All Things Ansys 078: Optimization & Automation Updates in Ansys 2020 R2 – OptiSLang

 

Published on: December 14th, 2020
With: Eric Miller & Josh Stout
Description:  

In this episode your host and Co-Founder of PADT, Eric Miller is joined by PADT’s Systems Support & Application Engineer Josh Stout for a discussion on how OptiSLang helps to increase the robustness and reliability of simulation, as well as a look at what new features are in the 2020 R2 updated version.

If you would like to learn more about this update, you can view Josh’s webinar on the topic here:

https://www.brighttalk.com/webcast/15747/458229

If you have any questions, comments, or would like to suggest a topic for the next episode, shoot us an email at podcast@padtinc.com we would love to hear from you!

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Optimization & Automation Updates in Ansys 2020 R2 – Webinar

Simulation is becoming an integral part of our customers’ product development processes, and new horizons await. By combining different physics into a multidisciplinary approach, phenomena can be investigated more holistically and optimized to a greater degree. Additionally, simulation processes can be standardized and shared across teams, allowing simulation novices to gain more direct access to simulation.

Time-consuming manual searches for the best and most robust design configuration can now be accelerated by adding state-of-the-art algorithms for design exploration, optimization, robustness and reliability analysis. Through the power of interactive visualization and artificial intelligence technologies, engineers and designers can gain a better understanding of their design and make the right decisions in less time.

The process integration and design optimization solution that enables all the above is Ansys optiSLang.

Join PADT’s Mechanical Application Engineer and Systems Expert Josh Stout for an exploration of this interconnected tool and what new capabilities are available in it’s 2020 R2 release.

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Press Release: Expanding its Product Development Expertise, PADT Adds Dr. Tyler Shaw, Former Head of Advanced Manufacturing at PING, as Director of Engineering

Change is an important part of growth. Our mission within the Engineering Services team at PADT is:

Delivering Premier Engineering Services to Enable World-Changing Product Development.

To do that, we need a world class leader. And when our long-time Director of Engineering decided to move to something different, we searched high and low for a new person. The ability and experience of the applicants was amazing and making a decision was difficult. In the end we were fortunate to have Dr. Tyler Shaw join PADT.

Read the official press release below to learn more. We are excited about this new phase for our consulting offering. Tyler’s background and knowlede open new and excited doors.

If you would like to explore how PADT can provide product development or simulation assistance to your organization, contact us, and Tyler along with the rest of the team will be eager to learn more.


Expanding its Product Development Expertise, PADT Adds Dr. Tyler Shaw, Former Head of Advanced Manufacturing at PING, as Director of Engineering

Shaw Tapped to Lead PADT’s Simulation and Product Development Team Who Provide Services Across Industries Worldwide

TEMPE, Ariz., December 3, 2020 PADT, a globally recognized provider of numerical simulation, product development, and 3D printing products and services, today announced it has hired Dr. Tyler Shaw as its Director of Engineering to oversee the company’s simulation and product development consulting team effective immediately. Shaw most recently served as the head of Advanced Manufacturing and Innovation at PING golf, and has worked as an engineer, product manager, and educator across a diverse range of industries for more than 20 years.

“PADT’s ability to help our customers solve tough problems is a key industry differentiator, and we’re thrilled to welcome Tyler as a leader to oversee our team of simulation and design experts,” said Eric Miller, co-founder and principal of PADT. “His experience and impressive technical background will enable us to continue our high-quality service while providing fresh, innovative ideas for developing products to their full potential.”

Dr. Shaw replaces Rob Rowan as the director of Engineering. Rowan spent nearly 20 years with PADT and is credited for driving the growth of PADT’s engineering services and capabilities. “We owe a tremendous debt of gratitude to Rob for his dedication and leadership,” said Miller. “He was greatly admired for his broad engineering knowledge and business acumen and we wish him the best in his future endeavors.”

After a comprehensive search, Dr. Shaw emerged as the most technically advanced, skilled, and capable candidate to assume the role as PADT’s engineering leader. Dr. Shaw will focus on setting strategy, managing resources, and providing technical expertise to solve customer challenges. Prior to working at PADT and PING, Dr. Shaw served as a product manager for Vestas where he led customer-specific technical and commercial solutions for wind turbine sales across North, Central, and South America. He was also a principal systems engineer for Orbital Sciences Corporation, now Northrop Grumman, where he managed projects related to the development of world-class rockets, satellites, and other space systems.

“I am thrilled to join PADT and am ready for the challenge of taking its engineering services to the next level,” said Dr. Shaw. “I’ve worked with PADT in my previous post and was impressed with their capabilities and portfolio of clients, which covers a diverse set of industries. My background and technical knowledge across many of these sectors will serve PADT’s customers well.”

To learn more about Dr. Shaw and PADT’s simulation and product development services, please visit www.padtinc.com.

About PADT

PADT is an engineering product and services company that focuses on helping customers who develop physical products by providing Numerical Simulation, Product Development, and 3D Printing solutions. PADT’s worldwide reputation for technical excellence and experienced staff is based on its proven record of building long-term win-win partnerships with vendors and customers. Since its establishment in 1994, companies have relied on PADT because “We Make Innovation Work.” With over 90 employees, PADT services customers from its headquarters at the Arizona State University Research Park in Tempe, Arizona, and from offices in Torrance, California, Littleton, Colorado, Albuquerque, New Mexico, Austin, Texas, and Murray, Utah, as well as through staff members located around the country. More information on PADT can be found at www.PADTINC.com.

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More formal versions of this Press Release are available here in PDF and here in HTML.

All Things Ansys 077: Multibody Dynamics Updates in Ansys Motion 2020 R2

 

Published on: November 30th, 2020
With: Eric Miller & Jim Peters
Description:  

In this episode your host and Co-Founder of PADT, Eric Miller is joined by PADT’s Senior Staff Technologist Jim Peters for a discussion on the new capabilities available within Ansys Motion 2020 R2. With an integration into Mechanical, users can take advantage of multi-use models resulting in substantial time savings.

If you would like to learn more about this update, you can view Jim’s webinar on the topic here:

https://www.brighttalk.com/webcast/15747/455203

If you have any questions, comments, or would like to suggest a topic for the next episode, shoot us an email at podcast@padtinc.com we would love to hear from you!

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Multibody Dynamics Updates in Ansys Motion 2020 R2 – Webinar

Ansys Motion, now in the Mechanical interface, is a third generation engineering solution based on an advanced multibody dynamics solver that enables fast and accurate analysis of rigid and flexible bodies and gives an accurate evaluation of physical events through the analysis of the mechanical system as a whole.

Ansys Motion uses four tightly integrated solving schemes (rigid body, flexible body, modal & meshfree EasyFlex) that give the user unparalleled capabilities to analyze in any combination imaginable. Large assemblies with millions of degrees of freedom can be studied with the effects of flexibility and contact included. With an integration into Mechanical, users can take advantage of multi-use models resulting in substantial time savings.

Join PADT’s Senior Staff Technologist, Jim Peters for an exploration of what this tool has to offer, and how seamlessly it integrates with the Ansys Mechanical interface.

Register Here

If this is your first time registering for one of our Bright Talk webinars, simply click the link and fill out the attached form. We promise that the information you provide will only be shared with those promoting the event (PADT).

You will only have to do this once! For all future webinars, you can simply click the link, add the reminder to your calendar and you’re good to go!

All Things Ansys 076: MAPDL – Elements, Contact & Solver Updates in Ansys 2020 R2

 

Published on: November 16th, 2020
With: Eric Miller & Ted Harris
Description:  

In this episode your host and Co-Founder of PADT, Eric Miller is joined by PADT’s Simulation Support Manager Ted Harris for a discussion on what’s new in the Ansys Mechanical APDL 2020 R2 release.

If you would like to learn more about this update, you can view Ted’s webinar on the topic here:

https://www.brighttalk.com/webcast/15747/452033

If you have any questions, comments, or would like to suggest a topic for the next episode, shoot us an email at podcast@padtinc.com we would love to hear from you!

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MAPDL – Elements, Contact & Solver Updates in Ansys 2020 R2 – Webinar

The Ansys finite element solvers enable a breadth and depth of capabilities unmatched by anyone in the world of computer-aided simulation. Thermal, Structural, Acoustic, Piezoelectric, Electrostatic and Circuit Coupled Electromagnetics are just an example of what can be simulated. Regardless of the type of simulation, each model is represented by a powerful scripting language, the Ansys Parametric Design Language (APDL).

APDL is the foundation for all sophisticated features, many of which are not exposed in the Workbench Mechanical user interface. It also offers many conveniences such as parameterization, macros, branching and looping, and complex math operations. All these benefits are accessible within the Ansys Mechanical APDL user interface.

Join PADT’s Simulation Support Manager, Ted Harris for a look at what’s new for MAPDL in Ansys 2020 R2, regarding:

  • Contact Modeling & Robustness
  • Elements
  • Post Processing
  • Solver Components
  • And Much More

Register Here

If this is your first time registering for one of our Bright Talk webinars, simply click the link and fill out the attached form. We promise that the information you provide will only be shared with those promoting the event (PADT).

You will only have to do this once! For all future webinars, you can simply click the link, add the reminder to your calendar and you’re good to go!

Introducing Level Up – An Ansys Mechanical Virtual Conference

PADT & Ansys are excited to announce Level Up with Ansys Mechanical, a free virtual technical conference on Wednesday, December 2, 2020 at 10 a.m. EST.

For the past 50 years, Ansys Mechanical continues to be the go-to finite element analysis platform for structural analysis, and they’re just getting warmed up. Join visionary Ansys product development, product management and engineering leaders as they provide expert insights on Mechanical’s technology advances and preview the platform’s future.

From those engineers looking to boot up their simulation experience to those seeking to step up their simulation skills, and even those operating in “beast mode”, who execute large and complex workflows, this action-packed event showcases how Mechanical radically transforms product design.

Highlights include: 

  • Learn the latest with scripting and automation to save valuable time
  • Discover how to lightweight product designs with structural optimization methods
  • Understand how to couple multiple physics to assess performance in the real world
  • And so much more

Catch the thought-provoking plenary presentation, engage with Ansys’ brightest during the live Q&A, and interact with fellow engineers during live polls. 

Register Here

Optical System Design & Disruption in Ansys SPEOS 2020 R2 – Webinar

When customers evaluate products, the overall look and details can make all the difference. Ansys physics-based imaging, photonics and illumination software streamlines the design process, so you can better understand how your product will look and operate under real-world lighting and usage conditions.

Whether you are designing a TV screen, street lighting network, smart headlight, head-up display or interior mood lighting in an automobile, Ansys optical simulation software helps you make your design more efficient and appealing. Optical sensors are the eyes of any intelligent system, and Ansys physics-based simulations can help you assess raw signals from camera and lidar systems in their operating environments.

Ansys 2020 R2 empowers Ansys SPEOS users to go further than ever before with enhancements that improve the handling of complex sensors, project preview and computation.

Enhancements include:

 •  Highly accurate camera models drastically improve camera simulation experience 

•  Faster simulation times when using light sources and provides nearly real-time review 

•  4X faster simulation setup thanks to optimized GUI

Join PADT’s Application Engineer Robert McCathren for a first hand look at the capabilities of optical simulation, followed by what’s available for SPEOS in the Ansys 2020 R2 update.

Register Here

If this is your first time registering for one of our Bright Talk webinars, simply click the link and fill out the attached form. We promise that the information you provide will only be shared with those promoting the event (PADT).

You will only have to do this once! For all future webinars, you can simply click the link, add the reminder to your calendar and you’re good to go!

All Things Ansys 074: Design & Digital Engineering Updates in Ansys 2020 R2

 

Published on: October 19th, 2020
With: Eric Miller & Robert McCathren
Description:  

In this episode your host and Co-Founder of PADT, Eric Miller is joined by PADT’s Application Engineer Robert McCathren for a look at 3D product design and updates for Ansys Discovery AIM, Live, and SpaceClaim in 2020 R2.

If you would like to learn more about this update, you can view Robert’s webinar on the topic here:

https://www.brighttalk.com/webcast/15747/440598

If you have any questions, comments, or would like to suggest a topic for the next episode, shoot us an email at podcast@padtinc.com we would love to hear from you!

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Design & Digital Engineering Updates in Ansys 2020 R2 – Webinar

The Ansys Discovery suite of tools allows engineers to improve their 3D design capabilities, by increasing productivity, improving product quality, and spurring innovation. Explore ideas, iterate and innovate with unprecedented speed early in your design process with Ansys 3D design software.

Delve deeper into design details, refine concepts and perform multiple physics simulations to better account for real-world behaviors. 

Join PADT’s Application Engineer Robert McCathren for a look at 3D product design and updates for Ansys Discovery AIM, Live, and SpaceClaim in 2020 R2.

In the Ansys 2020 R2, users can explore large design spaces and answer critical design questions early in the product design process without waiting days or weeks for traditional simulation results.

Additionally, these tools have been upgraded to support concept modeling and model prep for importing modified CAD geometry, auto-skinning topology optimization results from Ansys Mechanical for automated geometry reconstruction, and so much more.

Register Here

If this is your first time registering for one of our Bright Talk webinars, simply click the link and fill out the attached form. We promise that the information you provide will only be shared with those promoting the event (PADT).

You will only have to do this once! For all future webinars, you can simply click the link, add the reminder to your calendar and you’re good to go!

All Things Ansys 073: LS-DYNA Updates in Ansys 2020 R2

 

Published on: October 5th, 2020
With: Eric Miller & Jim Peters
Description:  

In this episode your host and Co-Founder of PADT, Eric Miller is joined by PADT’s Senior Staff Technologist Jim Peters to discuss the capabilities of the explicit simulation tool LS-DYNA, and look into what’s new in the 2020 R2 version of the latest Ansys acquisition.

If you would like to learn more about this update, you can view Jim’s webinar on the topic here: https://www.brighttalk.com/webcast/15747/440598

If you have any questions, comments, or would like to suggest a topic for the next episode, shoot us an email at podcast@padtinc.com we would love to hear from you!

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Efficient and Accurate Simulation of Antenna Arrays in Ansys HFSS – Part 2

Finite Arrays

In addition to explicit modeling of finite arrays in Ansys HFSS, there are three other methods based on using unit cells. To learn more about the unit cell, please see part 1 of this blog.

In part 2, I will introduce and compare these 3 methods (1) Finite array defined using the array setting in unit cell, (2) Finite Array using Domain Decomposition Method (FADDM), (3) 3D component arrays (Figure 1). Please note that that the method 3 requires HFSS 2020R1 or newer.

(a)

(b)

(c)

Figure 1. (a) Unit cell, (b) FADDM, (c) 3D component array.

Finite Array using Unit Cell

After defining a unit cell (Figure 1a), you may simply define the number of elements, the spacing between them, and the scan angle. The assumption is that there is no mutual coupling, every element has the same radiation pattern and the same excitation. This is a good approximation for large arrays (10×10 or larger). This method may not be accurate enough in some cases, for example for a small number of elements; and when the antenna elements have main beams toward the angles that are close to the plane of the array and toward the other elements, causing a higher level of mutual coupling. However, smaller arrays won’t require as large of a compute resource as a large array.

The advantage of this method is its simulation speed. It requires the minimum memory and time to provide a quick array simulation. To define the array (after running the analysis for unit cell), right-click on Radiation from the Project Manager window. Select Antenna Array Setup, and then Regular Array Setup. In the Antenna Array Setup under Regular Array type, define the location of the first cell, the direction, the distance between the cells and number of cells in each direction.

(a)  

(b)

(c)

Figure 2. Steps to define a finite array, (a) Antenna array setup, (b) & (c) Regular array setup.

Finite Array using Domain Decomposition Method

General Domain Decomposition (DDM) for a single domain provides a way to reduce memory requirement, however, it does not reduce the meshing time for large explicit arrays. Using Finite Array DDM (FADDM) addresses this shortcoming. The FADDM bypasses the adaptive meshing stage by duplicating the mesh that was generated for a unit cell. While the unit cell is used to create the mesh, the assumption of uniform excitation is no longer present. Each element in FADDM can have different magnitude and phase and is individually modeled, however, the mesh created in the unit cell is used to generate the overall mesh, therefore, no CPU time is spent on generating the mesh. This can be seen in Figure 3, by linking the mesh of the unit cell to the FADDM, the mesh is copied, and no mesh refinement will be needed. You may compare it with the explicit array of the same size (Figure 3(c)) where the entire array has to be meshed and mesh refinement will be necessary for adaptive meshing. This can be a huge simulation time saving when the array size is large.

(a)

(b)

(c)

Figure 3. (a) Mesh from a unit cell, (b) mesh linked to FADDM, (c) explicit array mesh.

To create FADDM from unit cell, create a new HFSS design. Then copy the unit cell into the new design. In the Project Manager window, right-click on Model and choose Create Array, as shown in Figure 4. This opens the window that allows user to define the number of elements of the array along the lattice directions. By selecting “Active Cells” tab, user can define where active, passive and padding cells are located. This gives the user a means of creating different lattice shapes.

Please note that padding cells defined in the General tab represent the size of vacuum buffer surrounding the array. They are not visible to the users but are included in the FADDM simulation. The same mesh from the unit cell simulation is duplicated to padding cells (Figure 5). It is also possible to add padding cells in the Active Cells tab, and those cells are also invisible, but can be used to create the array lattice of the desired shape (Figure 6).

Figure 4. The steps to create a DDM array, the Padding Cells are used to create the vacuum box and are invisible to the user.

Figure 5. The FADDM needs a padding cell to create a vacuum box around the design. The padding cells are invisible to the user.

(a)

(b)

Figure 6. (a) Padding cells can be used to create a lattice, (b) the lattice created does not show the padding cells.

The next step is to link the mesh to the unit cell. First, an analysis setup should be created. Choose Advanced Solution Setup. In the Driven Solution Setup General tab, reduce the number of Maximum Number of Passes to 1, as shown in Figure 7(a), then choose Advanced tab and click on Import Mesh (Figure 7(b)). Click on Setup Link. This is to link the simulation to the mesh of a unit cell. There are two steps needed here. First, choose the file or design that contains the mesh information (Figure 7(c)), second is to map the variables Figure 7(d). The last step to setting up the analysis is selecting Advanced Mesh Operation tab and selecting “Ignore mesh operation in target design” (Figure 7(d)). Now the array is ready and simulation can be run. You notice that adaptive meshing goes to only one pass. If in Setup Link window the option of “Simulate source design as needed” is checked (Figure 7(c)), then if a design variable that affects the geometry is changed, the meshing of the unit cell is repeated as needed. After the simulation is completed the elements magnitude and phases can be changed as a post processing step by “Edit Sources” (right-click on Excitations). The source names provided in the edit sources is slightly different than an explicit array (Figure 8)

(a)

(b)

(c)

(d)

(e)

Figure 7. Different windows related to setting up a linked mesh in FADDM.

Figure 8. Edit sources gives the ability to change the magnitude and phase of each element.

To compare the run-time and array patterns an example of circular polarized microstrip patch antenna of a 5 ´ 5 element array is shown in Figure 9 and Figure 10. The differences can be seen at angles away from the broadside angle. This shows how the edge effects are ignored in the unit cell approximation. Table 1 shows the comparison of memory and runtime for the three methods.

Table 1. Comparing run time and memory needed for a 5 x 5 array, explicit array vs FADDM.

Elapsed Time (min:sec) Memory (MB)
Unit cell01:0683.1
FADDM03:1781.4
Explicit Array25:0694.7

Figure 9. Comparison of the far-field patterns for LHCP (co-polarization) created using FADDM and unit cell array.

Figure 10. Comparison of the far-field patterns for RHCP (cross-polarization) created using FADDM and unit cell array.

Finally, we compare the co-polarization pattern with an explicit 5 x 5 element array for scan angles of 0 and 30 degrees in  Figure 11 and Figure 12, respectively.

Figure 11. Comparison of far-field LHCP created by explicit array vs. FADDM.

Figure 12. Comparison of scanned far-field LHCP, scan angle of 30 degrees.

3D Component Array

In 2020R1 the option of 3D component array was added. This option provides a means of combining different unit cells in one array. The unit cells are defined and imported as 3D components. To create a 3D component unit cell, define each type of the cells in a separate HFSS design, run the analysis, then select all objects in the model. In the Model ribbon, click on Create 3D Component, assign a name (no spaces are allowed in the name), add any information you like to add such as owner, email, company, etc., then click OK. Once all the 3D component cells are created, create a new HFSS design for the 3D component FADDM.

The next step is to create Relative CS for each of the 3D component elements in the HFSS design that will contain the array. For this step you need to plan the array lattice ahead of time, so the components are placed in the proper locations (Figure 13). Overlap is not allowed.

The unit cells should have the followings:

  • Identical dimensions of the bounding boxes
  • Identical Primary/Secondary (Master/Slave) boundary on the unit cells.

The generation of FADDM is similar to single unit cell array, except that when you select Model->Create Array, the window will be shown as 3D Component Array Properties (Figure 14). After choosing the number of elements and the number of padding cells, the unit cells window (Figure 15) will give you options of choosing one of the 3D component unit cells for each location of the elements in the lattice. The cells can be color coded. In the example shown in Figure 16  there are 3 components, the blank cell, the vertical cell and the horizontal cell. The sources under Edit Sources window are also arranged based on the name of the 3D component cells. At this point there is no option of linking the mesh. Therefore, the number of passes for adaptive mesh should be set to a number that is appropriate for getting a convergence.

Figure 13. 3D component unit cells are arranged to create a 3D component array.

Figure 14. The 3D component array can be created the same way as creating FADDM using a unit cell.

Figure 15. The unit cells are color coded for easier lattice creation.

Figure 16. The result of lattice created using 3D component array.

Conclusion

Unit cell and Finite Array Domain Decomposition are excellent options for simulating large finite arrays within a reasonable runtime and memory requirements. The 3D component finite array is a nice added feature in 2020R1 that now provides a way to combine unit cells with different geometries in one array.

If you would like more information related to this topic or have any questions, please reach out to us at info@padtinc.com.

All Things Ansys 072: Building Digital Twins in Ansys 2020 R2

 

Published on: September 21st, 2020
With: Eric Miller, Matt Sutton & Josh Stout
Description:  

In this episode your host and Co-Founder of PADT, Eric Miller is joined by PADT’s Senior Analyst & Lead Software Developer Matt Sutton, and Systems Application & Support Engineer Josh Stout for a discussion on the advantages of using Ansys Twin Builder to create simulation-based virtual replicas of physical assets for testing, as well as what’s new and improved for this tool in the 2020 R2 release.

If you would like to learn more about this update, you can view Matt’s webinar on the topic here: https://www.brighttalk.com/webcast/15747/437059

If you have any questions, comments, or would like to suggest a topic for the next episode, shoot us an email at podcast@padtinc.com we would love to hear from you!

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All Things Ansys 071: Structural Optimization & Additive Improvements in Ansys 2020 R2

 

Published on: September 8th, 2020
With: Eric Miller & Doug Oatis
Description:  

In this episode your host and Co-Founder of PADT, Eric Miller is joined by PADT’s Lead Mechanical Engineer Doug Oatis for a discussion on what you can expect from the latest advancements in topology optimization and simulation for additive manufacturing, available in Ansys 2020 R2. This update spans a variety of areas, including optimizing setup, modifying STL files, parameter free morphing, and much more.

If you would like to learn more about this update, you can view Doug’s webinar on the topic here: https://www.brighttalk.com/webcast/15747/433058

If you have any questions, comments, or would like to suggest a topic for the next episode, shoot us an email at podcast@padtinc.com we would love to hear from you!

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