Additive & Structural Optimization Updates in Ansys 2021 R2 – Webinar

Minimize risk and ensure high-quality, certifiable additive manufacturing parts with Ansys’ comprehensive and scalable software solution. Create and optimize designs for topology, lattice optimizations and more.

Ansys Additive Solutions, a comprehensive and scalable software solution, allows you to minimize risk and ensure high quality, certifiable parts. Dive deeper into the properties of your printer parts, ensure traceability of your data, optimize build files and more.

Join PADT’s Lead Mechanical Engineer and additive expert Doug Oatis for an in depth look at what’s new in the latest version of Ansys Additive.

This release Additive Solutions enhances speed and workflows for users. Users will experience a significant improvements in accuracy across the Additive Solution products.

Update highlights include: 

  • Faster solve times & improved user workflows

  • Increased accuracy & numerical consistency owing to changes to meshing defaults and improved robustness

  • Speed improvements in additive microstructure simulations​​​​​​

  • ​​​​And much more

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All Things Ansys 099: The Future of Ansys on the Cloud

 

Published on: October 18th, 2021
With: Eric Miller & Wim Slagter
Description:  

In this episode your host and Co-Founder of PADT, Eric Miller is joined by Director of Strategic Partnerships at Ansys Wim Slagter to discuss the latest advancements in the software’s HPC capabilities, and how users can make the most out of cloud computing.

If you have any questions, comments, or would like to suggest a topic for the next episode, shoot us an email at podcast@padtinc.com we would love to hear from you!

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Mechanical Updates in Ansys 2021 R2 pt. 3: nCode, Linear Dynamics & Acoustics – Webinar

Ansys Mechanical delivers features to enable easier workflows, analysis, scripting and product integrations that offer more complex solver capabilities. 

With the Ansys suite of tools, engineers can perform finite element analyses (FEA), customize and automate solutions for structural mechanics challenges and analyze multiple physics scenarios. By implementing this software into a manufacturing workflow, users can save money and time while ensuring their product meets the innovative requirements they have setup.

Join PADT’s Senior mechanical engineer & lead trainer Joe Woodward to discover the new features that have been added to Ansys Mechanical in PADT’s final webinar covering the 2021 R2 Mechanical release.

Highlights include nCode design capabilities, linear dynamics, acoustics, and explicit dynamics among many others.

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Using Ansys Fluent’s Gradient-Based Optimization

There is a new workflow that has been developed for the Fluent CFD solver.  It is called gradient-based optimization.  It uses the adjoint solver, which computes the linearized derivatives of a single output variable with respect to all the input variables.  It then calculates separate sensitivity fields for the inputs.  Based on the sensitivity fields, it determines which inputs to change to maximize the desired change in the output variable.

The optimization tool is accessed through the Design tab in the Fluent menu.

There are several observable types that can be optimized for:

The first step in the process is to calculate a steady state solution of the problem.  Once a converged solution has been obtained for steady state solution, an adjoint solution is evaluated to either maximize or minimize the desired observable.

Once the evaluation is completed, the adjoint solution is calculated.

The next step is to use the Design Tool menu to define the wall boundaries that will be modified by the optimization process and what portions of those boundaries.

To perform an individual iteration in the optimization process, click on the Calculate Design Change button in the Design Tool window.  If you are looking to achieve a larger change to the observable, series of iterations will need to be run.  This can be done automatically using the Gradient-Based Optimizer tool.

To test out the capability of this new optimization tool, I ran a simple model of a u-bend pipe and optimized it to reduce the pressure drop through the bend by 40%.  The initial solution of the pipe resulted in pressure contours shown below.

When the optimizer was run to reduce the pressure drop through the model by 40%, the optimization history is as follows:

The resulting pressure contours and pipe geometry are shown below.

The change to the shape of the tube is not something that would be easy to determine without this tool.  It is very easy to use and will allow users to quickly optimize the geometry of their designs.

As you can see, this new capability allows one to quickly optimize flowpath shapes to accomplish optimization objectives. Hopefully you have found this useful and we encourage you to explore this and other enhancements to Ansys Fluent.

All Things Ansys 098: Simulating Hypersonics with Ansys

 

Published on: October 4th, 2021
With: Eric Miller, Bruce Crawford, Valerio Viti & Marisa Melchiorre
Description:  

In this episode your host and Co-Founder of PADT, Eric Miller is joined by Senior Application Engineer Bruce Crawford and Aerospace & Defense Lead Valerio Viti from Ansys to discuss an area of simulation that has seen a lot of growth and interest over the past few years, hypersonics.

Additionally, Ansys Product Marketing Manager Marisa Melchiorre stops by to provide an introduction to Ansys Level Up 2.0, the latest in virtual engineering simulation conferences. You can learn more and register for this event for free here: https://bit.ly/3uIliGy

If you have any questions, comments, or would like to suggest a topic for the next episode, shoot us an email at podcast@padtinc.com we would love to hear from you!

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SpaceClaim Meshing & Geometry Updates in Ansys 2021 R2 – Webinar

Engineering exploration via simulation is virtually risk free because engineers are no longer bound to an expensive and time-consuming prototype-test-redesign cycle. New design ideas can be virtually evaluated in hours, not weeks, freeing up time to optimize the best design candidates or develop moonshot ideas that redefine markets. 

Ansys 2021 R2 continues to expand geometry capabilities and ease of use for every engineer to unlock innovation and increase productivity throughout the product development process. In addition, every analyst can also benefit from Ansys Discovery’s geometry modeling workflows for model prep for simulation.

Join PADT’s Application Engineer and geometry/meshing expert Robert McCathren to learn how you can leverage SpaceClaim’s improvements in Ansys 2021 R2 including: 

  • Discovery Modeling
  • Licensing Changes
  • Meshing
  • Sketch Constraints
  • And much more

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All Things Ansys 097: Fluids Updates in Ansys 2021 R2

 

Published on: September 20th, 2021
With: Eric Miller & Sina Ghods
Description:  

In this episode your host and Co-Founder of PADT, Eric Miller is joined by PADT’s Senior Application Engineer and fluids expert Sina Ghods for a look at what’s new for fluid simulation in Ansys 2021 R2.

If you have any questions, comments, or would like to suggest a topic for the next episode, shoot us an email at podcast@padtinc.com we would love to hear from you!

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Fluids Updates in Ansys 2021 R2 – Webinar

Ansys computational fluid dynamics (CFD) products are for engineers who need to make better, faster decisions. CFD simulation products have been validated and are highly regarded for their superior computing power and accurate results. Reduce your development time and efforts while improving performance and safety.

With Ansys 2021 R2 comes a variety of features for improved workflows and more advanced simulations. Experience up to 5X speed ups for high-speed flows to Mach 30 and above, with improved treatment of reaction sources in the density-based solver. Discover embedded best practices in the automated mesh adaption setup for combustion and multiphase applications, resulting in cell count reductions of up to 70%.

Join PADT’s Senior Application Engineer and fluids expert Sina Ghods for an overview of what’s new in this latest release, including enhancements made to: 

Fluent

Forte

EnSight

CFX & Turbo Tools

And much more

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All Things Ansys 096: IT Tips & Tricks for Ansys Support

 

Published on: September 7th, 2021
With: Eric Miller & Ahmed Fayad
Description:  

In this episode your host and Co-Founder of PADT, Eric Miller is joined by PADT’s IT Software Support Engineer, Ahmed Fayad to discuss common support questions he frequently receives, along with best practices for avoiding issues and finding solutions within Ansys simulation software.

If you have any questions, comments, or would like to suggest a topic for the next episode, shoot us an email at podcast@padtinc.com we would love to hear from you!

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3D Printing Ansys Mechanical Results with PADT’s “AM Result Printer” Ansys ACT Extension

One of the first things PADT did when we got our first multi-color 3D Printer was figure out how to convert a result in Ansys Mechanical to something to be printed. If you go back to earlier blog posts (2014, 2020) on the topic and find that our earlier methods were – well cumbersome would be kind. There was no easy way to get Ansys Mechanical results into a file that contained color contour information on the surface that could then be printed with a color Additive Manufacturing system.

That is when our Matt Sutton stepped up and used Ansys ACT skills and knowledge on graphics programming to create simple plugin that converts any result object on a solid object in Ansys Mechanical into a 3D Manufacturing Format (3MF) file: AM Result Printer. The 3MF file can be read by Stratasys Grab CAD, the standard tool for Stratasys color systems and, because 3MF is an accepted platform across systems, it should work with any newer color additive manufacturing system.

The plugin is available at the Ansys Store here. It is free, and the download file contains installation and user instructions, or read on to learn more.

Installation

Instaillation is simple. For each installation of Ansys Mechanical, do the following:

  1. Download the ZIP file from the Ansys store
  2. Extract the files in some scratch location
  3. Go into 2021_09_00-3MF-Writer\AM_Result_Printer_v1\Incoming
  4. Then also expand the bianary.zip file. This contains the plugin for various versions of Ansys Workbench
  5. You need the right Visual C++ Redistributable package, so doublick on “vcredist_x64.exe” to make sure its installed. Follow the prompts until its done.
  6. Add the extension through Ansys Workbench. On the project page, go to Extensions > Install Extensions

Go into the binary folder and find the “Additive Manufacturing Result Exporter.wbex” in the proper version folder.

Then to into Extensions > Manage Extensions and click the check box for the Additive Manufacturing Result Exporter.

Now, when you got into your model in Ansys Mechanical, you should see the extensions listed at the top, and if you right-mouse-click on the Solution part of you model, it should be a choice.

How to use it

Make sure you insert any result objects you want to 3d Print and scope them to the things you want printed. Then, for each 3MF file you want, insert an “AM Result Export” into the tree. Then select the result you want a file for, they type of contour, and the number of bands.

When everything is ready, Generate the model to create the file or files.

How it works

This little tool is a great example of using Opensource libraries with the Ansys ACT interface. Matt used the VTK and lib3mf libraries. When you generate the object, the following happens:

  1. Converts the mechanical mesh scoped to the result body to a VTK unstructured mesh.
  2. Export out the result data from the result object as nodal values to a temporart file.
  3. Apply these nodal values to the VTK mesh.
  4. Contour using an appropriate VTK algorithm.
  5. Extract the VTK contour data as a series of triangular facets.
  6. Group the facets by color for banded, or extract the individual vertex colors for smooth.
  7. Write that data to the .3mf format using the lib3mf library.

Need more information?

If you would like more information or have any questions or need support on the tool, please email info@padtinc.com or give us a call at 480.813.4884.

This is also a great example of the type of custom application that PADT creates for a wide variety of customers to improve and enhance their simulation experience. If you have any questions on software development or customization needs around simulation, please reach out to info@padtinc.com or call 480.813.4884 as well.


Press Release

This article is getting posted as we also do a press release on the V1 posting of the program to the Ansys Store. You can also find the official press releases as a PDF and HTML.

Free Extension Designed to Export Ansys Mechanical Results as Color 3MF Files for Additive Manufacturing Released by PADT

Custom Plugin Allows Users to Create 3D Printed Full-Color Models with Results Contours

TEMPE, Ariz., August 31, 2021 PADT, a globally recognized provider of numerical simulation, product development, and 3D printing products and services, is pleased to announce the initial release of the Ansys Mechanical extension, AM Result Printer.  Written by PADT’s Scientific & Technical Computing team in the Ansys Customization Toolkit (ACT), AM Result Printer allows users to select any Ansys Mechanical results they have extracted from their model and output a 3D manufacturing format[, or 3MF, file. The extension is available on the Ansys Store today.

“PADT is an industry leader in off-the-shelf and custom 3D printing and simulation tools and products,” said Tyler Shaw, PADT’s VP of Engineering. “When customers requested a way to export Ansys Mechanical results as color 3MF files, we saw an opportunity to develop a custom program and share it with our community for free.”

The PADT Scientific & Technical Computing team work on small extensions like the AM Result Printer, large standalone programs, and a multitude of tools that make simulation more efficient and useful. The AM Result Printer extension was written by Matt Sutton, PADT’s Lead Developer for Scientific & Technical Computing using the tools provided by Ansys through their API and several publicly available libraries for working with tessellated geometry and the 3MF format.

Any Ansys Mechanical user can install the extension for free by first downloading it from the Ansys Store where it is listed as “AM Result Printer.”  The download includes installation instructions. Once installed, users can easily add an AM Result Object to any result object and then create the 3MF file. This file can then be used in any additive manufacturing system that support the 3MF format and prints in full color, like the Stratasys J55, J826, J835, and J850 PolyJet systems.

“This simple program is a fantastic example of how our software experts, who are also Ansys experts, create applications that greatly enhance the already strong capabilities of Ansys products,” said Sutton. “We’re proud to make this powerful tool available to the Ansys user community.”

For more information on how to customize Ansys programs or to speak to PADT for help with writing custom tools and programs, please visit the PADT website at www.padtinc.com, contact info@padtinc.com or call 480.813.4884. 

About PADT

PADT is an engineering product and services company that focuses on helping customers who develop physical products by providing Numerical Simulation, Product Development, and 3D Printing solutions. PADT’s worldwide reputation for technical excellence and experienced staff is based on its proven record of building long-term win-win partnerships with vendors and customers. Since its establishment in 1994, companies have relied on PADT because “We Make Innovation Work.” With over 90 employees, PADT services customers from its headquarters at the Arizona State University Research Park in Tempe, Arizona, and from offices in Torrance, California, Littleton, Colorado, Albuquerque, New Mexico, Austin, Texas, and Murray, Utah, as well as through staff members located around the country. More information on PADT can be found at www.PADTINC.com.

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Thermal Results Visualization – Ansys SIWave Icepak and Ansys Electronics Desktop Icepak

As a typically mechanical / systems engineer, I am not exactly qualified to go through and list exactly what SIWave does and why you need it for any given situation (shoutout to Aleksandr, our actual expert, whose assistance has been invaluable for my simple example case). However, what I think I have grasped is that SIWave is just one of those Ansys tools where if you need it, you probably really need it. Where this becomes relevant to me is of course in a PCB thermal analysis. DCIR is typically the electrical half of this problem that is within SIWave’s expansive toolkit, though SIWave also contains some very easy-to-use thermal-oriented options for co-simulation with Icepak. I’ll admit that I have tended to somewhat dismiss this on my end, as I am already familiar with a couple more advanced thermal analysis tools, so why wouldn’t I just use these if I wanted to look at the thermal response of A PCB? Despite this, I have recently (begrudgingly) taken a more in-depth look at the thermal side of SIWave, and what I have found is that even if the settings available are a little more simplistic than I might always like, it really is incredibly accessible and provides some nice visualization capability. What’s more, it provides not only an easy path to view your existing thermal results in a full Icepak interface, but also serves as a great starting point if you need to analyze some more complex setups than Icepak.

So, having just been through much of this on my own, it seems like a great opportunity to share some tips and tricks for thermal visualization in both Ansys SIWave and Ansys Electronics Desktop (EDT) Icepak, see where each is strong relative to the other, and then perhaps even share some suggestions for using the SIWave solution as a starting point to take an Icepak PCB simulation to the next level!

To start with, we need a SIWave DCIR project. A DCIR solution is required for providing thermal loads for a thermal solution. I am glossing over this, but basically, you need a PCB definition, a voltage source, and a current source. In the model I borrowed from Aleks, I am using these sources to push some current through one section of my PCB’s power layer and then referencing them to the ground layer. To complete the loop. This means that there are EM losses on both the ground layer and power layer.

For the first simulation, we’ll want to set a baseline temperature for our electrical material properties and make sure the toggle for “Export power dissipation for use in ANSYS Icepak and Mechanical” is enabled.

Now, we can set up an Icepak simulation! As I alluded to, the settings available within SIWave are somewhat primitive, although they do an overall good job of adhering to typical best practices. Our choices are basically using a board model without components and strictly modeling thermal conduction within that board, using a board model with components that includes explicit thermal convection to the environment, manipulating a mesh detail slider bar, and choosing the cooling regime used (natural vs forced convection). For this model, I’ll be using forced convection with surface components and “Detailed” meshing so that I have the most to look at, but obviously the exact settings will vary somewhat depending on your use-case. In 2021R2, the default SIWave-Icepak behavior will be to use EDT Icepak as the solver, however, we can choose to specify “Use Classic Icepak” in the simulation setup window. This determines which version of Icepak we have to use for additional postprocessing in as well, so I will leave “Use Classic Icepak” turned off.

The first method of visualization in SIWave is to simply right-click an Icepak simulation definition in the “Results” window and Display temperature.

This gives us a nice temperature contour on the outer surface of all the solid bodies considered during the simulation. If we stick with the top-down view, we can make use of a nice temperature probe that automatically displays at the mouse location. Once we rotate around into a 3D view with the middle mouse button or other view options, we lose this probe but of course, gain a nice graphical representation of the full geometry.

The second method is to use the View > Temperature Plots toolbar option, which gives us some more flexibility for viewing temperature through each layer.

Most commonly, we will probably be working with the XY cutting plane and then selecting the layer of interest from the drop-down menu so that we can see a plane through the entire PCB. For more precise control, we can also use the slider bar or input the exact plane-normal location to use for plotting.

One of the benefits of this approach is that we can use the other cutting plane definitions to get a cross-section view, along with whatever ECAD board elements we would like to plot. For instance, if we’d like to see more clearly how the temperature varies with depth underneath active components, or around via definitions, we can easily explore this, as in the image below.

Depending on your needs, this may be sufficient flexibility for observing the temperatures of interest, and the smoothly moving cut plane with the slider-bar position is certainly an easy way to get a sense of the board’s behavior. However, SIWave only gives us access to temperature within the solid bodies of our PCB/components, and we can free ourselves from this limitation by moving into EDT Icepak. There are a couple of primary ways to do this – one is to right-click on the Icepak simulation definition in Results and “Open project in Icepak” and the other is to use the same option from the “Results” section of the top toolbar. The more manual method is to directly open the .aedt file that gets generated alongside the SIWave project file.

Much like SIWave, temperatures in EDT Icepak are primarily displayed on cut-planes or object surfaces. Three-dimensional contour plots are also available but tend to be less clear, especially on very thin bodies (like layers of a PCB). For a cut-plane, the most straightforward option is to directly draw a plane or create a new coordinate system (a coordinate system will automatically create the 3 component planes), which can both be done through the top toolbar. 

Personally, I find it easiest to quickly create the objects in the graphical window and then select them in the model tree to fine-tune their locations through the properties display, as above. I do think this is one of the places that SIWave has an edge in ease-of-use – having that slider bar definition for a plane is much nicer. Although, using this method in Icepak also lets us angle the plane however we like, so there are still trade-offs to be considered.

Once we have a plane defined, it is then very easy to select this plane in the model tree and right-click > Temperature > Temperature to create a temperature plot.

One of the immediately observable differences is that we can now view temperature contours throughout the volume of air surrounding our PCB in addition to the PCB itself. So, if we were trying to compare against something like an experimental setup with a thermocouple placed in-air near the board, this would be the way to do it!

If we’re not interested in quite so large of a plot, we can also limit it to a certain model volume by choosing one of the objects in the “In Volume” list of the plot properties. In this case, Box1 and Box2 are smaller volumes enclosing the PCB that were automatically generated for mesh controls, which we can easily reuse for trimming down our temperature plot.

To instead plot on the surface of an object, we can select that object in the model tree (for the whole PCB, it is convenient to right-click it in the tree and use the “Select All” option), follow the same Plot Fields > Temperature > Temperature as before, and then make sure to enable “Plot on surface only”.

This should produce a plot that is very similar to what we obtained in SIwave. Another advantage of doing this in Icepak should now become clear — we have the capability to stack multiple field plots! As below, we can see the solid body surface temperatures alongside our cut plane temperature down the center.

We can get as creative with this as we’d like, plotting on many different cut planes simultaneously, or even combining types of plots. Since we have access to the air volume solution, we can even do things like plot velocity vectors around the PCB for more insight into the overall system.

Having access to the full solution field (fluid and solids) means we can also visualize some other helpful values. The surface heat transfer coefficients can help us understand how to improve our setup in some cases, for instance. In the below plot, we can see some clear shadowing behind surface components which is indicative of the primary flow separating from the surface of the PCB. This certainly explains why the back end of the board is so hot – the components in the back are somewhat hidden from the flow field by those in the front. Since component (and component power) density is higher in the back, we might choose to reverse the direction of flow so that the particularly dense section of components receives the brunt of the airflow, or maybe we might explore angling the board relative to the inlet such that the entire top receives more direct flow.

While we might reach the same or similar conclusions by looking at data through SIWave’s interface, we certainly wouldn’t have access to the tools necessary to actually implement all these changes to the simulation.

As an example, I can pretty easily create a new coordinate system, rotate it by 11° from the original, and then assign my air box to the rotated reference. In effect, this angles all of PCB related volumes with respect to the flow field in just a couple of steps.

After solving, I can then compare the new temperature fields to the old and pretty quickly find that the hotspot on the top surface has been greatly reduced and that the maximum temperature of the system has dropped by about 9 °C. Not too bad! Of course, since I have modified at least one of the simulation bodies, we do have to remesh and solve from scratch, however, we already have an existing DCIR simulation to make use of, and it was much easier getting to this point having started in SIWave.

For my last set of tips, the visualization of the PCB itself in Icepak has been rudimentary so far, but we can also adjust this. Much like in SIWave, we can turn on and off the visualization of features for individual layers independently of anything else. These visualization settings are accessible by selecting our board in the 3D components list and then looking at the properties section.

Since these settings are independent of the 3D geometry visualization, we can selectively hide our model objects in order to isolate the detailed ECAD features. In my test case, the dielectric “Unnamed” layers include via definitions – so I can turn on visualization of these layers, hide the geometry for every layer except the bottom, and plot a temperature cut plane to get a nice visualization of how temperature varies around particular vias.

We could do the same for a temperature cut plane through the width/length of the board as well or even look at heat transfer coefficients on the PCB surface in regions of high via density. As is often the case with Ansys tools, the sky is the limit here.  

In summary, the SIWave interface can be both a great starting and ending point for thermal simulation depending on your needs. It makes setting up a complicated simulation very easy, albeit by removing some user flexibility, but it does allow for several methods of viewing thermal results. These include a smooth slider bar visualization for cut-plane temperatures and a dynamic mouse-probe for checking temperature values in the top-down 2D view. Since SIWave makes use of the full Icepak solver in the background, we can also access a whole lot of additional information by simply opening the existing Icepak solution in the full EDT Icepak interface after a solution has been generated. This gives us access to new thermal solution variables, variables from the fluid portion of our solutions, and new ways to plot and visualize all this information. The combination of SIWave and EDT Icepak also provides us with the opportunity to run an initial set of thermal simulations for relatively simple setups and then build on top of those with more complex boundary conditions or geometry configurations, if we either need greater detail or want to try out some more advanced cooling scenarios.

Mechanical Updates in Ansys 2021 R2: Post processing/graphics & MAPDL Updates – Webinar

Ansys Mechanical delivers features to enable faster simulations, easier workflows, journaling, scripting and product integrations that offer more solver capabilities. The Ansys finite element solvers enable a breadth and depth of capabilities unmatched by anyone in the world of computer-aided simulation.

In 2021 R2, Structures products continue to deliver new features that enable flexibility, robustness and efficiency. The integration of products through Ansys Workbench enables users to leverage additional technology to broaden their scope of simulation.

Join PADT’s Application Engineer Robert McCathren to discover the new features that have been added to Ansys Mechanical in the second webinar covering the 2021 R2 release. This presentation focuses on updates regarding:

  • Post-processing & Graphics
  • MAPDL Interface
  • MAPDL Elements
  • MAPDL Contact
  • MAPDL Materials
  • And much more

Register Here

If this is your first time registering for one of our Bright Talk webinars, simply click the link and fill out the attached form. We promise that the information you provide will only be shared with those promoting the event (PADT).

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All Things Ansys 095: High Frequency Electronics Updates in Ansys 2021 R2

 

Published on: August 25th, 2021
With: Eric Miller & Aleksandr Gafarov
Description:  

In this episode your host and Co-Founder of PADT, Eric Miller is joined by PADT’s application engineer and high frequency electronics expert, Aleksandr Gafarov for a look at what’s new for this product offering in Ansys 2021 R2.

If you have any questions, comments, or would like to suggest a topic for the next episode, shoot us an email at podcast@padtinc.com we would love to hear from you!

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High Frequency Electronics Updates in Ansys 2021 R2 – Webinar

Ansys HFSS is a 3D electromagnetic (EM) simulation software for designing and simulating high-frequency electronic products such as antennas, antenna arrays, RF or microwave components, high-speed interconnects, filters, connectors, IC packages and printed circuit boards. Engineers worldwide use Ansys HFSS software to design high-frequency, high-speed electronics found in communications systems, advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS), satellites, and internet-of-things (IoT) products.

In Ansys 2021 R2, Ansys HFSS continues to deliver groundbreaking technologies to address 3D IC package design challenges as well as advancements in 5G and autonomous simulation.

Join PADT’s Electronics Application Engineer and high frequency (HF) simulation expert Aleksandr Gafarov for a look at the latest enhancements made to Ansys HFSS, as well as other HF tools in Ansys 2021 R2. This includes an in-depth look at updates made for:

  • HFSS
  • Signal & Power Integrity
  • EMIT
  • Q3D
  • And much more

Register Here

If this is your first time registering for one of our Bright Talk webinars, simply click the link and fill out the attached form. We promise that the information you provide will only be shared with those promoting the event (PADT).

You will only have to do this once! For all future webinars, you can simply click the link, add the reminder to your calendar and you’re good to go!

Magnetic Gear Optimization with Ansys Maxwell and Ansys OptiSLang

PADT’s Kang Li shows how Ansys Maxwell can be driven by Ansys OptiSLang to optimize the design of a magnetic gear. This is a great example of connecting an Ansys solver to OptiSLang.