What’s new in Flownex 2021 Update 1

Friday Flownex Tip #16:

The Flownex team has just released Flownex SE 8.12.8, also known as 2021- Update 1. This release added new components, additional flexibility, additional improvements to user-friendliness, and bug fixes. There is a lot to unpack, and the best way to know all the details is to dig into the Release Notes. If you don’t have time for that, below are the nine enhancements that PADT’s engineers feel are the most noteworthy.

Velocity Based PID controller in the Distributed Control System

The new velocity based PID controller calculates the change in output variables, rather than an output itself. This enables multiple controllers to control the same variable without causing spikes in the output.

Steady state operations are now part of DCS components

DCS components can propagate their inputs into the model before, during, or after a steady state solution has been computed. This allows the user to decide if the DCS component initializes the steady state solution, calculate values for each timestep during the solution, or after the steady state solution has been completed. Be default, before is used.

Component Selection now has a search feature

The same controls that are in Flownex’s “Find” dialog are now in the Component Selection dialog. Multiple filters and options are available to make it easy to select components in models.

Added humid air fluid functions to Material Scripts

Psychrometric fluid functions have been added to the Material Scripts to enable the calculation of mixture mass fractions for three input combinations:

  • Humidity Ratio
  • Pressure, dry bulb temperature, and relative humidity
  • Pressure, dry bulb temperature, and wet bulb temperature

A new option to select between Conduction Shape Factors and Effective Area for the composite conductivity element

This one is pretty straightforward. A drop down in the Composite Conductivity dialog, under “Geometry”, lets the user specify which method they want for calculation conduction.

The installation verification tool now support several instances of Flownex in parallel

Users can now make sure that their installation is running parallel instances correctly with this new option. By default, it will run half the number of available logical processors, or the user can change the number in the tools user interface.

The Reactor Builder script has been greatly enhanced

User input has been combined to make multiple changes to the script that builds reactors. The enhancements are very specific to nuclear reactors and not only allow for more accurate models, but also a smoother process. If you use this feature, make sure you check the release notes.

Changes have been made to the runtime neutronics script

Another area that should excite (is that a pun?) those who model nuclear reactors are the user-driven changes to the script that models neutron behavior in reactors. These are fairly significant and a must-read for anyone who uses this feature.

Ability to select all components in a flow circuit on the drawing canvas

Users can now right-mouse-button on a component in their model and select all the components that are in the same flow circuit. Not only are they selected, but any common properties are shown in the properties grid.

And, much more

There were also a few bug fixes, especially in the flow solver components, so if you were dealing with an issue check the release notes or contact PADT to see if your problem has been resolved.

These were the changes that we think most users would be interested in knowing about. Check out the release notes to see all of them and, as always, don’t hesitate to reach out if you have any questions or don’t see something you need.

Friday Flownex Tech Tips #11

How to use Flow Path Graphs and Increment Plots in Flownex

Flow Path Graphs and Increment Plots can be incredibly useful visualization tools to see how a simulation result varies as a function of length along the axial flow path and to see a higher fidelity result for a single flow component. Use these in Flownex to up your reporting game! In this demo we are using Flownex version 8.12.7.4334

Creating a Flow Path

A flow path is any continuous series of flow elements and can be created by clicking “Flow Paths” in the results ribbon. Once we’ve created our new flow path we define it by choosing our start and end nodes.

Another, simpler, method is to simply drag and drop the nodes onto the flow path start and end point:

If we have a branched network we can add an intermediate node or flow component to our flow path to ensure the correct path is captured in the graph:

Insert a Flow Path Graph

The Flow Path Graph is in the component pane under visualization > graphs. Once the graph is added to the canvas we simply need to drag and drop our newly created flow path onto the graph and choose the characteristic we are interested in plotting. We will need to drag and drop the flow path for each characteristic we would like plotted.

How to create Increment Plots

You may have noticed in the previous images that there were many data points on the graphs for each of our flow components. This is because we had each pipe modeled as 25 increments. When we add increments to our flow components Flownex will treat each component as if it were split up that number of increments – solving the conservation equations for each increment rather than once over the entire component. This is helpful when modeling long pipes, capturing pressure waves, or determining exactly where a phase change may happen. A good way to think about this is that it is essentially the same as refining a mesh in a typical finite element analysis.

There is another plot in Flownex we can use for a single flow component that has been incremented. The increment plot is located in the components pane under Visualization > Graphs > Increment Plots. If we were, for example, trying to plot the inside surface temperature of our first pipe in this example network we could use an increment plot to see what is going on.

To create an increment plot we simply drag and drop the plot onto the canvas. We can either selectively drag results from individual increments or multi-select many increments and drag the desired variable onto the graph. Note that since there is a tie of each increment parameter separately there may be some delay if we are multiselecting a very large number of increments.

Bonus Tips!

  • We can use a Flow Path graph for a single component to avoid having to multi-select increments.
  • To create a graph on its own page instead of floating on the canvas go to the Project Explorer pane on the left side of the GUI, select Graphs, then right-click on the Graphs Folder and select Add Graph Page and choose your desired type of plot.

Friday Flownex Tech Tips #8

How to Setup an External Shared Database in Flownex

Hi Folks! Another short and simple tech tip this week; How to set up an external shared database in Flownex. When working as part of a team it makes sense to share resources. Once one person builds a custom component or defines a complex fluid we want to share that with everyone in our organization. Today I will show you how to create and maintain a shared database. For todays example we are working in Flownex version 8.12.7.4334

Creating the Database

Start by opening up Flownex – it can be a new project or any existing project. On the right side of the GUI we’ll want to navigate to the Components pane. At the top of the pane you’ll see a variety of buttons. Depending on your installation the buttons you see may be different than the ones in the visual below. To create a new database we’ll want to click the Create Database icon.

Then we’ll want to navigate to a shared network location and pick an appropriate folder that will be accessible to others in our organization. I would encourage keeping the directory name as short as possible (I.E. a top level location) so that there is no concern for a deep database hitting windows character limit.

Once we have chosen a location and clicked OK we will see our shared database in both the Components pane and in the Charts and Lookup Tables pane. We’ll need to right-click on the newly created shared database and create a New Library in which we will place our shared components. Creating multiple libraries can be useful when grouping similar components or to discretize between different groups in the organization which are using Flownex.

Adding components to an External Database

To add custom components to our external database we simply drag and drop them from our project database. If you want to learn how to create a custom compound component please reference our previous blog post on this topic here. Choosing “Copy” will create a copy of the component in the shared database, choosing “Move” will move the component to the shared database and any references to that component in the project will now reference the component from the external database.

Adding a fluid to an External Database

To add a custom fluid to our external database the process is very similar to the procedure for the custom compound component. The only difference is that we want to do this drag and drop action within the Charts and Lookup Tables pane instead of the Components pane. If you need a refresher on creating or importing custom fluids here is a blog post on that topic!

Connecting to an External Database

Once a user has created a shared database it is now possible for other users to connect to that database. the process of connecting to an external database is quite simple. On the Components pane we will again look at the buttons near the top. We will want to click the Connect Database icon and then navigate to the shared location of the external database. Once there we will find the database configuration file, .dbcfg. We should select this file and click OK. You are now connected to the shared database!

Bonus Tips!

  • To lock an external database to avoid unintentional editing you can right-click on the database in Flownex and select “Lock Database”.
  • If you need to migrate the database to another location on your server you can copy the entirety of the folder and move it. Users will simply need to follow the same procedure of connecting to an external database the next time they open Flownex.
  • Special Note: If sending a network to someone external to your organization it is important to note that components or references from external databases will not be included by default. These components or charts will need to be copied to the project database and then the shared database will need to be disconnected before archiving the project for transfer. A second option would be to share the database itself.

Friday Flownex Tech Tips #7

Using Views to bridge networks across multiple pages

When building our networks it may be necessary to utilize multiple pages for a single network. This could be simply because our network is large and complex, or because it simply makes sense to keep certain branches or processes separate. In this tech tip we will show how to use “views” to continue networks across multiple pages. For this example we are using Flownex version 8.12.7.4334.

Views

In Flownex the way that we continue networks across pages or even just jumping across portions of the same page is through the use of “views”. To create a view we right-click on the component we’d like to use as our bridge and select copy. Then navigate to where we’d like to continue our network and right-click, “paste view”.

Note that this is not really a “copy” of the previous node; it is another instance of the exact same node. I personally recommend using nodes for views over flow components so that they are less likely to be mistaken as separate components.

Regarding views

A couple of things to note regarding view components. First, you’ll notice the floating “V” to the left of the component. This indicates that the component is a view. It’s a good idea to leave this layer on – if for some reason you cannot see the “V” it can be turned on under the view ribbon:

Secondly, to find out where the views are located in your network the simplest way to jump between them is to right-click on an existing view and select the “views” option. Here you can navigate to any other views by simply clicking on them. Note that you are not limited to only two instances of a node (two views). There could be many instances across many pages.

Common uses of views could be to connect networks built by different engineers, connecting different subsystems that make up a larger network, or even capturing 3D network layouts by building a portion of the network in the x-y plane and using a view to connect to part of the network built in the z-y plane.

Friday Flownex Tech Tips #6

Creating Custom Fluids

Occasionally glossed over, adding custom fluids is a fairly standard operation in Flownex that we don’t think about until it’s necessary. There are a couple of ways to do this which we’ll go over in today’s post. I am working in Flownex 8.12.7.4334.

Creating a mixed fluid

To create a mixed fluid we first need to create a folder for this fluid in our project database. This can be done in the charts and lookup tables pane by right clicking on “mixed fluids” and selecting “add category”. We can create our new fluid by right-clicking on the new folder and selecting “Add a new mixed fluid”. Note we can right-click and rename both the fluid itself and the containing folder.

To define our new mixed fluid we double-click on the new mixed fluid to open the editor. Here we can add the components of our mixed fluids.

Creating a new fluid from scratch

To create a fluid from scratch we repeat the same process of creating a folder and creating a new fluid as above with the exception being that we’d complete these steps under the “Pure Fluids” category. Once this is done we’ll need to double-click or right-click > edit our from scratch fluid and enter in the fluid properties. Note for many properties we can define the relationship with pressure and temperature as constant (non-dependent), table, equation, or script.

Importing a fluid

To import a fluid we will follow the same steps of creating the folder under pure fluids. Now instead of right-clicking and adding new we will right-click and select “import”. Then we simply navigate to our desired fluid file and click “Ok”.

Bonus Tips!

  • In the window where you define your fluid you’ll notice the “Test” button. This feature can be utilized to test created fluids to confirm properties against known properties for given pressures and temperatures.
  • We can also copy and paste fluids from the master database into the project database to give us a good starting point for creating similar fluids (or extending properties to higher/lower temps/pressures).

Friday Flownex Tech Tips #5

Custom Result Layers!

The result layers in Flownex have evolved quite a bit over the last few iterations of the code. Although we might typically associate color-gradient results more with 3D CFD, it does have a place in 1D system modeling. Taking advantage of results layers in Flownex can give a very quick understanding of what is going on with our system, and, with a little customization, can be incredibly powerful as an addition to our design and analysis toolbelt. In this post I am using Flownex version 8.12.7.4334.

How to create a result layer

To create a custom result layer we must navigate to the results ribbon and select result layer setup.

First we want to right-click in the Result Layers window and add a new result layer.

There are two options to add the schema for our result layer. The first is to right-click on the Selected Result Layer Schemas and add either a specific or generic schema. The second, and my PREFERRED, method is to simply drag and drop results from components on the canvas into this window:

Note that I want to multi-select any component types which will be included in this result layer. This could be any flow components which share a common result such as “quality”. I also convert to generic because I want the result layer to apply to all pipes, not just the pipe I initially drag and drop the property from.

Defining the custom result layer

In this example I have a two-phase water network with a cold external temperature. I want to create a result layer to quickly see if the water is in the gas phase, liquid phase, or somewhere in-between. The problem I have been tasked with solving is ensuring that the water never condenses. I will need to determine where we may need to add additional heat flux to the network.

We can use the Quality result property to determine the phase of our fluid. Quality < 0 indicates fully liquid, quality between 0 and 1 indicates liquid/gas mixture, greater than 1 indicates fully vapor.

To make this work as intended I can set up a gradient with three increments going from -1 to 2. The idea being the lowest increment would encompass -1 to 0, middle increment would be 0 to 1, and the top increment would be 1 to 2. For the gradient mode I made sure to pick <-[MinValue, MaxValue]-> so that the max and min increments would extend past the specified range.

As we apply this to our network we can easily see that we do, in fact, have a phase change from gas at the inlet, to mixture in the second two component, to fully liquid near the outlet.

I may decide to add a heater to our outlet pipe and perhaps a thicker insulative layer to all three to attempt to keep the water in gas phase throughout the system.

Bonus Tip!

  • Result layers can also be super handy when troubleshooting to quickly identify large pressure differentials, choking points, or other outlying fluid properties.

Flownex Friday Tech Tips #4

How to make a great compound component!

Compound components make it easy and efficient to reuse the same collection of components over and over throughout your models. In this post I’ll be going over the basics of making a user-friendly and aesthetically pleasing compound component. In this example I am working in Flownex Version 8.12.7.4334

How to create a compound component

To create a compound component we must first create a local library in the project database. This can be done by right-clicking on the project database in the components pane and select “New Library”.

We can name our new library and choose a picture if desired:

To create our compound component we just need to right-click on the new library and select “New Compound Item”

To build our compound component we’ll use the “edit” function on the compound component. In this example I am building a Lohm resistor component. It’s a good idea to test my component on a separate page to make sure scripts interact as expected and validate results against some given test cases.

Let’s make it functional!

To define the inputs and results we’d like to expose to the user we right-click on the new compound component in the library and select “component setup”.

To add inputs and results we need to navigate to the Compound Setup ribbon and then simply drag and drop inputs and results into the Selected Properties window. Note that we can even grab whole categories of inputs or results to save time!

Now those inputs and results will appear to the user when they add this compound component to their canvas!

Let’s make it pretty!

To make our component more aesthetically appealing let’s replace the boring default icon with one more representative of our Lohm Resistor. To do this we right-click on our compound component again and this time stay in the “Display Setup” tab. We can click the “Choose Picture” button to upload our own icon. To refresh on the image selector check out the blog post on adding a background image.

To correct the aspect ratio so that it shows up looking less squished on our canvas we want to change the settings back in the Compound Setup tab. I’ll change it to 133×34 so that it appears similar in scale to the standard flow components but correct in the aspect ratio.

Now when we place our compound component onto our canvas it should look great!

Bonus Tips!

  • In the compound component setup there is a third ribbon called “Tooltips Setup”. This is where we can define what properties show up when we hover our mouse over the component.
  • Don’t forget we can save compound components in a “database” on a server so that they can be accessed by every Flownex user in your organization.

Friday Flownex Tech Tips #3

Input Sheet Hacks!

Building on last week’s global parameters example I’d like to show some tricks within the input sheet environment. These are really more so excel tricks – but the methodology within Flownex is slightly different. In this example I am working in Flownex Version 8.12.7.4334

Refresher on using Input Sheets

To create a new Input Sheet we will navigate to the project tab, then select “Excel Reports/Pages”, right-click on the Input Sheets folder, and select “New Input Sheet”

To add inputs to the sheet it’s as simple as dragging and dropping the inputs from the component into the desired cell in the Input Sheet.

Formatting our Input Sheet

I like to use color, shading, and border to specify which cells contain inputs so that if I pass the project off to a client or colleague it is immediately clear what variables they should be editing and which cells they shouldn’t change.

To modify the formatting we need to enter “workbook designer”. This is done by right-clicking on the input sheet and selecting “workbook designer”

All of the standard Excel-type formatting is available here, including adding graphs, images, etc. Typical operations are found in the format menu on the top ribbon.

Drop Downs

A more advanced Excel operation I like to integrate into these types of input sheets is a drop-down where multiple inputs may be tied to a given condition. In the example below I set up a scenario for given ambient temperature for cold day, hot day, and nominal day.

In the workbook designer we will click “insert” > “worksheet” and build our list of environmental conditions. On the right we will set the associated temperatures.

Back on Sheet1 we will need to set up the data validation cell reference to this table. Select the cell where we want to add the dropdown and go to data > validation. We will choose list, and reference cells B2:B4 of Sheet2.

We will need to use VLOOKUP to associate the temp to another cell based on this dropdown. Where this becomes valuable is when we have many input variables tied to each of the dropdown selections.

In this example, since we’ve put the applicable temps a single column to the right the syntax for VLOOKUP will be “=VLOOKUP(B5,Sheet2!B2:C4,2,FALSE)”. After this is added it should behave as follows:

As I mentioned before, this trick becomes very powerful when you have many different environmental or operational inputs tied to a single “scenario” that you want to model in an individual run rather than in a parameter study.

Bonus Tip!

  • All of these tricks can be applied to any of the excel-type sheets within Flownex. Remember to be careful with parameter tables as the inputs and results are tied to the columns instead of individual cells.

Flownex Tech Tips #2

Working with Global Parameters!

As we build more and more networks it quickly becomes tedious to enter in the same inputs many times. There are a couple methods of using global parameters to save us lots of time and clicks. In this example I am working in Flownex Version 8.12.7.4334

Refresher on Global Parameters

Global parameters are just what they sound like. Parameters defined globally for the project. These could be any type of component input; diameter, length, temp, pressure, etc.

The global parameters can be found in a couple of locations. Under the configuration ribbon we can open the global parameters in a floating window which gives us a friendly interface for creating or modifying these parameters. To create a global parameter one may simply right-click in the GlobalParameters window and select Add (hint: there’s a better way!).

Conventional method to add Global Parameter

Global parameters can also be accessed in via the solver tab in a similar way to typical inputs (this is important later on).

The Quick way to add Global Parameters

We don’t really want to have to navigate to that configuration ribbon, right-click a bunch, choose names and assign units do we? Good news! There is a much faster way to add a global parameter. We can add a global parameter with minimal work by simply typing a dollar sign “$” prefacing the name of the tag in any of our component input fields! Remember to hit enter after typing the identifier.

Global Parameter Shortcut

Once a global parameter has been defined we can tie more inputs to the existing parameter by typing the dollar sign “$” and choosing the correct parameter from a drop down:

Multi-Assign Global Parameters

As you can see, this can be quite a time saver when building a network! The next trick utilizing global parameters will have to do with using them for actual analysis.

Using Global Parameters as Manipulatable Inputs

The default/slow way to change a global parameter would be to go to the configuration ribbon > global parameters, and manually change the value in the floating window. No thanks. This is not automated at all and requires many clicks.

The better way to utilize the global parameter as an input would be to tie the global parameter to an input sheet, parameter table (for a parametric study), or even a human machine interface component (HMI).

Global Parameters in Input Sheet

For a design variable that an analyst or engineer may change which would then remain constant (such as pipe diameter) the input sheet comes in very handy. To reference a global parameter in the input sheet recall the second method to access the global parameters and then simply drag and drop onto the input sheet:

Global Parameter in Input Sheet

Global Parameters in Parameter Table

If you are trying to run a parametric study where you are varying something like ambient temperature, it makes sense to use a global parameter as you may have many boundary conditions defined by a single global parameter. Similar to the input sheet this can be tied to a global parameter by a simple drag and drop operation:

Global Parameter as variable in Parameter Table

Global Parameter in a Human Machine Interface

By now I expect you are catching on. The trick to defining a global parameter externally is to use the second method; solver tab > global parameters, and then drag and drop to your desired connection. In the HMI instance I’ve tied inlet mass flow to a Track Bar so that a user can dynamically change the flow rate during the solve:

Global Parameter tied to HMI
Global Parameters and HMI components

Global Parameters are efficient and POWERFUL

We can use global parameters during network construction using the “$” shortcut to build our networks much more quickly and keep identical inputs the same. We can tie these global parameters to other tools to keep our user inputs all in one place, reducing clicks, and reducing the chance of forgetting to update an input.

Bonus Tips!

  • Global Parameters can also be used in Designer so that you can keep your independent to dependent variable count the same (EX: Adjusting ALL pipe diameters to target a single exit flowrate)
  • Global Parameters can be adjusted via transient actions (EX: Adjusting ambient temperature to model the changing temperature over the course of 24 hours).

Getting to Know PADT: Flownex Sales and Support

This is the second installment in our review of all the different products and services PADT offers our customers. As we add more, they will be available here.  As always, if you have any questions don’t hesitate to reach out to info@padtinc.com or give us a call at 1-800-293-PADT.

The PADT sales and support team focused on simulation solutions is best known for our work with the full ANSYS product suite.  What a lot of people don’t know is that we also represent a fantastic simulation tool called Flownex. Flownex is a system level 1-D program that is designed from the ground up to model thermal-fluid systems.

What does Flownex Do?

Flownex Simulation Environment is an interactive software program that allows users to model systems to understand how fluids (gas and/or liquid) flow and how heat is transferred in that same system due to that flow.  the way it works is you create a network of components that are connected together as a system.  The heat and fluid transfer within and between each node is calculated over time, giving a very accurate, and fast,  representation of the system’s behavior.

As a system simulation tool, it is fast, it is easy to build and change, and it runs in real time or even faster.  This allows users to drive the design of their entire system through simulation.

Need to know what size pump you need, use Flownex.  Want to know if you heat exchanger is exchanging enough heat for every situation, use Flownex.  Tasked with making sure your nuclear reactor will stay cool in all operating conditions, use Flownex.   Making sure you have optimized the performance of your combustion nozzles, use Flownex.  Time to design your turbine engine cooling network, use Flownex. Required to verify that your mine ventilation and fire suppression system will work, use Flownex. The applications go on and on.

Why is Flownex so Much Better than other System Thermal-Fluid Modeling Solutions?

There are a lot of solutions for modeling thermal-fluid systems. We have found that the vast majority of companies use simple spreadsheets or home-grown tools. There are also a lot of commercial solutions out there. Flownex stands out for five key reasons:

  1. Breadth and depth of capability
    Flownex boasts components, the objects you link together in your network, that spread across physics and applications.  Whereas most tools will focus on one industry, Flownex is a general purpose tool that supports far more situations.  For depth they have taken the time over the years to not just have simple models.  Each component has sophisticated equations that govern its behavior and user defined parameters that allow for very accurate modeling.
  2. Developed by hard core users
    Flownex started life as an internal code to support consulting engineers. Experienced engineering software programmers worked with those consultants day-in and day-out to develop the tools that were needed to solve real world problems.  This is the reason why when users ask “What I really need to do to solve my problem is such-and-such, can Flownex do that?” we can usually answer “Yes, and here are the options to make it even more accurate.”
  3. Customization and Integration
    As powerful and in-depth as Flownex is, there is no way to capture every situation for every user.  Nor does the program do everything. That is why it is so open and so easy to customize and integrate. As an example, may customers have very specific thermal-pressure-velocity models that they use for their specific components. Models that they developed after years if not decades of testing. Not a problem, that behavior can be easily added to Flownex.  If a customer even has their own software or a 3rd party tool they need to use, it is pretty easy to integrate it right into your Flownex system model.Very common tools are already integrated. The most common connection is Matlab/Simulink.  At PADT we often connect Excel models from customers into our Systems  for consulting.  It is also integrated into ANSYS Mechanical.
  4. Nuclear Quality Standards
    Flownex came in to its own as a tool used to model the fluid system in and around Nuclear Reactors.  So it had to meet very rigorous quality standards, if not the most stringent they are pretty close. This forced to tool to be very robust, accurate, and well documented. And the rest of us can take advantage of that intense quality requirement to meet and exceed the needs of pretty much every industry.  We can tell you after using it for our own consulting projects and after talking to other users, this code is solid.
  5. Ease of Use
    Some people will read the advantages above and think that this is fantastic, but that much capability and flexibility must make it difficult to use. Nothing could be further from the truth.  Maybe its because the most demanding users are down the hallway and can come and harangue the developers. Or it could be that their initial development goal of keeping ease of use without giving up on functionality was actually followed.  Regardless of why, this simulation tool is amazingly simple and intuitive.  From building the model to reviewing results to customization, everything is easy to learn, remember, and user.  To be honest, it is actually fun to use. Not something a lot of simulation engineers say.

Why does buying and getting support from PADT for Flownex make a Difference?

The answer to this question is fairly simple: PADT’ simulation team is made up of very experienced users who have to apply this technology to our own internal projects as well as to consulting jobs.  We know this tool and we also work closely with the developers at Flownex.  As with our ANSYS products, we don’t just work on knowing how to use the tool, we put time in to understand the theory behind everything as well as the practical real world industry application.

When you call for support, odds are the engineer who answers is actually suing Flownex on a customer’s system.  We also have the infrastructure and size in place to make sure we have the resources to provide that support.  Investing in a new simulation tool can generate needs for training, customization, and integration; not to mention traditional technical support. PADT partners with our customers to make sure they get the greatest value form their simulation software investment.

              

Reach out to Give it a Try or Learn More

Our team is ready and waiting to answer your questihttp://www.flownex.com/flownex-demoons or provide you with a demonstration of this fantastic tool. .  You can email us at info@padtinc.com or give us a call at 480.813.4884 or 1-800-293-PADT.

Still want to learn more? Here are some links to more information: