check out PADT’s webinar on Fluids Updates in ANSYS 2019 R2 here: https://bit.ly/2J6l5We

If you have any questions, comments, or would like to suggest a topic for the next episode, shoot us an email at podcast@padtinc.com we would love to hear from you!

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Press Release: 2019 Commercial Vehicle Cleantech Challenge Selects PADT to Showcase Fuel Cell Blower Technology

Last week we were pleased to learn that we were selected to present our fuel cell blower technology at the Commercial Vehicle Cleantech Challenge in Denver, Colorado on July 10th. This is a great opportunity for us to share the solutions we developed for the military, automotive applications, and buses to the trucking industry. Many manufacturers of long-haul commercial trucks are looking at hybrid solutions that combine electrical drives, batteries, and hydrogen fuel cells to create zero-emission vehicles that do not require charging.

To learn more, take a look at the press release below and watch PADT’s news feed to see if we won against some pretty prestigious competition.

If you are interested in how PADT can help you solve your customer pump, blower, turbine, and fan needs, please contact us today.

Link to official press release here for html and here for PDF


2019 Commercial Vehicle Cleantech Challenge Selects PADT to Showcase Fuel Cell Blower Technology  

Major Automotive OEM’s, UTC Power and Several Government Organizations Have All Used Fuel Cell Blower Technology Developed by PADT

TEMPE, Ariz., June 27, 2019 ─ PADT, a globally recognized provider of numerical simulation, product development, and 3D printing products and services, today announced it has been selected as a finalist and to present its innovative fuel cell blower technology at the 2019 Commercial Vehicle Cleantech Challenge (CVCC) presented by the Colorado Cleantech Industries Association (CCIA) and North American Council for Freight Efficiency (NACFE). The showcase event will be held on July 10, 2019, at the Governor’s Residence in Denver, Colorado. 

“As a company who’s a proud supporter and supplier to organizations involved in the green- and cleantech space, it’s an honor to be selected to present at this event,” said Eric Miller, co-founder and principal, PADT. “We look forward to showcasing PADT’s solutions and demonstrating our history of excellence in the hydrogen fuel cell sector.”

PADT will be joined by event partners Toyota, Kenworth, Schneider, UPS, Xcel Energy, and Great Dane as well as trucking industry strategic investors, technology experts and industry environmental directors interested in technologies that can be deployed into their operations.  According to a press release from CCIA, program partners reviewed submissions, vetted applicants and ultimately selected eight finalists, including PADT, to present.

Hydrogen fuel cell technology has resurged in use in recent years and PADT remains one of the few companies with deep experience developing custom fuel cell accessory solutions for the transportation industry.

“The unique requirements of providing pressurized hydrogen and air to high-efficiency fuel-cells require custom solutions which operate at the proper pressure and flow, can deal with the safety issues presented by working with hydrogen, and operate with extremely high efficiency,” said Rob Rowan, director of engineering, PADT. “PADT is one of the few companies in the world with the experience and technical know-how to meet these needs.”

PADT has developed fuel cell blower technology solutions for a number of major automotive OEMs, UTC Power, and several government research organizations. The company’s fuel cell blower technology is still in use today by buses in Oakland, Calif., ten years after being installed.

For more information on PADT’s expertise in cleantech, please visit its alternative energy page here or contact us at 480.813.4884 or info@padtinc.com

About PADT

PADT is an engineering product and services company that focuses on helping customers who develop physical products by providing Numerical Simulation, Product Development, and 3D Printing solutions. PADT’s worldwide reputation for technical excellence and experienced staff is based on its proven record of building long-term win-win partnerships with vendors and customers. Since its establishment in 1994, companies have relied on PADT because “We Make Innovation Work.” With over 80 employees, PADT services customers from its headquarters at the Arizona State University Research Park in Tempe, Arizona, and from offices in Torrance, California, Littleton, Colorado, Albuquerque, New Mexico, Austin, Texas, and Murray, Utah, as well as through staff members located around the country. More information on PADT can be found at www.PADTINC.com.


All Things ANSYS 039: Updates for Design Engineers in ANSYS 2019 R2

 

Published on: June 17th, 2019
With: Eric Miller, Ted Harris, & Tom Chadwick
Description:  

In this episode your host and Co-Founder of PADT, Eric Miller is joined by PADT’s Simulation Support Manager Ted Harris, and Senior CFD Engineer Tom Chadwick for a discussion on what new capabilities (beta or otherwise) are available for design engineers in the latest updates made to Discovery Live in ANSYS 2019 R2.

If you would like to learn more about this update and see the tool in action, along with others in the 3D Design family of products (Discovery AIM, SpaceClaim & Live) check out PADT’s webinar on the topic here: https://bit.ly/2KfO0tK

If you have any questions, comments, or would like to suggest a topic for the next episode, shoot us an email at podcast@padtinc.com we would love to hear from you!

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3D Printing Polymer Parts with Electrostatic Dissipative (ESD) Properties

Getting zapped by static electricity at the personal level is merely annoying; having your sensitive electronic equipment buzzed is another, highly destructive story.

Much as you’d like to send these components out into the world wearing their own little anti-static wristbands, that’s just not practical (and actually, not good enough*). During build and use, advanced electronics applications need true charge-dissipative protection that is inherent to their design and easy to achieve. However, the typical steps of painting or coating, covering with conductive tape, or wrapping with carbon-filled/aluminum-coated films incur both time and cost.

Electrostatic dissipative (ESD) polymer materials instead provide this kind of protection on a built-in basis, offering a moderately conductive “exit path” that naturally dissipates the charge build-up that can occur during normal operations. It also prevents powders, dust or fine particles from sticking to the surface. Whether the task is protecting circuit boards during transport and testing, or ensuring that the final product works as designed throughout its lifetime, ESD materials present low electrical resistance while offering the required mechanical, and often thermal and/or chemically-resistant properties.

ESD-safe fixture for testing a printed-circuit board, produced by 3D printing with Stratasys ABS-ESD7 material. (Image courtesy of Stratasys)

Combining ESD Behavior with 3D Printing

All the features that are appealing with 3D printing carry over when printing with ESD-enabled thermoplastics. You can print trays custom-configured to hold circuit-boards for in-process testing, print conformal fixtures that speed up sorting, and produce end-use structures for projects where static build-up is simply not allowed (think mission-critical aerospace applications).

Acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS), that work-horse of the plastics industry, has been available as 3D printing filament for decades. Along the way, Stratasys and other vendors started offering this filament in a version filled with carbon particles that decrease the plastic’s inherent electrical resistance. Stratasys ABS-ESD7 runs on the Fortus 380, 400, 450 and 900 industrial systems, and soon will be available on the office-friendly F370 printer.

What kind of performance does ABS-ESD7 offer? When evaluating materials for ESD performance, the most important property is usually the surface resistance, measured in ohms. (This is not the same as surface resistivity, plus there’s also volume resistivity – see Note at end). Conductive materials – typically metals – have a surface resistance generally less than 103 ohms, insulators such as most plastics are rated at greater than 1012 ohms, and ESD materials fall in the mid-range, at 106 to 109 ohms.

Compared to standard ABS filament, ABS-ESD7 offers more than five orders of magnitude lower resistance, converting it from an insulator to a material that provides an effective static-discharge path to the outside world. Due to the inherent layered structure of FDM parts, the differences in properties between flat (XY) and vertical (ZX) build orientations produces a range of resistance values, with a target of 107 ohms, reflected in the product name of ABS-ESD7. Stratasys offers an excellent, easy-to-read FAQ paper about ABS-ESD7.

Printed-circuit board production tool, custom 3D-printed in Stratasys ABS-ESD7 material for built-in protection from electrostatic discharge during test and handling. (Image courtesy of Stratasys)

When ABS isn’t strong enough or won’t hold up to temperature extremes, engineers can turn to Stratasys’ ESD-enhanced polyetherketoneketone (PEKK), termed Antero 840CN03. Developed in 2016 and slated for full release in October 2019, this new filament expands the company’s Antero line of  high-temperature, chemically resistant formulations. The PEKK base material offers a high glass transition temperature (Tg 149C, compared to 108C for ABS-ESD7) while meeting stringent outgassing and cleanroom requirements. As with ABS-ESD7, the carbon-nanotube loading lowers electrical resistance values of Antero 840CN03 parts to the desirable “ESD safe” range of 106 to 109 ohm.

Setting up Parts for Printing with ESD-Enhanced Filament                                                            

Support structures in contact with part walls/surfaces can disturb the surface resistance behavior. To counter-act this condition for filament printing with any type of ESD material, users should perform a special calibration that makes the printer lay down slightly thinner-than-usual layers of support material. In Stratasys Insight software, this is currently accomplished by setting the Support Offset Thickness to -0.003; this decreases the support layers from 0.010 inches to 0.007 inches. In addition, supports should be removed (in Insight software) from holes that are smaller in diameter than 0.25 inches (6.35mm).

As more of these materials are developed, the software will be updated to automatically create supports with this process in mind.

ESD Applications for 3D Printing

Avionics boxes, fixtures for holding and transporting circuit boards, storage containers for fuel, and production-line conveyor systems are just a few examples of end-use applications of ESD-enabled materials. Coupled with the geometric freedom offered by 3D printing, three categories of manufacturing and operations are improved:

  • Protecting electronics from ESD damage (static shock)
  • Preventing fire/explosion (static spark)
  • Preserving equipment/product performance (static cling)

If you’re exploring how 3D printing with ESD-enhanced materials can help with your industrial challenge, contact our PADT Manufacturing group: get your questions answered, have some sample parts printed, and discover what filament is right for you.

PADT Inc. is a globally recognized provider of Numerical Simulation, Product Development and 3D Printing products and services. For more information on Insight, GrabCAD and Stratasys products, contact us at info@padtinc.com.

*Anti-static is a qualitative term and refers to something that prevents build-up of static, rather than dissipating what does occur


Surface Resistance, Surface Resistivity and Volume Resistivity

Surface resistance in ohms is a measurement to evaluate static-dissipative packaging materials.

Surface resistivity in ohms/square is used to evaluate insulative materials where high resistance characteristics are desirable. (Ref. https://www.evaluationengineering.com/home/article/13000514/the-difference-between-surface-resistance-and-surface-resistivity)

The standard for measuring surface resistance of ESD materials is EOS/ESD S11.11, released in 1993 by the ESD Association as an improvement over ASTM D-257 (the classic standard for evaluating insulators). Driving this need was the non-homogeneous structure of ESD materials (conductive material added to plastic), which had a different effect on testing parameters such as voltage or humidity,  than found with evaluating conductors.

Volume resistivity is yet a third possible measured electrical property, though again better suited for true conductors rather than ESD material. It depends on the area of the ohmeter’s electrodes and the thickness of the material sample. Units are ohm-cm or ohm-m.

             

Fluids Updates in ANSYS 2019 R2 – Webinar

ANSYS CFD goes beyond qualitative results to deliver accurate quantitative predictions of fluid interactions and trade-offs. These insights reveal unexpected opportunities for your product — opportunities that even experienced engineering analysts can miss.

Products such as ANSYS Fluent, Polyflow, and CFX work together in a constantly improving tool kit that is developed to provide ease of use improvements for engineers simulating fluid flows and it’s impacts on physical models.

Join PADT’s Simulation Support and Application Engineer, Sina Ghods, for a look at what is new and improved for fluids-related tools in ANSYS 2019 R2. This presentation includes updates regarding:

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