Good Times and Bad Times – 2020 has been a year to remember.

Here we are, the second week of December in the year 2020. This is the time of year when we usually look back on the year and see what went right and what didn’t. In a normal year, it’s a fun exercise. You can conduct the review two ways, something like a global pandemic that completely disrupts supply chains, decimated key industries, disrupts how we do our jobs, eliminates almost all travel, and brings real death and injury to people we know and care about. The first is focusing on the negatives, and the second is to acknowledge the challenges and then point out the bright spots. Let’s go with that second option.

Responding to the Challenge

We got wind of what was coming early. One of PADT’s owners was visiting Taiwan when it started to spread in China. He saw how seriously the Taiwanese government was taking it and let us know. At first, it didn’t impact business, but as the global supply chain started to show weakness, our customers started to let us know that they needed to make changes. As working from home became more common, our team helped where we could to get their users set up for Ansys usage at home. We moved meetings to online, and we helped users do their own 3D Printer repair over the phone when we couldn’t enter their facilities.

New ways of using 3D Printing & Simulation

As a longtime leader in 3D Printing, a big part of our adaption was to lend our connections and machines to the effort to use additive manufacturing to get protective equipment into the hands of those who needed them. By the time the supply chain was back working, we had manufactured thousands of face masks, consulted with dozens of people seeking our advice, and helped get material into the hands of those who needed it.

We also established a couple of panels on how our customers stepped up with both 3D Printing and Simulation to battle the virus’s spread. Take a listen to the recordings to learn more about some very clever applications of these two key technologies.

Even nine months into this pandemic, we are working with several companies on products or processes related to dealing with the virus.

New ways of doing work

We got a head start on cleaning and social distancing because we saw what was going on in Taiwan, and we started prepping our infrastructure for work from home (WFH). When things started to worsen in the US, our employees stepped up and made the changes they needed.

For us, Microsoft Office365, Teams, and OneDrive have been a wonderful toolset for collaboration and communication. We even got our ancient, over 20-year-old phone system swapped over quickly to forward to cell phones and email. Thanks to our amazing IT team, we were soon meeting with customers and vendors worldwide, collaborating, and pretty much back on track.

Essential employees adjusted their schedules to reduce the potential of contamination, and we doubled-downed on social distancing. All the machines kept running, our IT infrastructure stayed solid, and we really didn’t see much of a disruption to making deadlines.

Without travel or meetings, interacting with our customers and the community was a challenge. PADT has hosted nine networking events for the Arizona technology business community since late spring and also hosted three panels for tech company executives and owners to discuss how to deal with COVID-19.

New and improved offerings and territories

We started the year by announcing our new community resource in March, 3dprinting-glossary.com. This free reference site offers definitions for over 250 terms used in Additive Manufacturing. It is slowly making its way up the list on Google search, and every month we see more and more users. As the industry grows, we will continue to keep it up to date.

Speaking of 3D Printing, our next big milestone was our expansion into Texas for Stratasys sales and support. We have been selling Ansys in the Lone Star state for several years and were pleased when, as a Stratasys Elite Channel Partner, we were asked to add Texas to our existing territory of Ansys, Colorado, New Mexico, and Utah.

We kept the ball rolling when Art Newcomer relocated to New Mexico to support our growing customer base in that state. Art is one of our field service engineers and is an expert in maintaining and getting the most out of Stratasys AM systems.

Then just last month, we officially announced a new EOS M 290 system at PADT, greatly increasing our ability to provide Metal 3D Printing Services. The new system will be used to manufacture components for customers and conduct R&D projects.

Simulation also saw some new offerings. As Ansys, Inc. continues to add new simulation tools to their portfolio, our team works to understand what they offer and introduces them to and supports them for our customers. In 2020 we saw noticeable growth in new users and consulting around LS-Dyna, Sherlock, and SPEOS. Ansys also added some new acquisitions in 2020 that we see great interest in: AGI for mission-level aerospace simulation and Lumerical for the modeling of photonics components.

New team members

This year also saw new employees joining the team. Over the year, we have added 5 engineers and 4 salespeople. That is good growth in any year but fantastic in the middle of a worldwide pandemic.

On top of these new team members spread across simulation, product development, and 3D Printing, we added two critical senior staff members to help us grow to the next level.

  • Dr. Keng Hsu, a recognized expert on Metal 3D Printing who joined us as Principal R&D Engineer, Additive Manufacturing.
  • Dr. Tyler Shaw also came on board in the second half of the year as our new Director of Engineering, leading our consulting team.
Dr Keng Hsu and Dr Tyler Shaw

New challenges in 2021

Which brings us to 2021. Like most people, we will be working under #covidrules through the first quarter and maybe even a bit into April or May. With this schedule in mind, here is what we plan to do while still dealing with the pandemic and after:

  • Pandemic-mode
    • Keep our employees safe
    • Add some new and exciting 3D Printing technologies.
    • Grow our recent expansion in California and Texas with additional staff and activities
    • Listen to our customers and deliver what they need to be successful.
    • Find new and interesting ways to get information into the hands of our customers. We are all a bit “zoomed-out.”
    • Upgrade our compute infrastructure and continue to explore cloud solutions for business and engineering applications.
    • Host more events for the community
    • Remember to unmute at least 75% of the time.
  • Post-Pandemic-Mode
    • Look back on what worked and didn’t work, and modify how we travel, meet, and communicate to take advantage of what we learned.
    • Get out and see as many of our customers as possible face-to-face.
    • Make further investments in people and resources in Texas and California, building on our growth in both states in 2020.
    • Go to lunch with our co-workers.
    • Have an Arizona Tech Business Networking event in person.
    • Throw our annual Nerdtoberfest Open House at PADT’s headquarters in Tempe, Arizona
    • Have a 3D Printing Users Meeting in Colorado, outside, at a brewery.

Thank you!

This post has been purposefully upbeat. Although the business side of things has gone well, all things considered, it has been a stressful year, and many in the PADT extended family have struggled and dealt with serious health issues because of this virus.

As we close out 2020, a truly memorable year, we simply want to thank everyone who joined us on this journey for both helping us along the way and for letting us help you get through it.

Optimization & Automation Updates in Ansys 2020 R2 – Webinar

Simulation is becoming an integral part of our customers’ product development processes, and new horizons await. By combining different physics into a multidisciplinary approach, phenomena can be investigated more holistically and optimized to a greater degree. Additionally, simulation processes can be standardized and shared across teams, allowing simulation novices to gain more direct access to simulation.

Time-consuming manual searches for the best and most robust design configuration can now be accelerated by adding state-of-the-art algorithms for design exploration, optimization, robustness and reliability analysis. Through the power of interactive visualization and artificial intelligence technologies, engineers and designers can gain a better understanding of their design and make the right decisions in less time.

The process integration and design optimization solution that enables all the above is Ansys optiSLang.

Join PADT’s Mechanical Application Engineer and Systems Expert Josh Stout for an exploration of this interconnected tool and what new capabilities are available in it’s 2020 R2 release.

Register Here

If this is your first time registering for one of our Bright Talk webinars, simply click the link and fill out the attached form. We promise that the information you provide will only be shared with those promoting the event (PADT).

You will only have to do this once! For all future webinars, you can simply click the link, add the reminder to your calendar and you’re good to go!

Christmas Right-Left Gift Exchange Story: Sinatra Saves Christmas

For our Christmas parties at PADT, we generally have over 50 employees so a traditional secret Santa gift exchange takes too long. At some point, we downloaded a right-left gift exchange story from the internet and it was a big hit. When we ran out of stories on the internet, we started writing our own, usually in some sort of over-the-top style. This year’s theme was “Vegas, Baby.” So our story is a never-before-revealed true story (not) of how the Rat Back kept Santa from losing it all.

Here is how it works:

Everyone gets their gift and forms a big circle in the middle of the room.  Someone with a strong voice reads the story, and every time the word LEFT is read, everyone passes the package they have to the left. Every time the world RIGHT is read, everyone passes the package they have to their right.  You should pause a bit at each LEFT/RIGHT to give people a chance to pass.

You can find previous years stories here

– Vegas Christmas (2019)
– Hollywood Golden Age Christmas (2018)
– Elf Family Christmas (2017)
– Western Christmas (2016)
– Star Wars Christmas (2015)
– Fairy Tale Christmas (2014)
– Science Fiction Christmas (2013)
– Romance Christmas (2012)
– Film Noir Christmas (2011)


How the Chairman of the Board Saved Christmas

Let me tell you, young people, a story.  I got lots of stories.  But RIGHT now, I want to tell a story about the night in Vegas when Frank Sinatra saved Christmas.

I was RIGHT there. 1958. Working as a dealer in the casino at the Sands.  Back then, the Sands was RIGHT in the middle of everything.  It’s where the high-roller came, and the best entertainers in the world performed RIGHT there on the stage in the showroom.

That night, morning really, most everyone had LEFT.  The Rat Pack, Dean Martin, Sammy Davis Junior, and Frank Sinatra had performed a great show. I caught it from the service door LEFT of the stage.  But RIGHT after it finished, most people LEFT, going to other casinos or back to their hotels.  After grabbing drinks and some steaks in the restaurant, Sammy, Dean, and Frank decided to gamble.  And that is when it happened.

My poker table was on the RIGHT side of the room.  I was LEFT speechless when all three of my idols walked in, looked RIGHT, looked LEFT, and then sat… down at my table. After a few seconds, Dean asked, “You all RIGHT, kid?  You look kind of pale, like you seen a ghost or some’ting.” Frank added, “Yah kid, your jaw is hanging down RIGHT on the table. Pull it closed and deal us a hand.”

And with that, I starting dealing the most exciting evening of poker in my life.

The three icons, sitting RIGHT in front of me, played for about an hour.  A small crowd started gathering, and soon there was no room LEFT around my table.  It was magical. I tell you, those guys sure could sing. But they were also funny as hell. The way they ribbed each other. It LEFT me in tears.

About an hour in, things went from strange to surreal.  A large tall man was pushing people to the LEFT and to the RIGHT as he made his way to the table.  He had long white hair and a long white beard that covered his ample belly.  He came up and sat RIGHT next to Sammy, on his LEFT.  Sammy looked at his cards and then to his LEFT and said. “Hey, you.  I promise I’ve been nice this year.  These other two, there is no nice LEFT in them. Definitely need to be on your naughty list.”

The old man laughed and winked at all three men.  I heard Dean say, as he sipped from his whiskey glass, “Santa, how’s tricks. Don’t you have any gift wrapping LEFT to do? ”

It was Santa Clause. At my table, from LEFT to RIGHT, I had Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin, Sammy Davis Junior, and RIGHT at the end, Santa Clause. Only in Vegas.

I won’t bore you with details. I’ll just jump RIGHT to the end.  They played poker for ninety-minute or so, and Santa was losing badly.  When he had no chips LEFT, he bet the gold watch he kept in his RIGHT hip pocket.  When he lost that he reached into the inside RIGHT pocket of jacket and put a piece of paper on the table, saying, “This is all I got LEFT, boys.”

Across the top of the paper, I could read “Deed, North Pole Christmas Factory.”

Sammy blinked and said, “Man, Santa, Man, that ain’t so cool. If one of us wins RIGHT now, what are we gonna do with the north pole?  Dean here is too fat to fit in a chimney, and Frank is too stingy to hand out gifts. Man, take it RIGHT back.”

Santa shook his head.  “No boys, I’m betting the figurative farm. My hand is that good. I’m LEFT with no choice.”

Dean and Sammy folded, but Frank stayed in.  Pushing his chips RIGHT into the middle of the table.  “One card LEFT Santa.” Frank said, “And the fate of Christmas is decided. You win, you have enough money to buy a new, bigger sled for that fat ass of yours to fit into.  You lose, and RIGHT here, RIGHT now, I become the big guy, and I run Christmas.”

I dealt the last cards.

 Frank looked at his and winked RIGHT at me.  I still remember that wink and his blue-blue eyes.  He muttered a cuss word, hit Sammy in the back of the head, and tossed his cards in. “I fold.” He said. 

Santa took the chips and the deed and LEFT without a word.  No ho ho ho. No jolly.  He just LEFT.  So did the Rat pack, slapping each other on the back and headed to their next adventure.  Frank must have LEFT forty thousand dollars in chips in that pot. What a guy.

When they were all gone, you know what I did? I flipped those cards RIGHT over.  First Santa, on my RIGHT.  Three duces and to the RIGHT of those an Ace and a King.  Frank’s hand? Your RIGHT to ask me what is in Frank’s hand.  RIGHT there in front of his chair, I saw all hearts, Ten- Jack-Queen-King and yes, Ace.  He had folded with a royal flush and LEFT his money for Santa to take.

That night in Vegas, RIGHT there at the Sands Hotel. Frank Sinatra sang, he drank, he played poker, and he paid forty-thousand dollars to save Christmas. There are not a lot of people LEFT like Frank.  Guys that have the world RIGHT there in their hands.  And when they are LEFT with making a call about giving something up and doing what is RIGHT. They decide to do what is RIGHT.

Thanks, Frank. Thank you for doing it your way.

Press Release: Expanding its Product Development Expertise, PADT Adds Dr. Tyler Shaw, Former Head of Advanced Manufacturing at PING, as Director of Engineering

Change is an important part of growth. Our mission within the Engineering Services team at PADT is:

Delivering Premier Engineering Services to Enable World-Changing Product Development.

To do that, we need a world class leader. And when our long-time Director of Engineering decided to move to something different, we searched high and low for a new person. The ability and experience of the applicants was amazing and making a decision was difficult. In the end we were fortunate to have Dr. Tyler Shaw join PADT.

Read the official press release below to learn more. We are excited about this new phase for our consulting offering. Tyler’s background and knowlede open new and excited doors.

If you would like to explore how PADT can provide product development or simulation assistance to your organization, contact us, and Tyler along with the rest of the team will be eager to learn more.


Expanding its Product Development Expertise, PADT Adds Dr. Tyler Shaw, Former Head of Advanced Manufacturing at PING, as Director of Engineering

Shaw Tapped to Lead PADT’s Simulation and Product Development Team Who Provide Services Across Industries Worldwide

TEMPE, Ariz., December 3, 2020 PADT, a globally recognized provider of numerical simulation, product development, and 3D printing products and services, today announced it has hired Dr. Tyler Shaw as its Director of Engineering to oversee the company’s simulation and product development consulting team effective immediately. Shaw most recently served as the head of Advanced Manufacturing and Innovation at PING golf, and has worked as an engineer, product manager, and educator across a diverse range of industries for more than 20 years.

“PADT’s ability to help our customers solve tough problems is a key industry differentiator, and we’re thrilled to welcome Tyler as a leader to oversee our team of simulation and design experts,” said Eric Miller, co-founder and principal of PADT. “His experience and impressive technical background will enable us to continue our high-quality service while providing fresh, innovative ideas for developing products to their full potential.”

Dr. Shaw replaces Rob Rowan as the director of Engineering. Rowan spent nearly 20 years with PADT and is credited for driving the growth of PADT’s engineering services and capabilities. “We owe a tremendous debt of gratitude to Rob for his dedication and leadership,” said Miller. “He was greatly admired for his broad engineering knowledge and business acumen and we wish him the best in his future endeavors.”

After a comprehensive search, Dr. Shaw emerged as the most technically advanced, skilled, and capable candidate to assume the role as PADT’s engineering leader. Dr. Shaw will focus on setting strategy, managing resources, and providing technical expertise to solve customer challenges. Prior to working at PADT and PING, Dr. Shaw served as a product manager for Vestas where he led customer-specific technical and commercial solutions for wind turbine sales across North, Central, and South America. He was also a principal systems engineer for Orbital Sciences Corporation, now Northrop Grumman, where he managed projects related to the development of world-class rockets, satellites, and other space systems.

“I am thrilled to join PADT and am ready for the challenge of taking its engineering services to the next level,” said Dr. Shaw. “I’ve worked with PADT in my previous post and was impressed with their capabilities and portfolio of clients, which covers a diverse set of industries. My background and technical knowledge across many of these sectors will serve PADT’s customers well.”

To learn more about Dr. Shaw and PADT’s simulation and product development services, please visit www.padtinc.com.

About PADT

PADT is an engineering product and services company that focuses on helping customers who develop physical products by providing Numerical Simulation, Product Development, and 3D Printing solutions. PADT’s worldwide reputation for technical excellence and experienced staff is based on its proven record of building long-term win-win partnerships with vendors and customers. Since its establishment in 1994, companies have relied on PADT because “We Make Innovation Work.” With over 90 employees, PADT services customers from its headquarters at the Arizona State University Research Park in Tempe, Arizona, and from offices in Torrance, California, Littleton, Colorado, Albuquerque, New Mexico, Austin, Texas, and Murray, Utah, as well as through staff members located around the country. More information on PADT can be found at www.PADTINC.com.

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More formal versions of this Press Release are available here in PDF and here in HTML.

Christmas Right-Left Gift Exchange Story: Brock’s Star-Studded Christmas Adventure

For our Christmas parties at PADT, we generally have over 50 employees so a traditional secret Santa gift exchange takes too long. At some point, we downloaded a right-left gift exchange story from the internet and it was a big hit. When we ran out of stories on the internet, we started writing our own, usually in some sort of over-the-top style. This year’s theme was “a Hollywood Party,” red carpet and all. So our story takes a look back at the golden age in Tinseltown.

Here is how it works:

Everyone gets their gift and forms a big circle in the middle of the room.  Someone with a strong voice reads the story and every time the word LEFT is read, everyone passes the package they have to the left. Every time the world RIGHT is read, everyone passes the package they have to their right.  You should pause a bit at each LEFT/RIGHT to give people a chance to pass.

You can find previous years stories here

– Vegas Christmas (2019)
– Hollywood Golden Age Christmas (2018)
– Elf Family Christmas (2017)
– Western Christmas (2016)
– Star Wars Christmas (2015)
– Fairy Tale Christmas (2014)
– Science Fiction Christmas (2013)
– Romance Christmas (2012)
– Film Noir Christmas (2011)


Brock’s Star-Studded Christmas Adventure

The Hollywood sign showed brightly in the rearview mirror of Brock “Lefty” Johnsons’ 45 Cadillac convertible on that fateful Christmas Eve. Right now, he needed to focus. He was nervous because two of the biggest stars in the world were in the back seat. On the left was Catherine Hepburn. On the right, Jimmy Stewart. And to top it off, in the front seat to his right was Donna Reed, Jimmy Stewart’s co-star in the soon to be released “It’s a Wonderful Life.” Brock was a mid-level producer for the studio who was at the right place at the wrong, or maybe the right time. The studio boss, Robby Leftensteen had picked him to drive the stars to a Christmas Party right smack dab in the middle of Palm Springs.

They left the studio at four PM, right after Miss Hepburn had finished filming for the day. They were late, so Brock stayed in the left lane once they got on the freeway. Mrs. Read turned and talked to her friends over her left shoulder as they sped out of town and climbed right up the hill to the desert.

About an hour into the drive Brock heard Jimmy Stewart say, “Ah, l-l-Lefty, I think you should slow down. Um, Ah, over there. On the right side of the road. Looks like someone had a bit of a spill.” Brock looked out the right side of the car as he slowed and he could just make out the bottom of a big red vehicle. Strangely, on the right and left of the wreck, a group of deer stood chewing on the desert shrubs. He turned on his right turn signal and crossed to the opposite side of the road and drove slowly off the pavement to towards the wreck.

In his panic, he parked right next to some cactus, so they all had to exit from the right side of the car. He and Jimmy Stewart walked to the right side of the large red vehicle, noticing that it had no wheels. It was a slay. When they got to the other side, he could not believe what he saw.

Right there, right in the middle of the desert, right in front of him was Santa Clause laying with his legs pinned right of a giant bag of gifts. And he was obviously unconscious.

Kathrine Hepburn let out a scream and ran right to Santa’s left side, and Donna Read crouched on his right side. They gently slapped his face till he woke up.

“Ho Ho Ho! That was the biggest goose I’ve ever seen!” said Santa Clause as he shook his head left and right. “I thought I was left for dead! Ho Ho Ho!”

“W-W-We are right here to help. You lay right here while we get this bag off of you.”

With much grunting and struggling, Jimmy Stewart and Brock pulled the bag off, which left Santa’s legs free. The big jolly man rolled onto his left side then slowly stood up.

“Ho Ho Ho! That goose left me knocked out.  Right now I want to focus on righting my slay and deliver all the presents I have left.

That is when Brock “Lefty” Johnson found himself pushing on the right end of a giant red slay with Jimmy Steward, Kathrine Hepburn, Donna Read, AND Santa Clause. They rocked the sled left and back until it rolled right over onto its runners. Santa let out a whistle and the reindeer lined up right in front of the sleigh.

While they all stood lined up right along the side of the road, the sound of jingling bells filled the air around them as the sled leaped straight up in the air and moved in a slow right-hand turn above them.

“Ho Ho Ho! Jimmy and Kathrine, Donna and Lefty! Thank you for always doing the right thing and for making movies that have left me crying and laughing!”

Brock felt Miss Hepburn lean against his left shoulder as she whispered “Merry Christmas Santa” into the cool desert night as the giant red sleigh left their sight.

All Things Ansys 077: Multibody Dynamics Updates in Ansys Motion 2020 R2

 

Published on: November 30th, 2020
With: Eric Miller & Jim Peters
Description:  

In this episode your host and Co-Founder of PADT, Eric Miller is joined by PADT’s Senior Staff Technologist Jim Peters for a discussion on the new capabilities available within Ansys Motion 2020 R2. With an integration into Mechanical, users can take advantage of multi-use models resulting in substantial time savings.

If you would like to learn more about this update, you can view Jim’s webinar on the topic here:

https://www.brighttalk.com/webcast/15747/455203

If you have any questions, comments, or would like to suggest a topic for the next episode, shoot us an email at podcast@padtinc.com we would love to hear from you!

Listen:
Subscribe:

@ANSYS #ANSYS

Multibody Dynamics Updates in Ansys Motion 2020 R2 – Webinar

Ansys Motion, now in the Mechanical interface, is a third generation engineering solution based on an advanced multibody dynamics solver that enables fast and accurate analysis of rigid and flexible bodies and gives an accurate evaluation of physical events through the analysis of the mechanical system as a whole.

Ansys Motion uses four tightly integrated solving schemes (rigid body, flexible body, modal & meshfree EasyFlex) that give the user unparalleled capabilities to analyze in any combination imaginable. Large assemblies with millions of degrees of freedom can be studied with the effects of flexibility and contact included. With an integration into Mechanical, users can take advantage of multi-use models resulting in substantial time savings.

Join PADT’s Senior Staff Technologist, Jim Peters for an exploration of what this tool has to offer, and how seamlessly it integrates with the Ansys Mechanical interface.

Register Here

If this is your first time registering for one of our Bright Talk webinars, simply click the link and fill out the attached form. We promise that the information you provide will only be shared with those promoting the event (PADT).

You will only have to do this once! For all future webinars, you can simply click the link, add the reminder to your calendar and you’re good to go!

Press Release: With New Capabilities in Metal 3D Printing, PADT Expands its Presence in the AM Value Chain

The world of Additive Manufacturing continues to evolve, and PADT’s offerings grow with those changes. Our latest advance is in the addition of a new system and an experienced engineer – an EOS M 290 and Keng Hsu, former ASU and Univeristy of Lousville professor. Read below to learn more.

We also have a PDF and HTML version of the release.

As always, if you have any questions, please contact us.


With New Capabilities in Metal 3D Printing, PADT Expands its Presence in the AM Value Chain

To Deepen its Investments in Metal Additive Manufacturing Research and Development, PADT Also Brought Onboard Veteran Engineer Keng Hsu as Principal AM R&D Engineer

TEMPE, Ariz., November 17, 2020 PADT, a globally recognized provider of numerical simulation, product development, and 3D printing products and services, today announced it has installed an advanced metal 3D printer from EOS, a global leader in the industrial metal 3D printing technologies, at its headquarters facility in Tempe, Arizona. With this increase in AM process and material capability, PADT can not only develop the highest quality end-use metal products, but also is well-positioned to address some of the current research and development challenges in additive manufacturing. PADT’s wide range of customers in highly demanding industries, most notably aerospace and defense, will see direct benefits of this new capability.

To lead metal additive manufacturing research and development (R&D), PADT also announced it has brought onboard Keng Hsu, engineer, researcher and associate professor at University of Louisville and formerly Arizona State University. Hsu brings more than 20 years of experience in equipment and facility operations, engineering R&D, engineering project execution and management in areas of advanced manufacturing of polymers, metals, and semiconductors. He has performed in-depth R&D contracts on 3D printing process and material development for some of the world’s largest technology organizations including Intel, Northrup Grumman, Salt River Project, the Department of Defense, and NASA.

“Metal 3D printing has reached a level of maturity that enables the production of end-use components and is now one of the fastest-growing manufacturing sectors in the world,” said Rey Chu, co-founder and principal, PADT. “The addition of the powerful EOS M290 printer to our portfolio expands the already extensive list of 3D printing capabilities and services we offer our customers. Our investments in technology and the addition of additive manufacturing veteran Keng Hsu also improves our ability to perform in-depth R&D on the potential of metal 3D printing.” You can follow oceannenvironment for more updates.

Dr. Keng Hsu

The EOS M 290 is a highly productive, and well-established mid-size AM system with a broad portfolio of metals for production of high-quality components, and for material and process R&D. PADT will initially run two of the machines most popular and versatile metals – stainless steel and nickel super alloy. The system also features a host of software tools, including its comprehensive monitoring suite, which enables quality assurance of all production- and quality-relevant data in real-time. Hsu will lead PADT’s R&D involved with the EOS machine and all other aspects of the company’s work in 3D printing R&D and consulting.

“The innovation made possible by metal 3D printing and in the technology itself is yet to be fully realized across many industries, namely aerospace,” said Hsu. “I’m grateful for the opportunity to join a leader in the industry and further my research on the subject to advance PADT’s presence in the field and services for our customers.”

PADT has been the Southwest’s premier additive manufacturing expert since it was founded in 1994 and continues to invest in innovative metal and polymer 3D printing systems, as well as talent, to better serve its customers. The company is ITAR registered and its quality system is also AS9100D (2016) and ISO9001:2015 certified to better serve the aerospace and defense industry. As an Ansys Elite Channel partner, PADT can also bring their extensive simulation experience to better design parts to take advantage of laser powder bed fusion and to optimize the build processes itself.

As 3D printing technology has advanced, PADT has seen an increase in the industry’s use of 3D scanning and printing for end-use parts. Metal 3D printing provides many benefits to aerospace and defense companies, including lighter, cheaper parts made much faster and with fewer constraints than with traditional manufacturing methods.

A full list of the EOS M 290’s specifications can be found on PADT’s website here . For more information on PADT and its capabilities in metal and plastic 3D printing, please visit www.padtinc.com.

About PADT

PADT is an engineering product and services company that focuses on helping customers who develop physical products by providing Numerical Simulation, Product Development, and 3D Printing solutions. PADT’s worldwide reputation for technical excellence and experienced staff is based on its proven record of building long-term win-win partnerships with vendors and customers. Since its establishment in 1994, companies have relied on PADT because “We Make Innovation Work.” With over 90 employees, PADT services customers from its headquarters at the Arizona State University Research Park in Tempe, Arizona, and from offices in Torrance, California, Littleton, Colorado, Albuquerque, New Mexico, Austin, Texas, and Murray, Utah, as well as through staff members located around the country. More information on PADT can be found at www.PADTINC.com.

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All Things Ansys 076: MAPDL – Elements, Contact & Solver Updates in Ansys 2020 R2

 

Published on: November 16th, 2020
With: Eric Miller & Ted Harris
Description:  

In this episode your host and Co-Founder of PADT, Eric Miller is joined by PADT’s Simulation Support Manager Ted Harris for a discussion on what’s new in the Ansys Mechanical APDL 2020 R2 release.

If you would like to learn more about this update, you can view Ted’s webinar on the topic here:

https://www.brighttalk.com/webcast/15747/452033

If you have any questions, comments, or would like to suggest a topic for the next episode, shoot us an email at podcast@padtinc.com we would love to hear from you!

Listen:
Subscribe:

@ANSYS #ANSYS

Building a System Model of the RL-10 Rocket Engine in Flownex

When we engineers are building a new system or iterating on an existing design it can be expensive.  Simulating a full system-level model in a 3D CFD program can take days.  Making iterative changes to an existing system can be costly or even impossible. Utilizing a one-dimensional system modeler like Flownex allows us to analyze many different designs very quickly, on the order of seconds or minutes.

Flownex is a thermal-fluid network modeler.  It is a simulation tool that allows for 1D fluid modeling and 2D heat transfer.  It uses a variety of flow components, nodes, and heat transfer elements to model the entire system we are interested in analyzing.  It solves conservation of mass, momentum, and energy to obtain the mass flow, pressure, and temperature of fluids and solids throughout the complete network.  Because of this approach we can analyze large, complex networks very quickly, iterate on designs, and even run short or long transient simulations with ease.

In the example today we are looking at a version of the RL-10 rocket engine, which has been a staple in the delivery of satellites into orbit and an essential part of many spacecraft. The specific iteration of the RL-10 we will be using for building our network model is the RL10A-3-3A. A good place to begin with any system model is a system schematic:

Figure 2: RL10A-3-3A Engine System Schematic – Image from https://ntrs.nasa.gov/citations/19970010379

In Flownex we can assign an image (could be from a P&ID diagram, a CAD cross-section, or even a satellite image!) as the background for our drawing canvas. We simply need to right-click on the drawing canvas and select Edit Page to bring up the drawing canvas properties.

Clicking on the action button under Appearance Style brings up the Styles Editor.  Here we can change the fill style to Image and select the appropriate image for our background.

In the case of the RL-10 we can use the image from figure 2 as our background image.  We may want to consider adjusting the opacity of the image so that it blends into the background a little bit more.

In Flownex building a system model is as simple as drag and drop.  We can build our rocket engine using a variety of flow components from the Flow Solver library. To build the RL-10 system model we will be using the following components:

CEA Adiabatic Flame component to model combustion.

Composite Heat Transfer component to model thermal transport through pipe-walls to ambient and to model the regen.

Boundary Conditions to constrain our system at the inlets and outlet.

Basic Valves to model the different valves in the system,

Flow Resistances to model specified losses where appropriate.

Flow Interfaces to model the fluids entering the combustion chamber (to transfer fluid properties as we switch from two-phase O2 and H2 to gaseous fluids for modeling combustion.

Pipes for modeling various flow-paths.

Restrictors with Discharge Coefficient for our injection ports to the combustion chamber.

Restrictors with Loss Coefficient to model both the Calibrated Orifice and the Venturi contraction/expansion.

Basic Centrifugal Pumps for our Fuel and LOX pumps.

Simple Turbine to model the Fuel Turbine

Shafts to connect our different pumps mechanically.

Gearbox is used to connect the shafts between the LOX pump and the Fuel Pump.

Exit Thrust Nozzle to determine total thrust.

Script is used in assigning O2 properties prior to combustion.

The components may be dragged and dropped from the component library onto the drawing canvas to build our system model. We can also copy and paste components that are already on the canvas into different locations. This can be especially useful when the same inputs for say, a pipe, are used consistently throughout the model. All components have both Inputs and a Results associated with them as seen in the figure below. This is how we will define our flow components.

The completed model of the RL-10 Rocket Engine can be seen below. There are a few simplifications; we are using composite heat transfer components to model free convection to a specified ambient temperature (as though this was a land-based test). Rather than tie the actual temperatures and flow conditions in the nozzle to the regen we are using assumed temperatures and convective heat transfer coefficients. For additional fidelity we could model the heat transfer between these two flow paths with calculated convective heat transfer coefficients and we could model cross-conduction along the pipes which deliver the fuel and oxidizer to the combustion chamber. With additional effort, more complex use cases could also be simulated.

For the sake of demonstration we set up a transient action to slowly vary the oxidizer control valve fraction open; starting at 30% and ending at 100% open and observer the change in thrust at the nozzle as a function of this changing transient action.

Plots may be easily added by dragging a Line Graph from the Visualization > Graphs section of the component library onto our canvas. To choose the characteristics we would like plotted against time we simply need to drag and drop the desired inputs or results onto our newly placed line graph.

RL-10 Transient Thrust Plot

We can plot both the oxidizer control valve fraction open and the thrust versus time to observe the thrust reaction to the opening of the valve. The thrust plot has some jumps that are likely due to numerical singularities – with additional work this could be improved.

As can be seen, setting up complex system models in Flownex is relatively simple with most operations being drag and drop. For ease of sharing models with colleagues or customers adding a background image makes it very easy to see how the flow components in the model correspond with a system schematic. Setting up and plotting the effects of operational transients is a breeze!

For more information on Flownex please reach out to Dan Christensen at dan.christensen@padtinc.com.

MAPDL – Elements, Contact & Solver Updates in Ansys 2020 R2 – Webinar

The Ansys finite element solvers enable a breadth and depth of capabilities unmatched by anyone in the world of computer-aided simulation. Thermal, Structural, Acoustic, Piezoelectric, Electrostatic and Circuit Coupled Electromagnetics are just an example of what can be simulated. Regardless of the type of simulation, each model is represented by a powerful scripting language, the Ansys Parametric Design Language (APDL).

APDL is the foundation for all sophisticated features, many of which are not exposed in the Workbench Mechanical user interface. It also offers many conveniences such as parameterization, macros, branching and looping, and complex math operations. All these benefits are accessible within the Ansys Mechanical APDL user interface.

Join PADT’s Simulation Support Manager, Ted Harris for a look at what’s new for MAPDL in Ansys 2020 R2, regarding:

  • Contact Modeling & Robustness
  • Elements
  • Post Processing
  • Solver Components
  • And Much More

Register Here

If this is your first time registering for one of our Bright Talk webinars, simply click the link and fill out the attached form. We promise that the information you provide will only be shared with those promoting the event (PADT).

You will only have to do this once! For all future webinars, you can simply click the link, add the reminder to your calendar and you’re good to go!

All Things Ansys 075: Optical System Design & Disruption in Ansys SPEOS 2020 R2

 

Published on: November 2nd, 2020
With: Eric Miller & Robert McCathren
Description:  

In this episode your host and Co-Founder of PADT, Eric Miller is joined by PADT’s Application Engineer Robert McCathren for a look at how Ansys 2020 R2 empowers SPEOS users to go further than ever before with enhancements that improve the handling of complex sensors, project preview and computation.

If you would like to learn more about this update, you can view Robert’s webinar on the topic here:

https://www.brighttalk.com/webcast/15747/449021

If you have any questions, comments, or would like to suggest a topic for the next episode, shoot us an email at podcast@padtinc.com we would love to hear from you!

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@ANSYS #ANSYS

Introducing Level Up – An Ansys Mechanical Virtual Conference

PADT & Ansys are excited to announce Level Up with Ansys Mechanical, a free virtual technical conference on Wednesday, December 2, 2020 at 10 a.m. EST.

For the past 50 years, Ansys Mechanical continues to be the go-to finite element analysis platform for structural analysis, and they’re just getting warmed up. Join visionary Ansys product development, product management and engineering leaders as they provide expert insights on Mechanical’s technology advances and preview the platform’s future.

From those engineers looking to boot up their simulation experience to those seeking to step up their simulation skills, and even those operating in “beast mode”, who execute large and complex workflows, this action-packed event showcases how Mechanical radically transforms product design.

Highlights include: 

  • Learn the latest with scripting and automation to save valuable time
  • Discover how to lightweight product designs with structural optimization methods
  • Understand how to couple multiple physics to assess performance in the real world
  • And so much more

Catch the thought-provoking plenary presentation, engage with Ansys’ brightest during the live Q&A, and interact with fellow engineers during live polls. 

Register Here

Optical System Design & Disruption in Ansys SPEOS 2020 R2 – Webinar

When customers evaluate products, the overall look and details can make all the difference. Ansys physics-based imaging, photonics and illumination software streamlines the design process, so you can better understand how your product will look and operate under real-world lighting and usage conditions.

Whether you are designing a TV screen, street lighting network, smart headlight, head-up display or interior mood lighting in an automobile, Ansys optical simulation software helps you make your design more efficient and appealing. Optical sensors are the eyes of any intelligent system, and Ansys physics-based simulations can help you assess raw signals from camera and lidar systems in their operating environments.

Ansys 2020 R2 empowers Ansys SPEOS users to go further than ever before with enhancements that improve the handling of complex sensors, project preview and computation.

Enhancements include:

 •  Highly accurate camera models drastically improve camera simulation experience 

•  Faster simulation times when using light sources and provides nearly real-time review 

•  4X faster simulation setup thanks to optimized GUI

Join PADT’s Application Engineer Robert McCathren for a first hand look at the capabilities of optical simulation, followed by what’s available for SPEOS in the Ansys 2020 R2 update.

Register Here

If this is your first time registering for one of our Bright Talk webinars, simply click the link and fill out the attached form. We promise that the information you provide will only be shared with those promoting the event (PADT).

You will only have to do this once! For all future webinars, you can simply click the link, add the reminder to your calendar and you’re good to go!

Meshing in the New Ansys Fluent Task-based Workflows

Working with a variety of users with different levels of CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) backgrounds, I have to admit that Fluent meshing used to be a challenging and confusing task for beginners and even intermediate users.

Ansys has addressed this challenge by redesigning the Fluent user interface to provide a task-based workflow for meshing that enables engineers to do more and solve more complex problems than ever before in less time. The new Fluent task-based workflow streamlines the user experience by providing a single window that offers only relevant choices and options and prompts the user with best practices that deliver better simulation results.

Best practices are embedded into the workflow in the form of defaults and messages to the user. This reduces the amount of training required to start using the software and makes it easier for occasional users to return to the software.

How to Mesh Watertight CFD Geometry in the New Ansys Fluent Task-based Workflow

In order to use this workflow, you need a relatively clean watertight solid and/or fluid regions that can be meshed by surface meshing and then volume filling (no wrapping required.) Geometry can consist of single or multiple bodies.

Going through the task-based workflow is straightforward. You are presented with several steps, like:

  • Surface mesh.
  • Describe geometry. (Fluid and/or solid)
  • Capping. (If you are creating an internal flow volume, then the capping tools in Fluent makes extraction easy)
  • Volume meshing. (If you wish to use the latest Mosaic meshing technology, select “Poly-hexcore”)
Mosaic Meshing Technology

Now, click on “Switch-to-Solution,” to bring the mesh into a familiar Fluent interface.

Fault-Tolerant Workflow for Ansys Fluent Meshing Wraps and Seals Leaks and Gaps

Sometimes CFD simulations contain dirty, non-watertight geometries. For instance, 3D scanned or manufacturing geometry files. These geometries may contain missing faces, gaps, holes, overlaps, and other issues. As a result, they require extensive cleanup before simulation.

To overcome this obstacle, Ansys offers a new Fluent meshing workflow that wraps dirty geometry without cleanup.

The workflow for non-watertight geometry offers distinct advantages over other meshing technologies such as:

Part management:

Users can perform CAD-level changes to any geometry or assembly, including dragging and dropping objects from the CAD model into the simulation model.

Leakages and overlaps:

The fault-tolerant workflow seals leakages caused by gaps and misalignments between solid bodies. This significantly reduces the manual efforts required to clean up geometry.

The fault-tolerant workflow can easily wrap leaky geometry

STL file input

The workflow can create fluid regions directly from STL files or scanned data. This eliminates the need to convert STL files into solid geometry for the biomedical, oil and gas, automotive and other industries.

Imported STL File

2020R2 updates:

There are a few important improvements both in Watertight meshing (WTM) and Fault-Tolerant meshing (FTM) workflows in the 2020R2 release.

FTM/WTM: Wild card selection in lists

The Meshing Workflows now have an option to use a persistent Wildcard string for selecting labels or zones. This is in addition to the Filter Text option previously available. The new Use WildCard option stores the wildcard string itself in recorded workflows instead of an explicit list of locations so that when they are played back with new geometries, the matching will be performed again and pick up any matching zones/labels that were not in the earlier geometry.

WTM: Support of Region-specific Sizing 

You can specify region-specific Max Size and Growth Rates during the Volume Meshing task.  If you enable Region-based Sizing, Fluent will compute default sizing specifications for each region.  These can then be adjusted as required for each region.

WTM: Start From Imported Surface Mesh

This is useful if you have an established surface-meshing workflow or if you already have a mesh generated (perhaps from another preprocessor or an existing Fluent case) and want to use that as a starting point for Fluent meshing. Once you import the surface mesh you have the option of using it as it is, or selectively adding additional Local Size controls and/or remeshing particular surfaces as needed.

FTM: Continuous prism layers for Poly and Poly-Hexcore for Fluids

For the Fault-Tolerant Meshing Workflow you can now create continuous prism layers without stair-stepping within poly and poly-hexcore fluid regions.  Note that this will apply in all zones of the region.

WTM: Support of Local Sizing on Labeled Edges

Once you have labeled the edges, you can select Edge Size in Add Local Sizing to prescribe a target size on the selected edge(s).