3D Printed Plastics in Functional Aerospace Parts

Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM) is the most widely used 3D printing technology today, ranging from desktop printers to industrial scale manufacturing tools. While the use of FDM for prototyping and rapid tooling is well established, its use for manufacturing end-use parts in aerospace is a more recent phenomenon. This has been brought about primarily due to the availability of one material choice in particular: ULTEM. ULTEM is a thermoplastic that delivers compliance with FAA FAR 25.853 requirements. It features inherent flame retardant behavior and provides a high strength-to-weight ratio, outstanding elevated thermal resistance, high strength and stiffness and broad chemical resistance (official SABIC press release).

During an industry scan I conducted for a recent research proposal PADT submitted, I came across several examples of the aerospace industry using the FDM process to manufacture end-use parts. Each of these examples is interesting because they demonstrate the different criteria that make FDM preferable over traditional options, and I have classified them accordingly into: design opportunity, cost and lead-time reduction, and supply complexity.

Design Opportunity: In this category, I include parts that were primarily selected for 3D printing because of the unique design freedom that layer-wise additive manufacturing offers. This applies to all 3D printing technologies, the two examples below are for FDM in ducts.

ULA Environmental Control System (ECS) duct: As reported in a prior blog post, United Launch Alliance (ULA) leveraged FDM technology to manufacture an ECS duct and reduce the overall assembly from 140 parts to only 16, while reducing production costs by 57%. The ECS ducts distribute temperature and humidity controlled air onto sensitive avionics equipment during launch and need to withstand strong vibrations. The first Atlas V with these ducts is expected to launch in 2016.

ULA's Kyle Whitlow demonstrates the ECS duct that was printed using FDM
ULA’s Kyle Whitlow demonstrates the ECS duct that was printed using FDM

Orbis Flying Eye Hospital aircraft duct: The Flying Eye Hospital is an amazing concept from Orbis, who use a refurbished DC-10 plane to deliver eye care around the world. The plane actually houses all the surgical rooms to conduct operations and also has educational classrooms. The refurbishment posed a particular challenge when it came to air conditioning: a duct had to transfer air over a rigid barrier while maintaining the volume. Due to the required geometric complexity, the team selected FDM and ULTEM to manufacture this duct, and installed it and met with FAA approval. The story is described in more detail in this video.

FDM used to enable a complex duct connection on an Orbis DC-10 aircraft
FDM used to enable a complex duct connection on an Orbis DC-10 aircraft

Supply Complexity: 3D printing has a significant role to play in retro-fitting of components on legacy aircraft. The challenge with maintaining these aircrafts is that often the original manufacturer either no longer is in business or makes the parts.

Airbus Safety belt holder: Airbus shared an interesting case of a safety belt holder that had to be retrofitted for the A310 aircraft. The original supplier made these 30 years ago and since went out of business and rebuilding the molds would cost thousands of dollars and be time-consuming. Airbus decided to use FDM to print these safety belt holders as described in this video. They took a mere 2 hours to design the part from existing drawings, and had the actual part printed and ready for evaluation within a week!

Airbus used FDM to print safety belt holders for A310 aircraft when the original supplier went out of business
Airbus used FDM to print safety belt holders for A310 aircraft when the original supplier went out of business

Incidentally, the US Air Force has also recognized this as a critical opportunity to drive down costs and reduce the downtime spent by aircrafts awaiting parts, as indicated by a recent research grant they are funding to enable them to leverage 3D printing for the purpose of improving the availability of parts that are difficult and/or expensive to procure. As of 2014, The Department of Defense (DOD) reported that they have maintenance crews supporting a staggering 31,900 combat vehicles, 239 ships and 16,900 aircraft – and identified 3D printing as a key factor in improving parts availability for these crews.

Cost & Lead-time Reduction: In low-volume, high-value industries such as aerospace, 3D printing has a very strong proposition to make as a technology that will bring products to market faster and cheaper. What is often a surprise is the levels of reduction that can be obtained with 3D printing, as borne out by the three examples below.

Airbus A350 Electric wire covers: The Airbus A350 has several hundred plastic covers that are 3D printed with FDM. These covers are used for housing electric wires at junction boxes. Airbus claims it took 70% less time to make these parts, and the manufacturing costs plunged 80%. See this video for more information.

Airbus used FDM to manufacture wire covers for their A350 aircraft
Airbus used FDM to manufacture wire covers for their A350 aircraft

Kelly Manufacturing Toroid housing: Kelly Manufacturing selected FDM to manufacture toroid housings that are assembled into their M3500 instrument, which is a “turn and bank” indicator which provides the pilot information regarding the rate of aircraft turn. These housings were previously made of urethane castings and required manual sanding to remove artifacts from the casting process, and also had high costs and lead times associated with tooling. Using FDM, they were able to eliminate the need to do sanding and reduced the lead time 93% and also reduced per-piece costs by 5% while eliminating the large tooling costs. See the official case study from Stratasys here.

Kelly MFG housing FDM
Toroid housings manufactured for Kelly Manufacturing using FDM for significant cost savings and lead time reduction

These examples help demonstrate that 3D printing parts can be a cost savings solution and almost always results in significant lead time reduction – both of vital interest in the increasingly competitive aerospace industry. Further, design freedom offered by 3D printing allows manufacturing geometries that are otherwise impossible or cost prohibitive to make using other processes, and also have enormous benefit in overcoming roadblocks in the supply chain. At the same time, not every part on an aircraft is a suitable candidate for 3D printing. As we have just seen, selection criteria involve the readily quantifiable metrics of part cost and lead time, but also involve less tangible factors such as supply chain complexity, and the design benefits available to additive manufacturing. An additional factor not explicitly mentioned in any of the previous examples is the criticality of the part to the flight and the safety of the crew and passengers on board. All these factors need to be taken into consideration when determining the suitability of the part for 3D printing.

Arizona Chief Science Officers Design Their Own 3D Printed Name Badges

az-scitech-cso-badges-3d-printed-0The Chief Science Officer program is a program for 6th-12th grade students to represent their school in STEM. And what better way is there for them to identify themselves then with 3D Printed name badges?  The program’s sponsors, the AZ SciTech Festival offer a training retreat for the kids who get elected as their school’s CSO and we all thought introducing design and 3D Printing would be a great activity.

As part of the 2015 Fall CSO Institute, PADT’s Jeff Nichols joined local designer and artist John Drury to spend some time with the kids explaining how to work with logos and shapes to convey an idea, and how to design for 3D Printing.  The kids worked out their own design and sent it to PADT for printing.

We converted their sketch into a 3D Model, starting in Adobe Illustrator. The sketch was traced with vector geometry and then a generic name was added. This was then copied 144 times and each name was typed in, with a few extras. This step was the only boring part.

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The design worked great because it is a simple extrusion with no need for support material.    The outline of their names were exported as DXF from Illustrator and then imported onto the 3D Model and extruded up to make a solid model of a badge. This was then copied to make a badge for each student. Then the names were imported and extruded on the patterned badges.

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The was a simple extrusion for each feature, allowing for contrast and readability but keeping things simple.
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This project was a great opportunity to use both patterns and importing 2D drawings. By laying everything out in a grid, we only had to make one badge and copy that. Then import the names and extrude those on the patterned badges.

STL files were then made and sent off to one of our Stratasys FDM 3D Printers. The FDM (Fused Deposition Modeling) process extrudes an ABS plastic filament, and you can change material during the build. So, to add a bit of contrast, we changed the filament color after the base of the design was done, making the logo and student names stand out.  The final results came out really nice.

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This is what they look like right out of the machine. We swapped out two color for each build. With some clever packing, we were able to get 12 badges on each platform.
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The final products really stand out.

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This project was a lot of fun because we were able to work with the students. They got what John and Jeff taught them and did a great job.  We know they will be placed with pride on back backs and jackets across Arizona.

To learn more about the CSO program, visit their website: http://chiefscienceofficers.org/ Check out the blog.  Some of these kids can really write well and their insight into Science, Technology, Math, and Education is insightful.

Real World 3D Printing: PADT Helps ULA Save with Stratasys Digital Manufacturing

Every once in a while a customer hits a home run with Additive Manufacturing, and United Launch Alliance had done that with their application of Stratasys technology to the production of flight-ready components for their rockets.  They were able to leverage 3D printing to take one component from 140 parts to 16, reducing the risks associated with creating the assembly, the piece part costs, and the assembly cost. And PADT is proud to say we were partners in this effort with ULA and Stratasys.

If you are not familiar with ULA, they are the world’s premier launch service company in the US.  It is a joint venture of Boeing and Lockheed that launches the majority of military and civilian payloads that are sent into space. True “rocket scientists” who are headquartered down the street from PADT’s Littleton Colorado office.  They just released a ton of information on how they are using the Stratasys devices they acquired through PADT as an example of what the technology can achieve.

Stratasys just released a great video on how ULA is using the technology. This is a great example of the right people, using the right technology, in the right way:

You can also read the official press release here.

We are highlighting his application as a way to let people know that 3D Printing is not just about makers, nor is it just about engineering prototypes. Every day users are creating production hardware to produce usable parts that save them time and money.  Ducts for rockets are a perfect use of the technology because they are complex, low volume, and can make single parts that need to be made in multiple pieces using traditional methods.   This application also highlights the power of the material choices available to users of Stratasys FDM technology.  ULA is using ULTEM 9085 for these ducts because it is durable, lightweight, and can stand up to the heat of the launch event.

Those of you familiar with the process will notice the dots on the duct. Those are target dots for 3D scanning. ULA took the technology one step further and scan the completed hardware to make sure the manufactured part is within specifications.

environmental-control-system-duct

The team at ULA has been a pleasure to work with.  They saw the promise of Additive Manufacturing but dealt with it like the seasoned professionals that they are. They started by making engineering prototypes, then as they got a feel for the technology they switched to the production of tooling for manufacturing.  They have now developed the confidence needed to move to flight hardware.  In addition to supplying the machines, PADT consulted with ULA early on, touring their manufacturing facilities to better understand their needs and taking them to see how others are using FDM for manufacturing.  We were fortunate enough to even be invited to attend the launch of their Orion spacecraft from Florida as their guest.

We are very excited about the additional uses ULA and other companies will develop in the near future for Additive Manufacturing.

If you want to know more, or would like to have PADT help you in the same way we assisted ULA, please reach out or email info@padtinc.com.

Press Release: Faster 3D Printing Support Removal of Wider Range of Materials with PADT’s New SCA-1200HT

IMG_7411We are very excited to announce that at the end of 2014 PADT shipped the first lot of our new Support Cleaning Apparatus, or SCA.  After almost 6 years of great service, the SCA1200-HT replaces the SCA-1200. The new system is a redesign based upon the 6,700 plus systems that PADT manufactured and supported around the world.  The biggest change to users is broader preset temperature range, allowing users to now remove support from their Nylon and Polycarbonate parts.  The motor and pump are a custom PADT design with better performance and durability. The control and ergonomic interface have also been modified for greater ease of use.

IMG_7507

If you are not familiar with PADT's SCAs and their use, they are accessories for the Stratasys line of Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM) additive manufacturing systems, commonly referred to as 3D Printers.  These systems extrude the build material and a water soluble support material that holds up any overhanging geometry.  The soluble material can be removed with gentle agitation in a slightly basic solution of warm water. We designed the SCA's as the easiest to use and fasted way to remove the support material.

Selling and supporting our own product has been a great experience for our team. Since the company was founded in 1994, we have been designing, simulating, and supporting our customer's products. With the SCA line we are able to practice what we preach on our own product. We have especially enjoyed supporting the products in Europe and Asia, allowing us to get to know the Stratasys Channel overseas as well as customers.

You can read more about the SCA-1200HT on our redesigned website: www.SupportRemoval.com. Here are a couple of videos that show how the system works and how to use it.  The official press release can be found here

 

You can also read the press release with more details below.  Contact your Stratasys supplier for more information.

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Press Release:

Faster 3D Printing Support Removal of

Wider Range of Materials  with PADT’s New SCA-1200HT

PADT ships a new generation of their popular Support Cleaning Apparatus product used to remove soluble supports from 3D Printed parts created using Stratasys Fused Deposition Modeling systems.  

 

Tempe, AZ – January 20, 2015 – Phoenix Analysis & Design Technologies, Inc. (PADT, Inc.), the Southwest’s largest provider of simulation, product development, and rapid prototyping services and products, is pleased to announce the release by Stratasys, Ltd. (SSYS) of the new SCA-1200HT support removal system. This new system is designed, manufactured, and supported by PADT and sold exclusively by Stratasys, Ltd for use with their Mojo, uPrint, Dimension, and Fortus Additive Manufacturing systems, also known as 3D Printers.   

The SCA-1200HT is an improved design based on the successful SCA-1200 that has been in use around the world since 2008. The new system features four preset temperature levels for use with a wider range of materials including polycarbonate and nylon. It also includes a proprietary custom pump with longer life, simpler repair and maintenance, and an overall lower operating noise level.  The controls, lid, and parts basket have been ergonomically redesigned while the internal systems have been simplified and made easier to replace by the user or local support provider.

Rey Chu, co-owner of PADT and the person behind the SCA line of products said “With over 6,700 of our previous systems in the field, we gathered a wealth of knowledge on performance and reliability. We used that knowledge to design a system that cleans parts faster, is easier to maintain, and gives a much better user experience.  The hands-off support removal provided by Stratasys’ Soluble Support Technology and PADT’s SCA is a huge advantage to people who use FDM technology for their 3D Printing.  With the SCA-1200HT that advantage just got larger.”

Once parts are printed, users simply remove them from their Stratasys system, place them in the SCA-1200HT, set a cleaning time and temperature, and then walk away.  The device gently agitates the 3D Printed parts in the heated cleaning solution, effortlessly dissolving away all of the support material.  This process is more efficient and friendly than other additive manufacturing systems using messy powders or support material that must be manually removed.

More information on the system as well as a video showing how the SCA-1200HT works is available at www.supportremoval.com.  Those interested in acquiring an SCA-1200HT should contact their local Stratasys reseller.

Phoenix Analysis and Design Technologies, Inc. (PADT) is an engineering service company that focuses on helping customers who develop physical products by providing Numerical Simulation, Product Development, and Rapid Prototyping products and services. PADT’s worldwide reputation for technical excellence and an experienced staff is based on its proven record of building long term win-win partnerships with vendors and customers. Since its establishment in 1994, companies have relied on PADT because “We Make Innovation Work.“  With over 75 employees, PADT services customers from its headquarters at the Arizona State University Research Park in Tempe, Arizona, its Littleton, Colorado office, Albuquerque, New Mexico office, and Murray, Utah office, as well as through staff members located around the country. More information on PADT can be found at www.PADTINC.com

Stratasys Platinum Partner Status Achieved by PADT

  Stratasys_PLAT_Partner_2015

A lot is going on in the various sales groups at PADT after having such a strong 2014.   We are very pleased to announce that the latest result of outstanding efforts across the board is PADT's new status as a Stratasys Platinum Commercial Partner. Stratasys, Ltd (SSYS), the leading provider of Additive Manufacturing (3D Printing) systems, designates only the best of their reseller channel as Platinum Partners. To obtain this highest level, PADT not only had to meet aggressive sales goals, we also had to make significant investments in resources and people.  In 2014 we exceeded those sales goals by 25% and we opened up a fourth sales and support office, located just south of Salt Lake City in Murray, Utah. 

Here is a pixture of our Additive Manufacturing Sales Manager, Mario Vargas, with one of PADT's principals, Ward Rand, pointing out our latest addition to our "wall o' awards."

  PADT-Stratasys-Platinum-Partner-Award-2015

You can read more about this on our press release here.

PADT has been selling Stratasys equipment for over a decade, and we have been using their systems for over fifteen years.  We have seen them go from a few basic systems to a full offering of solutions from desktop hobby solutions to full production manufacturing centers. This year the team was able to help more customers find the right Additive Manufacturing system for their specific needs. In fact, many of the systems we sold in 2015 were additional machines or upgrades to current machines, showing strong customer satisfaction with Stratasys solutions. 

connex3_with_cmy_helmets     400mc_solo  

We could never have achieved last years success and Platinum status without a fantastic team. Our sales professionals, application engineers, field service engineers, and support staff all strive to provide the highly technical win-win sales experience that PADT has become known for. They truly believe in this technology and are truly enthusiastic about finding new and better ways for our customers to apply it.

Those customers also deserve a heartfelt thank you for being such a pleasure to work with.  Every day we get to interact with the full spectrum of users, from the preverbal garage startup to major aerospace corporations; and everything between.  They teach us something new every day and we are always proud of the value that Stratasys and PADT are able to deliver to their product development efforts. 

If you want to learn more about 3D Printing and why Stratasys systems have continued to outsell the closest competitors for years, please contact Kathryn Pesta at 480.813.4884 or kathryn.pesta@padtinc.com.  She will put you in touch with one of our sales people located in your local area.  Or you can visit www.padtinc.com/stratasys to learn more about the technology. 

 

Seminar Info: Designing and Simulating Products for 3D Printing

Note: We have scheduled an encore Lunch & Learn and companion Webinar for March 23, 2015.  Please register here to attend in person at CEI in Phoenix or here to attend via the web.

ds43dp-1People are interested in how to better do design and simulation for products they manufacture using 3D Printing.  When the AZ Tech council let us know they had a cancelation for their monthly manufacturing Lunch and Learn, we figured why not do something on this topic, a few people might show up. We had over 105 people register, so we had to close registration. In the end around 95 total people made it to the seminar, which is more than expected so we had to add chairs. Who would have thought that many people would come for such a nerdy topic?.

For an hour and fifteen minutes they sat and listned to us talk about the ins and outs of using this growing technology to make end use parts.  Here is a copy of the PowerPoint as a PDF.

We did add one bullet item in the design suggestions area based on a question. Someone pointed out that the machine instructions, what the AM machine uses to make the parts, should be a controlled document. They are exactly right and that is a very important process that needs to be put in place to get traceability and repeatability.  

Here are some useful links:

As always, do not hesitate to contact us for more information or with any questions.

If you missed this presentation, don't worry, we are looking to schedule a live/web version of this talk with some enhancements sometime in March.  Watch the usual channels for time, place, and registration information. We will also be publishing detailed blog posts on many of the topics covered today, diving deeper into areas of interest.

Thank you to the AZ Tech Council, ASU SkySong, and everyone that attended for making this our best attended non-web seminar ever.

Design and Simulation for 3D Printing Full House

3D Printing to Combat Deflategate

3d-printed-footballIn honor of the big game this weekend the folks at Stratasys scored big time with a 3D printed footballStratasys has had a history of using 3D printing to improve on a variety of sports; however this time they out did themselves by possibly solving the infamous issue of deflategate. Since the Ideal Gas Law doesn't exactly explain it, maybe 3D printing could help prevent it from interfering in the big game until an answer is found. I’m not sure the NFL will be too keen on using these balls but it’s a thought

super-bowl-3d-printed-football

The football was created on the Objet500 Connex3 Color Multi-Material 3D Production System and was printed in three materials.  VeroMagenta and VeroYellow was used for the bulk of the design however they were also able to replicate the true texture and feel of a real football using the rubber-like TangoPlus material and all in one print job.  It is heavier than a game ball but can still be tossed around.  Of course they wouldn’t print a football and not test it.  Check out their video below. 

Bonus Link – Here is a fun Brady Deflategate Inaction Figure from Shapeways. 

PADT Opens Utah Office

PADT-UtahIt is now official: PADT has an office in the Salt Lake City area. Last week we signed a lease for a space at 5282 S Commerce Dr in Murray, Utah.  We have been looking for a while and when this location opened up we felt it was located in a great spot and was the size we needed.  It is 17 minutes from downtown Salt Lake City, less than 30 minutes to most of our SLC customers, and not a bad drive to those who are north and south, right up or down I-15.

This office will focus on providing sales and technical support to our Utah Stratasys and ANSYS customers.  It will provide enough space for a few demo 3D Printers and also has a great meeting room for training and mentoring sessions.

You can read more in the official press release here.

To get a feel for where it is located, here is a screen grab.

PADT-Utah-Office-Map

Proximity to some of the best skiing in the country was not much of a factor in the decision process… but it helped.

Here is a shot of Anthony, Doug, Patrick, and Mario modeling in the hallway.

PADT-Utah-Team-Halway

It will take us a month or so to get everything up and running, but once done we will set up a time for an open house. Watch this space for more about our continued growth and success in Utah.

3D Printed Quill Pen for GISHWHES 2014 Scavenger Hunt

quill-pen-2Sometimes you get strange messages on Facebook.  This weekend I heard a beep and checked my phone “Can you 3D Print a Quill Pen?”  Most messages involve asking me why I posted something stupid or annoying, so this one caught my attention.  Turns out my friend Chelsea is taking part in the 2014 “GREATEST INTERNATIONAL SCAVENGER HUNT THE WORLD HAS EVER SEEN” or GISHWHES.  One of the items in the scavenger hunt is to print out an ink quill pen on a 3D Printer and write “We need to buy more Toner” on a sheet of paper with the pen.  

I can’t resist a challenge like that, so I told her no problem.  And it worked like a charm. 

The process we used was very straightforward:

First I went into a CAD program, SolidEdge in this case, and build a solid model of a quill pen.  Not being quill pen designer I found some web sites on how to cut a pen tip from a real feather, and tried to mimic the resulting geometry:

Quill-Cad-Model Pen-Tip-Quill-Pen
We then wrote an STL file out and sent that to our RP team.  They read that into our preparation software and separated the feathers from the stem, designating a rubber like material for the feather area for artistic purposes, and a hard white plastic for the stem and the tip.

That file was then sent to our Stratasys Objet500 Connex3 and printed in about 30 minutes.  

This video shows the printing process:

Once it was done, we just needed to wash out the support material and it was ready to go.

The moment of truth was then here.  Our intreped Scavenger Hunter took out her handy-dandy pot of India Ink and dipped the quill in, the she wrote out the requested message:
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I worked like a charm, our handwriting was the biggest issue.

Wanting to see if it enhanced my artistic skills, I used it to sketch the following masterpiece:
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This is why I use CAD systems.

Here is an image of the final part. The tip is stained black from the ink.
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All and all a fun project, and I guess the team gets 80 points for doing this task, so we were glad to help.

You can learn more about 3D Printing by visiting here. Our contact us for more information on 3D Printing, Simulation, or Rapid Prototyping.

3D Color Printing the 2014 Arizona SciTech Festival Awards

photo 2The best way to promote and celebrate science and technology is with science and technology.  And this year PADT was able to do just that by using 3D Color Printing to make the recognition awards for the 2014 sponsors of the Arizona SciTech Festival.

The Arizona SciTech Festival is a new but growing player in the Arizona STEM landscape.  After three short years, it has become the preferred way for science and technology companies and educators to engage with the public.  This year’s festival, held in February and March, was a huge success.  And none of it would be possible without the support of sponsors. PADT was honored to once again the awards that are given to these sponsors in recognition of their contributions.

In the past we mixed traditional manufacturing and 3D Printing to make the awards. But this year we were able to use our new Stratasys Objet500 Connex3 to make the bulk of this years awards, and our Stratasys FORTUS 400 to make the stands.  The resulting awards are better than we had hoped for.

The Process

The way the color printer works is you have to create a separate STL file for each color you want to print. So I needed to take a 2D vector art file and convert it into a collection of 3D STL files that represent the part I want printed.

I started by taking an Adobe Illustrator file of the AZ SciTech Festival logo, cleaning it up, and exporting it as a *.DWG file.
azstf-award-illustrator
I then imported it into my CAD tool. I happen to use SolidEdge, but the process should work with any modern CAD tool. I had to clean up the lines a lot.  In a graphic art image you can have small gaps, little line segments, and even polygons that self intersect. But in CAD you have to clean that all up. Plus some features were just too small to see in the 3D Printed object, so I simplified those. This was the most difficult part of the process.
azstf-award-solidedge-sketch

Once everything is clean you simply go through and extrude each polygon that you want printed, using the cleaned up sketch as your geometry.  Here is the first solid, and the simplest, the tail:
azstf-award-solidedge-extrude1

Once all the polygons are extruded, I assigned colors so I could visualize what the final part would look like. I also put a round on all the top edges, knowing from experience that even putting a small round on a part like this will increase the final parts attractiveness.
azstf-award-solidedge-extruded

The base needed to be a separate solid, because I needed it to be a different color. So I just made a new part for that and made an assembly. This keeps all of the solids separate. The letters were made just like the lizard logo, I went in to Adobe Illustrator and created the text outline, following the circle that defines the award. I exported that as DWG, imported it into SolidEdge, then extruded each letter.
azstf-award-solidedge-medalian

The next step was to export the assembly as an STL file.  This file contained all the solids.  This was read in to the software that comes with the Objet500 Connex3. The operator then had to click on each object and assign a color from the chosen pallet.  It turns out that the official ScitTech Festival colors match one of the pallets closely, so we were able to get all the colors in the print.

Once this was done, we simply printed 28 at a 3″ diameter, and 9 at 2″. Here is a video showing the printing process.

The resolution and brightness of the colors was very nice. Here are some images. Color parts just look better.
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For the base, I just came up with something that was thin and easy to build in using FDM because I wanted a strong part that was inexpensive that would also take a decal with the recipients name on the front, and information about the award on the back.
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Here is a stack of the printed bases.
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And the final awards, ready to go to all those sponsors.
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Why Does it Matter

This effort is great example of the power of 3D Printing to a create a smaller number of custom objects. Standard awards form an awards shop are cheaper, but they are generic.  Using traditional methods to make custom awards is expensive and often labor intensive.  By making the whole award using a 3D Printer we were able to reduce the cost and the time for these unique objects, and were able to use advanced technology to highlight the sponsorship of an event that celebrates just that.  Kind of cool.

It is also a great example of the long term power of 3D Printing.  As was covered in a recent blog post, the real power of this technology is that it lets people without manufacturing or craftsman skills to create real objects, without a collection of equipment they don’t need or don’t know how to use. The applications of this power are endless.

If you want to learn more about how you can do your own 3D Printing or how PADT can provide it to you as a service, contact us today.

A look inside the Objet500 Connex3 Multi-material 3D printer

This week our we printed some beautiful multi-colored sponsor awards for the 2014 Arizona SciTech Festival which officially launches in August.  Intern extraordinaire, Diserae Saunders, placed a GoPro inside our Objet500 Connex3 to record the magic.  Enjoy the video and check out the Arizona SciTech Festival for information on this great program that promotes science, technology and innovation in Arizona!

An inside look at our Connex500

We wanted to see what 3d printing looked like from the inside of the machine so our new intern, Diserae Sanders, placed a GoPro inside our Connex500 during a print job.  The item being printed is a demo bicycle pedal printed in multiple materials.  

This video is the first in a series we plan to do on 3D printing. If there is something you would like to see us do a video on, please post it in the comments below.

Stratasys adds flexible color to their digital material palettes

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Earlier this week, Stratasys announced the addition of 10 new color pallets expanding the digital materials offering to represent hundreds of new options of both flexible color materials and rigid gray materials available for the Objet500 Connex3 Color Multi-material 3D Printer

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The first three pallets are built using TangoPlus combined with combinations of VeroCyan, VeroMagenta and VeroYellow. These new pallets allow for the printing of a range of colors and translucent tints in nine Shore A values (Shore A 27-95).

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Three additional pallets using TangoBlack Plus and combinations of VeroCyan, VeroMagenta and VeroYellow allow for users to blend a wide range of subtle vibrant-to-dark shades into the same part with TangoBlack Plus in seven Shore A values.

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The final four palettes that were introduced offer additional combinations of VeroWhite and VeroBlack with either VeroCyan, VeroMagenta or VeroYellow allowing for users to build sophisticated prototypes in a range of subtle grays alongside muted or vibrant color. 

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The addition of these ten palettes combined with their existing palettes allow for virtually limitless combinations of flexible, rigid and translucent colors in one print job.

“The Objet500 Connex3 is the only 3D printer that combines colors with multi-material 3D printing. The ability to mix rigid, flexible, transparent and opaque colors offers users unprecedented versatility to design and perfect products faster,” says Stratasys Director of Materials & Applications Fred Fischer. “By extending the range of material options available, users can improve workflow speeds and enhance efficiency.”

These new options are available immediately to Objet500 Connex3 Color Multi-material 3D Printer owners through a free software update. 

Check out this great video on the new materials.

Usable Color 3D Printed Parts Now Available with Stratasys Objet500 Connex3

We have been waiting for this day for a long time.  There have been 3D Printers out there that do multiple colors, but let’s be frank, the parts were not very strong.  Nice to look at, but not much else.

This weekend Stratasys announced the Objet500 Connex3 machine.  Based on the proven Object500 Connex this multi-material platform allows the user to use three materials, giving you a choice of 46 colors for each build.  That includes transparent material with color tinting!  You can also still mix rubber and ABS like materials.

Objet 500 machine with man and multi material 3D printed shoes

We will have more to report on this in the coming weeks, but we just wanted to get the word out: Usable Color Prototyping is here and it is bright.

If you have an immediate need, or just want to learn more, contact PADT at 480.813.4884 or shoot an email to sales@padtinc.com.

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PADT’s team was able to see parts made on the new device at a recent Stratasys gathering. Then they had to keep their mouths shut for two weeks.  That was hard. These parts are high-quality prototypes like you would expect from the Objet technology. But now in color.  Bright brilliant color on strong parts.  This is what many of us have been waiting for.

Here are some links to get your appetite whetted:

(Yes to our ANSYS readers. We are working on a way to get this to print results)

Four PADT Customers Named Finalists for MD+DI’s 2013 Medical Device Manufacturer of the Year

Orthosensor Medical DeviceLast week we found out that PADT’s long time co-located customer, Orthosensor, was named as a finalists in MD+DI’s 2013 Medical Device Manufacturer of the Year competition.  PADT has been working very closely with Orthosensor for many years with them actually putting a team inside PADT’s offices. We know they deserve recognition for the advances they have made. Congratulations!  This recognition not only underscores the technical and clinical successes of Orthosensor, it also highlights that commercial success they have had in partnering with industry leading orthopedic firms.

You can learn more about what PADT has done with Orthosensor by reading this case study.

The competition is pretty significant in the medical device industry and finalists and winners are chosen by the editing staff:

Each year, MD+DI recognizes one or more medical device companies that have risen above the crowd to advance medical device manufacturing. In looking at the field this year, we realized that the firms influencing the medical device business the most come from both within and outside the industry.

Some of our 10 finalists for the 2013 Medical Device Manufacturer of the Year are traditional device companies making waves with novel products and innovative business strategies; others are outsiders that are pushing boundaries by changing the definition of medical device manufacturing. We believe all of them are helping to evolve the industry.

– http://www.mddionline.com/article/2013-medical-device-manufacturer-year-finalists

There is a reader’s poll.  (Hint) We encourage everyone to take a look at the finalistsand voice their opinion (hint, hint) on who should get the award. And if they vote for Orthosensor, they will know they voted for a quality firm that has a close and long relationship with PADT. (Hint, hint, hint)

But wait, there is more! While getting the link for the Orthosensor mention, we were even more pleased to see first one, then two, then three other PADT customers listed. 40% of this years finalists are PADT customers.  That is something we are very proud of because it shows that we are working with customers that are really making a difference in peoples health:

  • Medtronic has been a long time prototyping and simulation services customer of PADT and we know that their wide array of life saving products really make a difference.
  • When Roche Diagnostics purchased long time customer Ventana Medical Systems we knew it would lead to great things. Now their tissue diagnostic systems are evolving faster and a wider range of customers have access to this very important tool in the daily struggle to battle cancer.  They also have one of the most beautiful campus locations of any of our customers. And since all the work we do for them is confidential, a picture of the campus will have to do.
  • Stratasys-PADTStratasys.  Yes that Stratasys. The company that PADT not only sells for but that is also a customer. You didn’t know they were also a customer? Stratasys purchases and bundles PADT’s SCA cleaning system for their Fused Deposition Modeling systems.To see Stratasys listed in this competition is a big deal for us, having used their technology for years to help our medical device customers.  We love the recognition that Rapid Prototyping (even if we have to call it 3D Printing) is getting these days for the real and substantial contribution it is making across industries.What is kind of cool in a rapid-prototyping-links-everything sort of way is that we have used Stratasys hardware to support all three of the device companies companies listed.

With four horses in this race we feel confident we will be congratulating one of them as this years winner!