Phoenix Children's Hospital 3D printed heart model. (Image courtesy Phoenix Children's Hospital)

Workflow for Creating a 3D Printed Medical Model with Stratasys

For decades in the medical world, surgeons and their professional support teams have relied on X-rays, computed tomography (CT) scans and magnetic resonant imaging (MRI) data when performing their pre-surgical planning approach. These diagnostic tools have been literal lifesavers, yet the resolution and 2D perspective of these images can make it difficult to determine the full details of anatomical geometry. Subtle, critical abnormalities or hidden geometries can go unnoticed when viewing flat films and digital displays.

3D printed heart model produced by Phoenix Children’s Hospital. (Image courtesy Phoenix Children’s Hospital)

With the advent of 3D printing, many surgeons are now using 3D models for both surgical planning and patient communication. While cost is the primary hold-back, such models are seeing increased use. In addition, efforts are underway to quantify the benefits of reduced operating room time/expense and improved patient outcome; see Medical 3D Printing Registry (ACR/RSNA). Supporting this concept are the high-resolution, multi-material PolyJet 3D printers from Stratasys.

But how does the patient’s CT and MRI data become a unique 3D printed model you can hold in your hand? How do you segment out the areas of interest for a particular analysis or surgical model? This blog post describes the necessary steps in the workflow, who typically performs them, and the challenges being addressed to improve the process every step of the way.

Data Acquisition of Patient Anatomy

When we think of imaging throughout the decades, X-ray technology comes to mind. However, classic single 2D images on film cannot be used to drive 3D models because they are qualitative not quantitative. The main options that do work include the series of x-rays known as CT scans, MRI data, and to a lesser extent computed tomography angiography (CTA) and magnetic resonant angiography (MRA). Each approach has pros and cons and therefore must be matched to the proper anatomy and end use.

CT scans comprise a series of x-rays evenly spaced laterally across a particular body section, typically generating several hundred image files. These can be quickly acquired and offer high resolution, however, they do not do well displaying different types of soft tissue, and the process relies on extended exposure to a radiation source.

Sample multiple digital images generated as a CT scan is performed (Image courtesy nymphoenix/Shutterstock.com.)

Typical CT resolution is 500 microns in X and Y directions, and 1mm in Z. This is readily handled by Stratasys printers; for example, the print resolution of the J750 Digital Anatomy Printer is 42 microns in X, 84 microns in Y, and 14 to 27 microns layering in Z, which more than captures all possible scanned features.

Computed Tomography Angiography (CTA) involves the same equipment but uses a contrast agent. With this approach, brighter regions highlight areas with blood flow. This process is superior for showing blood vessels but does not differentiate tissue or bones well.

MRI data is based on a different technology where a strong magnetic field interacts with water in the body. This approach differentiates soft tissue and shows small blood vessels but is more expensive and not effective for capturing bone. Similarly, Magnetic Resonant Angiography (MRA) uses a contrast agent that can track small blood vessels which are important for identifying a stroke but cannot register tissue. MRI scans may also include distracting artifacts and offer poor regional contrast.

A final source of digital imaging data is Positron Emission Tomography (PET). Here, radioactive material is attached to a biologically active area such as cancer; the data obtained with sensors is useful but very local – it does not show surrounding tissue.

Segmentation: Conversion from DICOM to STL format

Whether generated by CT or MRI equipment, anatomic image data is stored in digital files in accordance with the Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) standard. Two aspects of this standard are relevant to 3D printing medical models: DICOM files include patient-specific, HIPPA-protected information, and the data in the individual images must be merged and converted into a solid model, with the areas of interest defined and partitioned.

Various software packages and services are available that will convert DICOM data into an STL model file (standard format for 3D printer input) while stripping out the personal identifying information. (The latter must be done to comply with HIPPA regulations: never send a DICOM file directly to any service bureau.)

Segmentation involves partitioning a digital image into distinct sets of pixels, defining regions as organ, bone, blood vessel, tumor, etc., then grouping and combining those sub-sections into a 3D model saved as an STL file. Not only does this format offer more meaningful information than a stack of separate images, but it can then be exported for 3D printing.

Example of processed CT scans, combined into a multiple-view 3D visualization and saved as an STL file. (Image courtesy PADT Inc.)

The standard unit of measure for identifying and segmenting the different regions within the combined 3D series of CT scans is a Hounsfield unit. This is a dimensionless value, defined as tissue density/x-ray absorption; for reference, water = zero, a kidney =+40 and bone = +1000.

Human guidance is needed to set threshold Hounsfield levels and draw a perimeter to the area of interest. You can define groups with the same threshold level, cut out certain areas that are not needed (e.g., “mask” the lungs to focus on the spine), and use preset values that exist for common model types. Typically, a radiologist or trained biomedical engineer performs this task, since correctly identifying boundaries is a non-trivial judgement task.

A particularly challenging task is the workflow for printing blood vessels, as opposed to bones or organs. The output from CTA/MRA imaging is the blood pool, not the enclosing vessel. In this case, users need third-party software to create a shell of X thickness around the blood pool shape, then keep both model files (pool and vessel) to guide printing the vessel walls and their internal support structure (which, on the Stratasys J750 Digital Anatomy Printer, is soluble and dissolves out.)

So far, just a few medical segmentation software packages exist:

  • Materialise Mimics Innovation Suite is internationally known for its excellence in image analysis and allows you to write scripted routines for automating repeated aspects of the segmentation tasks. There are also tools for interpreting images with metal artifacts, designing support connections between parts, measuring specified features, and rendering a view of the resulting 3D model.
  • Synopsys Simpleware ScanIP is a 3D image segmentation, processing, and meshing platform that processes data from MRI, CT, and non-medical imaging systems. Simpleware ScanIP removes or reduces unwanted noise in the greyscale images, allows cropping to the area of interest, supports both automated and user-guided segmentation and measuring and includes API scripting. Modules are available for Cardio, Ortho, and Custom solutions.
  • Invesalius 3 is open-source software that can reconstruct CT and MRI data, producing 3D visualizations, image segmentation, and image measurements in both manual and semi-automated modes.
  • Embodi3D/Democratiz3D is an online service that lets you upload a series of CT scans, select a basic anatomy type (bone, detailed bone, dental, muscle, etc.), choose the free medium-to-low resolution or paid high resolution conversion service, and receive the link to an automatically generated STL file. (Users do not interact with the file to choose any masking, measuring, or cropping.) The website also offers downloadable 3D printable models and 3D printing services.

Note that these packages may or may not have some level of 510K FDA clearance for how the results of their processing can be used. Users would have to contact the vendors to learn the current status.

Setting up the STL file for printing

Most of the segmentation software packages give you options for selected resolution of the final model. As with all STL files, the greater the number of triangles, the finer the detail that is featured, but the model size may get too large for reasonable set-up in the printer’s software. You may also find that you still want to edit the model, either to do some hole repairs or smoothing, slice away a section to expose an interior view, or add mechanical struts/supports for delicate and/or heavy anatomy sections. Materialise Magics software will do all of this readily, otherwise, adding a package that can edit STL files or create/merge geometry onto an STL file will be useful.

Medical Modeling software workflow from CT scan to print, for typical Stratasys 3D printed model.

Whoever is setting the file up for printing needs to make a number of decisions based on experience. For Stratasys Connex3, J55, J8-series or J750 Digital Anatomy Printers, the process begins by bringing the file into GrabCAD Print and deciding on an optimized build orientation. Next, colors and materials are assigned, including transparent sections, percentages of transparent colors, and flexible/variable durometer materials, which can be for a single part or a multi-body model.

For the J750 Digital Anatomy Printer in particular, users can assign musculoskeletal, heart, vascular, and general anatomies to each model, then choose detailed, pre-assigned materials and properties to print models whose tactile response mimics actual biomechanical behavior, such as “osteoporotic bone.” (see Sidebar).

I tested out the free online Democratiz3D segmentation service offered by Embodi3D. Following their tutorial, I was able to convert my very own DICOM file folder of 267 CT images into files without patient ID information, generating a single STL output file. I chose the Bone/Detailed/Medium resolution option which ignored all the other visible anatomy then brought the resulting model into the free software Meshmixer to edit (crop) the STL. That let me zero in on a three-vertebrae section of my lower spine model and save it in the 3MF format.

Lastly, I opened the new 3MF file in GrabCAD Print, the versatile Stratasys printer set-up software that works with both FDM (filament) and PolyJet (UV-cured resin) printers. For the former case, I printed the model in ivory ASA on an F370 FDM printer, and for the latter, I was able to assign a creamy-grey color (Red248/Green248/Blue232) to give a bone-like appearance, printing the model on a J55 PolyJet office-environment printer.

GradCAD Print software set-up of 3MF vertebrae model, ready for printing in a user-defined bone color on a Stratasys J55 PolyJet full-color 3D printer. (Image courtesy PADT Inc.)
3D printed vertebrae parts created from CT scans: on left, ABS part from a Stratasys F370 FDM printer; on right, Vero rigid resin material from a Stratasys J55 PolyJet printer. (Image courtesy PADT Inc.)  

Experience helps in producing accurately segmented parts, but more features, such as AI-enabled selections, and more online tutorials are helping grow the field of skilled image-processing health professionals. Clarkson College (Omaha, NE) also recently announced the first Medical 3D Printing Specialist Certificate program.

Reach out to PADT to learn more about medical modeling and Stratasys 3D printers.

PADT Inc. is a globally recognized provider of Numerical Simulation, Product Development and 3D Printing products and services. For more information on Stratasys printers and materials, contact us at info@padtinc.com.

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Sidebar: J750 Digital Anatomy Printer

The Stratasys J750 Digital Anatomy Printer uses PolyJet resin 3D printing technology to create parts that mimic the look and biomechanical response of human tissue, organs and bones. Users select from a series of pre-programmed anatomies then the material composition is automatically generated along with accurate internal structures. Pliable heart regions allow practice with cutting, suturing and patching, while hollow vascular models support training with guide wires and catheters. General anatomy models can replicate encapsulated and non-encapsulated tumors, while bone structures can be created that are osteoporotic and/or include regions that support tapping, reaming and screw insertion.

Currently the Digital Anatomy Printer models present in the range of 80 to 110 Hounsfield Units. Higher value materials are under development which would help hospitals create phantoms for calibrating their CT systems.

Currently available Digital Anatomy Printer   Model/Section Assignments:

Structural Heart:

  • Clot
  • Frame
  • Myocardium
  • Reinforcement
  • Solid Tumor
  • Valve Annulus
  • Valve Chordae
  • Valve Leaflet
  • Valvular Calcification
  • Vessel Wall

General Anatomy:

  • Dense connective tissues
  • Hollow internal organs
  • Solid internal organs
  • Solid Tumor

Blood Vessels:

  • Clot
  • Fixtures
  • Frame
  • Gel Support
  • Inlets
  • Reinforcements
  • Solid Tumor
  • Valve Annulus
  • Valve Leaflet
  • Vascular Calcification
  • Vessel Wall

Musculoskeletal

  • Facet Joints
  • General Bone
  • Intervertebral Discs
  • Ligament
  • Long Bone
  • Nerves
  • Open End
  • Ribs
  • Skull
  • Vertebra

From visualization to simulation: Digital Anatomy Solutions for 3D Printing – Webinar

The Stratasys J750 Digital Anatomy printer truly brings the look and feel of medical models to life with unrivaled accuracy, realism and functionality. Whether used for surgeon training or to perform testing during device development, its models provide unmatched clinical versatility mimicking both the appearance and response of human tissue.

Bring medical models to life. The J750 Digital Anatomy Printer takes the J750 capabilities to the next level. Step up to the printer’s digital capabilities to create models with an incredible array of microstructures which not only look, but now feel and function like actual human tissue for true haptic feedback. All of this in a single print operation with minimal to no finishing steps like painting, sanding or assembly.

Join PADT’s 3D Printing & Support Application Engineer Pam Waterman for a discussion on the value of this innovative new technology, including:

– How it solves challenges facing medical device companies and hospitals

– More realistic, functional, and anatomically accurate modeling capabilities

– Quicker design and development, leading to reduced time-to-market

– And much more

Register Here

If this is your first time registering for one of our Bright Talk webinars, simply click the link and fill out the attached form. We promise that the information you provide will only be shared with those promoting the event (PADT).

You will only have to do this once! For all future webinars, you can simply click the link, add the reminder to your calendar and you’re good to go!

Bring Your Most Imaginative Ideas to Life with Pantone Validation on the Stratasys J750 & J735

If seeing is believing, holding something this vivid is knowing for sure.

The Stratasys J735 and J750 deliver unrivaled aesthetics to your brightest ideas and boldest ambitions with true, full-color capability, texture mapping and color gradients.

3D print prototypes that look, feel and operate like the finished products in multiple materials and colors without sacrificing time for intricacy and complexity. Better communicate designs with vivid, realistic samples, and save on manual post-processing delays and costs.

Stratasys J735 and J750 printers are PANTONE Validated™

This validation makes the Pantone Matching System (PMS) Colors available for the first time in a 3D printing solution. It provides a universal language of color that enables color-critical decisions through every stage of the workflow for brands and manufacturers. It helps define, communicate and control color from inspiration to realization.

Color matching to Pantone Colors in a single click

GrabCAD Print software provides a quicker, more realistic expression of color in your models and prototypes, saving hours over traditional paint matching or iterative color matching processes.

  • Adding Pantone color selection increases the color gamut found within the GrabCAD Print Application and simplifies the color selection process
  • Designers can access the colors directly from GrabCAD Print, selecting Pantone within the Print Settings dialog box. From within this view the user can search for their desired Pantone color or select from the list.

Multiple material selections

This means  you can load up to six materials at once, including any combination of rigid, flexible, transparent or opaque materials and their components.

Double the number of print nozzles

More print heads means you can produce ultra-smooth surfaces and fine details with layer thickness as fine as 0.014 mm—about half the width of a human skin cell.

Discover how you can achieve stronger realism and color matching thanks to the Pantone Validation available on the Stratasys J750 & J735.

Contact the industry experts at PADT via the link below for more information:

Stratasys To Release First Pantone Validated 3D Printer & Much More! – New Product Announcement 2019

In an exciting statement this week, Stratasys, world leader and pioneer of all things of 3D Printing technology announced the launch of three new products: F120 3D Printer, V650 Flex Large Scale Stereolithography Printer, and Pantone Color Validation on the J750 and J735 3D Printers.

As a certified platinum Stratasys channel partner, PADT is proud to offer these new releases to manufacturers, designers, and engineers of all disciplines in the four corners area of the United States (Arizona, Colorado, Utah, and New Mexico).

Check out the brochures listed below, and contact PADT at info@padtinc.com for additional information. More on these offerings will be coming soon.

Introducing the Stratasys F120
Affordable Industrial-grade 3D printing

The newest member of the F123 platform brings the value of industrial grade 3D printing capabilities to an accessible price point​.

To get professional 3D printing results, you need professional tools. But most people think they can make do with low-priced desktop printers. They quickly find out, however, that these printers don’t meet their expectations.

It doesn’t have to be a choice between great performance and price. The Stratasys F120 delivers industrial-grade 3D printing at an attractive price with consistent results that desktop printers can’t match.

Introducing the Stratasys V650 Flex
A Configurable, Open VAT, Large Scale Stereolithography Printer by Stratasys

Introducing the Stratasys V650 Flex: a production ready, open material Vat Polymerization 3D Printer with the speed, reliability, quality, and accuracy you would expect from the world leader in 3D printing.

Upgrade to the Stratasys V650 Flex 3D Stereolithography printer and you can add game-changing advances in speed, accuracy and reliability to the established capabilities of Stereolithography.

Create smooth-surfaced prototypes, master patterns, large concept models and investment casting patterns more quickly and more precisely than ever.

Introducing Pantone Color Validation for the J750 and J735 3D printers
3D printing with true color-matching capabilities is here

Say goodbye to painting prototypes and say hello to the Stratasys J750 and J735 3D Printers. As the first-ever 3D printers validated by Pantone, they accurately print nearly 2,000 Pantone colors, so you can get the match you need for brand requests or design preferences.

This partnership with Pantone sets the stage for a revolution in design and prototype processes. As the industry’s first PANTONE Validated™ 3D printers, they allow designers to build realistic prototypes faster than ever before – shrinking design-to-prototype and accelerating product time-to-market.

Exploring RAPID 2018 in Fort Worth, TX

Waking up at 3 A.M. isn’t something I like to do often. However, for this conference I was about to attend, it was worth the early rise! Caffeine is a must to get through a long day of walking around and being educated by all the different new and old manufacturers of 3D printers. If you have been around 3D printing, you know there are really two conferences that are above the rest; AMUG and RAPID. Here are some of the things that were announced that I believe are the most significant at RAPID.

Stratasys:

Stratasys didn’t disappoint this year in introducing a new carbon fiber 3D printer, material, and metal technology that will be coming in a year+. We are very familiar with the Nylon 12 Carbon Fiber reinforced material that Stratasys has. It is THE best Nylon 12 carbon fiber material on the market and there are a few factors as to why that is the case. One is that they are using longer strands of Carbon Fiber than the competitor along with 35% carbon fiber filled parts compared to 15%. Soluble support is huge for this material as well, along with 2 to 5 times faster printer speeds. Check out how One Wheel is using this printer to help with manufacturing their cool skateboard:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tOojDgd7KVE

ANTERO 800 is the new material that Stratasys released recently. This material is being used in many amazing ways. Lockheed Martin/NASA/Stratasys/PADT collaborated in a very successful task to get flight approved hardware for one of the next missions to space. Below is the full story on this new and exciting ESD version of Antero 800 FDM material. Could your company also benefit from using this type of material? We would like to help!

http://www.3ders.org/articles/20180418-lockheed-martin-padt-stratasys-to-3d-print-over-100-parts-for-nasas-orion-capsule.html

Vero Magenta V and Vero Yellow V are the new Polyjet materials to help with getting more vibrant colors along with deeper red and brighter yellow. 500,000 color combinations can be achieved now with these 2 materials that have been improved upon. Absolutely beautiful parts can be made with a Stratasys J750 or J735.

Metal We have been asking (and have been asked) for metal for the longest time! When is Stratasys going to jump into the metal game? One of the main reasons why I went to RAPID this year was to see Stratasys Metal parts. They did not disappoint. As far as what density these metal parts are, the process for printing, and when a machine will be available, that is still the big unknown. One thing mentioned at the conference is that they are wanting to make metal 3D printing affordable to all with the ability to 3D print metal 80% cheaper than anything available right now. How this compares to what Desktop Metal, Mark Forged, HP, and others who proclaim to make metal parts cheaper than the Laser or Electron Beam options is yet to be known. Stratasys wants to be able to provide value to the metal market by focusing on areas that are lacking, which is Aluminum. Always good to have competition against the large companies of metal as it makes everyone get better at what they are doing. Read more about this machine and what Phil Reeves (VP of Strategic Consulting from Stratasys) has to say in an exclusive interview with TCT. Also below are a few pictures I took in the Stratasys booth of their metal parts that were on display.

www.tctmagazine.com/tct-events/3d-printing-at-rapid-tct/stratasys-metal-3d-printing/

 

 

 

 

 

 

Software was featured big time at RAPID because it unlocks the ability to 3D print amazing parts like this that was featured in the EOS booth. Lattice structures and topology optimized parts!

There were a lot of companies present at RAPID that highlighted where the industry is headed. Materials with vibrant color capabilities was one such area receiving a lot of attention. While competitors have introduced machines that are capable of printing in a wide variety of colors, they still fall short when compared to the Stratasys Polyjet offerings. Machines such as the J750 and J735 both offer a similar range of color compared to other companies on the market, but surpass them when it comes to material options, applications, and overall usability.

I enjoyed talking with all the major 3D printer manufactures at RAPID. One questions I would ask each of them is, what makes your system better than the competitors? I loved hearing the sales pitch about their machines and there was some great insight gained by asking this.At the end of the day, it all comes down to how you are wanting to use the 3D printer. At PADT we have many different 3D printers, and while we see and understand the appeal of the various different offerings on the market today, there is a reason why we continue to resell and support the brands we do. Let us know how we can help you out and any questions that you have with 3D printing.

Exploring the Value of Multi-Print 3D Models for Medical with Stratasys & Intermountain Healthcare

PADT’s Salt Lake City office has been involved with fulfillment of medical 3d Printing of several cases where customers are exploring the value of multi-color and multi-material medical 3D models by using the Stratasys J750 or the Connex 3. One of those cases was presented at the Mayo Clinic’s Collaborative 3D Printing in Medical Practice 2018 course, which was held in Arizona this year.

An Intermountain Healthcare facility in Salt Lake City needed help with 3D printing a patient-specific anatomy, as they were looking to better their understanding of the value of 3D printing using multi-color printer beyond their existing in-house capabilities. In the picture below, Rami Shorti, PhD., a senior Biomechanical Engineering Scientist at Intermountain Healthcare, wrote:

“A patient with a horseshoe kidney and multiple large symptomatic stones, who had failed Extracorporeal Shock Wave Lithotripsy and Ureteroscopy Treatment, was used to evaluate the benefit of using different imaging modalities intraoperatively.” 

Working with us in Salt Lake City, Rami Shorti, PhD, prepared the patient-specific medical imaging segmentation, post-processing of the patient anatomy, and finally generated for us a 3D printable CAD model that we were able to print using a Stratasys Objet 260 Connex 3. Since our office is located just around the corner from the hospital, we were able to work closely with Rami to identify the colors and finish of the final part.

The Connex 3 printer was introduced in 2014 as the only printer in the world that could combine three different model materials in a single print pass. Most 3D printers can only print with one material at a time, which is one of the main reasons why this technology is preferred for medical use cases along with its added precision. In 2017, Stratasys introduced the J750, which again is an industry first, becoming the only printer in the world that can print 6 different materials at the same time.  Combinations of hard plastics and rubber materials allow for a range of shore hardness values along with the ability to mix three primary colors to print 500,000 different colors.

With a quick turnaround needed, we decided to use the Connex 3 and were amazed that we were able to print the parts in two batches. Within 48 hours of receiving the STL files from Dr. Shorti, we were able to 3D print, post-process, and deliver the parts in time for the surgeon to review the time-sensitive surgical planning guides using the mockup. To enhance the transparency of the parts, we simply applied a few coats of Rust-Oleum Clear Gloss to the 3D printed part.  Now we were able to relax and wait for it to dry.  Below is a picture of the finished products displayed at the Mayo Clinic event.

 “3D printing added a level of benefit because of its ability to showcase the stones, renal pelvis, and renal arteries and veins simultaneously through the image fusion step done in Mimics software and with the use of specific materials and contrasting colors.  In addition, its ability to be held and manipulated in space was observed to be beneficial especially for patient education.”

– Rami Shorti, PhD., senior Biomechanical Engineering Scientist, Intermountain Healthcare

PADT is excited to continue our work with Intermountain Healthcare, and grow this relationship as new opportunities arise to leverage multi-material printing.

Introducing the Stratasys J750 – Webinar

Introducing the Stratasys J750 – Webinar

August 30th, 2017 – 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM MST

The Stratasys J750 3D printer delivers unavailed aesthetic performance including true, full-color capability with the texture mapping and color gradients. Create prototypes that look, feel and operate like finished products, without the need for painting or assembly, thanks to the Stratasys J750’s wide range of material properties.

With this, students can easily experience both the prototyping and testing stages of the manufacturing process, helping to prepare them for what they will experience once they enter the workforce. The high quality materials available with the J750 also allow for the creation of highly intricate and realistic models, perfect for helping medical students with research.

The wide color spectrum, combined with the fine-finish, multi-material capability, let’s the Stratasys J750 produce parts with an incredible array of characteristics. Prototypes that need to look, feel and function like future products are possible in a single print operation, with minimal to no finishing steps, like painting, sanding or assembly.

With such an innovative machine comes a variety of user applications, such as:

  • Image Rapid Prototyping
  • Concept Models
  • Medical Models
  • Jigs & Fixtures
  • Colored Textures

Join PADT’s Sales executive Jeff Nichols and 3D Printing Application Engineer James Barker from 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM MST AZ for an in depth look at how the Stratasys J750 stacks up against it’s competition, and how it’s various attributes help to make it the perfect fit for institutions such as yours!

 

Don’t miss this unique opportunity to bring the future of manufacturing into your classroom or workplace, secure your spot today!

  

Full Color 3D Printer Road Show: J750 Wows in Scottsdale, Including Local TV Coverage

Stratasys-J750-Road-Show-partsOur loop around the Southwest with the new Stratasys J750 Full Color 3D Printer finished strong with a well attended gathering at ASU’s Skysong in Scottsdale.  The event was so popular, Channel 10 did a story on it. Over 130 people signed up to learn more about this fantastic device, get caught up on latest industry trends, and talk with other users of Additive Manufacturing.

Stratasys-J750-Road-Show-lectureThis event had a great mix of users from multiple industries as well as students and people wanting to just learn more about the technology.

The presentations were a big hit from every seminar, and Dhruv’s was especially popular in Arizona.  You can download the presentations here:

Eric Miller’s Presentation on Design for 3D Printing:
PADT-Design-for-3DPrinting-2016_07_29-1

Dhruv Bhate’s Overview of Additive Manufacturing:
PADT-Introduction-to-Additive-Manufacturing-2016_07_29-1

James Barker and Mario Vargas’s Introduction of the Stratasys J750:
PADT-Introduction-Stratasys-J750-2016_07_29-1

Stratasys-J750-Road-Show-group

During the breaks and after the presentations, we had a chance to interact one-on-one with customers, show off parts, and answer questions.  If you have any questions, please feel free to contact us at 480.813.4884 or info@padtinc.com.

Lastly, we were visited by local TV channel 10, KSAZ who did a short but really informative segment on the show and the Stratasys J750:

Full Color 3D Printer Road Show: Salt Lake City Event Focuses on Real World Applications

slc-i4The second stop on our trip around the Southwest for Stratasys’ new J750 Full Color 3D Printer was in fantastic downtown Salt Lake City. This device is reinventing 3D printing, and we are showing it off in person so people can see it up close along with holding incredible parts it makes in their hands.

Next stop if Phoenix – sign up here!

The 3D Printing community in Utah is very mature and the attendees were mostly very experienced users of many different additive manufacturing technologies.  So we focused on real world applications for the J750 as well as other Stratasys systems.

slc-i1
slc-i2We were fortunate enought to have a customer, Ultradent, present the fantastic ways that they use their FDM and Polyjet printers to make prototypes, tooling, and production parts. slc-i3

As is usual in this type of an event, the discussion between and after presentations are the best part.  People from Aerospace, sporting goods, medical devices, and consumer products swapped stories, suggestions, and tips.

It was also a family affair. with Jame Barker’s latest family addition was in attendence to help spread the word on the value of 3D Printing with Stratasys solutions:slc-baby-1Beyond the little guy, the other hit of the afternoon was the J750.  As seasoned additive manufacturing profesionals they see the incredible leap forward this machine represents – truly reinventing 3D Printing and opening up a huge range of oportunities.

Full Color 3D Printer Road Show: First Stop a Success Including Radio Broadcast

ICOSA_07169Denver was the first stop on a trip around the Southwest for Stratasys’ new J750 Full Color 3D Printer.  We are showing this machine that is reinventing 3D printing off in person so people can see the device up close and hold the incredible parts it makes in their hands.

You can still sign up for the Salt Lake City or Phoenix events.

ICOSA_70965The Denver event was hosted by St. Patrick’s Brewery in Littleton, right down the street from PADT’s Colorado Office. Several customers and PADT employees gave talks on how to better use 3D Printing, including a presentation from Mario Vargas on the new Stratasys J750.

On top of all of that, local radio station KDMT, Denver’s Money Talk 1690, did a live broadcast from the event. You can listen in here. Again, PADT employees and customers talked about 3D Printing as well as the new Stratasys J750.

ICOSA_30368We also made the local paper, check that out here.