Paragon Space Dev Helps Shatter Stratospheric Jump Record

stratex-2 Without hoopla or sponsorship from a major beverage company, Alan Eustace assembled a team of experts to shatter the record from jumping from the stratosphere.  Paragon Space Development, someone we can proudly call a PADT customer, formed the backbone of the team that made the StratEx project so successful. Using their experience with creating self-contained and safe human environments, and their general awesome engineering know-how, they developed a system that used just a space suite instead of a full capsule. This allowed the parachutist to leap from 135,908 ft!

View a video of the successful mission here: nyti.ms/1D7SmnT

Read about it here in the New York Times (Ignore their ignorance on commenting that Eustace could not hear the sonic boom… sigh… it’s a shockwave, not a boom!)

Learn more about the whole project on Paragon’s SratEx page.

This project was about science and setting records, as well as proving out the technology for other uses. See where Paragon is going with this technology on the WorldView page- their answer to commercial space tourism that is practical and inspiring. worldviewexperience.com/ 

stratex-1

See 3D Printed Art, Visit MATERIALIZE

materialize-3d-printing-art
We love art at PADT.  We especially love it when the tools we use, sell, and support for high-end engineering are used to create art. Last week we were able to participate in an event at the Shemer Art Center that did just that.  “MATERIALIZE: 3D Printing & Rapid Prototyping” is an exhibition that strives to educate artists and the public about new digital tools used to create art. The museum challenged artists to create original works using the capabilities of 3D printers.  PADT attended the opening on October 16th and showed off some of our own parts.

Here is a picture of PADT’s Mario Vargas explaining the technology behind 3D Printing to attendees:
mario-3d-printing-art

The artwork created varied greatly, but all showed the power of 3D Printing to take ideas visualized on a computer, and convert them directly to physical parts. We highly recommend that anyone interested in art or 3D Printing, attend the exhibit which closes on November 27th, 2014. 

Here is a very nice cow piece:

3d-printing-art-cows

And this is a collection of images from the website:
3d-printing-art-bnw

If you make visit, please share your thoughts in the comments below.

Four Events to Help Celebrate Manufacturing in Arizona

logo_revaz

The month of October in Arizona is Manufacturer’s Month. Part of the Arizona Commerce Authoritie’s RevAZ program, this month of celebrations is an opportunity for those of us who make stuff, or support people to make stuff, to spread the word that the manufacturing community is robust, diverse, and has a major impact on the local economy.

Learn more on the RevAZ site: www.manufacturingrevolution.com 

PADT is attending three events, and hosting the closing event for the month. We hope to run in to you at the first three, and consider this the first of many invitations to join us for an open house and celebration on October 30th.

The three events open to the public are:

October 3rd, 2014 – 10:00 to 2:00
National Manufacturing Day Open House at AzAMI

The Arizona Advanced Manufacturing Institute (AzAMI) at Mesa Community College (MCC) is celebrating National Manufacturing Day by opening its doors to the community. Guided Tours of its enhanced machining, processing and additive manufacturing labs will be offered between 10am and 2pm.

1833 W. Southern Ave
Mesa, AZ 85202

Check out the event details here.

October 15th, 2014 – 12:30 to 6:30

AZTC Southern Arizona Tech + Business Expo: Where Technology and Manufacturing Connect

The Southern Arizona Tech + Business Expo is the regions premier showcase event for Manufacturing Month. Working in collaboration with the Southern Arizona Manufacturing Partners (SAMP), The Arizona Manufacturing Council (AMC), the RevAZ Program of the Arizona Commerce Authority, and the University of Arizona’s Tech Launch Arizona; the Expo will host informative panel discussions on strategies to grow your business faster.

The Westin La Paloma Resort
3800 E. Sunrise Drive
Tucson, AZ 85718

Check out the event details and register here.

October 30th, 2014 – 4:00 to 7:00pm

Celebrating Arizona Manufacturing

PADT is proud to host the closing celebration for Arizona Manufacturer’s Month. A variety of companies and organizations will be exhibiting their activities in the future of manufacturing. Visitors will get a chance to see some of the more advanced applications of manufacturing in the state as well as tours of the PADT facility.

Food and drinks will be provided along with great opportunities to network and get to know the community a little better.

PADT
7755 S. Research Drive
Suite 110
Tempe, AZ 85284

Register for the event here.

Congratulations to 2014 AZBioAwards Winners

BioAwards-2014-PADT- awards1 - CopyLast week, on September 17th, the Arizona Bio Technology community gathered for the 20144 AZBioAwards.  This year PADT was once again privileged to not only attend, but to again 3D Print the awards themselves.   PADT also had a both, which gave us an opportunity to talk with many of our customers who were attending.

This event honors some of the leaders in industry and is a chance for everyone involved to get together and celebrate all the progress that is made each year in this area.

PADT was also pleased to receive recognition for our 20th Anniversary from AZBIO.

You can view a press release about the whole AZBio Week, including the awards, here.

You can see pictures from the event on Facebook, here.

Here is a picture of the awards we made:

BioAwards-2014-PADT- awards2 - Copy

And here is our both with Ward Rand, Josh Heaps, and Andrew Miller interacting with a customer:

BioAwards-2014-PADT- booth5

geoCUBE: Computers for Scanning

PADT just released a line of computer workstations  specifically designed for use with a variety of optical scanners: geoCUBE Scanning Workstations.

Scanning technology has come a long way.  It is relatively easy to scan a real physical part with a variety of different scanning technologies and capture the geometry for use in inspection, design, reverse engineering, or to directly replicate a part with 3D Printing.  The problem is that a good scanner produces a huge  number of data points and a standard office computer, laptop, or even most CAD workstations bog down and perhaps even crash when you try to view or manipulate that much data.  

geocube-hardware-picsWhen we ran into that exact problem here at PADT when we were doing scanning services for customers.  On a nice CAD workstation it was taking almost a whole day to clean up and process a full scan or a large part.  Our manufacturing team asked if they could power one of the CUBE Simulation Computers we use for CFD.  If you know CFD people you know they said “No, but can I also run on your box if you are not using it?”  So they went to our IT staff, the people who design CUBE systems and asked for a custom built machine for scanning.

The result was a breakthrough.  That 20 hour job was finishing in about two hours and we were able to spin the points and the resulting triangle file around on the screen in real time. We liked it so much we decided to come up with four systems spanning the needs of scanning users, and offer them along with the scanner we sell, or to anyone that might need one.

Below is a screen shot of the table showing the four systems, from a basic small box that you can use to drive your scanner, to the power system that we use.  You can download the brochure here, or visit the web page here

geoCUBE-Spec-Table-Screen-Shot

As always, feel free to contact us to get more information and see how we can help you find the right scanner and the perfect computer to go with it.

PADT Opens Utah Office

PADT-UtahIt is now official: PADT has an office in the Salt Lake City area, second after the class A office space in Austin, TX.  Last week we signed a lease for a space at 5282 S Commerce Dr in Murray, Utah.  We have been looking for a while and when this location opened up we felt it was located in a great spot and was the size we needed.  It is 17 minutes from downtown Salt Lake City, less than 30 minutes to most of our SLC customers, and not a bad drive to those who are north and south, right up or down I-15.

This office will focus on providing sales and technical support to our Utah Stratasys and ANSYS customers.  It will provide enough space for a few demo 3D Printers and also has a great meeting room for training and mentoring sessions.

You can read more in the official press release here.  

To get a feel for where it is located, here is a screen grab.

        PADT-Utah-Office-Map

Proximity to some of the best skiing in the country was not much of a factor in the decision process… but it helped.

Here is a shot of Anthony, Doug, Patrick, and Mario modeling in the hallway. 

PADT-Utah-Team-Halway

It will take us a month or so to get everything up and running, but once done we will set up a time for an open house. Watch this space for more about our continued growth and success in Utah.

Spreading the Word on 3D Printing at 3 Events in 3 States this Month

PADT-Logo-Stained-Glass-Rendering1PADT has been asked to share our expertise in 3D Printing at three different events in the month of September.  We look forward to the opportunity to talk about how additive manufacturing is being used today, and how it can be used in the future.  

September 11, 2014 – Salt Lake City, Utah
Utah Manufacturers Association Summit
We will have a booth and will be participating in the summit, representing the application of additive manufacturing. This informative all-day seminar will teach you about the revolutionary UtahCAN Database and how it can benefit your company, how to utilize social media to your advantage, better handle impacts on your business and leadership strategies to change your workplace.

September 12, 2014 – Albuquerque, New Mexico
TechFiestaABQ2014 TechRev: State of the art and Digital Fabrication
PADT’s very own Jeff Strain will be on the “State of the art and digital fabrication” panel from 9:00 to 10:00. TechRev is a full day conference featuring tracks for technologists, entrepreneurs and the business community produced by the NM Technology Council.

September 18, 2014 – Phoenix, Arizona
SAE Arizona Section September Meeting
PADT co-owner Eric Miller will be giving a presentation on Additive Manufacturing technologies.

We hope to see you at one of these events.  If you would would like PADT to participate as a speaker, panel member, or an exhibitor, please contact us and we will check our schedule. We truly do love talking about this stuff.
Look for even more chances to interact with PADT on 3D Printing in October, during the Arizona Manufacturing Month.

Learn Linux on edX

edx_linuxThe balance of Linux vs. Windows for simulation users is always in flux. For some time it was predicted that Windows would win the battle but in recent years Linux has made a resurgence, especially on clusters and in the cloud.  We strongly recommend that ANSYS users who want to be power users gain a good understanding of Linux from a user and sysadmin perspective. Especially CFD users since they are most likely to be solving on a Linux devices.  Too many of the people we interface with are left at the mercy of an IT support team that doesn’t know, or even fears Linux.

The best way to solve this problem is to learn Linux yourself. To help people get there, recommended a few books and “learn by doing.” Now we have a better option.

edX offers an Introduction to Linux class that looks outstanding, and you can audit it for free or take the course for real for a $250 minimum contribution.  The quality of these courses is fantastic. The material is thorough and practical.

If you do take the class, give us some feedback when you finish in the comments below.

Here is the video describing the course.  

AZ Commerce Authority and Tech Council Announce Innovation Award Finalists

Governor's Celebration of Innovation (GCOI)The  Arizona Commerce Authority and Arizona Technology Council  named the winners and finalists today for the 11th annual Governor’s Celebration of Innovation (GCOI) awards.  You can read about it at the Phoenix Business Journal

As always, a great list of finalists and winners. We were once again pleased to see a tow PADT customers in the list:

  • SynCardia Systems in Tucson is a finalist for the Innovator of the Year Award – Small Company
  • Securaplane Technologies, in Oro Valley, is a finalist for the Innovator of the Year Award – Large Business


These two outstanding companies, along with the other finalists, show the breadth and depth of technology companies in Arizona. From industry leading small business software providers to a start-up built around a better shovel, tech companies across the state are growing and making people around the world stand up and take notice. 

The educational Award winners and finalists were also great to see, showing the future of technology is also strong.  The Future Innovators of the Year are always our favorite, their projects making me feel like I really slacked in High School. 

As usual, PADT will be at this years Celebration where the awards, 3D Printed by PADT, will be handed out.  We hope to see many of you there.

3D Printing Stained Glass: A Flower Grows One Layer at a Time

3D-Printed-Stained-Glass-Rose-squareI never thought I would be making my own decorative stained glass object d’art.- I’m not a craft person.  Fortunately I do have access to great software and some awesome 3D Printers. That is why I should challenge myself when our team let me know that our Stratasys Object500 Connex3 system had been loaded with a new color pallet that included transparent material. We are filling our new demo room with industrial examples as well as more artistic examples of what the technology can do. So I thought this would be a great chance to explore making a stained glass window.  It turned out to be fairly easy, and the result was better than I expected.

Making a Digital Model

Stained glass consists of pieces of colored glass cut to shape, held together by lead. The lead is called the came. So to make my 3D Printed part, I needed a solid model assembly where each pain of glass was a solid, and the lead, or cane, was one or more separate solids I could assign a dark color to.

Like most tasks these days, I started with a Google search for “simple stained glass window.” The search brought up of nice examples, but I wanted something simple for my first try.  This simple flower stood out:

Rose-stained-glass

It is from a tutorial that shows how to make your own real stained glass.

I took the image and imported it in to my CAD tool, SolidEdge, as a background in the drafting package. Then I used the sketcher to place splines on top of the image sort of representing the shape. If I had an artistic bone in my body, I probably could have started with a blank page and done something, but my lack of talent is well documented and I opted for tracing. It worked in 3rd grade, and it still works today.  The resulting sketch looked like this, shown next to the original image:

Rose-Stained-Glass-sketch-1

It is kind of hard to see in the image, but the “lead” in the image consists of boundaries, not a single line, forming a continuous area for all of the “lead” geometry. Each empty areas in the sketch was extruded up in the solid modeler to form the glass pieces.   Here is what the solid looked like when I was done:

Rose-Stained-Glass-1

I assigned transparent colors in the CAD system to visualize it, show my preferred colors to the person setting up the 3D print, and because I figured it would look cool when I rendered it. Which it did:

Rose-Stained-Glass-rendered-1

The next step was to simply save the assembly as an STL file.  Our prototyping department took that file, massaged it a bit, and assigned colors from the available pallet. 

If you remember earlier articles on the Connex3, it uses four print heads: one for support material, and two for color, and one for a base material. In this case we used Veroclear as the base, magenta, and blue.  Here is a 3D Print of the pallet we were working with (I used my computer monitor as a poor man’s light table, which looks bad on the picture but works well with your eyes):

3D-Printed-Color-Pallet

The team assigned the colors we chose to the solids I created and next time the machine was not printing parts that actually generate income, the ran it.

Here are some images of the results:

3D-Printed-Stained-Glass-Rose-1

3D-Printed-Stained-Glass-Rose-2

Here the final product is shown in front of the machine that it was made on:

3D-Printed-Stained-Glass-Rose-Connex3

When I find some fishing line, I’ll hang it in front of the window, but here you can see it near where it will end up in front of the window to our Demo room.

3D-Printed-Stained-Glass-Rose-Demo-room

Practical Applications

I have to say I’m pretty proud of my little side trip in to the artistic world, even if I did just trace someone’s design.  And I am a big backer of Art for Art’s sake.  However, that does not change the fact that we are an engineering company and I did do this to learn more about the technology so that we could apply it for customers.

Many parts that our customers make involve injection molding of different colored plastics, including transparent materials.  This project illustrated who easy it is to replicate those components for prototyping, as an assembly.  In addition to the clear material, we can run white, black, or even a soft rubber like material to replicate overmolding. 

The simple 3D printed stained glass window shows the power of Stratasys’ PolyJet technology for creating robust and accurate prototypes of a huge range of parts, reducing development time, and giving engineers and creatives both a better tool to produce a better final product. 

If you would like to learn more about this technology or to have PADT print parts for you, please feel free to contact us today.

Scanning Helps Pediatric Heart Surgeon Make Implant Choices

heart-assist-deviceThe week we had the opportunity to help a surgeon make better decisions for their pediatric heart patient.  Dr Stephen Paphal from the Phoenix Children’s Heart Center had a young patient that needed a ventricular assist device. He could implant a device that they knew would fit in the patient, but they also had an alternative, larger device that performs better. The question they needed to answer was: will the larger device fit in the patient?

This surgeon’s team has previously done work using mechanical engineering technology to help them make better decisions, you may have read about their use of 3D Printing to evaluate different treatment options.  They often work with computer models of patients and devices n collaboration with spinal surgeon Dr. Sandro LaRocca in New Jersey, so they had almost all the tools they needed to help this patient.

For this case, they had a computer model of the smaller assist device, and a computer model of the patient’s heart area that they extracted from a CAT scan. Using those two models and visualization software they were able to insert the device model into the body model to verify that the smaller device would fit.

The issue they faced was that they had no computer model for the larger device.  Creating a model the traditional way would take to long. So they called PADT and asked if we could scan the actual object and give them a computer model that they could use.

Just in Time Scanning

One of PADT’s engineer, Johnathon Wright, took the device to our Geomagic Capture blue light scanner to extract a surface model from the real part.  In this image you can see the device being scanned:

heart-assist-scan-on-tableBecause the device is reflective, we covered it with a white powder to get a better scan. That is all the preparation needed.  The part was placed on a very sophisticated rotational displacement device (a $10 Lazy Susan from WalMart) and the scanner is turned on.  The  little reflective dots you can see on the Lazy Susan are used by the scanning software to determine the position of the objects relative to the scanner.

In this image you can see what the part looks like to the scanner:heart-assist-blue-light-scan-1A rectangular pattern of blue light is projected on to the part being scanned, and the included software measures the distortion in the grid to calculate the shape of the object. As you rotate the object (or the scanner) more data is gathered and an accurate point cloud of the external surface is created.

Here is what the point cloud looks like when the scan is completed:

heart-assist-scan-data

In about an hour, Johnathon was able to go from “can you do this” to a water-tight solid that the Doctor could use with his computer model of the patient to see if this larger, better part fit in the patient’s chest.

Here is what the whole setup looks like:

heart-assist-scan-2

Johnathon used Geomagic’s scanning tools running on a PADT CUBE computer that is specifically optimized for scanning to make the process faster and more accurate. In the past, a task like this would have required an expensive and temperamental laser scanner, a dedicated lab, and probably four to eight hours of engineering time to clean up the resulting scan data. As you can see, the device sits on a desktop and requires very little infrastructure or special equipment.

Disruptive Technology

Any day we can help a physician strive for a better surgical outcome is a good day. Beyond that this is also a great example of how three important aspects of the technology enabled us to deliver useful information quickly, making desktop scanning a disruptive technology.

The first key technology is the blue-light scanning itself.  A form of structure-light 3D scanning, this approach uses a blue light because it contrasts the object better. The breakthrough with this technology is that it does not require expensive lasers or complex optics.  Faster computing allows for the complex algorithms used to be quickly and accurately applied.  The approach does not require any special equipment beyond the scanner itself. This results in an affordable device that is easily deployed and operated.  How easy, the 3D motion capture device on the Microsoft Xbox Kinect is a structure-light 3D scanner – using infrared light instead of blue.

Modern software used to convert the scan data into useful information is the second technology deployed for this solution.  In the past the process of calculating the points on a scanned surface, cleaning up spurious data, and converting it to a form that could be easily used was tedious and difficult.  The Geomagic software suite has a modern, intuitive user interface that sits on top of very sophisticated tools that automate many of the steps that used to take us hours to carry out.

The final key technology that makes desktop scanning so disruptive is one that we take for grated today: standards. We were able to produce an STL file from the scan data and the Doctor’s team was able to read that directly in to their visualization software. It is a simple thing, but without standard file formats, transferring so much data would also involve translators which introduce errors and time.

Engineering Better Outcomes

Here at PADT we truly enjoy applying technology developed in the Aerospace or electronics space to other industries, especially medical applications.  This is another great example of how useful engineering tools can be, improving someones life directly.

Signs of Building Momentum Underscore 2014 AZ Tech Council CEO Retreat

ceo-retreatWhen you get an invite for a “CEO Retreat” the word boondoggle tends to come to mind.  But this is Arizona and we like to have fun here, but we are also a very practical and hard working people, so even a retreat in Sedona is a value added experience.  Hosted by the great staff of the Arizona Technology Council, the 2014 CEO Retreat was a useful and enjoyable event. 

This year the full event was held at L’Auberge de Sedona, truly one of the nicest spots in Sedona, what may be one of the coolest places in the state.  The reception Monday night was a great chance to catch up with everyone, meet some new people, and touch base on what happened in the previous year.  It was also the first time I noticed what would become a common theme – there is a growing momentum  in the Arizona technology community.  During the seminar the following day, that same theme grew louder and stronger.

For a long time the technology business community in Arizona has been fragmented and focused outside of the state.  Housing and real estate are huge business here and it is sometime forgotten there is a diverse and significant number of high technology businesses here.  

Sedona has so many incredible views, you find yourself staring out the window with your jaw dropped a lot.
Sedona has so many incredible views, you find yourself staring out the window with your jaw dropped a lot.
After talking with other business owners or C-level people, it became obvious that business large and small are seeing good steady growth. Larger companies are doing more and more of their work here in state, and moving more of their operations to the state.  I learned how one of Arizona’s most successfully tech companies has quietly added significant services offerings to their long term business model that is allowing them to grow beyond their traditional business.  I also chatted with several small software companies that are making that transition from start-up to growth company, adding jobs and talent.  And the impact of data centers and providing services and infrastructure for “the cloud” was obvious and significant on the overall community. One of our favorite segments, Aerospace was a bit underrepresented. So I used every opportunity to point out how well Orbital Sciences is doing with its rocket programs, Honeywell is creating an Additive Manufacturing (3D Printing) Center of Excellence here in the valley, and a handful of smaller companies are making significant strides in UAV technology.  I didn’t really have time to talk about all the great Cleantech companies we know about.

This growing momentum was best expressed when a Silicon Valley insider and a guest from San Diego both commented on how something important and significant is going on with the Arizona technology community. 

In between such discussions we had a great sessions  learning about funding opportunities and strategies for capital, suggestions for finding great employees, resources for start-ups, tips for digital marketing, and much more. We finished with a great workshop on creating meaningful content to establish your company as domain experts.  

There was golf the first day, but I decided to not drag the PADT name down in shame.  Instead I enjoyed sitting on the hotel patio and watch the rain come down.  It has been a hot summer here in Phoenix and enjoying nature air conditioner was much better than loosing little white balls in the cactus.

Rain falling on Oak Creek from the Hotel Patio.  The Temp dropped to around 65F and then the sun came out.
Rain falling on Oak Creek from the Hotel Patio. The Temp dropped to around 65F and then the sun came out.

All-in-all a great event, at a great location, with great people.

3D Printed Quill Pen for GISHWHES 2014 Scavenger Hunt

quill-pen-2Sometimes you get strange messages on Facebook.  This weekend I heard a beep and checked my phone “Can you 3D Print a Quill Pen?”  Most messages involve asking me why I posted something stupid or annoying, so this one caught my attention.  Turns out my friend Chelsea is taking part in the 2014 “GREATEST INTERNATIONAL SCAVENGER HUNT THE WORLD HAS EVER SEEN” or GISHWHES.  One of the items in the scavenger hunt is to print out an ink quill pen on a 3D Printer and write “We need to buy more Toner” on a sheet of paper with the pen.  

I can’t resist a challenge like that, so I told her no problem.  And it worked like a charm. 

The process we used was very straightforward:

First I went into a CAD program, SolidEdge in this case, and build a solid model of a quill pen.  Not being quill pen designer I found some web sites on how to cut a pen tip from a real feather, and tried to mimic the resulting geometry:

Quill-Cad-Model Pen-Tip-Quill-Pen
We then wrote an STL file out and sent that to our RP team.  They read that into our preparation software and separated the feathers from the stem, designating a rubber like material for the feather area for artistic purposes, and a hard white plastic for the stem and the tip.

That file was then sent to our Stratasys Objet500 Connex3 and printed in about 30 minutes.  

This video shows the printing process:

Once it was done, we just needed to wash out the support material and it was ready to go.

The moment of truth was then here.  Our intreped Scavenger Hunter took out her handy-dandy pot of India Ink and dipped the quill in, the she wrote out the requested message:
quill-pen-2

I worked like a charm, our handwriting was the biggest issue.

Wanting to see if it enhanced my artistic skills, I used it to sketch the following masterpiece:
quill-pen-face

This is why I use CAD systems.

Here is an image of the final part. The tip is stained black from the ink.
quill-pen-4

All and all a fun project, and I guess the team gets 80 points for doing this task, so we were glad to help.

You can learn more about 3D Printing by visiting here. Our contact us for more information on 3D Printing, Simulation, or Rapid Prototyping.

Talking About 3D Printing on Talk Radio

radio-microphone-on-the-airWith the increase of interest in 3D Printing from the general public, PADT has been asked to speak about the technology over several different forms of media. The local Phoenix TV stations were kind enough to come in and learn about the technology, including a great interview on the local PBS station.  We have been asked to give presentations to schools, inventor groups, and even a conference on traditional digital printing. Last week we crossed over into a new area for us, talk radio.

Don’t worry, this was not political talk radio… we are still waiting for Rush Limbaugh’s call.  A local financial station, Money Radio, wanted to talk about 3D Printing. Renee Palacios and your truly were interviewed by John Barnabas, host  for “Happiness, Opportunity and Technology.”

You can listen to the full broadcast here:

You can always learn more about 3D Printing on our Rapid Prototyping Page  or contact us.

If you need someone to talk about 3D Printing to your organization or if you are in the media and need recognized experts who can explain the technology, contact us and we would be happy to work with you.

Throwback Thursday: 3D Printing on “Good Morning America” in 1989

3dprinting-1989

Note: This post is not displaying correctly, here is a link to the video:
http://youtu.be/NpRDuJ5YgoQ

Take a look at this science segment that Jeff Strain found on Stereolithography from 1989.  If you ignore the hair styles (Joan Lunden rocked that helmet hair) the report isn’t that much different from news coverage that 3D Printing is getting today. But the technology has sure progressed.

To add some additional perspective, according to the 2014 Wohlers Report, 104 systems were sold in 1989. 94 SLA machines from 3D Systems and 10 systems from now defunct Japanese SLA providers. 

The same report estimates that for 2013 9,823 commercial systems were sold by over 33 different suppliers.  This does not include the personal printer (low cost desktop) systems, which was estimated at over 72,000 units!.  That is 9,345% growth over 24 years for commercial systems.. 66,702 systems have been tracked as old.  

Take a look at the video. It is truly fascinating how the message still resonates and how predictions for replacing traditional manufacturing were maybe a bit optimistic.  But even in the early days, this report captured the promise of the technology. 

It has been an incredible ride, and it is not over yet.