3D Printing Ansys Mechanical Results with PADT’s “AM Result Printer” Ansys ACT Extension

One of the first things PADT did when we got our first multi-color 3D Printer was figure out how to convert a result in Ansys Mechanical to something to be printed. If you go back to earlier blog posts (2014, 2020) on the topic and find that our earlier methods were – well cumbersome would be kind. There was no easy way to get Ansys Mechanical results into a file that contained color contour information on the surface that could then be printed with a color Additive Manufacturing system.

That is when our Matt Sutton stepped up and used Ansys ACT skills and knowledge on graphics programming to create simple plugin that converts any result object on a solid object in Ansys Mechanical into a 3D Manufacturing Format (3MF) file: AM Result Printer. The 3MF file can be read by Stratasys Grab CAD, the standard tool for Stratasys color systems and, because 3MF is an accepted platform across systems, it should work with any newer color additive manufacturing system.

The plugin is available at the Ansys Store here. It is free, and the download file contains installation and user instructions, or read on to learn more.

Installation

Instaillation is simple. For each installation of Ansys Mechanical, do the following:

  1. Download the ZIP file from the Ansys store
  2. Extract the files in some scratch location
  3. Go into 2021_09_00-3MF-Writer\AM_Result_Printer_v1\Incoming
  4. Then also expand the bianary.zip file. This contains the plugin for various versions of Ansys Workbench
  5. You need the right Visual C++ Redistributable package, so doublick on “vcredist_x64.exe” to make sure its installed. Follow the prompts until its done.
  6. Add the extension through Ansys Workbench. On the project page, go to Extensions > Install Extensions

Go into the binary folder and find the “Additive Manufacturing Result Exporter.wbex” in the proper version folder.

Then to into Extensions > Manage Extensions and click the check box for the Additive Manufacturing Result Exporter.

Now, when you got into your model in Ansys Mechanical, you should see the extensions listed at the top, and if you right-mouse-click on the Solution part of you model, it should be a choice.

How to use it

Make sure you insert any result objects you want to 3d Print and scope them to the things you want printed. Then, for each 3MF file you want, insert an “AM Result Export” into the tree. Then select the result you want a file for, they type of contour, and the number of bands.

When everything is ready, Generate the model to create the file or files.

How it works

This little tool is a great example of using Opensource libraries with the Ansys ACT interface. Matt used the VTK and lib3mf libraries. When you generate the object, the following happens:

  1. Converts the mechanical mesh scoped to the result body to a VTK unstructured mesh.
  2. Export out the result data from the result object as nodal values to a temporart file.
  3. Apply these nodal values to the VTK mesh.
  4. Contour using an appropriate VTK algorithm.
  5. Extract the VTK contour data as a series of triangular facets.
  6. Group the facets by color for banded, or extract the individual vertex colors for smooth.
  7. Write that data to the .3mf format using the lib3mf library.

Need more information?

If you would like more information or have any questions or need support on the tool, please email info@padtinc.com or give us a call at 480.813.4884.

This is also a great example of the type of custom application that PADT creates for a wide variety of customers to improve and enhance their simulation experience. If you have any questions on software development or customization needs around simulation, please reach out to info@padtinc.com or call 480.813.4884 as well.


Press Release

This article is getting posted as we also do a press release on the V1 posting of the program to the Ansys Store. You can also find the official press releases as a PDF and HTML.

Free Extension Designed to Export Ansys Mechanical Results as Color 3MF Files for Additive Manufacturing Released by PADT

Custom Plugin Allows Users to Create 3D Printed Full-Color Models with Results Contours

TEMPE, Ariz., August 31, 2021 PADT, a globally recognized provider of numerical simulation, product development, and 3D printing products and services, is pleased to announce the initial release of the Ansys Mechanical extension, AM Result Printer.  Written by PADT’s Scientific & Technical Computing team in the Ansys Customization Toolkit (ACT), AM Result Printer allows users to select any Ansys Mechanical results they have extracted from their model and output a 3D manufacturing format[, or 3MF, file. The extension is available on the Ansys Store today.

“PADT is an industry leader in off-the-shelf and custom 3D printing and simulation tools and products,” said Tyler Shaw, PADT’s VP of Engineering. “When customers requested a way to export Ansys Mechanical results as color 3MF files, we saw an opportunity to develop a custom program and share it with our community for free.”

The PADT Scientific & Technical Computing team work on small extensions like the AM Result Printer, large standalone programs, and a multitude of tools that make simulation more efficient and useful. The AM Result Printer extension was written by Matt Sutton, PADT’s Lead Developer for Scientific & Technical Computing using the tools provided by Ansys through their API and several publicly available libraries for working with tessellated geometry and the 3MF format.

Any Ansys Mechanical user can install the extension for free by first downloading it from the Ansys Store where it is listed as “AM Result Printer.”  The download includes installation instructions. Once installed, users can easily add an AM Result Object to any result object and then create the 3MF file. This file can then be used in any additive manufacturing system that support the 3MF format and prints in full color, like the Stratasys J55, J826, J835, and J850 PolyJet systems.

“This simple program is a fantastic example of how our software experts, who are also Ansys experts, create applications that greatly enhance the already strong capabilities of Ansys products,” said Sutton. “We’re proud to make this powerful tool available to the Ansys user community.”

For more information on how to customize Ansys programs or to speak to PADT for help with writing custom tools and programs, please visit the PADT website at www.padtinc.com, contact info@padtinc.com or call 480.813.4884. 

About PADT

PADT is an engineering product and services company that focuses on helping customers who develop physical products by providing Numerical Simulation, Product Development, and 3D Printing solutions. PADT’s worldwide reputation for technical excellence and experienced staff is based on its proven record of building long-term win-win partnerships with vendors and customers. Since its establishment in 1994, companies have relied on PADT because “We Make Innovation Work.” With over 90 employees, PADT services customers from its headquarters at the Arizona State University Research Park in Tempe, Arizona, and from offices in Torrance, California, Littleton, Colorado, Albuquerque, New Mexico, Austin, Texas, and Murray, Utah, as well as through staff members located around the country. More information on PADT can be found at www.PADTINC.com.

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Thermal Results Visualization – Ansys SIWave Icepak and Ansys Electronics Desktop Icepak

As a typically mechanical / systems engineer, I am not exactly qualified to go through and list exactly what SIWave does and why you need it for any given situation (shoutout to Aleksandr, our actual expert, whose assistance has been invaluable for my simple example case). However, what I think I have grasped is that SIWave is just one of those Ansys tools where if you need it, you probably really need it. Where this becomes relevant to me is of course in a PCB thermal analysis. DCIR is typically the electrical half of this problem that is within SIWave’s expansive toolkit, though SIWave also contains some very easy-to-use thermal-oriented options for co-simulation with Icepak. I’ll admit that I have tended to somewhat dismiss this on my end, as I am already familiar with a couple more advanced thermal analysis tools, so why wouldn’t I just use these if I wanted to look at the thermal response of A PCB? Despite this, I have recently (begrudgingly) taken a more in-depth look at the thermal side of SIWave, and what I have found is that even if the settings available are a little more simplistic than I might always like, it really is incredibly accessible and provides some nice visualization capability. What’s more, it provides not only an easy path to view your existing thermal results in a full Icepak interface, but also serves as a great starting point if you need to analyze some more complex setups than Icepak.

So, having just been through much of this on my own, it seems like a great opportunity to share some tips and tricks for thermal visualization in both Ansys SIWave and Ansys Electronics Desktop (EDT) Icepak, see where each is strong relative to the other, and then perhaps even share some suggestions for using the SIWave solution as a starting point to take an Icepak PCB simulation to the next level!

To start with, we need a SIWave DCIR project. A DCIR solution is required for providing thermal loads for a thermal solution. I am glossing over this, but basically, you need a PCB definition, a voltage source, and a current source. In the model I borrowed from Aleks, I am using these sources to push some current through one section of my PCB’s power layer and then referencing them to the ground layer. To complete the loop. This means that there are EM losses on both the ground layer and power layer.

For the first simulation, we’ll want to set a baseline temperature for our electrical material properties and make sure the toggle for “Export power dissipation for use in ANSYS Icepak and Mechanical” is enabled.

Now, we can set up an Icepak simulation! As I alluded to, the settings available within SIWave are somewhat primitive, although they do an overall good job of adhering to typical best practices. Our choices are basically using a board model without components and strictly modeling thermal conduction within that board, using a board model with components that includes explicit thermal convection to the environment, manipulating a mesh detail slider bar, and choosing the cooling regime used (natural vs forced convection). For this model, I’ll be using forced convection with surface components and “Detailed” meshing so that I have the most to look at, but obviously the exact settings will vary somewhat depending on your use-case. In 2021R2, the default SIWave-Icepak behavior will be to use EDT Icepak as the solver, however, we can choose to specify “Use Classic Icepak” in the simulation setup window. This determines which version of Icepak we have to use for additional postprocessing in as well, so I will leave “Use Classic Icepak” turned off.

The first method of visualization in SIWave is to simply right-click an Icepak simulation definition in the “Results” window and Display temperature.

This gives us a nice temperature contour on the outer surface of all the solid bodies considered during the simulation. If we stick with the top-down view, we can make use of a nice temperature probe that automatically displays at the mouse location. Once we rotate around into a 3D view with the middle mouse button or other view options, we lose this probe but of course, gain a nice graphical representation of the full geometry.

The second method is to use the View > Temperature Plots toolbar option, which gives us some more flexibility for viewing temperature through each layer.

Most commonly, we will probably be working with the XY cutting plane and then selecting the layer of interest from the drop-down menu so that we can see a plane through the entire PCB. For more precise control, we can also use the slider bar or input the exact plane-normal location to use for plotting.

One of the benefits of this approach is that we can use the other cutting plane definitions to get a cross-section view, along with whatever ECAD board elements we would like to plot. For instance, if we’d like to see more clearly how the temperature varies with depth underneath active components, or around via definitions, we can easily explore this, as in the image below.

Depending on your needs, this may be sufficient flexibility for observing the temperatures of interest, and the smoothly moving cut plane with the slider-bar position is certainly an easy way to get a sense of the board’s behavior. However, SIWave only gives us access to temperature within the solid bodies of our PCB/components, and we can free ourselves from this limitation by moving into EDT Icepak. There are a couple of primary ways to do this – one is to right-click on the Icepak simulation definition in Results and “Open project in Icepak” and the other is to use the same option from the “Results” section of the top toolbar. The more manual method is to directly open the .aedt file that gets generated alongside the SIWave project file.

Much like SIWave, temperatures in EDT Icepak are primarily displayed on cut-planes or object surfaces. Three-dimensional contour plots are also available but tend to be less clear, especially on very thin bodies (like layers of a PCB). For a cut-plane, the most straightforward option is to directly draw a plane or create a new coordinate system (a coordinate system will automatically create the 3 component planes), which can both be done through the top toolbar. 

Personally, I find it easiest to quickly create the objects in the graphical window and then select them in the model tree to fine-tune their locations through the properties display, as above. I do think this is one of the places that SIWave has an edge in ease-of-use – having that slider bar definition for a plane is much nicer. Although, using this method in Icepak also lets us angle the plane however we like, so there are still trade-offs to be considered.

Once we have a plane defined, it is then very easy to select this plane in the model tree and right-click > Temperature > Temperature to create a temperature plot.

One of the immediately observable differences is that we can now view temperature contours throughout the volume of air surrounding our PCB in addition to the PCB itself. So, if we were trying to compare against something like an experimental setup with a thermocouple placed in-air near the board, this would be the way to do it!

If we’re not interested in quite so large of a plot, we can also limit it to a certain model volume by choosing one of the objects in the “In Volume” list of the plot properties. In this case, Box1 and Box2 are smaller volumes enclosing the PCB that were automatically generated for mesh controls, which we can easily reuse for trimming down our temperature plot.

To instead plot on the surface of an object, we can select that object in the model tree (for the whole PCB, it is convenient to right-click it in the tree and use the “Select All” option), follow the same Plot Fields > Temperature > Temperature as before, and then make sure to enable “Plot on surface only”.

This should produce a plot that is very similar to what we obtained in SIwave. Another advantage of doing this in Icepak should now become clear — we have the capability to stack multiple field plots! As below, we can see the solid body surface temperatures alongside our cut plane temperature down the center.

We can get as creative with this as we’d like, plotting on many different cut planes simultaneously, or even combining types of plots. Since we have access to the air volume solution, we can even do things like plot velocity vectors around the PCB for more insight into the overall system.

Having access to the full solution field (fluid and solids) means we can also visualize some other helpful values. The surface heat transfer coefficients can help us understand how to improve our setup in some cases, for instance. In the below plot, we can see some clear shadowing behind surface components which is indicative of the primary flow separating from the surface of the PCB. This certainly explains why the back end of the board is so hot – the components in the back are somewhat hidden from the flow field by those in the front. Since component (and component power) density is higher in the back, we might choose to reverse the direction of flow so that the particularly dense section of components receives the brunt of the airflow, or maybe we might explore angling the board relative to the inlet such that the entire top receives more direct flow.

While we might reach the same or similar conclusions by looking at data through SIWave’s interface, we certainly wouldn’t have access to the tools necessary to actually implement all these changes to the simulation.

As an example, I can pretty easily create a new coordinate system, rotate it by 11° from the original, and then assign my air box to the rotated reference. In effect, this angles all of PCB related volumes with respect to the flow field in just a couple of steps.

After solving, I can then compare the new temperature fields to the old and pretty quickly find that the hotspot on the top surface has been greatly reduced and that the maximum temperature of the system has dropped by about 9 °C. Not too bad! Of course, since I have modified at least one of the simulation bodies, we do have to remesh and solve from scratch, however, we already have an existing DCIR simulation to make use of, and it was much easier getting to this point having started in SIWave.

For my last set of tips, the visualization of the PCB itself in Icepak has been rudimentary so far, but we can also adjust this. Much like in SIWave, we can turn on and off the visualization of features for individual layers independently of anything else. These visualization settings are accessible by selecting our board in the 3D components list and then looking at the properties section.

Since these settings are independent of the 3D geometry visualization, we can selectively hide our model objects in order to isolate the detailed ECAD features. In my test case, the dielectric “Unnamed” layers include via definitions – so I can turn on visualization of these layers, hide the geometry for every layer except the bottom, and plot a temperature cut plane to get a nice visualization of how temperature varies around particular vias.

We could do the same for a temperature cut plane through the width/length of the board as well or even look at heat transfer coefficients on the PCB surface in regions of high via density. As is often the case with Ansys tools, the sky is the limit here.  

In summary, the SIWave interface can be both a great starting and ending point for thermal simulation depending on your needs. It makes setting up a complicated simulation very easy, albeit by removing some user flexibility, but it does allow for several methods of viewing thermal results. These include a smooth slider bar visualization for cut-plane temperatures and a dynamic mouse-probe for checking temperature values in the top-down 2D view. Since SIWave makes use of the full Icepak solver in the background, we can also access a whole lot of additional information by simply opening the existing Icepak solution in the full EDT Icepak interface after a solution has been generated. This gives us access to new thermal solution variables, variables from the fluid portion of our solutions, and new ways to plot and visualize all this information. The combination of SIWave and EDT Icepak also provides us with the opportunity to run an initial set of thermal simulations for relatively simple setups and then build on top of those with more complex boundary conditions or geometry configurations, if we either need greater detail or want to try out some more advanced cooling scenarios.

Mechanical Updates in Ansys 2021 R2: Post processing/graphics & MAPDL Updates – Webinar

Ansys Mechanical delivers features to enable faster simulations, easier workflows, journaling, scripting and product integrations that offer more solver capabilities. The Ansys finite element solvers enable a breadth and depth of capabilities unmatched by anyone in the world of computer-aided simulation.

In 2021 R2, Structures products continue to deliver new features that enable flexibility, robustness and efficiency. The integration of products through Ansys Workbench enables users to leverage additional technology to broaden their scope of simulation.

Join PADT’s Application Engineer Robert McCathren to discover the new features that have been added to Ansys Mechanical in the second webinar covering the 2021 R2 release. This presentation focuses on updates regarding:

  • Post-processing & Graphics
  • MAPDL Interface
  • MAPDL Elements
  • MAPDL Contact
  • MAPDL Materials
  • And much more

Register Here

If this is your first time registering for one of our Bright Talk webinars, simply click the link and fill out the attached form. We promise that the information you provide will only be shared with those promoting the event (PADT).

You will only have to do this once! For all future webinars, you can simply click the link, add the reminder to your calendar and you’re good to go!

All Things Ansys 095: High Frequency Electronics Updates in Ansys 2021 R2

 

Published on: August 25th, 2021
With: Eric Miller & Aleksandr Gafarov
Description:  

In this episode your host and Co-Founder of PADT, Eric Miller is joined by PADT’s application engineer and high frequency electronics expert, Aleksandr Gafarov for a look at what’s new for this product offering in Ansys 2021 R2.

If you have any questions, comments, or would like to suggest a topic for the next episode, shoot us an email at podcast@padtinc.com we would love to hear from you!

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High Frequency Electronics Updates in Ansys 2021 R2 – Webinar

Ansys HFSS is a 3D electromagnetic (EM) simulation software for designing and simulating high-frequency electronic products such as antennas, antenna arrays, RF or microwave components, high-speed interconnects, filters, connectors, IC packages and printed circuit boards. Engineers worldwide use Ansys HFSS software to design high-frequency, high-speed electronics found in communications systems, advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS), satellites, and internet-of-things (IoT) products.

In Ansys 2021 R2, Ansys HFSS continues to deliver groundbreaking technologies to address 3D IC package design challenges as well as advancements in 5G and autonomous simulation.

Join PADT’s Electronics Application Engineer and high frequency (HF) simulation expert Aleksandr Gafarov for a look at the latest enhancements made to Ansys HFSS, as well as other HF tools in Ansys 2021 R2. This includes an in-depth look at updates made for:

  • HFSS
  • Signal & Power Integrity
  • EMIT
  • Q3D
  • And much more

Register Here

If this is your first time registering for one of our Bright Talk webinars, simply click the link and fill out the attached form. We promise that the information you provide will only be shared with those promoting the event (PADT).

You will only have to do this once! For all future webinars, you can simply click the link, add the reminder to your calendar and you’re good to go!

Magnetic Gear Optimization with Ansys Maxwell and Ansys OptiSLang

PADT’s Kang Li shows how Ansys Maxwell can be driven by Ansys OptiSLang to optimize the design of a magnetic gear. This is a great example of connecting an Ansys solver to OptiSLang.

All Things Ansys 094: The Indy Autonomous Challenge – Ansys Simulation Race

 

Published on: August 9th, 2021
With: Eric Miller, John Zinn, Alexander Wischnewski & Filippo Parravicini
Description:  

In this episode your host and Co-Founder of PADT, Eric Miller is joined by participants of the recent Ansys Simulation Race as part of the Indy Autonomous Challenge (IAC).

Before university teams from around the globe compete in the IAC race currently scheduled for October 2021, they first had to prove their software in the virtual world at the Ansys IAC Simulation Race.

Once the racecar software controllers of the teams were submitted, Ansys conducted an entirely virtual race consisting of qualifying rounds and a final race. Ansys awarded the winning team a $100,000 prize and the runner up a $50,000 prize.

Listen to learn more about this exciting showcase for the capabilities of Ansys autonomous technology.

If you have any questions, comments, or would like to suggest a topic for the next episode, shoot us an email at podcast@padtinc.com we would love to hear from you!

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Ansys Motor CAD Modeling Damper Bars

PADT’s Kang Li shows how to add Damper Bars to an Electric Motor in Ansys Motor-CAD. This step-by-step video is a tutorial on that process as well as a fantastic look at how Ansys Motor-CAD works.

PADT Announces Leadership Team Expansion to Support the Growth of 3D Printing and Simulation Business Units

Additions to the Executive Team and Staff Allow PADT to Better Serve Customers Across New and Existing Business Units

Our sales and support team is the part of PADT that the largest number of customers interact with. Over two decades we have grown our offering from the core Ansys product in Arizona to representing half a dozen different simulations, 3D Printing, and scanning solutions across the US. that is why we decided to step back and take a look at the leadership and structure of our team and create three new positions that allow our sales professionals and engineers to better serve our customers.

You can read the details below in the press release. The primary changes are the promotion of two leaders, Kathryn Pesta and Ted Harris to the Director level where they will oversee expanded teams in sales operations and simulation technical support. We have also created a new team, Enterprise Solutions & Alliances, and appointed Alan McNeil as Director. Under the restructuring, Doug Oatis is taking over our Simulation application engineering team.

These changes are on top of the addition of Jim Sanford as VP of Sales and Support at the beginning of the year and new agreements with EOS to distribute and support their metal 3D Printers and #handsOnMetrology for their scanning solutions.

Our longstanding partners, Ansys, Stratasys, and Flownex, and users of their tools will also benefit from these developments. At the same time, we continue to add experienced engineers to our award-winning support team and seasoned professionals to our respected sales teams. Read below to learn more about these new staff members, and visit our careers page if you or someone you know wants to join our growing family. You can view a quick update on the nine new employees who joined PADT in the first half of 2021 at the bottom of our July newsletter.

You can also view the official press release in HTML or PDF.

As always, If you have any questions about these changes or want to learn more about the amazing products, contact us.


Press Release:

PADT Announces Leadership Team Expansion to Support the Growth of 3D Printing and Simulation Business Units

Additions to the Executive Team and Staff Allow PADT
to Better Serve Customers Across New and Existing Business Units

TEMPE, Ariz., August 3, 2021 PADT, a globally recognized provider of numerical simulation, product development, and 3D printing products and services, today announced the expansion of its 3D printing and simulation sales and support team with the addition of new members and management. The executive growth includes a new hire and two promotions. Alan McNiel joined as the director of Enterprise Solutions & Alliances, Ted Harris has been promoted to director of Simulation Support and Kathryn Pesta has been promoted to director of Sales Operations. The additions to the executive team are necessary to support the overall rise in demand for PADT’s sales and support offerings.

“As the U.S. begins to recover from the pandemic and gets back to business, we’re seeing significant demand for simulation tools and advanced 3D printing systems and materials,” said Ward Rand, co-founder and principal, PADT. “To meet this demand and serve our customers, PADT is bolstering our executive teams with the hiring of an industry-leader in Alan McNiel and the promotion of two of our most tenured and capable employees, Ted Harris and Kathryn Pesta.”

The newly appointed directors’ responsibilities include:

  • McNiel is now leading the newly created Enterprise Solutions and Alliances team. He is focused on the sale of Ansys, Stratasys, and EOS products to enterprise customers, growing Flownex in North America, as well as expanding new industry alliances.
  • Harris will restructure the company’s award-winning software support team to be aligned with expanded product offerings and drive optimal customer outcomes.
  • Pesta is leading a reengineering of PADT’s sales and support operations to meet the changing demands and increasing size of the company’s customer base.

Along with these management changes, PADT has recently added experienced salespeople to the Ansys and Stratasys sales team. The hiring of Mike Borsum in California, Brandyn Small in Texas and Brian Basiliere in Arizona as account managers will bolster PADT’s growing presence in California, Oklahoma, Texas and Arizona, respectively. Additionally, Shane Stahl has joined PADT to represent EOS for the western U.S. Multiple additional sales positions will be filled across the country in the second half of 2021.

PADT’s Expanding Sales Territories

Bolstering PADT’s technical staff, electrical engineers Kang Li, PhD and Akimun Alvina have recently been added.  Li, located in Arizona, specializes in motors and electrification, while Alvina, located in Colorado, is a high frequency antenna specialist. As part of the transformation, former PADT team lead Doug Oatis has been promoted to engineering manager over the customer facing simulation application engineer team, while Harris assumes the role of acting manager over the simulation engineering support team. The 3D Printing technical team also increased its capability with the addition of Chase Wallace as an additive manufacturing application engineer.

“To support our customers across the U.S., PADT has worked hard to add talent in new and existing regions, as well as new products and capabilities, as quickly as possible,” said Jim Sanford, vice president, Sales and Support, PADT. “Our continued growth is truly a testament to our people and the technical excellence they’ve displayed despite the challenges of the last year and a half.”

PADT experienced significant growth in 2021, which began in April when it partnered with EOS to improve its additive manufacturing product offerings, resulting in the immediate addition of five advanced EOS metal 3D printing systems to its portfolio. The company also partnered with GOM and the #HandOnMetrology Network in May to add new products and capabilities in 3D scanning. The additions to the management team and new partnerships exemplify PADT’s commitment to growth based on long-term success providing customers with the technical and business solutions they need to design and improve their products. 

To learn more about PADT’s growth story please visit www.padtinc.com.

About PADT

PADT is an engineering product and services company that focuses on helping customers who develop physical products by providing Numerical Simulation, Product Development, and 3D Printing solutions. PADT’s worldwide reputation for technical excellence and experienced staff is based on its proven record of building long-term win-win partnerships with vendors and customers. Since its establishment in 1994, companies have relied on PADT because “We Make Innovation Work.” With over 90 employees, PADT services customers from its headquarters at the Arizona State University Research Park in Tempe, Arizona, and from offices in Torrance, California, Littleton, Colorado, Albuquerque, New Mexico, Austin, Texas, and Murray, Utah, as well as through staff members located around the country. More information on PADT can be found at www.PADTINC.com.

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Discovery Updates in Ansys 2021 R2 – Webinar

Ansys 2021 R2 continues to expand simulation capabilities and ease of use for every engineer to unlock innovation and increase productivity throughout the product development process. ​​In addition, every analyst can now benefit from Ansys Discovery’s geometry modeling workflows, groundbreaking Discovery Live physics and innovative user interface. 

Join PADT’s design engineering expert Robert McCathren for a look at what Ansys 2021 R2 brings to the 3D Design family of products. This includes enhancements such as:

  • More engineering use cases
  • Ansys Workbench connectivity
  • Connected geometry workflow
  • Workflow innovation
  • And much more
Register Here

If this is your first time registering for one of our Bright Talk webinars, simply click the link and fill out the attached form. We promise that the information you provide will only be shared with those promoting the event (PADT).

You will only have to do this once! For all future webinars, you can simply click the link, add the reminder to your calendar and you’re good to go!

Ansys Maxwell Loss Calculations in a Magnetic Gear

In this video, PADT’s Kang Li shows how to carry out loss calculations from permanent magnets and the core materials.

All Things Ansys 093: Introducing Ansys 2021 R2

 

Published on: July 26th, 2021
With: Eric Miller, Tom Chadwick, Aleksandr Gafarov, Joe Woodward, Ted Harris, Sina Ghods, & Josh Stout
Description:  

In this episode your host and Co-Founder of PADT, Eric Miller is joined by members of the simulation support team to explore Ansys 2021 R2 and discuss their favorite features so far.

Ansys multiphysics software solutions and digital mission engineering help companies innovate and validate like never before. Ansys gives engineers the power to see how their ideas will perform against millions of variables.

Ansys 2021 R2 delivers significant improvements in simulation technology together with nearly unlimited computing power to help engineers across all industries reimagine product design and achieve product development goals that were previously thought impossible.

If you have any questions, comments, or would like to suggest a topic for the next episode, shoot us an email at podcast@padtinc.com we would love to hear from you!

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@ANSYS #ANSYS

ANSYS Maxwell: Building a Magnetic Gear Model

In this video, PADT’s Kang Li steps users through the process of building and running a magnetic gear from scratch in Ansys Maxwell. The model shows both standard magnets and a Halbach array.

An Ansys Licensing Tip – ANSYSLMD_LICENSE_FILE

Most Ansys users make use of floating licensing setups, and I would say the majority of those actually make use of licenses that are hosted nonlocally but on their network. Within this licensing scheme, there are quite a few different tools and utilities that we can use to specify where we pull our licenses, too. One of the methods that is making a comeback (in my recent experience) as far as success in troubleshooting and overall reliability is specifying the environment variable ANSYSLMD_LICENSE_FILE.

This variable allows you to point directly towards one or more license servers using a port@address definition for the FlexNet port. With just this defined, the interconnect port will default to 2325, but if your server setup requires another interconnect port then you can also specify this using the ANSYSLI_SERVERS environment variable with the same format.

The downside is that this is a completely separate license server specification from the typical ansyslmd.ini approach, so any values specified this way will not be visible in the “Ansys Client License Settings” utility. On the upside, this is a completely separate license server specification! Meaning, if there are permission issues associated with ansyslmd.ini, or the other license utilities experienced some unknown errors on installation, this may be able to circumvent those issues entirely.

Also, for more advanced setups this can be used to assign specific license servers to individual users on a machine or to potentially help with controlling the priority of license access if multiple license servers are present. Anyway, this may be worth looking into if you encounter issues with client-side licensing!

Mechanical Updates in Ansys 2021 R2: External Models, Composites & Meshing – Webinar

Ansys Mechanical delivers features to enable faster simulations, easier workflows, journaling, scripting and product integrations that offer more solver capabilities. 

With the Ansys suite of tools, engineers can perform finite element analyses (FEA), customize and automate solutions for structural mechanics challenges and analyze multiple design scenarios. By using this software early in the design cycle, businesses can save costs, reduce the number of design cycles and bring products to market faster.

Join PADT’s Lead mechanical engineer Doug Oatis to discover the new features that have been added to Ansys Mechanical in the first webinar covering the 2021 R2 release.

Highlights include unlimited modeling possibilities with journaling and scripting in the Mechanical interface and increased meshing efficiency and quality for shell meshing, among many others.

Register Here

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