Our Parking Lot Gets Cool for PADT Motorsport Day

There were Chevys and Fords, Porches and Harleys, Teslas and Acuras. Big trucks and little sports cars. And of course, there was pizza. Our first ever Motorsport Day was a blast. Mechanical engineers have a special relationship with cars. For those of us who studied machine design, statics, dynamics, thermo, and CAD, various forms of motor driven transportation often represent the pinnacle of our trade during a given era. So having a parking lot full of wheeled vehicles tickled our brains.

Employees, as well as family and friends of employees, brought their rides. The best part was to see the love and passion that the owners put into their vehicles. These are far more than just a way to get to and from work. One thing we can’t share in words is the sound of each machine. From the purr of the Porche to the throaty roar of the two drag cars to the rumble of the Harley, each one had its own unique and special sound. And the Tesla, not wanting to be left out in the sound department, cranked up its stereo did a dance for us.

This was our first attempt at this type of an event, a practice run to see if anyone was interested. Duh. It was a huge success. So, watch your email and this blog for an announcement of our 2020 Motorsport Day when we will open it up to customers and vendors who are interested in sharing their ride or taking a look.

Words don’t do these marvelous machines justice, so here is a gallery with this year’s entries. And for the car fans, a table after that gives specifics on each vehicle.


—-Owner—-

—-Year—-

———-Make———-

———-Model———-
Rob R1935ChevyStandard Three Window Coupe
Tom S1950Chevy3100 – Resto Mod Patina Truck
Ralph G1964ChevyNova SS (Chevy II)
Steve G1968FordMustang Cobra Covertible
Vince E1969ChevyNova SS
Dwaine R1973ChevyCorvette
Scott R1983Datsun 280ZX
Mark M2001DodgeRAM 2500
Ted H2003AcuraCL Type S
Tom B2011ChevyCamaro SS
Teri S2015Harley DavidsonDyna Lowrider
Tim M2015Porsche911 Carrera S
Roger S2018TeslaX

Reveling in Speed and Technology – Tesla Test Drive Day at PADT

We have great customers.  The kind of cusomers that call up and ask “Hey, what do you think about having a Tesla test drive event for PADt employees”  Duh.  Yes.  Please provide contact information.

Then we thought this was an event better shared with other techno-speed-nerds. The Tempe Tesla show room people liked the idea so we put together an event for our ANSYS and Stratasys customers. (Just another reason to buy from us)

The basic idea was simple, stop on by the PADT parking lot in Tempe and drive a Tesla Model S or Model X, or both.  The Tesla people brought along their technical person and the test drive people were also very knowledgable about all the features in the three vehicles they let us drive. The course left the PADT parking lot, drove up to Elliot, then entred to 101, and then get off at Warner or Rey and head back, while the brave Tesla employee tried to keep cool. Especially when Oren was driving.

For many of us, this was the first time we had driven one.  Let me just say that the common factor across employees and cusotmers is that everyone had an ear-to-ear grin on their face when they got back from their test drive.  These cars are not just fast (large numbers of electrons pushed through big motors equals lots of torque right away) but they are brilliantly engineered. From the user interface, to the seats to, to the suspension. Everything is done right.  As a group of engineers that was almost as exciting as the raw power and impecable styling of the cars.

It was a true nerdfest.  We spent 10 minutes discussing regenerative breaking schemes and the idea of using regeneration all the time when you lift off the accerator instead of putting your foot on the break to slow down slightly.  This is the type of paradigm shift that disrupts around one hundred years of automotive legacy.  Why does the accelrator pedal have to be an accelerator pedal. Why can’t it be an input for acceleration and deceleration based on position?  We also spent even more time (I’m embarassed to say how long) talking about charging.  And then the topic turned to autonomous driving and the sensors used.  Good times.  Good times.

PADT’s relationships with Tesla actually goes way back. When they were first starting out and were just a handfull of engineers, we provided some ANSYS training and did a consulting job for them on thermal management for an early battery system.  So we proudly count them as a happy PADT customer.  And of course PADT worked on the large Blink chargers and has supported many companies that are suppliers to tesla.

Look for similar events in the future. No sales or seminars, just smart-people-fun type of events.