All Things Ansys 058: Combining Mechanical Simulation with Additive Manufacturing

 

Published on: March 9th, 2020
With: Eric Miller, Matt Humrick & Pam Waterman
Description:  

In this episode your host and Co-Founder of PADT, Eric Miller is joined by 3D Printing Applications Engineer Pamela Waterman and Advatech Pacific’s Engineering Manager Matt Humrick for a discussion on real world applications for topology optimization, and it’s value when it comes to creating parts though additive manufacturing.

If you would like to learn more about this topic and what Advatech Pacific is doing, you can download our case study covering these topics here: https://bit.ly/38Bqu2b

If you have any questions, comments, or would like to suggest a topic for the next episode, shoot us an email at podcast@padtinc.com we would love to hear from you!

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@ANSYS #ANSYS

Icepak in Ansys Electronic Desktop – Why should you know about it?

The role of Ansys Electronics Desktop Icepak (hereafter referred to as Icepak, not to be confused with Classic Icepak) is in an interesting place. On the back end, it is a tremendously capable CFD solver through the use of the Ansys Fluent code. On the front end, it is an all-in-one pre and post processor that is streamlined for electronics thermal management, including the explicit simulation and effects of fluid convection. In this regard, Icepak can be thought of as a system level Multiphysics simulation tool.

One of the advantages of Icepak is in its interface consistency with the rest of the Electronic Desktop (EDT) products. This not only results in a slick modern appearance but also provides a very familiar environment for the electrical engineers and designers who typically use the other EDT tools. While they may not already be intimately familiar with the physics and setup process for CFD/thermal simulations, being able to follow a very similar workflow certainly lowers the barrier to entry for accessing useful results. Even if complete adoption by these users is not practical, this same environment can serve as a happy medium for collaboration with thermal and fluids experts.

Figure 1: AEDT Icepak interface. The same ribbon menus, project manager, history tree, and display window as other EDT products.

So, beyond these generalities, what does Icepak actually offer for an optimized user experience over other tools, and what kinds of problems/applications are best suited for it?

The first thing that comes to mind for both of these questions is a PCB with attached components. In a real-world environment, anyone that has looked at the inside of a computer is likely familiar with motherboards covered with all kinds of little chips and capacitors and often dominated by a CPU mounted with a heatsink and fan. In most cases, this motherboard is enclosed within some kind of box (a computer case) with vents/filters/fans on at least some of the sides to facilitate controlled airflow. This is an ideal scenario for Icepak. The geometries of the board and its components are typically well represented by rectangular prisms and cylinders, and the thermal management of the system is strongly related to the physics of conjugate heat transfer. For the case geometry, it may be more convenient to import this from a more comprehensive modeler like SpaceClaim and then take advantage of the tools built into Icepak to quickly process the important features.

Figure 2: A computer case with motherboard imported from SpaceClaim. The front and back have vents/fans while the side has a rectangular patterned grille.

For a CAD model like the one above, we may want to include some additional items like heatsinks, fan models, or simple PCB components. Icepak’s geometry tools include some very convenient parameterized functions for quickly constructing and positioning fans and heatsinks, in addition to the basic ability to create and manipulate simple volumes. There are also routines for extracting openings on surface, such as the rectangular vent arrays on the front and back as well as the patterned grille on the side. So, not only can you import detailed CAD from external sources, you can mix, match, and simplify it with Icepak’s geometry, which streamlines the entire design and setup process. For an experienced user, the above model can be prepared for a basic simulation within just a matter of minutes. The resulting configuration with an added heatsink, some RAM, and boundary conditions, could look something like this:

Figure 3: The model from Figure 2 after Icepak processing. Boundary conditions for the fans, vents, and grille have been defined. Icepak primitives have also been added in the form of a heatsink and RAM modules.

Monitor points can then assigned to surfaces or bodies as desired; chances are that for a simulation like this, temperature within the CPU is the most important. Additional temperature points for each RAM module or flow measurements for the fans and openings can also be defined. These points can all be tracked as the simulation proceeds to ensure that convergence is actually attained.

Figure 4: Monitoring chosen solution variables to ensure convergence.

For this simple system containing a 20 W CPU and 8 RAM modules at 2 W each, quite a few of our components are toasty and potentially problematic from a thermal standpoint.

Figure 5: Post-processing with Icepak. Temperature contours are overlaid with flow velocities to better understand the behavior of the system.

With the power of a simulation environment in Icepak at our fingertips, we can now play around with our design parameters to improve the thermal management of this system! Want to see what happens when you block the outlet vents? Easy, select and delete them! Want to use a more powerful fan or try a new material for the motherboard or heatsink? Just edit their properties in the history tree. Want to spin around the board or try changing the number of fins on the heatsink? Also straightforward, although you will have to remesh the model. While these are the kinds of things that are certainly possible in other tools, they are exceptionally easy to do within an all-in-one interface like Icepak.

The physics involved in this example are pretty standard: solid body conduction with conjugate heat transfer to a turbulent K-Omega fluid model. Where Icepak really shines is its ability to integrate with the other tools in the EDT environment. While we assumed that the motherboard was nothing more than a solid chunk of FR-4, this board could have been designed and simulated in detail with another tool like HFSS. The board, along with all of the power losses calculated during the HFSS analysis, could have then been directly imported into the Icepak project. This would allow for each layer to be modeled with its own spatially varying thermal properties according to trace locations as well as a very accurate spatial mapping of heat generation.

This is not at all to say that Icepak is limited to these kinds of PCB and CCA examples. These just often tend to be convenient to think about and relatively easy to geometrically represent. Using Fluent as the solver provides a lot of flexibility, and there are many more classes of problems that could be benefit from Icepak. On the low frequency side, electric motors are a good example of a problem where electronic and thermal behavior are intertwined. As voltage is applied to the windings, currents are induced and heat is generated. For larger motors, these currents, and consequently the associated thermal losses, can be significant. Maxwell is used to model the electronic side for these types of problems, where the results can then be easily brought into an Icepak simulation. I have gone through just such an example rotor/stator/winding motor assembly model in Maxwell, where I then copied everything into an Iecpak project to simulate the resulting steady temperature profile in a box of naturally convecting air.

Figure 6: An example half-motor that was solved in Maxwell as a magnetostatic problem and then copied over to Icepak for thermal analysis.

If it is found that better thermal management is needed, then extra features could then be added on the Icepak side as desired, such as a dedicated heatsink or external fan. Only the components with loads mapped over from Maxwell need to remain unmodified.

On the high frequency side, you may care about the performance of an antenna. HFSS can be used for the electromagnetic side, while Icepak can once again be brought in to analyze the thermal behavior. For high powered antenna, some components could very easily get hot enough for the material properties to appreciably change and for thermal radiation to become a dominant mode of heat transport. A 2-way automatic Icepak coupling is an excellent way to model this. Thermal modifiers may be defined for material properties in HFSS, and radiation is a supported physics model in Icepak. HFSS and Icepak can then be set up to alternately solve and automatically feed each other new loads and boundary conditions until a converged result is attained.

What all of this really comes down to is the question: how easy is it for the user to set up a model that will produce the information they need? For these kinds of electronics questions, I believe the answer for Icepak is “extraordinarily easy”. While functional on its own merit, Icepak really shines when it comes to the ease of coupling thermal management analysis with the EM family of tools.

Varied Infill Options for CAD models brought into GrabCAD Print software for 3D Printing. (Image courtesy PADT)

GrabCAD Print Software, Part Two: Simplify Set-ups, Save Time, and Do Cool Stuff You Hadn’t Even Considered

(Edited 3 August 2020 to reflect GrabCAD Print V1.44)

You haven’t really lived in the world of 3D printing until you’ve had a part fail spectacularly due to open faces, self-intersecting faces or inverted normals. Your part ends up looking more like modern art than technical part. Or perhaps the design you have in mind has great geometry but you wish that some parts could have regions that are dense and strong while other regions would work with minimal infill.

In Part One of this blog post about GrabCAD Print software, we covered the basics of setting up and printing a part; now we’ll look at several of the advanced features that save you set-up time and result in better parts.

Behind the Scenes Repairs

Stratasys GrabCAD Print software, available as a free download, is crafted for users setting up solid models for 3D printing on Stratasys FDM and PolyJet printers. Once you’ve started using it, you’ll find one of its many useful advanced features is the automated STL file-repair option.

Imported STL file, with GrabCAD Print ready to automatically repair errors. PADT image.

Most people still create solid models in CAD software then convert the file to the industry-standard STL format before opening it in a given 3D printer’s own set-up software. Every CAD package works a little differently to generate an STL file, and once in a while the geometry just doesn’t get perfectly meshed. Triangles may overlap, triangles may end up very long and very skinny, or the vector that signals “point in” or “point out” can get reversed.

Traditionally, the 3D printer set-up program reacts to these situations by doing one of two things: it prints exactly what you tell it to print (producing weird holes and shifted layers) or it simply refuses to print at all. Both situations are due to tiny errors in the conversion of a solid CAD model to a tessellated surface.

GrabCAD Print, however, gives your file a once-over and immediately flags sections of the model in need of repair. You can see a color-coded representation of all the problem areas, choose to view just some or all, and then click on Automatic Repair. No hand-editing, no counting layers and identifying sections where the problems reside – just a click of the virtual button and all the problem regions are identified, repaired and ready for the next processing steps.

CAD vs. STL: Do So Much More with CAD

GrabCAD Print also uniquely allows users to bring in their models in the original CAD file-format (from SolidWorks, Autodesk, PTC, Siemens, etc.) or neutral formats, with no need to first convert it to STL. For FDM users, this means GrabCAD recognizes actual CAD bodies, faces, and features, letting you make build-modifications directly in the print set-up stage that previously would have required layer-by-layer slice editing, or couldn’t have been done at all.

For example, with a little planning ahead, you can bring in a multi-body CAD model (i.e., an assembly), assemble and group the parts, then direct GrabCAD to apply different parameters to each body. This way you can reinforce some areas at full density then change the infill pattern, layout, and density in other regions where full strength is unnecessary.

Here’s an example of a SolidWorks model intended for printing with a solid lower base but lighter weight (saving material) in the upper sections. It’s a holder for Post-It® notes, comprising three individual parts – lower base, upper base and upper slot – combined and saved as an assembly.

Sample multi-body part ready to bring into GrabCAD Advanced FDM. Image PADT.

Sample multi-body part ready to bring into GrabCAD Advanced FDM. Image PADT.

Here was my workflow:

1 – I brought the SolidWorks assembly into GrabCAD, assembled and grouped all the bodies, selected an F370 Stratasys FDM printer, chose Print Settings of acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) and 0.010 inches layer height, and oriented the part.

2 -To ensure strength in the lower base, I selected just that section (you can do this either in the model tree or on the part itself) and opened the Model Settings menu at the right. Under Body, I chose Solid Infill.

3 – Next I selected the upper base, chose Hexagram, and changed the Infill Density to 60%.

4 – Lastly, I selected the upper slot section, chose Sparse, and changed the Infill Density to 35%.

5 – With all three sections defined, I clicked on Slice Preview, sliced the model and used the slider bar on the left to step through each section’s toolpath. For the screenshots, I turned off showing Support Material; the yellow bits indicate where seams start (another parameter that can be edited).

Here is each section highlighted, with screenshots of the parameter choices and how the part infill looks when sliced:

Upper base set up in GrabCAD to print as Hexagram pattern, 60% infill; sliced toolpath shown at right. Image PADT.
Upper slot section set up in GrabCAD to print as Sparse pattern, 35% infill; sliced toolpath shown at right. Image PADT.

So that you can really see the differences, I printed the part four times, stopping as the infill got partway through each section, then letting the final part print to completion. Here are the three partial sections, plus my final part:

Lower base (solid), upper base (hexagram) and first part of upper slot (sparse), done as partial prints. Image PADT.
Completed note-holder set up in GrabCAD Print, Advanced FDM mode, weighted toward the bottom but light-weighted internally. Image PADT.
Completed note-holder set up in GrabCAD Print using advanced infill features, weighted toward the bottom but light-weighted internally. Image PADT.

Automated Hole Sizing Simplifies Adding Inserts

But like the old advertisements say, “But wait – there’s more!” Do you use heat-set inserts a lot to create secure connections between 3D printed parts and metal hardware? Planning ahead for the right hole size, especially if you have different design groups involved and fasteners may not yet be decided, this is the feature for you.

Sample part set up for easy insert additions, using Advanced FDM in GrabCAD Print. Image PADT.

Sample part set up for easy insert additions, using advanced, automated hole-resizing features in GrabCAD Print. Image PADT.

In your CAD part model, draw a hole that is centered where you know the insert will go, give it a nominal diameter and use Cut/Extrude so that the hole is at least the depth of your longest candidate insert. Save the file in regular CAD format, not STL. Next bring your part into GrabCAD Print and go to Model Settings in the right-hand menu.

This time, click on Face (not Body) and Select the inner cylindrical wall of your hole. Several options will become active, including Apply Insert. When you check that box, a new drop-down will appear, giving you the choice of adding a heat-set insert, a helicoil insert or creating a custom size. Below that you select either Inch or Metric, and for either, the appropriate list of standard insert sizes appears.

Automatic hole-resizing in GrabCAD Print, for a specific, standard heat-set insert. Image PADT.

Choose the insert you want, click Update in the upper middle of the GrabCAD screen, and you’ll see the hole-size immediately changed (larger or smaller as needed). The new diameter will match the required oversized dimensions for the correct (melted into place) part-fit. You can even do this in a sidewall! (For tips on putting inserts into FDM parts, particularly with a soldering iron, see Adding Inserts to 3D Printed Parts: Hardware Tips.)

Note that this way, you can print the overall part with a sparse infill, yet reinforce the area around the insert to create just the right mass to make a solid connection. The Sliced view will show the extra contours added around each hole.

Sliced view showing insert holes with reinforced walls, done in GrabCAD Print. Image PADT.
Manufacturing notes automatically created in GrabCAD Print when insert holes are resized. Image PADT.

To document the selected choices for whoever will be doing the insert assembly, GrabCAD also generates a numbered, manufacturing-footnote that lists each insert’s size; this information can be exported as a PDF file that includes a separate close-up image of each insert’s location.

GrabCAD Print keeps adding very useful functions. Download it for free and try it out with template versions of the various Stratasys 3D printers, then email or call us to learn more.

PADT Inc. is a globally recognized provider of Numerical Simulation, Product Development and 3D Printing products and services. For more information on Stratasys printers and materials, contact us at info@padtinc.com.

Press Release: 3D Printing Glossary Now Available from PADT Provides Most Comprehensive Online Resource for Additive Manufacturing Terminology

3DPrinting-Glossary.com Covers Everything from Machines and Materials to Pre- and Post-Processing Terms

After searching the internet for a resource you can’t find, have you ever sat at your desk and said to yourself “I wish someone would take the time to create this. I could really use it.” Here at PADT, we have been saying that for many years about the need for a comprehensive reference on the terms used in Additive Manufacturing. Then we realized that the only way to get it done was to roll up our sleeves and do it ourselves. And so we did.

The result is www.3DPrinting-Glossary.com

This free online resource contains over 250 terms with definitions for each one. We write each definition and reviewed it amongst our team of long term users of Additive Manufacturing. After over 25 years in the business, we should know the difference between direct laser melting and selective laser sintering. And even if we are off a little, it is a start and we encourage the community to send us corrections, recommendations, and especially new terms to add to this compendium.

The site is free for use, and the contents are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License. This allows anyone to use the content how they wish as long as they say where it came from and don’t make money directly off of it.

Check it out and let us know what you think. More details are below in the official Press Release, which you can also find in PDF and HTML.

And do not hesitate to contact PADT for any of your Additive Manufacturing, Product Development, or Simulation needs. The same expertise that went into creating this resource is applied to every project we work on and every product we sell.


3D Printing Glossary Now Available from PADT Provides Most Comprehensive Online Resource for Additive Manufacturing Terminology

3DPrinting-Glossary.com Covers Everything from Machines and Materials to Pre- and Post-Processing Terms

TEMPE, Ariz., March 3, 2020 PADT, a globally recognized provider of numerical simulation, product development, and 3D printing products and services, today announced the launch of the most comprehensive online Glossary of industry terms relevant to additive manufacturing. The new site, www.3dprinting-glossary.com, includes more than 250 definitions in nine different categories.

“In addition to being an outstanding partner to our customers, PADT strives to be a trusted advisor on all things additive manufacturing,” said Eric Miller, co-founder and principal, PADT. “Our goal for the glossary is to help educate the community on the evolving terminology in our industry and serve as a critical resource for students and professionals seeking 3D printing knowledge and clarification.”

The company has been a provider of additive manufacturing services since 1994. They are also a Stratasys Platinum Partner that has sold and supported Stratasys equipment in the Southwest for over fifteen years. Many of their employees are recognized and award-winning experts in the AM community.

The creation of PADT’s 3D Printing Glossary was the result of a companywide effort to gather and define the terms used in the industry daily. The user-friendly website allows visitors to search for terms directly or by category. PADT will continue to support and update the glossary as the industry grows and innovates.

The nine glossary categories include:

  • Additive Manufacturing Processes
  • Build Characteristics
  • General
  • Manufacturing Term
  • Material
  • Post-Processing
  • Pre-Processing
  • Product Definition
  • System Characteristic

Since founding PADT in 1994, the company’s leadership has made a great effort to become more than just a reseller or service provider.  They want to be a resource to the community. In addition to investing in entrepreneurs, serving on technology boards and committees, and speaking at industry events, PADT donates a great deal of money, time and resources to STEM-focused educational initiatives. The 3D Printing Glossary is another resource that PADT has created for the benefit of students as well as up and coming professionals in the engineering and manufacturing industry.

PADT is also asking the community to contribute to this effort If users notice a term is missing, disagree with the definition, or have more to add to the definition, they ask that readers email additions or changes to info@padtinc.com.

About PADT

PADT is an engineering product and services company that focuses on helping customers who develop physical products by providing Numerical Simulation, Product Development, and 3D Printing solutions. PADT’s worldwide reputation for technical excellence and experienced staff is based on its proven record of building long-term win-win partnerships with vendors and customers. Since its establishment in 1994, companies have relied on PADT because “We Make Innovation Work.” With over 90 employees, PADT services customers from its headquarters at the Arizona State University Research Park in Tempe, Arizona, and from offices in Torrance, California, Littleton, Colorado, Albuquerque, New Mexico, Austin, Texas, and Murray, Utah, as well as through staff members located around the country. More information on PADT can be found at www.PADTINC.com.

# # #

Media contact: Alec Robertson Brodeur Partners arobertson@brodeur.com 585-281-6399

Organization Contact:
Eric Miller
PADT, Inc.
eric.miller@padtinc.com
480-813-4884

3D Design Updates in ANSYS 2020 R1 – Webinar

The ANSYS Discovery 3D Design family of products enables CAD modeling and simulation for all design engineers. Since the demands on today’s design engineer to build optimized, lighter and smarter products are greater than ever, using the appropriate design tools is more important than ever. With ANSYS you can explore ideas, iterate, and innovate with unprecedented speed early in your design process. Delve deeper into design details, refine concepts and perform multiple physics simulations — backed by ANSYS solvers — to better account for real-world behaviors.

Capabilities in this tool-set allow engineers to increase speed and reduce costs from the start of the design cycle, all the way to product launch. Improve engineering productivity and accelerate development time, create higher-quality products while reducing development & manufacturing costs, and respond quickly to changing customer demands while bringing new products to market faster than the competition.

Join PADT’s Training & Support Application Engineer, Robert McCathren for a look at whats new & improved when it comes to these tools in ANSYS 2020 R1. This update includes new releases for ANSYS Discovery Live, AIM, and SpaceClaim, focusing on areas including:

  • Simulation of Thin Parts
  • Topology Optimization in Discovery Live
  • Structural Material Properties
  • Physics Aware Meshing
  • Beam and Shell Modeling
  • And much more

Register Here

All Things ANSYS 057: Simulation for Additive Manufacturing in ANSYS 2020 R1

 

Published on: February 24th, 2020
With: Eric Miller & Doug Oatis
Description:  

In this episode your host and Co-Founder of PADT, Eric Miller is joined by Lead Mechanical Engineer Doug Oatis for a discussion on the latest advancements in simulation for additive manufacturing and topology optimization in ANSYS 2020 R1.

If you would like to learn more about what this release is capable of, check out our webinar on the topic here:

https://www.brighttalk.com/webcast/15747/384528

If you have any questions, comments, or would like to suggest a topic for the next episode, shoot us an email at podcast@padtinc.com we would love to hear from you!

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@ANSYS #ANSYS

ANSYS Mechanical: Mesh Time Metric Display

The things you find out from poking around the Enhancement Request list…

Did you know that you can get ANSYS Mechanical to report the amount of time that the meshing takes? I didn’t until I stumbled across this little gem on the request to show mesh time metrics.

This option is already available for many releases now. Users can turn performance diagnostics by setting to Tools -> Options -> Miscellaneous -> “Report Performance Diagnostics in Messages” to Yes inside Mechanical.

So, of course, I tried it out.

This was in version 2020R1, but it says that the option has been there since R19.0.  Now they just need to add it to the Statistics section of the Mesh Details so that we can use it as an output parameter.

Additive Manufacturing & Topology Optimization in ANSYS 2020 R1 – Webinar

ANSYS offers a complete simulation workflow for additive manufacturing (AM) that allows you to transition your R&D efforts for metal additive manufacturing into a successful manufacturing operation. This best-in-class solution for additive manufacturing enables simulation at every step in your AM process. It will help you optimize material configurations and machine and parts setup before you begin to print. As a result, you’ll greatly reduce — and potentially eliminate — the physical process of trial-and- error testing.

ANSYS additive solutions continue to evolve at a rapid pace. A variety of new enhancements and features come as part of ANSYS 2020 R1, including the ability to work with EOS printers, using the inherent strain approach in ANSYS Workbench Additive, and new materials in ANSYS Additive Print and Science.

Join PADT’s Lead Mechanical Engineer Doug Oatis for an exploration of the ANSYS tools that help to optimize additive manufacturing, and what new capabilities are available for them when upgrading to ANSYS 2020 R1. This presentation includes updates regarding:

  • Level-set topology optimization
  • Density based topology optimization
  • Inherent strain method in workbench Additive
  • Improved supports in Additive Prep
  • Additive Wizard update
  • And much more

Register Here

If this is your first time registering for one of our Bright Talk webinars, simply click the link and fill out the attached form. We promise that the information you provide will only be shared with those promoting the event (PADT).

You will only have to do this once! For all future webinars, you can simply click the link, add the reminder to your calendar and you’re good to go!

GrabCAD Print Software: Part One, an Introduction

Where are you on your New Year’s resolutions? They often include words such as “simplify,” “organize” and “streamline.” They can be timely reminders to rethink how you do things in both your personal and professional lives, so why not rethink the software you use in 3D Printing?

Preparing a CAD solid model or an STL file to print on a 3D printer requires using set-up software that is typically unique to each printer’s manufacturer. For Flashforge equipment, you use FlashPrint, for Makerbot systems you use MakerBot Print, for Formlabs printers you use PreForm, and so on.

GrabCAD Print software for setting up STL or CAD files to print on Stratasys 3D printers (main screen).
GrabCAD Print software for setting up STL or CAD files to print on Stratasys 3D printers (main screen). Image courtesy PADT.

For printers from industrial 3D printing company Stratasys, the go-to software is GrabCAD Print (along with GrabCAD Print Mobile), developed for setting up both fused deposition modeling (FDM) and PolyJet technologies in new and efficient ways. Often just called GrabCAD, this versatile software package lets you organize and control prints assigned to one of more than 30 printer models, so the steps you learn for one printer transfer directly over to working with other models.

If you’ve previously used Stratasys Catalyst (on Dimension and uPrint printers), you’ll find similarities with GrabCAD, as well as some enhanced functionality. If you’re accustomed to the fine details of Stratasys Insight, you’ll see that GrabCAD provides similar capabilities in a streamlined interface, plus powerful new features made possible only by the direct import of native CAD files.  Additionally, you can access Insight within GrabCAD, combining the best of both traditional and next-generation possibilities.

Simple by Default, Powerful by Choice

GrabCAD lets users select simplified default settings throughout, with more sophisticated options available at every turn. Here are the general steps for print-file preparation, done on your desktop, laptop or mobile device:

1 – Add Models: Click-and-drag files or open them from File Explorer. All standard CAD formats are supported, including SolidWorks, Autodesk, Siemens and PTC, as well as STL. You can also bring in assemblies of parts and multi-body models, choosing whether to print them assembled or not. (Later we’ll also talk about what you can do with a CAD file that you can’t do with an STL.)

2 – Select Printer: Choose from a drop-down menu to find whatever printer(s) is networked to your computer. You can also experiment using templates for printers you don’t yet own, in order to compare build volumes and print times.

3 – Orient/Rotate/Scale Model: Icons along the right panel guide you through placing your model or models on the build platform, letting you rotate them around each axis, choose a face to orient as desired, and scale the part up or down. You can also right-click to copy and paste multiple models, then edit each one separately, move them around, and delete them as desired.

4 – Tray Settings: This icon leads to the menu with choices such as available materials, slice height options, build style (normal or draft), and more; always targeted to the selected printer. These choices apply to all the parts on the tray or build sheet.

5 – Model Settings: Here’s where you choose infill style, infill density (via slider bar), infill angle, and body thickness (also known as shell thickness) per part. Each part can have different choices.

6 – Support Settings: These all have defaults, so you don’t even have to consider them if you don’t have special needs (but it’s where, for example, you would change the self-supporting angle).

7 – Show Slice Preview: Clicking this icon slices the model and gives you the choice to view layers/tool paths individually, watch a video animation, or even set a Z-height pause if you plan on changing filament color or adding embedded hardware.

8 – Print: You’re ready to hit the Print button, sending the prepared file to the printer’s queue.

Scheduling Your Print, and Tracking Print Progress

A clock-like icon on the left-side GrabCAD panel (the second one down, or third if you’ve activated Advanced FDM features) switches the view to the Scheduler. In this mode, you can see a day/time tracking bar for every printer on the network. All prints are queued in the order sent, and the visuals make it easy to see when one will finish and another start (assuming human intervention for machine set-up and part removal, of course).

Scheduling panel in GrabCAD Print, showing status of files printing on multiple 3D printers.
Scheduling panel in GrabCAD Print, showing status of files printing on multiple 3D printers. Image courtesy PADT.

If you click on the bar representing a part being built, a new panel slides in from the right with detailed information about material type, support type, start time, expected finish time and total material used (cubic inches or grams). For printers with an on-board camera, you can even get an updated snapshot of the part as it’s building in the chamber.

Below the Scheduler icon is the History button. This is a great tool for creating weekly, monthly or yearly reports of printer run-time and material consumption, again for each printer on the network. Within a given build, you’ll even see the files names of the individual parts within that job.

Separately, if you’re not operating the software offline (an option that some companies require), you can enable GrabCAD Print Reports. This function generates detailed graphs and summaries covering printer utilization and overall material use across multiple printers and time periods – very powerful information for groups that need to track efficiencies and expenditures.

And That’s Just the Beginning

Once you decide to experiment with these settings, you begin to see the power of GrabCAD Print for FDM systems. We haven’t even touched on the automated repairs for STL files, PolyJet’s possibilities for colors, transparency and blended materials, or the options for setting up a CAD model so that sub-sections print with different properties.

For example, you’ll see how planning ahead allows you to bring in a multi-body CAD model and have GrabCAD identify and reinforce some areas at full density, while changing the infill pattern, layout, and density in other regions. GrabCAD recognizes actual CAD bodies and faces, letting you make build-modifications that previously would have required layer-by-layer slice editing, or couldn’t have been done at all.

Stay tuned for our next blog post, GrabCAD Print Software, Part Two: Simplify Set-ups, Save Time, and Do Cool Stuff You Hadn’t Even Considered, and reach out to us to learn more about downloading and using GrabCAD Print.

PADT Inc. is a globally recognized provider of Numerical Simulation, Product Development and 3D Printing products and services. For more information on Stratasys printers and materials, contact us at info@padtinc.com.

All Things ANSYS 056: A Unique Perspective on a Unique Solution – PADT Sales Talks ANSYS Applications

 

Published on: February 10th, 2020
With: Eric Miller, Bob Calvin, Dan Christensen, Brian Benbow, Heather Dean, Ian Scott & Will Kruspe
Description:  

In this episode your host and Co-Founder of PADT, Eric Miller is joined by Bob Calvin, Dan Christensen, Brian Benbow, Heather Dean, Ian Scott, and Will Kruspe from PADT’s ANSYS sales team to discuss the benefits they see in ANSYS as a solution for their unique customer bases, as well as for manufacturers and engineers as a whole. With a combination of technical know-how and knowledge of positioning within different industries, the PADT sales team shares a unique perspective on the value of the various tools that make up the ANSYS suite and how users can best take advantage of them in order to help them succeed.

If you have any questions, comments, or would like to suggest a topic for the next episode, shoot us an email at podcast@padtinc.com we would love to hear from you!

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Introducing the Stratasys J826 – Full-color, multi-material printing for the enterprise design world

Taking risks attempting to capture design intent at the end of the process requires a lot of post-processing (coloring, assemblies, a mix of technologies, etc.) – when its too time consuming, expensive and late to make changes or correct errors. Stratasys PolyJet 3D printing technology is developed to elevate designs by realizing ideas more quickly and more accurately and taking color copies to the next level.

By putting realistic models in a designer’s hands earlier in the process, companies can promote better decisions and a superior final product. Now, with the Stratasys J8 Series, the same is true for prototypes. This tried and tested technology simplifies the entire design process, streamlining workflows so you can spend more time on what matters –creating, refining, and designing the best product possible.

PADT is excited to introduce the new Stratasys J826 3D printer 

Based on J850 technology, the J826 supplies the same end-to-end solution for the design process and ultra-realistic simulation at a lower price point.
Better communicate design intent and drive more confident results with prototypes that realistically portray an array of design alternatives.

The Stratasys J826 3D Printer is able to deliver realism, shorter time to market, and streamlined application thanks to a variety of unique attributes that set it apart from most other Polyjet printers:

  • High Quality – The J826 can accurately print smaller features at a layer thickness of 14µm to 27µm. As part of the J8 series of printers it is also capable of printing in ultra-realistic Pantone validated colors.
  • Speed & Productivity – Three printing speed modes (high speed, high quality & high mix) allows the J826 to always operate at the most efficient speed for each print. It can also avoid unnecessary down-time associate with material changeovers thanks to it’s built-in material cabinet and workstation.
  • Easy to Use – A smooth workflow with the J826 comes from simple integration with the CAD format of your choice, as well as a removable tray for easy clean up, and automated support creation and removal.

Are you ready to learn how the new Stratasys J826 provides the same quality and accuracy as other J8 series printers at a lower cost?

Provide the requested information via the form linked below and one of PADT’s additive experts will reach out to share more on what makes this new offering so exciting for the enterprise design world.

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All Things ANSYS 055: Introducing ANSYS 2020

 

Published on: February 3rd, 2020
With: Eric Miller, Josh Stout, Sina Gohds, Ted Harris & Tom Chadwick
Description:  

In this episode your host and Co-Founder of PADT, Eric Miller is joined by Josh Stout, Sina Gohds, Ted Harris, and Tom Chadwick from the simulation support team to discuss their thoughts on ANSYS 2020 R1, and what specific capabilities they are excited about exploring after attending the annual ANSYS sales kickoff in Florida.

This new release covers updates for the entirety of the ANSYS suite of tools, so there is a lot to talk about.

If you have any questions, comments, or would like to suggest a topic for the next episode, shoot us an email at podcast@padtinc.com we would love to hear from you!

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Fluent Updates in ANSYS 2020 R1 – Webinar

Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) can be challenging for a multitude of reasons, but not with ANSYS Fluent. Anyone can get great CFD simulation results with ANSYS solutions. Fluent software contains the broad, physical modeling capabilities needed to model flow, turbulence, heat transfer and reactions for industrial applications. These range from air flow over an aircraft wing to combustion in a furnace, from bubble columns to oil platforms, from blood flow to semiconductor manufacturing and from clean room design to wastewater treatment plants.

Fluent spans an expansive range, including special models, with capabilities to model in-cylinder combustion, aero-acoustics, turbomachinery and multiphase systems. The latest innovations and updates simplify and speed setup and meshing while adding even more accurate physical models. The outcome: great results, without compromise.

Join PADT’s Senior CFD & FEA Application Engineer, Sina Ghods, for a look at what’s new and improved in this latest version of ANSYS Fluent, including:

  • User Interface/Graphics
  • Meshing Workflows
  • Multi-phase Robustness
  • Solver Enhancements
  • And much more

Register Here

If this is your first time registering for one of our Bright Talk webinars, simply click the link and fill out the attached form. We promise that the information you provide will only be shared with those promoting the event (PADT).

You will only have to do this once! For all future webinars, you can simply click the link, add the reminder to your calendar and you’re good to go!

Mechanical Updates in ANSYS 2020 R1 – Webinar

With ANSYS structural analysis software, users are able to solve more complex engineering problems, faster and more efficiently than ever before. Customization and automation of structural solutions is much easier to optimize thanks to new and innovative finite element analysis (FEA) tools available in this product suite.

Once again, ANSYS is able to cement their role as industry leaders when it comes to usability, productivity, and reliability; adding innovative functionality to an already groundbreaking product offering. ANSYS Mechanical continues to be used throughout the industry, and for good reason as it enables engineers to optimize their product design and reduce the costs of physical testing.

Join PADT’s Senior Mechanical Engineer & Lead Trainer Joe Woodward, for an in-depth look at what’s new in the latest version of ANSYS Mechanical, including updates regarding:

  • External Modeling
  • Graphics
  • Composites
  • Linear Dynamics
  • And much more

Register Here

If this is your first time registering for one of our Bright Talk webinars, simply click the link and fill out the attached form. We promise that the information you provide will only be shared with those promoting the event (PADT).

You will only have to do this once! For all future webinars, you can simply click the link, add the reminder to your calendar and you’re good to go!

Reduce EMI with Good Signal Integrity Habits

Recently the ‘Signal Integrity Journal’ posted their ‘Top 10 Articles’ of 2019. All of the articles included were incredible, however, one stood out to me from the rest – ‘Seven Habits of Successful 2-Layer Board Designers’ by Dr. Eric Bogatin (https://www.signalintegrityjournal.com/blogs/12-fundamentals/post/1207-seven-habits-of-successful-2-layer-board-designers). In this work, Dr. Bogatin and his students were developing a 2-Layer printed circuit board (PCB), while trying to minimize signal and power Integrity issues as much as possible. As a result, they developed a board and described seven ‘golden habits’ for this board development. These are fantastic habits that I’m confident we can all agree with. In particular, there was one habit at which I wanted to take a deeper look:

“…Habit 4: When you need to route a cross-under on the bottom layer, make it short. When you can’t make it short, add a return strap over it..”

Generally speaking, this habit suggests to be very careful with the routing of signal traces over the gap on the ground plane. From the signal integrity point of view, Dr. Bogatin explained it perfectly – “..The signal traces routed above this gap will see a gap in the return path and generate cross talk to other signals also crossing the gap..”. On one hand, crosstalk won’t be a problem if there are no other nets around, so the layout might work just fine in that case. However, crosstalk is not the only risk. Fundamentally, crosstalk is an EMI problem. So, I wanted to explore what happens when this habit is ignored and there are no nearby nets to worry about.

To investigate, I created a simple 2-Layer board with the signal trace, connected to 5V voltage source, going over an air gap. Then I observed the near field and far field results using ANSYS SIwave solution. Here is what I found.

Near and Far Field Analysis

Typically, near and far fields are characterized by solved E and H fields around the model. This feature in ANSYS SIwave gives the engineer the ability to simulate both E and H fields for near field analysis, and E field for Far Field analysis.

First and foremost, we can see, as expected, that both near and far Field have resonances at the same frequencies. Additionally, we can observe from Figure 1 that both E and H fields for near field have the largest radiation spikes at 786.3 MHz and 2.349GHz resonant frequencies.

Figure 1. Plotted E and H fields for both Near and Far Field solutions

If we plot E and H fields for Near Field, we can see at which physical locations we have the maximum radiation.

Figure 2. Plotted E and H fields for Near field simulations

As expected, we see the maximum radiation occurring over the air gap, where there is no return path for the current. Since we know that current is directly related to electromagnetic fields, we can also compute AC current to better understand the flow of the current over the air gap.

Compute AC Currents (PSI)

This feature has a very simple setup interface. The user only needs to make sure that the excitation sources are read correctly and that the frequency range is properly indicated. A few minutes after setting up the simulation, we get frequency dependent results for current. We can review the current flow at any simulated frequency point or view the current flow dynamically by animating the plot.

Figure 3. Computed AC currents

As seen in Figure 3, we observe the current being transferred from the energy source, along the transmission line to the open end of the trace. On the ground layer, we see the return current directed back to the source. However at the location of the air gap there is no metal for the return current to flow, therefore, we can see the unwanted concentration of energy along the plane edges. This energy may cause electromagnetic radiation and potential problems with emission.

If we have a very complicated multi-layer board design, it won’t be easy to simulate current flow on near and far fields for the whole board. It is possible, but the engineer will have to have either extra computing time or extra computing power. To address this issue, SIwave has a feature called EMI Scanner, which helps identify problematic areas on the board without running full simulations.

EMI Scanner

ANSYS EMI Scanner, which is based on geometric rule checks, identifies design issues that might result in electromagnetic interference problems during operation. So, I ran the EMI Scanner to quickly identify areas on the board which may create unwanted EMI effects. It is recommended for engineers, after finding all potentially problematic areas on the board using EMI Scanner, to run more detailed analyses on those areas using other SIwave features or HFSS.

Currently the EMI Scanner contains 17 rules, which are categorized as ‘Signal Reference’, ‘Wiring/Crosstalk’, ‘Decoupling’ and ‘Placement’. For this project, I focused on the ‘Signal Reference’ rules group, to find violations for ‘Net Crossing Split’ and ‘Net Near Edge of Reference’. I will discuss other EMI Scanner rules in more detail in a future blog (so be sure to check back for updates).

Figure 4. Selected rules in EMI Scanner (left) and predicted violations in the project (right)

As expected, the EMI Scanner properly identified 3 violations as highlighted in Figure 4. You can either review or export the report, or we can analyze violations with iQ-Harmony. With this feature, besides generating a user-friendly report with graphical explanations, we are also able to run ‘What-if’ scenarios to see possible results of the geometrical optimization.

Figure 5. Generated report in iQ-Harmony with ‘What-If’ scenario

Based on these results of quick EMI Scanner, the engineer would need to either redesign the board right away or to run more analysis using a more accurate approach.

Conclusion

In this blog, we were able to successfully run simulations using ANSYS SIwave solution to understand the effect of not following Dr.Bogatin’s advice on routing the signal trace over the gap on a 2-Layer board. We also were able to use 4 different features in SIwave, each of which delivered the correct, expected results.

Overall, it is not easy to think about all possible SI/PI/EMI issues while developing a complex board. In these modern times, engineers don’t need to manufacture a physical board to evaluate EMI problems. A lot of developmental steps can now be performed during simulations, and ANSYS SIwave tool in conjunction with HFSS Solver can help to deliver the right design on the first try.

If you would like more information or have any questions please reach out to us at info@padtinc.com.