“Equation Based Surface” for Conformal and Non-Planar Antenna Design

ANYSY HFSS provides many options for creating non-planar and conformal shapes. In MCAD you may use shapes such as cylinders or spheres, and with some steps, you can design you antennas on various surfaces. In some applications, it is necessary to study the effect of curvatures and shapes on the antenna performance. For example for wearable antennas it is important to study the effect of bending, crumpling and air-gap between antenna and human body.

Equation Based Surface

One of the tools that HFSS offers and can be used to do parametric sweep or optimization, is “Draw equation based surface”. This can be accessed under “Draw” “Equation Based Surface” or by using “Draw” tab and choosing it from the banner (Fig. 1)

Fig. 1. (a) Select Draw -> Equation Based Surface
Fig. 1. (b) click on the icon that is highlighted

Once this is selected the Equation Based Surface window that opens gives you options to enter the equation with the two variables (_u, _v_) to define a surface. Each point of the surface can be a function of (_u,_v). The range of (_u, _v) will also be determined in this window. The types of functions that are available can be seen in “Edit Equation” window, by clicking on “…” next to X, Y or Z (Fig. 2). Alternatively, the equation can be typed inside this window. Project or Design Variables can also be used or introduced here.

Fig. 2. (a) Equation Based Surface window
Fig. 2. (b) Clikc on the “…” next to X and see the “Edit Equation: window to build the equation for X

For example an elliptical cylinder along y axis can be represented by:

This equation can be entered as shown in Fig. 3.

Fig. 3. Elliptical surface equation

Variation of this equation can be obtained by changing variables R1, R2, L and beta. Two examples are shown in Fig. 4.

Fig. 4. Elliptical surface equation

Application of Equation Based Surface in Conformal and Non-Planar Antennas

To make use of this function to transfer a planar design to a non-planar design of interest, the following steps can be taken:

  • Start with a planar design. Keep in mind that changing the surface shape can change the characteristics of the antenna. It is a good idea to use a parameterized model, to be able to change and optimize the dimensions after transferring the design on a non-planar surface. As an example we started with a planar meandered line antenna that works around 700MHz, as shown in Fig. 5. The model is excited by a wave port. Since the cylindrical surface will be built around y-axis, the model is transferred to a height to allow the substrate surface to be made (Fig 5. b)
Fig. 5. Planar meandered antenna (a) on xy plane, (b) moved to a height of 5cm
  • Next, using equation based surface, create the desired shape and with the same length as the planar substrate. Make sure that the original deisgn is at a higher location. Select the non-planar surface. Use Modeler->Surface->Thicken Sheet … and thicken the surface with the substrate thickenss. Alternatively, by choosing “Draw” tab, one can expand the Sheet dropdown menu and choose Thicken Sheet. Now select the sheet, change the material to the substrate material.
Fig. 6. Thicken the equation based surface to generate the substrate
  • At this point you are ready to transfer the antenna design to the curved surface. Select both traces of the antenna and the curved substrate (as shown in Fig. 7). Then use Modeler->Surface->Project Sheet…, this will transfer the traces to the curved surface. Please note that the original substrate is still remaining. You need not delete it.
Fig. 7. Steps for transferring the design to the curved surface (a)

Fig. 7. Steps for transferring the design to the curved surface (b)

Fig. 7. Steps for transferring the design to the curved surface (c)
  • Next step is to generate the ground plane and move the wave port. In our example design we have a partial ground plane. For ground plane surface we use the same method to generate an equation based surface. Please keep in mind that the Z coordinate of this surface should be the same as substrate minus the thickness of the substrate. (If you thickened the substrate surface to both sides, this should be the height of substrate minus half of the substrate thickness). Once this sheet is generate assign a Perfect E or Finite Conductivity Boundary (by selecting the surface, right click and Assign Boundary). Delete the old planar ground plane.
Fig. 8. Non-planar meandered antenna with non-planar ground

Wave Port Placement using Equation Based Curve

A new wave port can be defined by the following steps:

  • Delete the old port.
  • Use Draw->Equation Based Curve. Mimicking the equation used for ground plane (Fig. 9).
Fig. 9. Use Equation Based Curve to start a new wave port (a) Equation Based Curve definition window (b) wave pot terminal created using equation based curve and sweep along vector
  • Select the line from the Model tree, select Draw->Sweep->Along Vector. Draw a vector in the direction of port height. Then by selecting the SweepAlongVector from Model tree and double clicking, the window allows you to set the correct size of port height and vector start point (Fig. 10).
  • Assign wave port to this new surface.
Fig. 10. Sweep along vector to create the new wave port location

Similar method can be used to generate (sin)^n or (cos)^n surfaces. Some examples are shown in Fig. 11. Fig. 11 (a) shows how the surface was defined.

Fig. 11. (a) Equation based surface definition using “cos” function, (b), (c), & (d) three different surfaces generated by this equation based surface.

Effect of Curvature on Antenna Matching

Bending a substrate can change the transmission line and antenna impedance. By using equation based port the change in transmission line impedance effect is removed. However, the overall radiation surface is also changed that will have effects on S11. The results of S11 for the planar design, cylindrical design (Fig. 8), cos (Fig. 11 b), and cos^3 (Fig. 11 c) designs are shown in Fig. 12. If it is of interest to include the change in the transmission line impedance, the port should be kept in a rectangular shape.

Fig. 12. Effect of curvature on the resonance frequency.

Equation based curves and surfaces can take a bit of time to get used to but with a little practice these methods can really open the door to some sophisticated geometry. It is also interesting to see how much the geometry can impact a simple antenna design, especially with today’s growing popularity in flex circuitry. Be sure to check out this related webinar  that touches on the impact of packaging antennas as well. If you would like more information on how these tools may be able to help you and your design, please let us know at info@padtinc.com.

You can also click here to download a copy of this example.

Four Different Ways to Add Customization to ANSYS Mechanical

ANSYS Mechanical is a very powerful tool right out of the box.  Long gone are the days when an FEA tool was just a solver, and users had to write code to create input files and interpret the results.  Most of the time you never have to write anything to effectively use ANSYS Mechanical. But, users can realize significant gains in productivity and access greater functionality through customization. And it is easy to do.

Before we talk about the four options, we need to remember how the tool, ANSYS Mechanical, is actually structured.  The interface that users interact with is a version of ANSYS Workbench called ANSYS Mechanical. The interface allows users to connect to geometry, build and modify their model, set up their solution, submit a solve, and review results. The solve itself is done in ANSYS Mechanical APDL. This is the original ANSYS Multiphysics program. 

When you press the solve button ANSYS Mechanical writes out commands in the languages used by ANSYS Mechanical APDL, called the ANSYS Parametric Design Language, or APDL.  Yes, that is where ANSYS Mechanical APDL got its name. We like to call it MAPDL for short. (Side note: years ago we started a campaign to call it map-dul. It didn’t work.) Once the file is written, MAPDL is started, the file is read in, the solve happens, and all of the requested output files are written. Then ANSYS Mechanical reads those files and shows results to the user.

Customization Tool 1: Command Snippets for Controlling the Solver

Not every capability that is found in ANSYS Mechanical APDL is exposed in the interface for ANSYS Mechanical.  That is not a problem because users can use the APDL language in ANSYS Mechanical to access the full capability of the solver.  These small pieces of code are called Snippets and they are added to the tree for your ANSYS Mechanical model.  When the solver file is written, ANSYS Mechanical inserts your snippets into the command stream.  Simple and elegant.

PADT has a seminar from back in 2011 that lays it all out.  You can find the PowerPoint Presentation here. We do have plans to update this webinar soon.

This approach is used when you want to access capabilities in the solver that are not supported in the interface but you want to get to those features and keep track of them from inside your ANSYS Mechanical Model.

If you are not familiar with APDL, find a more “seasoned” user to help you. Or you can teach yourself APDL programming with PADT’s Guide to APDL .

Customization Tool 2: ANSYS Customization Toolkit (ACT) for Controlling the User Interface and Accessing the Model

As mentioned above, ANSYS Mechanical is used to define the model and review results.  The ANSYS Customization Toolkit (ACT) is how users customize the user interface, automate tasks in the interface, add tools to the interface, and access the model database. This type of customization can be as simple as a new feature, presented as an app, or it can be used to create a focused tool to streamline a certain type of simulation – what we call a vertical application.

image
A Vertical Application Written in ANSYS ACT by PADT for Automating the Design of Turbine Disks

Unlike APDL, ACT does is not have its own language. It uses Python and is a collection of Application Programmer Interface (API) calls from Python. This is a very powerful toolset that increases in capability at every release.  PADT has written stand alone applications using ACT to reduce simulation time significantly. We have also written features and apps for ourselves and users that make everyday use of ANSYS Mechanical better. 

Do note that ACT is supported in most of the major ANSYS products and more capability is being added across the available programs over time, not just in ANSYS Mechanical. You can also use ACT to connect ANSYS Mechanical to in-house or 3rd party software.

Because this is a standard environment, you can share your ACT applications on the ANSYS App Store found here. Take a look and you can see what users have done with ACT across the ANSYS Product suite, including ANSYS Mechanical.   PADT has two in the library, one for adding a PID controller to your model and the other is a tool for saving your ANSYS Mechanical APDL database.

Another great aspect of ACT is that it is fully documented.  If you go to the Customization Suite documentation in the ANSYS help library you can find everything you need.

Customization Tool 3: APDL for Automating the Solve  

With Code Snippets we talked about using APDL to access solver functions from ANSYS Mechanical that were not supported in ANSYS Mechanical.  You can also use APDL to automate what is going on during the solve.  Every capability in the ANSYS solver is accessible through APDL.

The most common usage of APDL is to create a tool that solves in batch mode. APDL programs are used to carry out tasks without going back to ANSYS Mechanical.  As an example, maybe you want to solve a load step, save some information from the solve, export it, read it in to a 3rd party program, modify it, modify some property in your model, then solve the next load step. You can do all of that with APDL in batch mode.

This is not for the faint of heart, you are getting into complex programming with a custom language. But if you take the time, it can be very powerful.  All of the commands are documented in the ANSYS Mechanical APDL help and details on the language are in the ANSYS Parametric Design Language Guide.  The PADT Blog is full of articles going back over a decade on using APDL in this way.

Customization Tool 4: User Programable Features in the Solver

One of the most powerful capabilities in the ANSYS Mechanical ADPL solver is the ability for end-users to add their own subroutines.  These User Programable Features, or UPF’s, allow you to create your own elements, make custom material models, customize loads, or customize contact behavior.

There are other general purpose FEA tools on the market that heavily publicize their user elements and user materials and they try to use it to differentiate themselves from ANSYS. However, ANSYS Mechanical APDL has always had this capability.  Many universities and companies add new capability to ANSYS using this method.

To learn more about how to do create your own custom version of ANSYS, consult the Programer’s Reference in the ANSYS Help. PADT also has a webinar sharing how to make a custom material here.

Next Steps

The key to successful customization ANSYS is to know your options, understand what you really want to do, and to use the wide range of tools you have available. Everything is documented in the help and this blog has some great examples.  Start small with a simple project and work your way up.

Or, you can leverage PADT’s expertise and contract with PADT to do your customization. This is what a half-dozen companies large and small have done over the years.  We understand ANSYS, we get engineering, and we know how to program. A perfect combination.

Regardless of how you customize ANSYS Mechanical, you will find it a rewording experience.  Greater functionality and more efficient usage are only a few lines of custom code away.

All Things ANSYS 037 – Optimizing the Industrial Internet of Things with ANSYS Digital Twins

 

Published on: May 20th, 2019
With: Eric Miller & Matt Sutton
Description:  

In this episode your host and Co-Founder of PADT, Eric Miller is joined by PADT’s Senior Analyst and Lead Software Developer, Matt Sutton for a discussion on the industrial internet of things, and how ANSYS Digital twins helps companies make confident predictions about future product performance, reduce the cost and risk of unplanned downtime, and improve future product development processes.

If you would like to learn more about this update and see the tools in action, check out PADT’s webinar covering ANSYS Twin Builder here: http://alturl.com/ccjjq

If you have any questions, comments, or would like to suggest a topic for the next episode, shoot us an email at podcast@padtinc.com we would love to hear from you!

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Optimize Product Performance with ANSYS Digital Twins – Webinar

Engineering simulation has traditionally been used for new product design and virtual testing, eliminating the need to build multiple prototypes prior to product launch.

Now, with the emergence of the Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT), simulation is expanding into operations. The IIoT enables engineers to communicate with sensors and actuators on an operating product to capture data and monitor operating parameters. The result is a digital twin of the physical product or process that can be used to monitor real-time prescriptive analytics and test predictive maintenance to optimize asset performance.

Join PADT’s Senior Analyst & Lead Software Developer Matt Sutton for an in depth look at how digital twins created using ANSYS simulation tools optimize the operation of devices or systems, save money by reducing unplanned downtime and enable engineers to test solutions virtually before doing physical repairs.

This webinar will include an overview of technical capabilities, packaging for licensing, and updates made with the release of ANSYS 2019 R1.

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All Things ANSYS 036 – Updates for Design Engineers in ANSYS 2019 R1 – Discovery Live, AIM, & SpaceClaim

 

Published on: May 6th, 2019
With: Eric Miller, Ted Harris, & Clinton Smith
Description:  

In this episode your host and Co-Founder of PADT, Eric Miller is joined by PADT’s Simulation Support Manager Ted Harris, and CFD Team Lead Engineer Clinton Smith for a round-table discussion regarding new capabilities for Design Engineers in the latest release of the ANSYS Discovery family of products (Live, AIM, & SpaceClaim). Listen as they express their thoughts on exciting new capabilities, long anticipated technical improvements, and speculate at what has yet to come for this disruptive set of tools.

If you would like to learn more about this update and see the tools in action, check out PADT’s webinar covering ANSYS Discovery AIM & Live in 2019 R1 here: shorturl.at/gyKLM

If you have any questions, comments, or would like to suggest a topic for the next episode, shoot us an email at podcast@padtinc.com we would love to hear from you!

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Discovery Updates in ANSYS 2019 R1 – Webinar

The ANSYS 3D Design family of products enables CAD modeling and simulation for all design engineers. Since the demands on today’s design engineer to build optimized, lighter and smarter products are greater than ever, using the appropriate design tools is more important than ever.

Two key tools helping design engineers meet such demands are ANSYS Discovery AIM and ANSYS Discovery Live. ANSYS Discovery AIM seamlessly integrates design and simulation for all engineers, helping them to explore ideas and concepts in greater depth, while Discovery Live operates as an environment providing instantaneous simulation, tightly coupled with direct geometry modeling, to enable interactive design exploration.

Both tools help to accelerate product development and bring innovations to market faster and more affordably.

Join PADT’s Simulation Support Manager, Ted Harris for a look at what exciting new features are available for design engineers in both Discovery Live and AIM, in ANSYS 2019 R1. This webinar will include discussions on updates regarding: 

  • Suppression of loads, constraints, & contacts
  • Topology Optimization
  • Improving simulation speed
  • Transferring data from AIM to Discovery Live

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All Things ANSYS 035 – The History of ANSYS: An Interview with Dr. John Swanson, author of the original program & founder of ANSYS Inc.

 

Published on: April 22nd, 2019
With: Eric Miller, Ted Harris, & Dr. John Swanson
Description:  

In this episode your host and Co-Founder of PADT, Eric Miller is joined by PADT’s Ted Harris for a very special interview for users of ANSYS software, Dr. John Swanson. Dr. Swanson is known as the founder of “Swanson’s Analysis Systems” in 1970; the company that would later be known to the public as ANSYS Inc. He also wrote the original ANSYS program in his home, and since leaving the company has gone on the work in philanthropy and alternative energy.

A John Fritz Medal winner, and member of the National Academy of Engineering, John is considered an authority and pioneer in the application of Finite Element methods to engineering.

We are incredibly thankful that John was able to join us for this interview, and we hope you enjoy learning a little bit about the history of ANSYS from the founder himself.

If you have any questions, comments, or would like to suggest a topic for the next episode, shoot us an email at podcast@padtinc.com we would love to hear from you!

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Analyze, Visualize, and Communicate – What’s New With EnSight In ANSYS 2019 R1 – Webinar

Effective prototyping in today’s day and age requires not only an understanding of your product’s capabilities but also those of the environment it operates in, and how said environment impacts its use.

Engineers are finding that it is no longer possible to ignore the interactions between fluids and the structures that surround them, as they strive to optimize their product’s performance. 

EnSight helps you visualize coupled fluid-structure interaction data to gain the insights you need; providing a highly effective environment regardless of the complexity of the situation and the simulation being run. After exploring your data, EnSight can also be used to create a high quality visual representation to effectively communicate your results, thanks to the ability to place your model in immersive environments, add realistic lighting conditions, and so much more. 

Join PADT’s CFD Team Lead Engineer, Clinton Smith as we explore the capabilities of this tool, and take a look at what’s new in ANSYS 2019 R1, including updates on:

  • Parallel Fluent to Parallel Ensight capabilities
  • Transnational visual symmetry
  • EnVision handling of multi-panel display
  • And much more

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All Things ANSYS 034 – Celebrating 25 Years of ANSYS Simulation: Changes In The Last Quarter Century & Where The Future Will Take Us

 

Published on: April 8th, 2019
With: Eric Miller, Ted Harris, Tom Chadwick, Sina Ghods, & Alex Grishin
Description:  

In this episode your host and Co-Founder of PADT, Eric Miller is joined by PADT’s Ted Harris, Tom Chadwick, Sina Ghods, and Alex Grishin, for a round-table discussion on their experience and history with simulation, including what has changed since they started using it and what they’re most impressed and excited by, followed by some prediction and discussion on what the future may hold for the world of numerical simulation.

Thank you again for those of you who have made the past 25 years something to remember, and to those of you who have come to know PADT more recently, we look forward to what the next 25 will bring.

If you have any questions, comments, or would like to suggest a topic for the next episode, shoot us an email at podcast@padtinc.com we would love to hear from you!

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All Things ANSYS 033 – Using ANSYS Simulation to Disrupt the World of Capacitor Technology

 

Published on: March 25th, 2019
With: Eric Miller & Sean Katsarelis
Description:  

In this episode your host and Co-Founder of PADT, Eric Miller is joined by Sean Katsarelis form Polycharge for a discussion on how they leverage the ANSYS Startup Program and simulation tools to disrupt the world of capacitor technology.

Listen as they discuss the various capabilities and applications best suited for this market, along with updates on the worlds of PADT and ANSYS.

If you have any questions, comments, or would like to suggest a topic for the next episode, shoot us an email at podcast@padtinc.com we would love to hear from you!

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Using Command Snippets in Solution (And a cool new ACT Extension to make life easier)

So you have results for a job that took several hours to run, or several days, and now you realize that you need to use a post-processing command snippet. In the past, prior to version 14.5, this would be a huge problem, because just adding the command snippet in the Solution branch would trigger a resolve. So, in those cases, we would usually just jump over to MAPDL to do the post-processing.  In version 14.5, however, ANSYS allowed you to add the snippet to the Solution branch without triggering a resolve.

When you hit “Evaluate All Results”, Mechanical will copy the files to a scratch directory and start a separate MAPDL session. This leads to a secondary problem. Often you need to select nodes or elements to use during your snippet. This is usually done with a Named Selection, or a material ID that you saved to a parameter in a Geometry command snippet.  The problem is that the Named Selections, or components in MAPDL, are not saved in the RST file, neither are parameters. They are stored in the DB file. If you thought ahead, then in the Analysis Settings, you set the ‘Save DB file’ option to ‘Yes’ before you solved. In your post-processing command snippet you could then use the RESUME command to bring the database back to the state that it was just before the solve – having all your Named Selections and parameters. But since the default is to not save the DB file, odds are that you don’t have it.  It’s okay, though. There are still some options.

The first thing I recommend is that you save the solved project, and then do a ‘Save As’ to make a copy from which to work, just in case something goes wrong.

Method 1:

When you hit the Solve button in Mechanical, it writes out a ‘ds.dat’ file that then gets run in a batch MAPDL run.

If you have all of your needed Named Selections setup prior to the Solve, then you can open an MAPDL session and use the File>Read Input From… command to read in the ds.dat file.  In interactive mode, the file stops just before the Solve command, so you can then save the database file at that point.  You then need to right-click on the Solution branch in Mechanical and hit “Open Solution Directory”, in to which you need to copy the new “file.db” file.  Then you can resume the file.db in your post-processing command snippet. 

If you need to add a new Named  Selection, you can add a new one, even in 14.5, without triggering a resolve, but then you will have to write out a new input file. To do this, highlight the Solution branch in the tree, go to Tools>Write Input File…, and then follow the procedure above.  

Method 2:

If you are using version 17.1 or later, you have another option. You can Right-click on a Name Selection and choose “Create a Nodal Named Selection”. Then right-click that new nodal named selection and hit “Export Selections to CDB File”.  You can select several Nodal Named Selections to export, and the export will all go to one file. Include that text in your snippet.

Method 3:

In R19.2, the Named Selections are now stored in the RST file. If you don’t need to add a new Named Selection, then can you access the Named Selections that were created prior to the solution run.  After a SET command in your snippet, you can just use the name in the NSEL command, as I did in the picture above, with no need to include the CMBLOCK from the CDB file.  If you need a new Named Selection, however, then you have to use Methods 1 or 2 above.

Pitfalls:

Now that all sounds somewhat difficult, and it actually gets worse. With Method 1, you have to know at least enough MAPDL to open it and read in the input file, and then save the database file.

With Method 2 and 3, the parameters are still not saved in the RST file. So if you need parameters that were created in earlier command snippets, then you have to go back to Method 1.

But there’s hope!!

Method 4:  Oh, Joy!!!

There is one other thing that you can do, and this is my favorite method. (Probably because I wrote it. J)  There is now a new free ACT extension in the ANSYS App store. It is called SAVE_DB, and was written because yours truly got tired of dealing with the other three methods above.  SAVE_DB allows you to save the MAPDL database file without having to solve the Mechanical model, or cause a resolve. SAVE_DB will automatically change the Analysis Settings > Analysis Data Management > Save MAPDL DB value to “Yes” so that future resolves are also saved. MAPDL will be run in the background on the same version as the Workbench project, and the “file.db” will be saved to the Solver Files Directory.  Now any new Named Selections that you add will be ready at the push of a button. This one:

This is the first of many helpful tools planned for a PADT_Toolkit. I will post another plug, I mean ‘blog’, when I get more tools added and the PADT_Toolkit uploaded to the APP Store.  Until then enjoy SAVE_DB!

All Things ANSYS 032 – What’s New in ANSYS Mechanical: Updates Made in 2019 R1

 

Published on: March 11th, 2019
With: Eric Miller & Ted Harris
Description:  

PADT’s Simulation Support Manager, Ted Harris for a discussion on what updates have been made available in the 2019 R1 version on ANSYS Mechanical. Listen as they discuss the various capabilities and applications for this new release, along with what makes these updates so significant.

Want to learn more about what to expect in ANSYS Mechanical 2019 R1? Check out PADT’s webinar covering everything you need to know about the tool’s latest update.

Watch here: https://bit.ly/2SSntmd

If you have any questions, comments, or would like to suggest a topic for the next episode, shoot us an email at podcast@padtinc.com we would love to hear from you!

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Mechanical Updates in ANSYS 2019 R1 – Webinar

From designers and occasional users looking for quick, easy, and accurate results, to experts looking to model complex materials, large assemblies, and nonlinear behavior, ANSYS Mechanical enables engineers of all levels to get answers fast and with confidence. 

With applications for everything form strength analysis to topology optimization, it’s no wonder this comprehensive suite of tools continues to serve as the flagship mechanical engineering software solution.

Impressive performance just got even faster with ANSYS Mechanical’s ability to run models with large contact areas up to 2X faster.

Join PADT’s Simulation Support Manager, Ted Harris for a look at this update along with what other new capabilities are available for ANSYS Mechanical, in the latest version; 2019 R1.

This presentation will feature exploration into updates regarding:

  • Linear Dynamics
  • Rigid Body Dynamics
  • Explicit Dynamics
  • Topology Optimization
  • Composites
  • And Much More

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All Things ANSYS 031 – Experience the Power of Simulation on the Cloud

 

Published on: February 25th, 2019
With: Eric Miller, Sina Ghods, & Judd Kaiser
Description:  

In this episode your host and Co-Founder of PADT, Eric Miller is joined by Sina Ghods from the Simulation Support Team and Judd Kaiser of ANSYS Inc. for a discussion on the latest offering from ANSYS: ANSYS Cloud; a tool that allows you to take advantage of the speed and computing power of ANSYS simulation products, all without the need for expensive hardware. Listen as they discuss the various capabilities and applications for this new tool and share their excitement about what impact this will have on the world of engineering.

Want to learn more about what to expect in ANSYS Cloud? Check out PADT’s webinar covering everything you need to know about the tool’s latest update.

Watch here: https://bit.ly/2U7blzj

If you have any questions, comments, or would like to suggest a topic for the next episode, shoot us an email at podcast@padtinc.com we would love to hear from you!

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Introducing ANSYS Cloud Compute – Webinar

Engineering simulation has long been constrained by fixed computing resources available on a desktop or cluster. Today, however, cloud computing can deliver the on-demand, high performance computing (HPC) capacity required for faster high-fidelity results offering greater performance insight.

ANSYS Cloud delivers the speed, power and compute capacity of cloud computing directly to your desktop — when and where you need it. You can run larger, more complex and more accurate simulations to gain more insight into your product — or you can evaluate more design variations to find the optimal design without long hardware/software procurement and deployment delays.

Join PADT’s Application & Simulation Support Engineer Sina Ghods for a look at how ANSYS is working to drive adoption by providing users a ready to use cloud service that offers: 

  • Reduced Turnaround Time
  • More Accurate Results
  • Access to More Complex/Larger Models
  • Secure Workflows
  • And Much More
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