Arizona Chief Science Officers Design Their Own 3D Printed Name Badges

az-scitech-cso-badges-3d-printed-0The Chief Science Officer program is a program for 6th-12th grade students to represent their school in STEM. And what better way is there for them to identify themselves then with 3D Printed name badges?  The program’s sponsors, the AZ SciTech Festival offer a training retreat for the kids who get elected as their school’s CSO and we all thought introducing design and 3D Printing would be a great activity.

As part of the 2015 Fall CSO Institute, PADT’s Jeff Nichols joined local designer and artist John Drury to spend some time with the kids explaining how to work with logos and shapes to convey an idea, and how to design for 3D Printing.  The kids worked out their own design and sent it to PADT for printing.

We converted their sketch into a 3D Model, starting in Adobe Illustrator. The sketch was traced with vector geometry and then a generic name was added. This was then copied 144 times and each name was typed in, with a few extras. This step was the only boring part.

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The design worked great because it is a simple extrusion with no need for support material.    The outline of their names were exported as DXF from Illustrator and then imported onto the 3D Model and extruded up to make a solid model of a badge. This was then copied to make a badge for each student. Then the names were imported and extruded on the patterned badges.

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The was a simple extrusion for each feature, allowing for contrast and readability but keeping things simple.
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This project was a great opportunity to use both patterns and importing 2D drawings. By laying everything out in a grid, we only had to make one badge and copy that. Then import the names and extrude those on the patterned badges.

STL files were then made and sent off to one of our Stratasys FDM 3D Printers. The FDM (Fused Deposition Modeling) process extrudes an ABS plastic filament, and you can change material during the build. So, to add a bit of contrast, we changed the filament color after the base of the design was done, making the logo and student names stand out.  The final results came out really nice.

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This is what they look like right out of the machine. We swapped out two color for each build. With some clever packing, we were able to get 12 badges on each platform.
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The final products really stand out.

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This project was a lot of fun because we were able to work with the students. They got what John and Jeff taught them and did a great job.  We know they will be placed with pride on back backs and jackets across Arizona.

To learn more about the CSO program, visit their website: http://chiefscienceofficers.org/ Check out the blog.  Some of these kids can really write well and their insight into Science, Technology, Math, and Education is insightful.

Star Wars – The Force Awakens with PADT

padt-star-wars-vii-5For an engineer, there are certain TV and Movie experiences that border on the religious – Star Wars is of course one of those.  That is why PADT’s main office in Tempe closed down today to head down the freeway to the Chandler to see Star Wars VII: The Force Awakens.

Around 370 employees, family members, friends, vendors, former employees, and customers showed up for the 10:00 am showing.  We were confident that JJ Abrams would do a great job, because he did so well with an even more important franchise to PADT, Star Trek.  We were not disappointed.  There were cheers, there was laughter, and several of us confessed in the lobby afterwards that we teared up a bit.  A true treat.

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We had a 410 seat theater and about 350 RSVP’s . So we got a bit nervous as the seats filled up. We did get more unexpected people then we cancellations, but we had plenty of room and the more the merrier. Bottom line, the first two rows were empty. So prefect.

I want to thank Josh Heaps here for putting it all together and for dealing with our constantly asking him about when and where it was and how many seats the theater had.

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My friend Ryan, one of AZ’s biggest Star War fans, and our fantastic V.P from Chase, Camille, were great sports who dressed up and posed for pictures. Not only does Camille constantly help make our banking a great experience, she jumps right in with our engineering fun.

This is also a great venue to thank our customers and vendors for coming and for bringing your families.  We don’t get to see many of you often enough, and rarely outside of a meeting or a phone call.  Seeing the smiles on everyone’s face after the movie was, as they say, worth the price of admission.

May the Force Be With You

If you want to organize similar event to your colleagues, hire team building company in Singapore!

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That Opening Logo that We have All Been Waiting a Long Time to See.

GCOI 2015 – Celebrating Arizona’s Technology Community

gcoi_iconFor those of us that are part of the Arizona Technology community, the official kickoff of holiday and end of year celebrations is the Governor’s Celebration of Innovation, or GCOI.  A who’s who of key people from startups to large aerospace firms gather at the convention center to recognize students, academicians, companies, and individuals who have had a significant impact on the State’s high tech industries.  This is always a special evening for PADT because many of the attendees, and usually a few of the award winners, are our customers.

In fact, for 2015 we are proud to congratulate the following long time PADT customers who were recognized last night:

  • Medtronic Tempe Campus for Innovator of the Year, Large Company
  • Raytheon Missile Systems for winning the Pioneering Award
  • ASU’s Michael Crow, the OneNeck IT Services People’s Choice Lifetime Achievement Award winner (ASU is a large PADT customer… so we feel Dr. Crow is our customer as well.)

You can find a full list of winners and some great pictures  from the event in Tishin Donkersley’s article at AZ Tech Beat.

This fantastic event is put on by the Arizona Technology Council and the Arizona Commerce Authority.  For those that were there: Mac & Cheese bar FTW.

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About the Awards

As in past years, PADT was honored to be able to fabricate the awards that were handed out. This year we used the overall design for the event, created by Atom, as our starting point. We used our Stratasys FDM printers to make the stair steps and “tech guy silhouette” The graphics are then printed on large stickers that are adhered to the back of an Arizona’ish shaped piece of plexiglass.

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The PADT Booth

This year we decided to not bring a 3D Printer and instead focus on parts made on a wider variety of printers. The hit for visitors were the metal parts that were made on ConceptLaser Direct Laser Melting systems.  In addition we got to talk about the great work that our product development team did for GlobalStar on the Spot devices and Orthosensor for their intelligent orthopedic sensors. We even had a few simulation people come by to talk ANSYS.

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Hopefully you had a chance to talk with Andrew Miller, Kathryn Pesta, or Mario Vargas. If you missed us and want to know more about PADT, what we do, or the Arizona Technology Community, reach out and we will be happy to chat.

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2015 PADT Pumpkin Fest and Launch

padt-pumpkin-lunch-1Every year around the end of October PADT has our holiday season kick-off event, our Pumpkin Fest and Launch.  This year we also added in a company meeting, killing three birds with one pumpkin.

The weather was fantastic, and we all enjoyed sitting outside in the sun under a clear blue sky.  Our pumpkin catapult, recently improved, was then rolled out for some pumpkin chunkin’ fun.

Thanks to the folks at Tech Shop Chandler we had a redesigned basket for the pumpkins to go in. Their industrial sewing machine was a perfect tool to make something strong enough.  Her are some picture below that I took with my phone, we will add video next week.

Manoj M won on distance, and Jeff McK took the prize for accuracy.

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The PADT Pumpkin cataPult ready to go.
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Ted shows good form while striving for accuracy
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The only change to this years design was a better basket made with industrial fabric on an industrial sewing machine from Tech Shop

Making Old Desks New at PADT

  • whiteboard-desks-icon1It has been a long time since I have written any articles. I thought to get me back into the flow of writing and share a recent fun project that I completed at work, where I was able reuse and re-purpose abandoned 20 year-old office desks. We are talking about excellent quality desks, just as the Buy Direct Online Computer Desks. The issue started out a frustration related to note taking and I wanted something better. What is my frustration, how did it start? It was started by simple pet peeve of my own. I do not like using paper to jot down quick ideas, thoughts or a to-do on! I write numerous quick notes down during my day at work.

    Some examples of my daily office dilemma:

  • Rapid fire phone calls that can bounce my phone off the desk.
  • I just have to jot something down less than a single sentence down.
  • A conference call occurs I need to capture a couple quick thoughts down because I am such a great active listener and don’t want to interrupt.
  • Even sketching out a quick design for a new CUBE HPC cluster or workstation.

My whys may not be your whys and I feel like it is a time & resource waste! You might too especially when I the thoughts go something like this.

Should I:

  • Use a new piece of paper to write quick notes on? Nope
  • Find the special square colored sticky things? Nope
  • Dig through the paper recycling bin and get strange looks from my co-workers? Nope
  • Cut my own square colored sticky note things? Nope
  • I can’t seem to find a pen, open a brand new box of pens? Nope
  • Take your notes on the electronic device of your choosing, okay which one phone, laptop, and/or tablet or how about use that conference room computer? Then I end up having quick notes and scribbles EVERYWHERE!
  • Sigh…

I hope those points made you laugh and frames a picture that I was not in my comfort zone. I knew what I wanted. I had used the same note taking process for years. Probably every day I would use my two whiteboards to write quick notes on. Whiteboards worked for me, I loved my whiteboards and life was good. What happened and where the frustration occurred was that I had four office desk moves over a time span of a year at PADT, Inc. Guess what happened the new office areas did not have whiteboards in them!

Here is a picture of a bunch of abandoned desks here at PADT, Inc. I walk past desks like these every day. Then during the office moving a thought occurred to me that maybe I could use paste or mat whiteboard type surface to them and make a whiteboard type desk?

whiteboard-desks-01I figured that someone had already thought of the idea already and remembered about a business trip that I took to California this past year. I remember walking through the insides of startup lab office building. You could feel the venture capital money pulsing through the office walls. This office building environment was sophisticated and exciting. What did I notice? I am sure you can think of some good examples. Haha, but what I found fascinating was groups of people collaborating with dry-erase markers in hand and notes scribbled over entire sections of walls. On huge conference room tables I even saw that large sections of glass walls where used. Boom! I had my solution.

I did my research and this is what I used.

The primer & the solution:

The cost:

  • About $50 and a few hours of time
    • One package of the dry erase can do about 3-4 coats for a 30 sq ft area, or about two thick coast on two desks.

The steps:

  1. Lightly sand the top until smooth.
  2. Clean the top of the desk.
  3. Mask the ends of the table
  4. Apply coat of primer
  5. Apply the solution
    1. After the third or fourth coat is on, wait 3 days for use.

The results:

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Do It!

Manufacturing Open House Highlights – October 2015

padt-mfg-openhouse-2015-1Here at PADT we help people who make products, stuff that gets manufactured.  So we focused our open house yesterday on advanced manufacturing and invited the community to come out and network, learn, and share.  Even though it was a busy week for technology events in Arizona, we had a great turnout on a surprisingly cloudy Wednesday evening.

October is Manufacturing month and this open house was part of the Arizona Commerce Authority’s coordinated events to highlight manufacturing in Arizona.   You can learn more about other events in the state here.

This event was a bit more casual and less structured then past PADT open houses, letting attendees spend more time one-on-one with various experts and dig deep in to technologies like metal 3D Printing, urethane casting, topological optimization, and scanning.

What struck all of us here was the keen interest in and knowledge about the various tools we were showing across a wide range of attendees.  From students with home built 3D Printers to managers from local aerospace companies that are on the forefront of Additive Manufacturing, the questions that were asks and comments that were made with insightful and show a transition of this technology from hype to real world application.

Below are some more quick snapshot taken during the event.

A big thanks to everyone who made it out and we hope to see more of you next time. If you have any questions about the application of advanced manufacturing technologies to your products, don’t hesitate to reach out to us at info@padtinc.com or 480.813.4884.  As always, visit www.PADTINC.com to learn more.

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PADT’s Dr. Dhruv Bhate explains the latest developments in metal Additive Manufacturing.

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PADT’s Director of Engineering, Rob Rowan, discusses how PADT Medical has helped companies turn their medical device ideas into products.
 

 

 

 

 

Ademola Falade, PADT's scanning expert, describes how blue light scanning has changed how we capture geometry of existing parts.
Ademola Falade, PADT’s scanning expert, describes how blue light scanning has changed how we capture geometry of existing parts.

PADT's Seminar Room was packed with people talking to PADT's expert engineering staff.
PADT’s Seminar Room was packed with people talking to PADT’s expert engineering staff.
 

 

PADT’s 3D Printing Demo room was the place to hang and discuss different ways to use 3D Printing.
  
 

3D Printing the 4th Dimension – GISHWHES 2015 Scavenger Hunt

padt-sundial-insun-apple-watch-wGISHWHES is a huge international scavenger hunt. Every year teams around the globe comb through the list of 215 tasks and pick as many as possible that their team can do.  Last year they introduced 3D Printing as a task, and we helped a team 3D Print a quill pen. That was a lot of fun, so when this year’s list included an item on 3D printing, we jumped at the chance to be involved.

The item was:

110: VIDEO. Use a cutting edge 3D printer to 3D print your representation of the 4th dimension.62 POINTS

Being engineers we said “4th Dimension?  Time.”  Then it became a choice between the way mass distorts the space-time continuum or some sort of clock’ish thing.  The distortion thing seemed difficult so we focused on a clock.  Being that we were constrained on budget and time we decided to do a sundial.

The result can be seen here in this YouTube video.

It was a fun project and the team spent a bit of time in the 112F sunshine trying it out.  We can’t wait to see what we will get to do for the 2016 scavenger hunt.

Making the Model

A couple of people have asked if we downloaded the solid model for the sundial or if we made it. We actually made it. After a little bit of research we found that making a simple horizontal sundial like this one is very easy. Here are the steps we took:

Get Geometry Values

So it turns out that the angle of each hour line is determined by the latitude of where the dial will go. The angle of the pointy thing, called a gnomon, is also the latitude.  So for Tempe, AZ that is 33.4294°.That gets applied to the equation:

angle(h) = arctan(sin(L*tan(15° · h))

h = integer of the hour, 6 am to 6 pm
L = latitude

I plopped that into Excel:

=ABS(DEGREES(ATAN(SIN(RADIANS($C$3))*TAN(RADIANS(15)*B7))))

and got the following:

Latitude 33.4294
Hour Angle
6 90.00
7 64.06
8 43.66
9 28.85
10 17.64
11 8.40
12 0.00

Build the Solid Model

The next step is to build the model. I used SolidEdge because I know it real well and was able to knock it out quickly.  But all CAD tools would be the same:

  1. Pick a center point.
  2. Add lines as rays from that using the angles in the table above for each hour.
  3. Design the shape of your sundial to look cool. I did a simple circle .
  4. Mark the hours using the sketch. I raised up thin rectangles.
  5. Model the gnomon using the latitude as the angle.  Make this as fancy or simple as you want.
  6. Add whatever doo-dads you want.
  7. Label the hours if you want.
  8. Save to STL

Here is what my sketch looked like:PADT-sundial-cad-model-hour-sketc

And the final solid model looked like this:

PADT-sundial-cad-modelWe sent this to the printer as shown in the video, and got a sundial.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Come See PADT at a Conference Near You.

padt-on-the-road-iconSometimes you get that prefect storm where everything happens at once, and these last weeks of May and first weeks of June are shaping up to be our busiest time for conferences and shows this year.  We are going to be all over the place: Newfoundland, Montreal, Long Beach, Houston, and even Phoenix.

So I thought I’d shoot out this quick note just in case some of you who follow this blog are going to be at any of these events. Please make sure you stop by and say hello:

  • May 19-21, 2015:  RAPID Show – Long Beach, California
    We will have a booth and will be talking about 3D Printing as well as Simulation and Design.
  • May 31-June 6, 2015:  ASME 2015 34th International Conference on Ocean, Offshore and Arctic Engineering (OMAE) – St John’s, Newfoundland, Canada
    Clinton Smith will be presenting a paper with ANSYS, Inc.  on a mesh refinement study we did for a customer on an offshore platform with ANSYS FLUENT
  • June 2-3, 2015: AmCon Phoenix – A Design & Contract Manufacturing Expo – Phoenix, AZ
    This will be our third AmCon this year, this time in our home territory.  The 3D Printing and product development team will be in a booth and I will be doing a talk on “The Practical Application of 3D Printing for Prototyping, Tooling, and Production”
  • June 9, 2015: ANSYS Convergence – Houston, TX
    Clinton Smith will be manning our booth at this event and available to talk about all that PADT does.
  • June 15-19, 2015: ASME Turbo Expo (IGTI) – Montreal Quebec, Canada
    We will just attending this conference, hanging in the Flownex booth, and can probably be found around the ANSYS booth as well.

And don’t forget our Lunch and Learn Road Show: Dealing with Scanned, Repaired, and Legacy Geometry for 3D Printing

Running in Circles Pays off at 11th Annual Pat’s Run for Team PADT

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For three months we walked, jogged, ran, and whimpered around the lake in front of our office. We trained as a team, we stretched, we mumbled, but we stuck with it. This past weekend running in circles paid off with a very successful showing at the 11th Annual Pat’s run at ASU.  I you were at the race, you may have seen our bright orange shirts in the sea of the official blue that most people were wearing.

To get to Saturday’s race, every Tuesday and Thursday we sat on big foam cylinders and yoga mats in the grass.  We butt kicked and we pranced in the parking lot. And then we starting making a clockwise orbit around the lake across the street. At first, it was walking with a little running.  Invectives were hurled.  But over time the walkers got faster, the walk/runners ran more, and the runners got faster. We found out that the sidewalk around the north lake here at the ASU Research Park is exactly a half mile, as if the designers planned it that way. We learned that if it is 82f outside you need to drink a lot of water to stay hydrated.  With the help of our fantastic Training, Susan Leveque from Physix, we worked through upset joints, asthma, and too much time spent in front of the computer.  Everyone that could make it to Pat’s Run this past Saturday did fantastic.  The most noticeable characteristic was that every single one of us had a smile on their face at the finish.

If you are not familiar with Pat’s Run, it is a charity race to honor Pat Tillman and other courageous men and women who have sacrificed everything for their country. It is a 4.2 mile loop starting and ending at the Arizona State University stadium where Pat played for ASU and then the Cardinals before he put his NFL career on hold to serve his country in the wake of the 9/11 attacks. The course loops around Tempe Town lake and ends with a run in to the stadium and on to the field.  Over 30,000 people participated this year. The weather was perfect, the event was well organized, and everyone on the 2015 PADT Running Team walked, jogged, and/or ran a great race.  Until you have done a big event like that, it is hard to understand how encouraging the large crowd is. They count your top 5 finishers, so our official team time ws 39:37 or a 9:26 min/mile pace.  We were fortunate enough to also have friends and family run with the team.

A big shout-out to Shannon, Cyril, and of our primary trainer Susan from Physix for setting up the whole thing.  We literally did not have the time or bandwidth to do this without your help, and we certainly didn’t have the knowledge.  The plan worked and you took all of us way beyond where we started.

Here are pictures from the event below.  Another thanks to Michael Dunn, Physix client on dealing with some knee issues who came out and took pictures for both teams. Great job making us look good.

We hope to see more customers and friends at next years run.  We may even follow Shawn’s lead and go for the bright green shorts next year.

Tempe Prep Robotics Team Needs your Help to Win at FIRST Robotics National Championship

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Tempe Preparatory Academy’s High School Robotics team, FRC Team #3944 All Knights, was on the winning alliance for the FIRST Robotics Competition, FRC, Arizona East Regional Competition on March 19-21st. And they are therefore on their way to St Louis, Missouri to represent Arizona at Nationals.  Last night they were on local Phoenix channel 12 to show off their robot and announce their GoFundMe campaign to raise the $25,000 in travel and entrance fees.  

PADT has pitched in already and we encourage the rest of the Arizona technology community to go to www.gofundme.com/allknights and donate what they can. Make sure you check out the video.  Great group of kids (the reporter… well I'll let you decide… typical media reaction to technology…) who have a great piece of equipment that they built in just six months.  

Support FIRST, Support Arizona STEM

Donate $25 as a Person, get your company to donate more!

 

Celebrate the Grand Opening of PADT StartUp Labs at CEI

 

PADT_StartUpLabs-1

 

PADT is excited to celebrate the opening of PADT StartUp Labs, the advanced 3D Printing facility for startups located at CEI. PADT StartUpLabs is focused on working with other tenants at CEI.  Engineers from PADT hold regular office hours to answer questions about 3D Printing and product development.  Clients can also set up a consultation with anyone on our staff to talk about simulation, product design or test, quality systems, or manufacturing. The goal is to eventually expand these services to a broader audience. 

Join Us

CEI2
 

 

What:  Grand Opening of PADT StartUp Labs

When: April 20th, 3pm – 7pm

Where: CEI – 275 N. Gateway Drive, Phoenix, AZ 85034

Food and drinks will be provided. 

Register Here

If you have questions about the event, please contact Kathryn Pesta at kathryn.pesta@padtinc.com

CEI

 

Hike Run Ski Pi(e): Team Building at PADT

padt-pi-day-platesLast week was a big, and diverse, week for "team building" at PADT.  We learned some things and "bonded" in not-as-nerdy as you would think ways. A fun week had by all, with a lot of hard work thrown in between.  Over the years we have learned that we need to take a break now and then and do something "other" and mingle with people from different parts of the company. 

PADT Running Team

The group preparing for this year's Pat's Run is over half way through their training.  Everyone is getting stronger and faster and we are all pleased with the fact that we don't feel like we are going to pass out at the end of a training session. A sign that Physix has been doing a great job.  We also got our team shirts:

padt-running-team-shirts

Look for us at the race, we will not be hard to find.

Albuquerque Hike

While visiting Albuquerque, I was able to have some informal "team building" with Jeff Strain in the Albuquerque office.  We headed up to the Sandia mountain foothills and hiked Emudito Canyon.  A nice afternoon climb past some very beautiful scenery.  I was reminded that Albuquerque is also a mile high… pant pant pant.

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The trail head is just down the street from Hank and Marie's house in Breaking Bad.  

2nd Annual Colorado Office Ski Trip (ACOST)

On Friday the PADT team in Colorado, accompanied by a two of us from the Tempe office, headed up to Breckenridge for a fantastic day of skiing.  Their was a bit of fresh snow and no real lines on the lift.  Fun was had by all even with a very wide range in ski/board skills.  

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[Left to Right: Cara, Pat, Manoj, Stephen, Doug, Eric, Ben (Eric's son)]

Pi Day

Back in Tempe we celebrating 3/14/15 a day early. We like Pi day and we are nerdy, but not nerdy enough to come in to the office on a Saturday to celebrate that nerdiness.  We only have one Tauist in our ranks, so there was no open conflict.  We decided to make moon pies, cookies with ice cream between.

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padt-pi-day-moon-pie-setup

 

Major Milestone Achieved: 3D Printing of a Full Turbine Engine

3d-printed-jet-engine

Not long ago the sages in the additive manufacturing world said "Someday in the future we will be able to print a complete Turbine Engine."  That someday is now, much sooner than many of us predicted.  Researchers at Monash University in Australia recently created a modified version of a Safron Microturbo Auxiliary Power Unit using 3D Printing.  The whole thing.  Milestone Achieved.

The best article on this amazing story is on the Melbourne Examiner page:
www.smh.com.au/technology/sci-tech/3d-printing-melbourne-engineers-print-jet-engine-in-world-first-20150226-13pfv1.html 

Turbine Engines are really the peak of machine design. They contain every nasty thing you might run into in other machines, but spin faster and run hotter.  It's hard stuff. The geometry is difficult, lots of small features and holes, and significant assembly and tolerance constraints.  Getting a demonstrator built like this is a huge deal.  As a former turbine engine engineer and a long time user of additive manufacturing, I'm amazed. 

Check out their video:

The "3d Printer" they used was a huge Concept Laser Direct Laser Melting system.  The technology uses a laser to draw on the top of a bed of powder medal, melting the medal in small pools the bind and create a fully dense part with cast like properties.  They used three different metals: nickel alloy, titanium, and aluminum.

Concept-Laser-3d-printed-turbine-enginePADT has chosen to partner with Concept Laser for our metal 3D Printing strategy, which gives us additional excitement for this sucessful project.  

Now that someone has achieved this milestone, the industry can move forward with confidence that even more can be done with metal 3D Printing.  Much was learned in the creation of this advanced device that we can build on and apply to other industries and applications. 

Much is said in the twittersphere and press about printing food or custom dog tags, but this sort of high value industrial application is where the real impact of 3D Printing will be felt. It shows that companies can develop new more efficient products in less time and that are not constrained by traditional manufacturing methods. 

Seminar Info: Designing and Simulating Products for 3D Printing

Note: We have scheduled an encore Lunch & Learn and companion Webinar for March 23, 2015.  Please register here to attend in person at CEI in Phoenix or here to attend via the web.

ds43dp-1People are interested in how to better do design and simulation for products they manufacture using 3D Printing.  When the AZ Tech council let us know they had a cancelation for their monthly manufacturing Lunch and Learn, we figured why not do something on this topic, a few people might show up. We had over 105 people register, so we had to close registration. In the end around 95 total people made it to the seminar, which is more than expected so we had to add chairs. Who would have thought that many people would come for such a nerdy topic?.

For an hour and fifteen minutes they sat and listned to us talk about the ins and outs of using this growing technology to make end use parts.  Here is a copy of the PowerPoint as a PDF.

We did add one bullet item in the design suggestions area based on a question. Someone pointed out that the machine instructions, what the AM machine uses to make the parts, should be a controlled document. They are exactly right and that is a very important process that needs to be put in place to get traceability and repeatability.  

Here are some useful links:

As always, do not hesitate to contact us for more information or with any questions.

If you missed this presentation, don't worry, we are looking to schedule a live/web version of this talk with some enhancements sometime in March.  Watch the usual channels for time, place, and registration information. We will also be publishing detailed blog posts on many of the topics covered today, diving deeper into areas of interest.

Thank you to the AZ Tech Council, ASU SkySong, and everyone that attended for making this our best attended non-web seminar ever.

Design and Simulation for 3D Printing Full House

Deflategate Update: ANSYS Simulation Shows it Really Does not Make a Difference.

There is still more debate going on about the deflated footballs that the New England Patriots used in their playoff game. "Who Deflated Them? When? Were they acting on orders?"  But no one is asking if it makes a real difference.

Enter ANSYS simulation software. Using the newest ANSYS product, ANSYS AIM, the engineers at ANSYS, Inc. were able to simulate the effect of lower pressure on grip. It turns out that the the difference in pressure only made a 5mm difference in grip. No big deal.  

Being a Multiphysics tool they were able to quickly also run a flow analysis and see what impact drag from "wobble" had on a pass.  A 10% off axis wobble resulted in 20% more drag, that is a few yards on a long pass.  Their conclusion, throwing a tight spiral is more important than the pressure of the ball.

Check out the full article on the ANSYS blog: 

http://www.ansys-blog.com/superbowl-deflategate-scandal-debunked-using-engineering-simulation/#more-11576

Here is the video as well: