Optimize Additive Topology with FDM Fixture Generator – Webinar

Additive Manufacturing has profoundly impacted all aspects of manufacturing. With the ability to increase speed-to-market, lower production costs, and customize specialty parts, it continues to fuel innovation. Manufacturing jigs, fixtures, and other tooling accounts for more than 20% of all end-use parts produced with 3D printing today. Yet, without tools that make the design of custom jigs and fixtures simpler, many users are kept from reaching the full benefits of Additive Manufacturing on the factory floor.

One tool that is helping engineers bypass this roadblock is the latest collaborative effort from Stratasys and nTopology, the FDM Fixture Generator.

This innovative software tool allows you to automate the design of 3D printed jigs & fixtures. Generate custom designs and streamline operations on your factory floor without spending time in CAD. Ready to print with a few clicks.

Join nTopology and PADT to learn more about FDM Fixture Generator and how it stands to disrupt the manufacturing environment.

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All Things Ansys 078: Optimization & Automation Updates in Ansys 2020 R2 – OptiSLang

 

Published on: December 14th, 2020
With: Eric Miller & Josh Stout
Description:  

In this episode your host and Co-Founder of PADT, Eric Miller is joined by PADT’s Systems Support & Application Engineer Josh Stout for a discussion on how OptiSLang helps to increase the robustness and reliability of simulation, as well as a look at what new features are in the 2020 R2 updated version.

If you would like to learn more about this update, you can view Josh’s webinar on the topic here:

https://www.brighttalk.com/webcast/15747/458229

If you have any questions, comments, or would like to suggest a topic for the next episode, shoot us an email at podcast@padtinc.com we would love to hear from you!

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@ANSYS #ANSYS

Optimization & Automation Updates in Ansys 2020 R2 – Webinar

Simulation is becoming an integral part of our customers’ product development processes, and new horizons await. By combining different physics into a multidisciplinary approach, phenomena can be investigated more holistically and optimized to a greater degree. Additionally, simulation processes can be standardized and shared across teams, allowing simulation novices to gain more direct access to simulation.

Time-consuming manual searches for the best and most robust design configuration can now be accelerated by adding state-of-the-art algorithms for design exploration, optimization, robustness and reliability analysis. Through the power of interactive visualization and artificial intelligence technologies, engineers and designers can gain a better understanding of their design and make the right decisions in less time.

The process integration and design optimization solution that enables all the above is Ansys optiSLang.

Join PADT’s Mechanical Application Engineer and Systems Expert Josh Stout for an exploration of this interconnected tool and what new capabilities are available in it’s 2020 R2 release.

Register Here

If this is your first time registering for one of our Bright Talk webinars, simply click the link and fill out the attached form. We promise that the information you provide will only be shared with those promoting the event (PADT).

You will only have to do this once! For all future webinars, you can simply click the link, add the reminder to your calendar and you’re good to go!

All Things Ansys 066: Simulation Automation & Optimization management with Ansys optiSLang

 

Published on: June 29th, 2020
With: Eric Miller & Josh Stout
Description:  

In this episode your host and Co-Founder of PADT, Eric Miller is joined by PADT’s systems application & support engineer Josh Stout to look at the optimization tool optiSLang. This tool helps automate simulation and optimization activities across various solution areas, such as autonomy, electrification, digital twins, and more, as well as how it enables users to capitalize on the benefits of enterprise simulation management.

If you would like to learn more, you can view the product brochure here: https://www.ansys.com/-/media/ansys/corporate/resourcelibrary/brochure/optislang-brochure.pdf.

If you have any questions, comments, or would like to suggest a topic for the next episode, shoot us an email at podcast@padtinc.com we would love to hear from you!

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This is also a perfect example of how a customer can hand over an entire project that they need done, but don’t have the resources to do in-house. PADT’s team created the test specification, designed the hardware, conducted the tests, and delivered actionable information to the customer.

If you have a project you do not have the resources to complete in-house, consider having our engineers take a look at it to see how we can help.

Serial and Parallel ANSYS Mechanical APDL Simulations

ANSYS-APDL-Macro-PeDALThere are times when you want to study the effects of varying parameters.  If you have an existing MAPDL script that is parameterized, the following procedure will allow you to easily run many variations in an organized manner. 

Let’s assume a parameterized MAPDL macro called build_solve that does something you want to simulate many times and has 2 variables called power and scale which are set with argument 1 and 2 respectively.  Running this macro with the classic interface, with power=30 and scale=2.5 would look like this:

build_solve,30,2.5

Next, create a MAPDL macro to launch all of the simulations.  This script could be named control.mac.  The first thing to do here is to create arrays of your parameters and assign values to them.  This example will vary power and scale.  Here are the arrays of values that will be passed to build_solve:

*dim,power,array,4

power(1)=10,20,40,80

*dim,scale,array,6

scale(1)=1,2,3,5,10,20

Most of the control.mac commands will be put inside of nested *do loops.  There will be a *do loop for each of parameters being varied.

*do,ii,1,4

*do,jj,1,6

Next, use *cfopen to set up the arguments to be passed to build_solve.  Each time through the *do loops will create a new run1.mac

*cfopen,run1,mac

  a=power(ii)

  b=scale(jj)

  *vwrite,a,b

  build_solve,%G,%G

*cfclose

One of the key features of this approach is to run anywhere and build directories below the working directory.  Use the /inquire command to store the current directory name.

/INQUIRE,dir_,DIRECTORY

Use *cfopen to create a string that will be used for the directory name.  By using the variables as part of the string, the directories will have unique names.  A time or date stamp could also be included in this string.  This macro is executed immediately to create the string dirnam for use in the commands subsequently.

*dim,power,array,4

*cfopen,temp1,mac

*vwrite,a,b

dirnam='power_%G_scale_%G'

*cfclose

/input,temp1,mac

Eventually, the resulting directory structure will look something like the image below.  Each directory will contain a separate simulation with the arguments of power and scale set respectively.

mapdl-script-automation

The last *cfopen creates a windows batch file which will (when executed)

  1. Create the new directory

  2. Copy all of the macro files from the working directory into the new directory (including run1.mac)

  3. Change into the new directory using CD

  4. Launch ansys in batch mode, in this case using a gpu and 12 cpus, using the run1.mac input and outputting to f.out

  5. Change back to the working directory (ready to do it all again)

The code for the windows batch file is:

*cfopen,rfile,bat

*vwrite,dir_(1),dirnam

MKDIR "%C\%S"

*vwrite,dir_(1),dirnam

COPY *.mac "%C\%S"

*vwrite,dir_(1),dirnam

CD "%C\%S"

*vwrite,

"C:\Program Files\ANSYS Inc\v150\ansys\bin\winx64\ansys150" -b -acc nvidia -np 12 -i run1.mac -o f.out

*vwrite,dir_(1)

CD "%C"

*cfclose

The last step is to run the windows batch file.  /sys is used to make this system call.  If the simulation is not well parallelized and you have enough licenses available, run the simulations in low priority mode immediately.  This will launch all of your simulations in parallel:

  • /sys,start /b /low rfile.bat

If the model is well parallelized (in other words, it will use your system’s gpu/cpus/RAM efficiently) or you only have 1 license available, launch the batch files in high priority mode and use the /wait option which will insure that windows waits for the job to finish before launching the next simulation.

  • /sys,start /b /high /wait rfile.bat

You can download and view the examples control.mac and build_solve.mac from this zip file: build_solve-control-macros.zip