Press Release: PADT Adds the Faster, Larger and More Advanced Stratasys F900 Fused Deposition Modeling Additive Manufacturing System at its Tempe Headquarters

Well, the cat is now out of the bag. We are pleased to announce that we now have a Stratasys F900 FDM system up and running at PADT. Over the years we have helped dozens of customers specify and acquire their own F900 system. These are great machines. And our services customers were always asking when we would be adding one to our fleet of machines.

The answer is now. Our new F900 is up and running and making large, robust, and accurate parts right now.

A few weeks ago we published this picture on social media to announce the arrival of something big:

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Now we can share what it was all about. Inside the truck was a big box:

And inside that box was a brand new Stratasys F900 FDM System!

It was a tight fit through PADT’s painting room, down the hallway, and into its new home:

After our team plugged it in and Stratasys came out to finish the install and calibrate everything, we ran our first part:

This is a big machine:

Here are the specs:

Build Size: 36 x 24 x 36 in
Layer thickness: 0.005 in – 0.020 in
Materials: ABS-ESD7, ABSi, ABS-M30, ABS-M30i, ABSplus, ASA, FDM Nylon 12, FDM Nylong 5, PC, PC-ABS, PC-Iso, PPSF, ST-130, ULTEM.

The machine is up and running and ready to make parts. So please contact us at rp@padtinc.com or 480.813.4884 to talk about how our new, big, fast, robust machine can 3D Print better and bigger parts for you.

We have an official press release below or here.


PADT Adds the Faster, Larger and More Advanced Stratasys F900 Fused Deposition Modeling Additive Manufacturing System at its Tempe Headquarters

The F900 is the Most Capable System on the Market for Companies Who Need Large, 3D-Printed Production Parts in Small or Large Volume

TEMPE, Ariz., August 29, 2019 ─ In an exciting development that enhances its additive manufacturing services and capabilities, PADT, a globally recognized provider of numerical simulation, product development, and 3D printing products and services, added a Stratasys F900 Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM) Additive Manufacturing System at its headquarters in Tempe, Arizona. With fast build speed and large build volume, the F900 significantly increased PADT’s 3D Printing capability and capacity.

“The addition of the F900 flagship FDM printer to our growing lineup of additive manufacturing systems is a major milestone in our long-term partnership with Stratasys,” said Ward Rand, co-founder and principal, PADT. “This move greatly enhances the capabilities we provide our customers based on Stratasys’ leading-edge equipment.”

The Stratasys F900 is specifically built for manufacturing and aerospace. With the largest build size of any Stratasys FDM system, it’s designed to handle the most demanding manufacturing needs. The system uses a wide range of thermoplastics with advanced mechanical properties so parts can endure high heat, caustic chemicals, sterilization and high-impact applications.

FDM is the most common additive manufacturing process because of the technology’s ability to provide robust parts quickly at low-cost. PADT has developed expertise with the FDM printing process over the past 20 years. The Stratasys F900 is the pinnacle of FDM technology because it’s designed to meet the needs of the manufacturing industry’s shift from prototyping towards production parts. The addition of the F900 comes at a critical time for PADT due to the increased demand from its customers in industries such as aviation, space and defense, to create end-use components created under ISO9001/AS9100 standards.

“When we added a large stereolithography machine in 2018, we quickly learned how significant the demand is for more materials, larger parts, and faster turnaround,” said Rey Chu, co-founder and principal, PADT. “The Stratasys F900 fulfills all three of these same requirements for companies who need the outstanding performance of parts made with the FDM process. We look forward to partnering with our customers to make innovation work with this new capability.”

This new system will augment PADT’s existing fleet of four FDM systems from Stratasys.  It will compliment Stereolithography, PolyJet, Selective Laser Sintering, and Digital Light Synthesis systems. This wide range of material and process choices is why hundreds of companies rely on PADT as their Additive Manufacturing services provider. 

To learn more about PADT and its services, please visit www.padtinc.com.

About Phoenix Analysis and Design Technologies

Phoenix Analysis and Design Technologies, Inc. (PADT) is an engineering product and services company that focuses on helping customers who develop physical products by providing Numerical Simulation, Product Development, and 3D Printing solutions. PADT’s worldwide reputation for technical excellence and experienced staff is based on its proven record of building long-term win-win partnerships with vendors and customers. Since its establishment in 1994, companies have relied on PADT because “We Make Innovation Work.” With over 80 employees, PADT services customers from its headquarters at the Arizona State University Research Park in Tempe, Arizona, and from offices in Torrance, California, Littleton, Colorado, Albuquerque, New Mexico, Austin, Texas, and Murray, Utah, as well as through staff members located around the country. More information on PADT can be found at www.padtinc.com.

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Seven Tips for 3D Printing with Nylon 12CF

If you’ve been thinking of trying out Nylon 12 Carbon Fiber (12CF)  to replace aluminum tooling or create strong end-use parts, do it! All the parts we’ve built here at PADT have shown themselves to be extremely strong and durable and we think you should consider evaluating this material.

Nylon 12CF filament consists of black Nylon 12 filled with chopped carbon fibers; it currently runs on the Stratasys Fortus 380cf, Fortus 450 and Fortus 900 FDM systems when set up with the corresponding head/tip configuration. (The chopped fiber behavior requires a hardened extruder and the chamber runs at a higher temperature.) We’ve run it on our Fortus 450 and found with a little preparation you get excellent first-part-right results.

Forming tool printed in Nylon 12CF on a Stratasys Fortus 450 FDM printer. Build orientation was chosen to have the tool on its side while printing, producing a smooth curved surface (the critical area). (Image courtesy PADT)

With Nylon 12CF, fiber alignment is in the direction of extrusion, producing ultimate tensile strength of 10,960 psi (XZ orientation) and 4,990 psi (ZX orientation), with tensile modulus of 1,100 ksi (XZ) and 330 ksi (ZX). By optimizing your pre-processing and build approach, you can create parts that take advantage of these anisotropic properties and display behavior similar to that of composite laminates.

Best Practices for Successful Part Production

Follow these steps to produce best-practice Nylon 12CF parts:

  1. Part set-up in Insight or GrabCAD Print software:
    • If the part has curves that need a smooth surface, such as for use as a bending tool, orient it so the surface in question builds vertically. Also, set up the orientation to avoid excess stresses in the z-direction.
    • The Normal default build-mode selection works for most parts unless there are walls thinner than 0.2 inches/0.508 mm; for these, choose Thin Wall Mode, which reduces the build-chamber temperature, avoiding any localized overheating/melting issues. Keep the default raster and contour widths at 0.2 inches/0.508 mm.
    • For thin, flat parts (fewer than 10 layers), zoom in and count the number of layers in the toolpath. If there is an even number of layers, create a Custom Group that lets you define the raster orientation of the middle two layers to be the same – then let the rest of the layers alternate by 90 degrees as usual. This helps prevent curl in thin parts.
    • Set Seam Control to Align or Align to nearest, and avoid setting seams on edges of thin parts; this yields better surface quality.

2. In the Support Parameters box, the default is “Use Model Material where Possible” – keep it. Building both the part and most of the surrounding supports from the same material reduces the impact of mismatched thermal coefficient of expansion between the model and support materials. It also shortens the time that the model extruder is inactive, avoiding the chance for depositing unwanted, excess model material. Be sure that “Insert Perforation Layers” is checked and set that number to 2, unless you are using Box-style supports – then select 3. This improves support removal in nearly enclosed cavities.

3. Set up part placement in Control Center or GrabCAD Print software: you want to ensure good airflow in the build chamber. Place single parts near the center of the build-plate; for a mixed-size part group, place the tallest part in the center with the shorter ones concentrically around it.

4. Be sure to include a Sacrificial Tower. This is always the first part built, layer by layer, and should be located in the right-front corner. Keep the setting of Full Height so that it continues building to the height of the tallest part. You’ll see the Tower looks very stringy! That means it is doing its job – it takes the brunt of stray strings and material that may not be at perfect temperature at the beginning of each layer’s placement.

Part set-up of a thin, flat Nylon 12CF part in GrabCAD print, with Sacrificial Tower in its correct position at lower right, to provide a clean start to each build-layer. (Image courtesy PADT)

5. Run a tip-offset calibration, or two, or three, on your printer. This is really important, particularly for the support material, to ensure the deposited “bead” is flat, not rounded or asymmetric. Proper bead-profile ensures good adhesion between model and support layers.

6. After printing, allow the part to cool down in the build chamber. When the part(s) and sheet are left in the printer for at least 30 minutes, everything cools down slowly together, minimizing the possibility of curling. We have found that for large, flat parts, putting a 0.75-inch thick aluminum plate on top of the part while it is still in the chamber, and then keeping the part and plate “sandwiched” together after taking it out of the chamber to completely cool really keeps things flat.

7. If you have trouble getting the part off the build sheet: Removing the part while it is still slightly warm makes it easier to get off; if your part built overnight and then cooled before you got to it, you can put it in a low temp oven (about 170F) for ten (10) to 20 minutes – it will be easier to separate. Also, if the part appears to have warped that will go away after the soluble supports have been removed.

Be sure to keep Nylon 12CF canisters in a sealed bag when not in use as the material, like any nylon, will absorb atmospheric moisture over time.

Many of these tips are further detailed in a “Best Practices for FDM Nylon 12CF” document from Stratasys; ask PADT for a copy of it, as well as for a sample or benchmark part. Nylon 12 CF offers a fast approach to producing durable, custom components. Discover what Nylon 12CF can mean for your product development and production groups. Don’t forget to check the Custom Printing San Diego services for more information on the best printing techniques.

PADT Inc. is a globally recognized provider of Numerical Simulation, Product Development and 3D Printing products and services. For more information on Nylon 12CF and Stratasys products, contact us at info@padtinc.com.

Introducing TPU 92A – The latest FDM material from Stratasys

PADT is excited to announce the release of the latest FDM material from Stratasys: TPU 92A.
Thermoplastic Polyurethane (TPU) is a type of elastomer material, known for its flexibility, resilience, tear resistance, and high elongation. It’s a highly process-able material which makes it ideal for additive manufacturing.
TPU 92A is an elastomeric material that is ideal for prototyping highly functional, large, durable, complex elastomer parts. 

This material brings the benefits of an elastomer to the accurate and easy-to-use F123 3D Printer. Combined with soluble support, it lets you create simple to complex elastomer parts, and through printing on the F123 Series gives product developers more tools to expand their prototyping capabilities with reliable accuracy.
Curious to learn more about the unique properties that make TPU 92A such a great option for prototyping?Schedule a meeting to see the material for yourself.Click the link below to start a conversation with PADT’s resident material experts, in order to discuss the capabilities of this Thermoplastic Polyurethane material, and how your company can benefit from using it.

Don’t miss this unique opportunity, schedule a meeting today!

How to Simplify Aircraft Certification – Stratasys Webinar

The aerospace industry’s adoption of additive manufacturing is growing and predicted to revolutionize the manufacturing process. However, to meet stringent FAA and EASA requirements, AM-developed aerospace products must be certified that they can achieve the robust performance levels provided by traditional manufacturing methods. Current certification processes are complex and variable, and thus obstruct AM adoption in aerospace.

Thanks to a newly released aerospace package released by Stratasys for their Fortus 900mc printer and ULTEM 9085 resin, Aerospace Organizations are now able to simplify the aviation certification process for their manufactured parts.

Join PADT’s 3D Printing General Manager, Norman Stucker for a live webinar that will introduce you to the new Stratasys aerospace package that removes the complexity from FAA and EASA certification.

By attending this webinar, you will learn:

  • How Stratasys can help get more parts certified for flight quicker and easier.
  • The benefits of Aerospace Organizations using the Fortus 900mc and ULTEM 9085 resin
  • And much more!

Don’t miss your chance to attend this upcoming event,
click below to secure your spot today!

 

If this is your first time registering for one of our Bright Talk webinars, simply click the link and fill out the attached form. We promise that the information you provide will only be shared with those promoting the event (PADT).

You will only have to do this once! For all future webinars, you can simply click the link, add the reminder to your calendar and you’re good to go!

Press Release: New 3D Printing Support Cleaning Apparatus Features Large Capacity for Stratasys FDM Systems

PADT-Press-Release-IconBuilding on the worldwide success of previous products in the family, PADT has just released the new SCA 3600, a large capacity cleaning system for removing the support material from Stratasys FDM parts.  This new system adds capacity and capability over the existing benchtop SCA-1200HT System.

A copy of the press release is below.
At the same time, we are also launching a new website for support removal: www.padtinc.com/supportremoval.

The SCA 3600 can dissolve support from all the SST-compatible materials you use – ABS, PC, and nylon. A “no heat” option provides agitation at room temperature for the removal of Polyjet SUP706 material as well. The SCA 3600’s versatility and efficient cleaning performance are built on the success of earlier models with all the features you have come to expect, in a larger and more capable model.sca_3600-3pics

Since the launch of the original SCA-1200 in 2008, PADT has successfully manufactured and supported the SCA family of products for users worldwide. Common requests from desktop SCA users were for a larger system for bigger parts, the ability to clean many parts at the same time, and the option to remove supports from PolyJet parts. The SCA 3600 is the answer: Faster, larger, and more capable.

sca-logo3-web7SCA 3600 Key Features are:

  • Removes soluble support from ABS, PC, and nylon 3D printed FDM parts
  • Removes soluble support from PolyJet 3D Printed parts
  • User-selectable temperature presets at 50, 60, 70, and 85°C and “No Heat” for PolyJet
  • User-controlled timer
  • Uses cleaning solutions from Stratasys
  • Unique spray nozzle optimizes flow coverage
  • 230 VAC +/- 10%, 15A
  • Whisper-quiet operation
  • Includes rolling cart for easy movement, filling, and draining.
  • Capacity: 27 gal / 102 L
  • Size: 42.8″ x 22.8″ x 36.5″/ 1,086 x 578 x 927 mm
  • 16” x 16” x 14” / 406 x 406 x 356 mm removable large parts basket
  • Integral hinged lid and small part basket
  • Stainless steel tub and basket
  • Over temperature and water level alarms
  • Automatic halt of operation with alarms
  • Field replaceable sub-assemblies
  • Regulatory Compliance: CE/cTUVus/RoHS/WEEE

You can download our new brochure for both systems:

SCA 3600 Spec Sheet

SCA-1200HT Spec Sheet

If you are interested in learning more or adding an SCA 3600 to your additive manufacturing lab, contact your Stratasys reseller.

Official copies of the press release can be found in HTML and PDF.

Press Release:

New 3D Printing Support Cleaning Apparatus Features Large Capacity for Stratasys FDM Systems

Offered Worldwide, the SCA 3600 is Big Enough to Handle Large 3D Printed Parts, Effortlessly Dissolving Support Material

TEMPE, Ariz., November 17, 2016 – Phoenix Analysis & Design Technologies, Inc. (PADT), the Southwest’s largest provider of simulation, product development, and rapid prototyping services and products, today introduced its new SCA3600 3D Printing Support  Cleaning Apparatus (SCA). The systems are sold exclusively by Stratasys, Ltd. (SSYS) for use with its FORTUS line of 3D Printers. The hands-free support removal technology is a huge advantage to people who use Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM) systems for their 3D Printing.

“With more than 10,000 of our benchtop SCA units in the field, we gathered a wealth of knowledge on performance and reliability,” said Rey Chu, Co-owner and Principal of PADT. “We used that information to design and manufacture a system that cleans larger parts, or multiple small parts, while keeping the speed, easy maintenance and great user experience of the benchtop system.”

A powerful upgrade over PADT’s successful SCA-1200HT and SCA-1200 support removal products that have been in use around the world since 2008, the SCA 3600 features a simpler, more user-friendly design. The new versatile SCA offers temperature choices of 50, 60, 70 and 80 degrees Celsius, as well as no-heat, that readily cleans supports from all SST compatible materials – ABS, PC and Nylon. The SCA 3600 also features a large 16” x 16” x 14” parts basket, 3400 watts of heating for faster warm-up and a wheeled cart design for mobility.

The advantages of the system were highlighted by Sanja Wallace, Sr. Director of Product Marketing and Management at Stratasys, Ltd. when she commented, “the addition of the SCA 3600 as an accessory to our very successful FORTUS systems simplifies the support removal process with increased speed and capacity for multiple large parts.”

Once parts are printed, users simply remove them from their Stratasys FDM system, place them in the SCA 3600, set a cleaning cycle time and temperature, and then walk away.  The device gently agitates the 3D printed parts in the heated cleaning solution, effortlessly dissolving away all of the support material. This process is more efficient and user friendly than those of other additive manufacturing systems using messy powders or support material that must be manually removed.

More information on the systems available at www.padtinc.com/supportremoval. Those interested in acquiring an SCA 3600 should contact their local Stratasys reseller.

About Phoenix Analysis and Design Technologies

Phoenix Analysis and Design Technologies, Inc. (PADT) is an engineering product and services company that focuses on helping customers who develop physical products by providing Numerical Simulation, Product Development, and Rapid Prototyping solutions. PADT’s worldwide reputation for technical excellence and experienced staff is based on its proven record of building long term win-win partnerships with vendors and customers. Since its establishment in 1994, companies have relied on PADT because “We Make Innovation Work.” With over 80 employees, PADT services customers from its headquarters at the Arizona State University Research Park in Tempe, Arizona, and from offices in Torrance, California, Littleton, Colorado, Albuquerque, New Mexico, and Murray, Utah, as well as through staff members located around the country. More information on PADT can be found at http://www.PADTINC.com.

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Media Contact
Alec Robertson
TechTHiNQ on behalf of PADT
585-281-6399
alec.robertson@techthinq.com
PADT Contact
Eric Miller
PADT, Inc.
Principal & Co-Owner
480.813.4884
eric.miller@padtinc.com

 

Students 3D Print and Assemble Prosthetic Hands for School Project

hand1What do you get when you combine a motivated student leader, enthusiastic classmates, a worldwide online community, and the latest 3D Printing technology from Stratasys? You give children around the world a cool way to hold things again.  That is what happened when high school student Rahul Jayaraman of Basis Chandler decided to take part in a project called Enabling The Future. They describe themselves as “A global network of passionate volunteers using 3D Printing to give the world a ‘helping hand'” by designing a wide variety of prosthetic hands for kids that can be printed and assembled by volunteers.

Local news station, KSAZ FOX 10 Phoenix stopped by PADT while we were printing three hands in our Stratasys FORTUS 450 to interview Rahul and talk to us about the project.  It gives a great summary:

And Channel 3, KTVK, came to the assembly event at Basis Chandler:>

azfamily.com 3TV | Phoenix Breaking News, Weather, Sport

 

As did Channel 12, KPNX:

3D Printing is a fantastic technology for one simple reason, it enables almost anyone to manufacture parts. All you need is a good design. And that is where the people at Enabling the Future come in.  Check out their website to see some great examples of how their volunteer work changes so many lives. Have a box of tissue handy if you watch the videos…

This is how the project works.  A leader like Rahul takes the initiative to sign up for the project. He then chooses which of the many designs he wants to make.  For this first go around, he picked a general design from Thingiverse called the Raptor Reloaded.  Next they needed the hardware you could not 3D Print – screws springs, velcro, and bits and pieces that hold the design together.  For this they needed to raise $25 per hand so Rahul was given the opportunity to learn how to raise money, a very useful skill.

hand2PADT’s Dhruv Bhate and the rest of our 3D Printing team worked with Rahul to get the design just right and then 3D Print the hands.  That will be done this week and this weekend the next phase will take place. Rahul and a large number of his classmates from Basis Chandler will get together at the school this weekend to put thirty or so hands together.  They will then box them up and another volunteer group, www.HandChallenge.com, will ship them to kids in the developing world that need them.

Here is a video from Tom Fergus from Fox10 showing a closeup of the hand in action:

We at PADT love projects like this because it is win-win-win.  The students get a chance to run a complicated project by themselves, learning the skills they will need later in life to organize, manage, and finish a project. PADT wins because we can contribute to our chosen area of charity, STEM education, in a way that benefits others beyond a given school. And the big winners are the kids around the world that receive a new and cool way to grab hold of life.

We will have sample hands at our open house next Thursday: Nerdtoberfest as well as an update when we get feedback from the distribution of the hands.

Stratasys and Objet Merger Complete

Stratasys

It is now official. Stratasys and Object have completed their merger to form a company worth over $3.0 Billion.  Actually, as we prepare this update it is up to $3.37B.  Obviously the markets thing this merger is a good thing.

And now Stratasys has a new logo and what we think is a great slogan: “For a 3D World”

You can read the press release here.

As a long time Stratasys distributor and a user of Objet’s and Stratasys systems in our rapid prototyping services business, we are very familiar with both product lines and look forward to the synergy of the merger.  These are two truly complimentary product lines.

Right now this merger will have no impact on how we do business with our existing customers for any of the product sales or services we offer, including sales of new systems, maintenance of existing machines, material ordering, or prototyping services with either FDM or PolyJet.  As the two companies combine organizationally we will keep everyone informed.

Learn more about the Stratasys line of Mojo, uPrint SE, Dimension, and FORTUS 3D Printers here.