Press Release: Innovative GOM and ZEISS 3D Scanning Solutions Added to PADT Portfolio as it Joins the #HandsOnMetrology Digital Platform Global Network

The new combined offerings are being called #HandsOnMetrology. Someone must of let an engineer into the branding meeting because the new name is a perfect description of what the product line offers. Right now we are reselling three scanners and the outstanding software package that enables the unique advantages of each system:

When ZEISS and GOM joined forces, it was hard on our sales team here at PADT. We wanted to let our customers know about the significant advantages of the merger. After selling ZEISS Optical systems for many years, we knew that more and more customers wanted the flexibility of more handheld solutions along with laser scanning for larger objects. With the addition of the GOM line, we can now meet those needs.

GOM Scan 1: Compact, mobile, vesatile
T-SCAN hawk: Portable, versatile and handheld
T-SCAN: Fast, intuitive and highly precise
GOM Inspect Software: All-inclusive and user-centered

You can learn more about these tools on our new #HandsOnMetrology page or by contacting PADT today. Remember, we are more than a reseller, we use these same tools in our consulting business, so we have real-world experience on how to apply and leverage this technology. You might say that PADT even has “hands on” experience with these tools.

Access the offical press release here or as a PDF here, or you can read it below.


Press Release:

Innovative GOM and ZEISS 3D Scanning Solutions Added to PADT Portfolio as it Joins the #HandsOnMetrology Digital Platform Global Network

PADT is Now Selling the Three Leading GOM and ZEISS Optical and Laser Scanning Systems Throughout the Mountain and Southwest States

TEMPE, Ariz., May 11, 2021 PADT, a globally recognized provider of numerical simulation, product development, and 3D printing products and services, today announced it has joined #HandsOnMetrology, a digital platform dedicated to 3D metrology. Created after the merger of GOM and ZEISS, HandsOnMetrology consists of a unique, global network of companies selling leading 3D scanning products. As a part of this exclusive network, PADT now offers three high-end optical and laser 3D scanning systems, the T-SCAN, T-SCAN hawk, and GOM Scan 1.

“The HandsOnMetrology systems are the most precise and flexible scanners on the market,” said Ward Rand, co-founder and principal, PADT. “We are pleased to be expanding our product offerings, as well as providing scanning services to our customers. Specifically, the systems enhance our simulation services by allowing us to scan existing parts that can be simulated, or scan parts after testing for verification of simulation. It also supports our additive manufacturing activities by providing a simple-to-use and cost-effective way to reverse engineer older parts and inspect 3D Printed parts.”

The portfolio of HandsOnMetrology systems focuses on new to market hand-held measuring systems. The scanners are characterized by their precise measuring results and allow for mobile and flexible use around the shop floor. The industry-standard software GOM Inspect Suite is pre-installed on all three systems and supports users during inspections and analyses. It also walks users through the entire workflow from 3D scanning to the evaluation, including the inspection report.

PADT is selling the scanners and accompanying software across Arizona, California, Colorado, Idaho, Kansas, Nebraska, Nevada, New Mexico, Montana, Oklahoma, Texas, Utah, and Wyoming. The systems allow PADT and its customers to address a variety of 3D scanning processes including reverse engineering, art, architecture, inspection, quality, and control. The company is also providing support and training to help customers get real work done quickly and accurately.

“In addition to our ability to sell this innovative lineup of scanners, PADT and our customers will gain access to a network of resources through HandsOnMetrology,” said Jim Sanford, vice president, Sales and Support, PADT. “By teaming with these industry leaders, PADT can support our community of designers, technicians, engineers, scientists, and specialists with valuable knowledge to increase product quality, optimize processes and expand possibilities. It is the perfect complement to our long-term position as Ansys Elite, Stratasys Platinum  and EOS Channel Partners.”

To learn more about PADT and its new lineup of #HandsOnMetrology 3D scanning systems and software, please visit www.padtinc.com.

About PADT

PADT is an engineering product and services company that focuses on helping customers who develop physical products by providing Numerical Simulation, Product Development, and 3D Printing solutions. PADT’s worldwide reputation for technical excellence and experienced staff is based on its proven record of building long-term win-win partnerships with vendors and customers. Since its establishment in 1994, companies have relied on PADT because “We Make Innovation Work.” With over 90 employees, PADT services customers from its headquarters at the Arizona State University Research Park in Tempe, Arizona, and from offices in Torrance, California, Littleton, Colorado, Albuquerque, New Mexico, Austin, Texas, and Murray, Utah, as well as through staff members located around the country. More information on PADT can be found at www.PADTINC.com.

About #HandsOnMetrology

#HandsOnMetrology is a new global 3D scanning network and provides a digital go-to for everything you always wanted to know about 3D scanning on the platform HandsOnMetrology.com. The platform is operated by GOM, a ZEISS company, that sets new standards in optical 3D metrology. From step-by-step setup instructions to more advanced tutorials and expert hacks: the platform is made for learning and for getting inspired. It gives users all the information they need to deliver 3D scanning excellence. HandsOnMetrology.com supports the community of designers, technicians, engineers, scientists and specialists with valuable knowledge to increase product quality, optimize processes and expand possibilities.

About GOM GmbH

GOM, a company of the ZEISS Group, specializes in industrial 3D coordinate measuring technology, 3D computed tomography and 3D testing. From product development to production and worldwide distribution, GOM offers machines and systems for manual and automated 3D digitizing, evaluation software, training and professional support from a single source. In industries such as automotive, aerospace, energy and consumer goods, more than 17,000 GOM system installations are in use internationally. At more than 60 locations and with more than 1,200 metrology specialists, GOM guarantees profound advice and first-class service. Since mid-2019, GOM has been a part of the ZEISS Group and has formed the Center of Excellence for optical metrology. With more than 31,000 employees in 50 countries and annual revenue totaling more than 6.4 billion euros, ZEISS is an internationally leading technology enterprise operating in the fields of optics and optoelectronics. (Status: September 30, 2019)

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A Comparison of ANSYS Fluent Meshing and Ansys Meshing for CFD

If you have ventured into Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), you know that the meshing process can be laborious, but critical to the solve-time and solution accuracy. You may have also noticed that there are a lot of meshing tools to choose from, and while it is tempting to think of them as a commodity, they certainly are not. The types of meshes and the workflows available in the tool can make or break your simulation (and your mood). 

Ansys Meshing and Ansys Fluent Meshing are the two most used Ansys meshing tools for CFD. It is thus useful to learn about the commonality and difference between the two. Common questions new (and existing users) have are:

  • How do the two tools fit into the Ansys CFD workflow?
  • How are the two tools different?
  • When is one tool preferred over the other?

Let us start with how these two fit into the Ansys CFD workflow. In particular, let us cover how both integrate with Ansys Workbench.

Ansys Meshing Workbench Integration

Ansys meshing is a staple of the workbench environment. Its physics-aware mesh settings allow you to tailor meshes for Electromagnetics, Structural FEA, CFD, etc. One can drag a mesh component system onto the project or bring it in as part of an analysis system. Figure 1 shows Ansys meshing component in Workbench as well as the CFD analysis systems with Ansys meshing. It is seamless.

Figure 1: Ansys Meshing Workbench Integration

Fluent Meshing Workbench Integration

Many users use Fluent Meshing in standalone mode instead of Workbench as part of the “New Fluent Experience Workflow.” However, Fluent meshing is available in Workbench as well. You can import Fluent Meshes to Polyflow and CFX, not only Fluent. Note that to do so, one must enable the beta feature in the workbench options as shown in Figure 2 to allow connections between Fluent Meshing and Polyflow or CFX.

Figure 2: Fluent Meshing Workbench Integration

Meshing Topologies

Fundamental to meshing is cell topology. It is important to first note that Fluent meshing is a strictly 3D mesher, while Ansys meshing can generate 2D and 3D meshes. In 3D, both tools can generate meshes with tet, hex, prism/wedge, and pyramid elements. Fluent’s Mosaic Meshing technology sets itself apart by leveraging conformal polyhedron elements. Polys offer advantages over tets in that they greatly reduce cell count, offer good gradient calculations because of the additional faces, while still being easy to use for complex geometries.

Figure 3: 3D Element Types, Polyhedrons are Only Available in Fluent Meshing

Conformal vs Nonconformal Meshes

Keep in mind that not all CFD tools are compatible with non-conformal meshes. Reminder, conformal meshes match every node to a node in the adjacent cells. Ansys CFD tools can handle non-conformal mesh mapping at interfaces i.e. a coarse solid mesh interface with a fine fluid mesh. However, CFX and Polyflow are not compatible with non-conformal cell structures like standard Fluent meshing hex-core meshes with 1/8 octree transitions. Do not worry though, Fluent meshing users can now easily fill in these transitions with pyramids via the advanced setting “Avoid 1/8 octree transition” and thus achieve a conformal cell structure.  

Figure 4: Fluent Meshing Conformal Hex-Core is Compatible with Ansys CFX and Polyflow

Volume Mesh Methods

The volume mesh methods available in these two tools have some commonality but also significant differences. Often the decision as to which tool should depend on which mesh method is most appropriate for your geometry and your real-world constraints like computing power, project deadlines, accuracy requirements, etc. For example, if your manager comes by your desk and tells you he wants a rough estimate for pressure drop through a manifold by the end of the day, you probably do not have time to block off a structured mesh with perfect boundary layer resolution. Figures 5 and 6 provide a high-level comparison of the methods available in both tools and you should use them to guide you as you plan your CFD model.

Figure 5: Ansys Meshing Volume CFD Mesh Methods

Figure 6: Fluent Meshing Volume Mesh Methods

Meshing Workflows

So how do you use these tools? Let us review that next because while the general steps are similar, the workflow from cad to finished mesh differs significantly.

Ansys Meshing Workflow

I would sum up the Ansys meshing workflow as flexible, parametric, and iterative. It is flexible in that you can mix/match mesh methods for different bodies and sequence them as you wish. Your control of the mesh can be as simple as accepting the physics-aware global mesh control defaults or you can take a fine comb and specify edge, node, face, body sizing, etc. in any sequence to achieve mesh refinement exactly where you want it. It is parametric in that you can have all controls be driven by user-defined name selections. These name selections can be automated based on size/ location/ associativity via the worksheet tool allowing you to update your geometry and have mesh settings propagate through. Lastly, it is iterative because you can generate the mesh for sections of the model, check quality metrics, and iterate until the mesh is ready for analysis.

Figure 7: Ansys meshing Workflow

Fluent Meshing Task-Based Workflows

Two task-based workflows are available in Fluent meshing and they cover most use cases: Watertight and Fault-Tolerant. These workflows guide users step by step through the meshing process beginning with geometry and import and ending in volume mesh generation. These workflows are customizable and can be saved to be re-used in future analyses.

Figure 8 compares the two workflows at a high level. As the names suggest, the watertight workflow is used for fluid and/or solid geometry that is relatively clean and watertight. Most users opt for this workflow when they are fortunate enough to have clean geometry or after using the capable geometry clean-up tools in Ansys Spaceclaim.

However, sometimes CAD is very dirty and/or composed of many parts that make it a laborious undertaking to clean up. The fault-tolerant meshing (FTM) workflow excels here. FTM can be used with all major CAD formats like STL, JT, etc. The best way to visualize FTM for external flow applications is to picture shrink wrapping a car. For internal flow, picture blowing up a balloon inside the part. The “wrapping” process covers up small leakages and errors in the CAD. You use the wrap to build a surface mesh and then a volume mesh.

Figure 8: Fluent Meshing Task-Based Meshing Workflows

Usability Features

Figure 9 lists some notable usability features in both tools to consider when deciding which tool is best for the project. The list is of course not exhaustive, but those listed are notable when it comes to having an efficient meshing experience. 

Figure 9: Comparison of Usability Features in Ansys Meshing and Fluent Meshing

Summary

To summarize, both Ansys Meshing and Fluent Meshing generate high quality meshes and they provide convenient usability features for efficient and accurate CFD analysis.

Notable differences between the two include:

  • Cell types/ Methods:
    • Fluent Meshing’s Mosaic-Enabled Parallel Poly-Hexcore Meshing combines high geometry fidelity, cell quality and fast solve time.
    • Ansys Meshing Sweep and Multi zone meshing enable users to create structured (primarily) hex meshes with intuitive control and flexibility.
  • Workflows
    • Fluent Meshing’s task-based workflows are easy to use and tailored to the most common CFD applications.
    • Ansys Meshing provides a flexible environment allowing users to leverage smart physics-based global controls while also providing detailed local mesh control.
  • Usability Features
    • Fluent meshing offers the ability to create custom workflows that can include journal files, local sizing and automatic mesh improvement tasks.
    • Ansys meshing worksheets enable mesh operation recording and name selection definition based on size, location, or topology for mesh control

Some readers are likely still interested in the answer to the blunt question: Which tool should I use?

Well, it depends:

  • When using Fluent to solve, the Poly-Hexcore mesh topology offers a clear advantage making Fluent Meshing the likely choice.
  • When using CFX or Polyflow, you can still leverage conformal hex-core meshing or tetrahedral meshes in Fluent Meshing, but the robust integration of Ansys meshing with CFX/ Polyflow makes it the preferred tool.
  • If a structured hex mesh is needed or preferred to minimize mesh size or to align the mesh with the flow direction everywhere, then Ansys meshing offers a more user-friendly environment for this topology via sweep or multizone meshing.

Adding a Background Image in Flownex

In this post I will go over what is usually the first step in any Flownex network I build. Adding a background image not only helps me lay out my network but also helps colleagues and clients understand networks at a very quick glance. In this example I am using Flownex version 8.12.7.4334

Choosing an Appropriate Image

The first thing we want to do is to make sure that the image size is such that it’s reasonable in size both resolution-wise (so it doesn’t appear pixelated), and right-size so that components don’t appear too small when placed on top. I recommend something in the multi-thousand of pixels both in width an height. 3000 pixels at a minimum. I usually shoot for around 10,000 wide by 5,000 high if the background image will be landscape. For very complex, large networks, it may make sense to go much larger. If you want more tips click here topquartile .

Once we’ve found an appropriate image we will want to make a note of the exact size. This can be found by right-clicking on the image file, selecting properties, and navigating to the details tab.

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Confirming Image Resolution

Resizing Flownex Canvas

The canvas in Flownex can be resized to match this resolution by right-clicking on the canvas, selecting edit page, and populating the correct inputs:

Editing Canvas Inputs

Applying Background Image

The background image can be applied by clicking the radio button next to Style in the Appearance subcategory. Here we will change the Fill Style type to Image, then click the Select Image button:

Styles Editor

The images saved locally to this project will appear here. To add an image we simply click Add Image, navigate to the image of our choice, and click open. Now that it is available as an option we select the image in the Image Selector Gallery and click OK.

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Image Selector Gallery

We can press OK in the Styles Editor to confirm our changes and we should now see our added image as the new background!

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Drawing Canvas with Background Image

Bonus Tips!

  • Adjusting the Fill Style opacity can fade out the background image so that it doesn’t overwhelm the Flownex components placed on top.
  • Turning off the grid under the View ribbon can make the canvas a bit more aesthetically pleasing.

Signal & Power Integrity Updates in Ansys 2021 R1 – Webinar

The use of Ansys Electronics solutions minimizes the testing costs, ensures regulatory compliance, improves reliability and drastically reduces your product development time. All this while helping you build the best-in-class and cutting-edge products.

With signal and power integrity (SI & PI) analysis products, users can mitigate many electrical and thermal issues affecting printed circuit boards such as electromagnetic interference, crosstalk, overheating, etc. Ansys integrated electromagnetics and circuit simulation tools are essential for designing high-speed serial channels, parallel buses, and complete power delivery systems found in modern high-speed electronic devices.

Leverage the simulation capability from Ansys to solve the most critical aspects of your designs. Join PADT’s Electronics expert and application engineer Aleksandr Gafarov for a detailed look at what is new for SI & PI in Ansys 2021 R1, including updates available within the following tools:

• SIwave – Granta support & differential time domain crosstalk

• Q3D – Uniform current terminals

• Circuits – Network data explorer & SPISim

• HFSS 3D – Parallel meshing, encrypted 3D components & IC workflow improvements

• Electronics Desktop – Ansys cloud, Minerva & optiSLang integration

• And much more

Register Here

If this is your first time registering for one of our Bright Talk webinars, simply click the link and fill out the attached form. We promise that the information you provide will only be shared with those promoting the event (PADT).

You will only have to do this once! For all future webinars, you can simply click the link, add the reminder to your calendar and you’re good to go!

Ansys Mechanical Selection Information: Even More Useful Than We Thought

I have always known that the Selection Information window is extremely useful, giving us properties like Surface Area, Edge length, and the distance between two selected nodes.

But it will also do a few things that I had not known about, until recently. 

Normally you can Export the Nodal Locations with a solution result plot, but for that you have to solve the model first. If you have not yet solved the model, you can still get the nodal locations using the Selection Information window, though it is a little finicky.

  1. Open the Selection information window from the Home tab.
  1. Select all the nodes by selecting one node and hitting CTRL-A.
  1. In the Selection Information window, click the ‘Node ID’ header to sort by Node ID number.
  1. Select the first cell of the data you want.
  1. Scroll all the way to the bottom of the Window, and while holding down the Shift key, select the last row of the adjacent columns that you want to select.
  1. Once selected, right-click on it and hit “Export Text File”, or “Copy” and then Paste the data into Excel.

The trick is that the “Export Text File” and “Copy” do not show up if you pick the headers to select the entire columns like you do in Excel.

You can do the same thing to thing to get the mass properties of an assembly.

Selecting bodies will give you the mass, centroid, and principal moments of inertia. You can get this in the Worksheet view when the Geometry branch is highlighted.  Unlike the Worksheet, however, we can change the options to show the Moments of inertia about a given coordinate system.

We can now export out the six moments of inertia about any given coordinate system.  Next, I will attempt the find the ACT calls to do the same thing.   Stay tuned…

All Things Ansys 087: Introducing Rocky DEM – The latest in 3D Discrete Element Modeling Technology

 

Published on: May 3rd, 2021
With: Eric Miller, Robert McCathren, Ahmad Haidari & Marcus Reis
Description:  

In this episode your host and Co-Founder of PADT, Eric Miller is joined by PADT’s Application Engineer, Robert McCathren, as well as Ahmad Haidari – Senior Director of Strategy & Business Development at Rocky DEM, and Marcus Reis – VP of Sales, Support & Marketing at Rocky DEM to discuss the company’s partnership with Ansys and what their tool is capable of.

Rocky is a powerful 3D Discrete Element Modeling (DEM) Particle Simulation Software that quickly and accurately simulates the flow behavior of bulk materials with complex particle shapes and size distributions, for typical applications such as conveyor chutes, mills, mixers, and other materials handling equipment.

If you have any questions, comments, or would like to suggest a topic for the next episode, shoot us an email at podcast@padtinc.com we would love to hear from you!

Listen:
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@ANSYS #ANSYS

Simulation Workflow from Ansys Electronic Desktop Circuit to Ansys HFSS

ANSYS Electronics Desktop (AEDT) is a collection of powerful tools for simulation. AEDT Circuit provides time domain as well as frequency domain analyses. AEDT Circuit has high execution speed and robust ability to handle circuits of active and passive elements. Analysis types range from DC, Linear Networks (frequency domain), Transient, Oscillator, TV Noise, Envelope, Harmonic Balance, VerifEye (Statistical Eye Diagram), AMI Analysis, and more, with integrated support for additional co-simulation with tools like HSPICE or Matlab. Follow arturoherrera to get access for Matlab courses.

AEDT Circuit also provides an easy way to create and simulate planar structures such as microstrip, stripline, coupled lines, co-planar strips, co-planar waveguides, and other Printed Circuit Board (PCB) elements which can then be converted into a physical layout of the PCB. In this blog a simple workflow is explained to generate and model a planar structure in Circuit, then export the circuit model to HFSS 3D layout and HFSS for further analysis.

Define your substrate:

After inserting a Circuit Design, right-click on Data under project tree, choose Add Substrate Definition. This brings you to Substrate Defintion window that gives you many optios of substate types. You can choose the type of substarte you need and enter the dielectric and trace metalization information as shown in Figure 1. This substrate is used in calucalation of line impedances.

(a)

(b)

Figure 1. (a) Substrate Definition options of substrate types, (b) the definition of strapline used in this blog.

Define your stackup:

The stackup in Circuit is very similar to the stackup in HFSS 3D Layout. Please note that the definition of substrate is not automatically transferred to the stackup. The stackup needs to be defined by the user. Select the Schematic tab and from the top banner choose Stackup. Then define each layer. This stackup will be used in creating the layout and transferring it to HFSS 3D Layout.  Figure 2 shows the stackup used for the FR4 substrate that was defined in Figure 1(b).

Figure 2. Stackup definition that will be used to transfer the layout to HFSS 3D Layout.

Create the circuit:

Circuit provides a large selection of component libraries. To see the Component Libraries, click on View and check Component Libraries. In the Component Libraries window look for Distributed and expand it. Under this category you see different types of PCB structures. We will use Stripline library. Expanding Stripline library there are various categories, including Transmission Lines. We need Transmission Line Physical Length component, as we would like to use pieces of transmission line to create an ideal branch line coupler. You notice by hovering the cursor on the name of the component a small information windows shows the symbol and information about the component, alternatively you can right-click on the name of the component and choose “View Component Help” to get to the complete help page about the component. Once a component is selected and placed in the circuit it will also appear under the Project Components list at the bottom of the Component Libraries list. This provides a quick way to reuse them (Figure 3).

Figure 3. (a) Component Libraries, (b) Project Components and information window.

Let’s choose a physical length transmission line and place it on the schematic window. By double clicking on the symbol the Properties window opens and can be modified. Explicit values or parameters can be used to define the line properties.

Are you starting to calculate the line impedance to figure out the dimensions? Wait, there is a tool here that helps you do that. Click on TRL to open the line calculator. The line can be synthesized based on its impedance and electrical size by choosing the correct frequency and clicking on Synthesize (Figure 4). Using physical length transmission lines (50 and 35 ohms) and Tee lines and 4 ports I created an ideal branch line coupler (Figure 5). I ran a frequency analysis to make sure the circuit is working properly.

Before moving on to export the layout to HFSS 3D layout we can do one more step. To keep the substrate definition and reuse it layer, click on File->Save As Technology File. This would save the definition of stripline substrate in the personal library. Next step is to export the layout to HFSS 3D layout.

Figure 4. Properties and TRL windows.

Figure 5. Branch line coupler schematic.

Export to HFSS 3D Layout:

Under Schematic tab, click on Layout, or from the top menu choose Circuit->Layout Editor. Notice that this layout editor is very similar to the HFSS 3D Layout window. Click Ctrl+A, to select everything. Then choose Draw form the top banner and click on Align MW Ports (Figure 6), notice that other tools are also available under Draw, such as Sanitize Layout and Geometry Healing. You might need to do a bit more corrections and cleaning before exporting the layout. Before exporting the geometry, you can also check the HFSS Airbox using Layout->Draw HFSS Airbox.

Figure 6. Aligning ports.

You may change the orientation to Isometric for a better view of the box (Figure 7).

Figure 7. Layout editor in Isometric orientation, showing the HFSS airbox.

Make sure everything is still selected or select them with Ctrl+A, then under Edit, choose Copy to HFSS 3D Layout.  Now an HFSS 3D Layout design is created. Open the design. There might be a few things you like to change. Expand the ports, the name of the ports might have changed. You also note that the ports are of Gap type. You can select the port and in the Properties window, under HFSS click on Gap and choose the Wave port. Just note that the wave port cannot be internal to the design. You might need to adjust the air box size or create PEC port caps in HFSS later.

The second point to consider is about the parameters defined in Circuit. Remember that we defined W35 and W50 as the line widths in Circuit. The parameter are transferred but several local variables are also created based on them. For example click on the 50 ohm line. The width is now shown as a new parameter. You can see the complete list of parameters that are created by choosing HFSS 3D Layout->Design Parameters. Under the Parameters Default you still see W35 and W50, but moving to Local Variables tab you see the parameters created based on the Parameters Default.

Figure 8. Properties window.

Export to HFSS:

Any HFSS 3D Layout design can be exported to HFSS. Click on Analysis from the project three. Right-click and Add HFSS Solution Setup (Figure 9). There is no need to run this analysis. It just needs to be created. Right-click on the HFSS Setup that was just created, select Export->HFSS Model (Figure 10). Select the name and location for this file. Open this file and examine the model. Notice that the parameters are not transferred to HFSS model, this is because all parts of the model are imported (Figure 11). The default ports (Gap ports) appear as lumped port. If you changed the Gap ports to Wave ports in HFSS 3D Layout, it is now the time to add the PEC port caps or change the airbox to make sure ports are not internal to the model.

Figure 9. Adding HFSS solution setup.

Figure 10. Exporting the layout to an HFSS model.

Figure 11. HFSS model.

It is important to note that the type of analysis in Circuit is different than HFSS which will lead to slightly different result (Figure 12), which is expected and emphasizes the value of simulating structures in a full-wave field simulator like HFSS.

(a)

(b)

Figure 12. (a) Branch-line coupler S parameters from Circuit model, (b) the imported HFSS branch-line coupler S parameters.

Conclusion

This was a short blog showing the workflow for importing PCB and planar designs from AEDT Circuit to HFSS 3D Layout and HFSS. The workflow is a good method to quickly create the HFSS model of a planar structure.

If you would like more information related to this topic or have any questions, please reach out to us at info@padtinc.com.

Project Management for Non-Linear Dynamics Simulation with ANSYS LS-DYNA

We spend a lot of time writing articles about how to use the very capable tools that are available from Ansys, Inc., but tend to skip over the project management side of simulation. But, project management can be as important, especially for challenging simulations, as the technical aspects.  We recently completed a series of Non-Linear Dynamics simulations with ANSYS LS-DYNA and ended up learning a lesson or two about how to get such projects done on time and on budget. Follow korucaredoula to get access to the series.

What is Non-Linear Dynamics Simulation, and what makes it different?

When materials are deformed so fast that the rate of strain changes material properties, we refer to that as non-linear dynamics. In non-linear structural simulation, the material may be distorting in a non-linear way (usually plasticity), but the non-linear properties are dynamic. Because of this, time gets involved in the equation, as do non-linear material properties.  Think car crash, metal forming, drop, bird impact on windshields and jet engine blades, and bullets going through stuff. 

There are various software tools in the Ansys family that can do the non-linear dynamics, but our preferred program is Ansys LS-Dyna.  It is an explicit dynamics solver that solves structural, fluid, thermal, and other physics.  It is an amazing program that does many things. Still, for the class of problem we are talking about here, we only care about time-dependent material non-linearity for structural deformation.

Setting expectations

Before beginning a project of any type, it is important to establish goals.  Non-linear dynamics is no different. What is different is that you have to be realistic about what goals you can achieve.  The events you are modeling are, by their very nature are very, well, non-linear. The answers you calculate can change drastically with mesh, loads, material properties, and solver parameters.

If you need high accuracy, then you need to set the expectation that it will take longer to solve, and you have to be more careful with your model. If you don’t need accuracy and you may be looking for relative improvements, like seeing if one geometry option makes things better or worse in your design, then you can back off and be less detailed.  This difference can have a large impact on your schedule and overall cost.

So before you plan, before you start gathering information, decide what you expect to get out of your model.

Planning for the Job

Once you have set your expectations and goals, it’s time to map out the project. It is not that different from most structural or vibration jobs. You still have to get geometry, create a mesh, define loads and constraints, apply material models, run, and post processes.

However, each of those steps can be different for non-linear dynamics.  Here are some critical issues to be aware of when producing a schedule:

  • Geometry
    If you are working with thin, especially sheet metal, parts, you probably want to use shells. They are more efficient and can be more accurate in many situations. You need to not just have a CAD model, but also a model that has the mid-plane surface defined as well as thicknesses.

    You also want to look at removing tiny features that don’t impact the solution.  The run time in an explicit dynamic solver is driven by the smallest element size. If you have tiny features relative to your overall geometry, capturing them can drive up your run times.  So set aside time to remove or simplify them.
  • Meshing
    As mentioned above, small elements can drive up run time. Also, distorted elements or elements that become distorted can cause your solutions to diverge and fail. You may (probably) need to create a hexahedral (brick) mesh.  All of these things require more time to create the mesh, and from a project standpoint, you need to plan for that.
  • Contact
    Ansys LS-Dyan rocks at contact.  It is pretty much automatic in most cases. So here, you don’t have to set aside time to define and tweak your contacts to get convergence. But there are many options, including erosion and other fancy options. Understand your contact needs and track and manage them.
  • Loads
    Everything in LS-DYNA is time-dependent, and loads are no exception.  If you are lucky, your load or loads are constant over time. But if not, you need to set aside time to characterize those loads and get them specified in the right format.  In addition, loads can be calculated, say the results of an explosion or an airbag deployment. These use Equation of State models to calculate forces on the fly and are a major advantage of the tool.
  • Solving
    From a project management standpoint, it is very important to plan for relatively long solves, restarts, and if possible, solving several jobs at the same time.  Non-linear dynamics is computationally intense. Do some trade studies on computer resources vs. schedule time.  Is it worth investing in more cores to solve faster or just let it chug away on a smaller computer? Also, don’t assume a single run to get the answer you want. Often you need to run the model multiple times before you understand what is really going on.

  • Post-processing
    We are solving highly non-linear events, and understanding what the model is telling us is the whole point of the exercise.  Budget time for processing massive amounts of data over time and reducing it into something useful. Also, time is needed to create animations.  The analyst may also find themselves buried in the weeds at the post-processing stage, and project management should take on the role of reviewing the results from a big picture perspective and drive what tables, graphs, plots, and animations are created.

Keeping the project on the rails when things are literally blowing up and crashing

The dynamic nature of both the events being modeled and the process of creating and running the models make for a less predictable progression for the project.  A project manager needs to pay close attention to what is going on at all times and pull the engineers doing the work back up for air to find out where things are going. 

Here are some things to watch out for:

  • Building a model that is more complex than needed
  • Making sure that the situation being simulated in the model is what the customer needs simulated
  • Too much time being spent to fit the model on a limited computer. Get a bigger computer.
  • The simulation engineer is fixated on details that don’t impact the solution much
  • Oversimplification of components, connections, and loads.
  • Science project mode – spending time trying to learn basic information or trying to get something new to work, and not solving a specific problem.

One of, if not the most important roles for the project manager is communication.  Constantly interacting with the engineers (without nagging) and with the customer (the person who will consume the results) is critical.  This is not a throw-it-over-the-wall type of project.  And the more you accomplish, often the more you have new questions.  It may take two weeks or nine months. But either way, the PM needs to be constantly talking to everyone involved.

And yes, here at PADT, we have actually modeled a train car going off the rails. The project, though, stayed on track because we kept a close watch and stayed focus on the specifications. Things did surprise us, and we had to change some of the model when we got the first results, but we planned for that, communicated with the customer, and kept our changes to what was needed to answer the customer’s questions.

Our cars have incredible crash safety, very few planes fail because of bird ingestion, and we create amazing components out of formed sheet metal because of this type of non-linear dynamic simulation, and in most cases, Ansys LS-Dyna. Proper project management that recognizes the challenges and differences for this type of project can make a massive variety of products even better.

Electronics Reliability Updates in Ansys 2021 R1 – Webinar

Best practices for ensuring and predicting electronics reliability require comprehensive multi-physics simulations. Ansys ensures reliability success by developing solutions and workflows that overcome today’s biggest simulation and design challenges. 

With Ansys 2021 R1, electronics reliability became much easier to manager with advanced capabilities for design democratization, workflow automation, and robust reliability predictions. Along with these updated components, users can better access integrated workflows between Ansys Sherlock, Icepak, Mechanical, LS-Dyna, and more to provide the results necessary to optimize product designs and ensure unparalleled reliability in the field. 

Join PADT’s Systems Application & Support Engineer Josh Stout for a presentation covering updates to existing features and the introduction of new tools available in this latest release. Learn how users can:

• Extract detailed geometries from any ECAD file

     • Predict time to failure before prototyping

     • Perform complex multiphysics analyses

     • Implement automation and optimization 

     • And much more

Register Here

If this is your first time registering for one of our Bright Talk webinars, simply click the link and fill out the attached form. We promise that the information you provide will only be shared with those promoting the event (PADT).

You will only have to do this once! For all future webinars, you can simply click the link, add the reminder to your calendar and you’re good to go!

All Things Ansys 086: Thermal Integrity in Ansys 2021 R1

 

Published on: April 20th, 2021
With: Eric Miller & Josh Stout
Description:  

In this episode your host and Co-Founder of PADT, Eric Miller is joined by PADT’s Systems Application & Support Engineer, Josh Stout in order to discuss what is new with regards to thermal integrity in Ansys 2021 R1.

If you have any questions, comments, or would like to suggest a topic for the next episode, shoot us an email at podcast@padtinc.com we would love to hear from you!

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A PADT Engineer in King Attiball’s Court – Chapter 3

There just is not enough engineer-focused fiction out there. Romance, Horror, Sci-Fi, Young Adult, Historical, Mystery, etc. They all do well, but they are rarely written for the engineers of the world.

Here at PADT, we are all about undoing such injustices. We decided to brainstorm a story about an engineer who does simulation and 3D Printing and ends up on an adventure. We hope they will find some mystery, some science fiction, and some horror. Maybe even a little romance. To develop the characters and the plot we all got on an MS Teams meeting and blocked it out. It was a lot of fun. That turned into an outline, that will turn into a chapter every month.

We hope you enjoy the result as much as we enjoyed dreaming the journey up.

It should be noted that every character in this story is completely made up. Sometimes we steal some names from real people as a shoutout to them, but that is about it. PADT does not have a basement or a fancy cluster in one. Everything is made up. Well, almost everything. We do have a stack of furniture in the back of shipping and receiving.


Chapter 1: Batch Submission

Chapter 2: New Friends


Chapter 3
Like an Owl

It was comforting for Ash to learn that food tastes had not changed so much over the millennia. Sitting in that courtyard under those trees, the marinated vegetables and stewed meats in the bowls Mnihh’dm had brought out tasted wonderful.  And the bowls of watered wine quenched her thirst and had just enough flavor to taste good and alcohol to kill the microbes living in the local water supply.

Verihbitt explained each dish and sampled them with Ash.

She then drained her bowl of wine and reached over to touch Ash’s leg. “You have eaten and drunk. Are you ready for questions?”

Ash was ready. “Sure, I guess now is as good a time as any.”

“Are you a witch?”

She was a little stunned by the question but had to remember that everything about Ash’s world was magic to this woman. It was best to address that head-on. How do you explain to an ancient Babylonian what an engineer is? She gave it a try.

 “No, I am not a witch. But I am a scholar and an artisan. I study the world around us, and I use what I learn to make things that make life better. Tools that people use.”

Verihbitt thought for a while. “Like the King’s architect?”

“In a way.” Ash pushed down some of the jokes about civil engineers that she had learned in college. “I get paid to solve problems but not to build structures.” She could not resist. “Nor do I design ditches.”

“It is normal for a woman to do such things where you are from?”

Ash laughed, remembering all the meetings where she was the only woman in the room. “Not as normal as it should be. But it is getting better.”

“Well, here it is good for a smart woman like yourself to speak through a man. Some will listen to a wo-“

The sound of shattering wood interrupted Verihbitt as the gate to the courtyard exploded and rained splinters down on the two women. It was quickly followed by the angry shouts of three men who rushed through the opening, spears in their hands. They stopped momentarily to scan the courtyard, then rushed towards Verihbitt.

Without thinking, Ash stood and kicked the low table, bowls and all, towards the approaching men. It slowed them down enough to give Verihbitt time to dart behind the nearest tree.  She reappeared with her own spear, and in one fluid motion,  launched it at the closest attacker.

Another spear flew by Ash’s head before it thudded into the chest of another attacker. She looked back as Takaa, who must have been sitting in the far corner of the courtyard behind a thick pillar, grabbed another spear. He sent it past her ear, and she heard another thunk as it landed.  She ran towards Takaa and dived behind the column.

“Fight or flight,” she said between gasping breaths. “I guess flight wins out today.”

The sounds of a struggle grew louder. There were grunts and cries of pain, but no screaming. After only a few seconds, the sound stopped, and she heard heavy boots approaching her.

“Are you harmed, my lady?” It was the voice of Takaa. Ash relaxed.

Ash stood and came out from behind the column. “I am just a little shaken. I didn’t help much.”

Verihbitt appeared behind Takaa and said, “Well, we know you are not a witch. You cast no spells. But kicking the table at them did slow them down.  Thank you.”

Minihh’dm came flying through the door into the house, short sword at the ready.

“My princess, Verihbitt, you are covered in blood. Are you injured?”

Stunned, Ash looked at Verihbitt and could only say, “Well, I may not be a witch, but you appear to be a princess?”

The next half hour was another blur of activity. Takaa ran outside and returned a few minutes later with a chariot let by a beautiful gray horse. All four of them clambered on, and Takaa steered them down a maze of narrow passages, knocking over stalls and more than a few people who could not get out of the way fast enough. At some point, Ash had to close her eyes and hold on as hard as she could to the two-wheeled cart’s railing.

She opened her eyes when Verihbitt told her that they had exited through the eastern gate. Farmland stretched out along the rolling hills. There was still some dodging around donkey carts, and it was too loud to talk. Which was good. Ash needed the journey to process all that had happened. She had never seen someone killed before.  And certainly never with a spear.

Takaa guided the cart off the main road up a dirt track that led up a small mountain. A large stone building stood on top. Mnihh’dm yelled over the din into her ear, “The King’s summer palace. We will be safe here. And no, to answer your next question, your hostess is not the King’s daughter, but she is his niece.”

Ash did not know what to expect as the chariot passed through the gate to the building. The outside was simple stone, and she had only seen artist’s guesses at what a Babylonian summer palace would look like.

The bright colors were stunning. There were statues and frescos everywhere. What Ash had seen in books and online was not even close to what she saw in front of her. The large courtyard was surrounded by two stories of buildings. And every surface she could see was covered with paintings or sculptures.

Ash got off the chariot when it stopped, and she was thankful for Verihbitt’s steadying hand.

She said, “that was some ride. I was not sure I would be able to hold on much longer.”

Verhibitt laughed. “In my line of work, you often have to make a quick escape on a chariot.”

“As a princess? I always thought that involved sitting on pillows and being fed by servants.”

“No.” Verhibitt looked at Ash sideways, smiled, said, “I am also a spy,” and ran across the courtyard towards a man in bright robes.

Ash looked more closely at the far side of the courtyard as she walked towards it. The man stood with Verhibitt at the bottom of a large dirt ramp, and hundreds of shirtless men were pulling a stone slab up the ramp on large wooden rollers using two ropes. She could tell there was a carving of some kind of the top surface of the slab. The wall was covered with scaffolding, and it looked like they were going to hoist a giant stone carving up onto the top of the second story.

Verhibitt was waiting for her at the foot of the ramp, her right arm entwined with that of the older man in bright robes.

“This is my father, Prince Batnoam. One of the King’s brothers and, more importantly, the King’s Architect. He is one of those people who build walls and ditches.”

Feeling a little embarrassed, Ash bowed to Batnoam.

The prince nodded his head in acknowledgment and said, “welcome, my child. My darling Verhi has been breathlessly telling me about your adventures today. I have to admit I could not follow half of it, so I want to know more at dinner.”

He snapped his fingers, and two women in simple robes appeared as if from nowhere. “Please prepare rooms for my daughter and her friend.”

“While we wait for that, let me show you our latest project. This is a piece that shares the story of my glorious brother’s latest conquest in the East. It took almost a full year to carve and most of the summer season to bring up the hill on rollers. Today, we will pull it up to the top of the wall and secure it. We will then spend another week digging out the ramp under it to lower it down against the wall.”

“And you will spend even more of my money doing so.”

Ash turned to see a tall man dressed in shining brass armor taking purposeful steps up the ramp. A dozen soldiers and a cluster of men in robes struggled to climb behind him.

Everyone bowed to him, so Ash followed their motion.

Boatnoam said, “My brother, when you came back from the East you told me you wanted something grand to celebrate your victory. Nobles will flock to the summer palace just to see this story immortalized in stone.”

“Yes, yes. That is what you always say. Then you ask for more money, and it is always too late for me to back out.”

While listening to the Prince and King jest with one another, Ash looked up at the slab and how they were lifting it. Iron rings were attached to the top of the wall and, ropes went from the slab, through rings, and back down to the teams of men who were pulling. Up next to the rope, she could see two boys were slathering grease onto the rope to reduce friction.

The teams pulled, the King and prince argued, and the boys kept applying grease as the slab slowly moved on the wooden rollers. Ash soaked in the pure joy of seeing ancient engineering at work.

And then, for the third time that day, someone tried to kill Ash.  

Two men who had been walking next to the ropes on either side of the ramp pulled out large axes and, in unison, swung down on the taught rope. With a loud twang, the ropes split, and the slab began to roll down the hill. It headed right towards Ash, her new friends, and the King.

She screamed, “The slab is loose, run!”

She raced to the side as others ran down the ramp in front of the slab. The air was filled with dust, but she could see the stone crash onto the flat courtyard and stop. There were shouts and screams from a large crowd gathered around the slab. Ash ran down the ramp to find Prince Batnoam trapped. A split roller kept the slab from crushing the prince completely, but it was apparent that both of his legs were trapped.

The King screamed for everyone to come out and to fetch new ropes. But Batnoam saw the same thing Ash did. If they pulled the slab in any direction, it would come off the roller and crush him.

“Brother, I think we need to lift it.” In between gasps of pain, the architect described his latest scheme. “Put stakes in the dirt mound to keep the slab from moving. Then attach ropes to the far end up through the iron loops. Then pull to tilt it up and off of me.”

Ash looked at the geometry. The angle was too low. There was no way they could lift the slab. She decided to speak.

“Your highness, although this idea is close, I do not think it will be enough to lift the stone. In my land, we use a different method to lift large items. Might I try that?”

“No.” Said the King. “We will do as my brother’s asked, not the musings of a foreign girl.”

The next half hour was busy. The workers were able to wedge some more wood under the stone to relieve a little pressure. But no matter how many men or oxen they put on the ropes, they could not lift the stone.

As the sun started to set, Batnoam gestured for the King to come closer. “Brother, it is getting late, and we are losing light. And I do not want to miss dinner.” The King laughed at his brother’s bravado. “Bring torches and, maybe we should let the foreign girl try.”

The King reluctantly nodded towards her, and Ash sprang into action.

“Someone bring that scaffolding over here, the tall one there, and put it over the end of the slab.”

She walked to a group of men who had been pulling on the ropes and said, “You need to gather me two of thickest rollers you have. And more rope, lots of rope.” She shouted after their retreating backs, “And lots of grease.”

It had been years since Ash had studied how a simple tackle worked. But, while others had been attempting to lift the stone, she had been sketching her idea in the dirt. The top roller would be attached to the scaffolding. A rope would be attached to either end of the lower roller, looped up over the top roller, back down around the bottom roller, then over the top roller again. This configuration would provide four times the lifting force, minus all the drag from the ropes rubbing on the rollers.

It took close to an hour to build the rig. No one had spoken to Ash while it was being created and they followed her orders with obvious irritation. But, the King had sanctioned this approach, so they worked at it.

When the rig was ready, she had two teams of twelve men at the ends of each rope.

“You need to pull together so that it lifts the same on both sides.” She shouted to them. “At first, it will not move much. But it will move. Try now.”

Ash put her hands behind her back and crossed her fingers. In English, she whispered, “Freshman statics, don’t fail me now,”under her breath.

They pulled, and the scaffolding creaked. And then the ropes began to stretch. The slab didn’t move.

“Keep pulling!”

The men just stood and looked at her.

The King shouted, “Pull, you dogs, or I’ll toss all of you off the top of that wall.”

With the King’s orders, they pulled again, and the lower roller began to rise, pulling the slab with it.

“One more pace back!” shouted Ash.

They heaved one more time as one, and the slab lifted again. Other builders quickly placed wood blocks under the slab while a soldier pulled the King’s brother from under the stone.

Once clear of the stone they moved him to stretcher.  Batnoam took his daughter’s hand and says, “I do like this new friend. She is wise, like an owl.”

Everyone was focused on the prince and getting him to his rooms, and they stopped paying attention to Ash. So no one noticed when she lost consciousness and crumpled to the stone paving of the courtyard.

“bzzzzzz.” “bzzzzzzzzzz.” “bzzzzzz”

Ash wasn’t sure if she was dreaming or not. She opened her eyes to a dark room. The full moon was shining through open windows and a light sea breeze filled the room with humid, salty air.

“bzzzzzz.” “bzzzzzzzzzz.” “bzzzzzz”

Sitting up, Ash looked around the room. She was a little light-headed but felt better than she expected. The moonlight illuminated her backpack in the corner of the small room. She walked towards it, and the buzzing got louder. It was her phone.

Fumbling a bit, she found it in the outside pocket.

“bzzzzzz.” “bzzzzzzzzzz.” “bzzzzzz”

She turned it over in her hand and pressed the action button. The screen lit the room, showing her a single text message.

ALEX A: “Where did you go? One second you were here. Then you were gone. The system has locked me out. I thought you had gone on your vacation, but the police came looking for you just now. Are you OK?”

At first, Ash thought this must be a message that he had sent right after she had been tossed back into time. She checked the time. It said 5 min ago. The signal strength in the upper right corner showed one bar.

She quickly typed a message.

ASH: “I’m here. OK, all things considered. Let me know if you get this.”

She waited for a second, bathed in the moonlight that shined through an open window of a Babylonian King’s summer palace.

ALEX A: “Whew! 😊”

– To Be Continued –

Please subscribe to our newsletter, so you will know when the next installment, “Off to Sea,” is released, wherein our engineering hero finds out if she has sea legs and tries to communicate with the present.

Press Release: PADT Named EOS Metal 3D Printing Distribution Partner Across the Southwest, Expanding its Established Additive Manufacturing Products Offering

PADT’s model for over 27 years has been to become experts on the leading tool that engineers use, then become a reseller. We continue that model with our new partnership with EOS, the leader in Metal 3D Printing. We have been a user of several metal Additive Manufacturing solutions for some time, settling on EOS’ DMLS technology last year. We are now pleased to announce that that technical relationship has grown to include PADT as an EOS Distribution Partner for the Southwestern United States.

More details can be found in the press release below. You can see the official press release in PDF and HTML as well.

What does it mean for our customers? The same technology-driven win-win relationship you have come to count on for Ansys, Stratasys, and Flownex are now available if you need to add metal 3D Printing. And after your purchase, when you call for assistance you will talk to people that run the same machines you are.

Have questions? Why EOS or what machine would be best for you? More details on the metal systems can be found on our website. But the best way to learn more is to contact us at info@padtinc.com or 480.813.4884

If metal 3D Printing is part of how you make innovation work, PADT is ready to help.


PADT Named EOS Metal 3D Printing Distribution Partner Across the Southwest, Expanding its Established Additive Manufacturing Products Offering

Building on its Expertise in Metal 3D Printing Services and R&D, PADT Adds Metal Laser Powder Bed Fusion Systems to its Sales Portfolio

TEMPE, Ariz., April 13, 2021 PADT, a globally recognized provider of numerical simulation, product development, and 3D printing products and services, today announced it has been named Distribution Partner for EOS’s full lineup of industrial metal 3D printing systems. Founded in 1989, EOS is a leading technology provider for industrial additive manufacturing of metals and plastics. PADT will represent the company’s Direct Metal Laser Fusion (DMLS®) powder bed fusion systems across Arizona, California, Colorado, Idaho, New Mexico, Nevada, Texas, and Utah.

“PADT is experiencing explosive growth,” said Jim Sanford, Vice President, Sales & Support, PADT. “Our new partnership with EOS helps us serve our customers and expand their 3D printing options with this impressive lineup of systems. Metal materials are the next major frontier in 3D printing innovation and PADT is an early adopter. We continue to explore new ways to apply the technology to meet our customer’s evolving needs.”

EOS’ metal 3D printing platforms use proprietary DMLS technology that meters and deposits ultra-fine layers of metal powders and then melts each layer – as defined by a 3D CAD model – using high-powered lasers. The applications produced with DMLS are highly accurate, highly dense, and allow for incredible functionality at a cost that can be less than traditional manufacturing. DMLS printers are considered the industry standard for oil and gas components, consolidated and lighter-weight aerospace applications, and custom medical solutions such as guides and implants that improve patient outcomes.

PADT will sell EOS’  metal 3D printing systems, including the company’s small and medium systems, EOS M 100 and EOS M 290; and its large production platforms, EOS M 300 Series, EOS M 400, and EOS M 400-4. PADT has installed an EOS M 290 machine onsite to develop high-quality end-use metal products for customers and expand its ongoing research and development of metal 3D printing.

“As 3D printing technology has advanced, PADT has seen an increase primarily in the aerospace and defense industry’s use of 3D printing for end-use parts,” said Rey Chu, co-founder and principal, PADT. “Metal 3D printing provides many benefits over traditional manufacturing, including lighter, cost-effective parts made much faster and with greater design freedom. The EOS machines provide PADT’s entire range of customers with a wide variety of options to produce metal parts quickly and effectively. Those same advantages will benefit any industry that has a need for low volume production of complex metal parts.”

“PADT is a long-time leader in 3D printing systems and services since the early 1990s with a proven track record of identifying advanced manufacturing trends and helping customers integrate 3D printing innovation into their manufacturing operations,” said Andrew Snow, senior vice president at EOS North America. “We look forward to deepening our reach across the Southwest, a leading hub for aerospace and defense customers, through our partnership with PADT.”

To learn more about PADT and its new lineup of EOS metal 3D printing products and accessories, please visit www.padtinc.com.

About PADT

PADT is an engineering product and services company that focuses on helping customers who develop physical products by providing Numerical Simulation, Product Development, and 3D Printing solutions. PADT’s worldwide reputation for technical excellence and experienced staff is based on its proven record of building long-term win-win partnerships with vendors and customers. Since its establishment in 1994, companies have relied on PADT because “We Make Innovation Work.” With over 90 employees, PADT services customers from its headquarters at the Arizona State University Research Park in Tempe, Arizona, and from offices in Torrance, California, Littleton, Colorado, Albuquerque, New Mexico, Austin, Texas, and Murray, Utah, as well as through staff members located around the country. More information on PADT can be found at www.PADTINC.com.

About EOS

EOS is the world’s leading technology supplier in the field of industrial 3D printing of metals and polymers. Formed in 1989, the independent company is pioneer and innovator for comprehensive solutions in additive manufacturing. Its product portfolio of EOS systems, materials, and process parameters gives customers crucial competitive advantages in terms of product quality and the long-term economic sustainability of their manufacturing processes. Furthermore, customers benefit from deep technical expertise in global service, applications engineering and consultancy.

Mechanical Analysis Updates in Ansys 2021 R1 – Webinar

Ansys 2021 R1 delivers significant improvements in simulation technology together with nearly unlimited computing power to help engineers across all industries reimagine product design and achieve product development goals that were previously thought impossible. 

With updates made to Ansys mechanical, users can easily handle the complexity of a variety of design environments. Everything from mulitphysics analysis to dynamic simulation allows for the ability to create a product that meets performance goals and holds up over time. 

Join PADT’s Application Engineer Robert McCathren for a look at analytical advancements in Ansys Mechanical 2021 R1, including updates for: 

          ​​​​• Element Technology

          • NonLinear Adaptivity

          • Coupled Physics Analysis

          • Linear Dynamics

          • Contact

          • And much more

Register Here

Running Ansys Fluent on Ansys Cloud using a Journal File and a UDF

Cloud computing is becoming more and more popular with the recent changes in the work environment, and Ansys Cloud solution is no exception. While running a Fluent simulation on the Ansys Cloud is now a more familiar task among CFD users since its introduction around a year ago, there are still some cases that might be challenging and need more attention. One of these cases is performing a Fluent simulation using a UDF.

The first thing users might notice when launching an Ansys Cloud Fluent job through the ACT extension is that the UDF files won’t be uploaded, which is why they might see their cases are failing if they don’t pay extra attention. In order to avoid this issue, users must follow one of the options below.

The first and most commonly used method to launch a Fluent job with a UDF is via the CLI (Command Line Interface). With this method, the .c and all other files in the working directory will be uploaded to the Cloud. Then UDF will then be compiled on the Cloud.

Since the Cloud computers already have compilers installed, one doesn’t need to anything special. The local directory should have .c file, case file with UDF plugged-in, and a journal file. As a side note, Ansys Fluent 19.3 and higher supports expressions that can be used to define boundary conditions instead of UDF. Starting with Ansys Fluent 2020R2, the C compiler is built-in with the software. Please refer to the product documentation.

We highly recommend that the user should have the required compiler installed locally to compile, hook, and test the routine before submitting it to the cloud.

If you have not used CLI to submit a Fluent job to the clouds, please read the article below:

https://cloudforum.ansys.com/t/80njy9/how-to-running-fluent-on-cloud-using-a-journal-file-and-udf

In short, you have to open a command prompt (cmd.exe) and navigate to your working folder. This folder should contain all the Fluent input files needed for the run: journal file, case file, etc. Once you login using ansyscloudcli command, you are ready to submit your job on the cloud.

Below is a common example for the commands to run Fluent on the cloud:

ansyscloudcli runfluent -j fluent_via_journal --jou tjunction.jou –q Flexible_eastus_Standard_HC44rs_2020r2 -n 1 -m 36 -v 2020r2

Here is some description of these commands:

> AnsysCloudCLI runFluent -j <job name> [--jou <journal>] -q <queue>  [-n <num nodes>] [-m <max cores>] -v <solver version>
-j: job name
-q: name of the queue 
    (run: ansyscloudcli getQueues, to get a list of all queues. Queue name is case sensitive)
-i: name of the input file for the solver
--jou: journal to execute (if set, -i is not used)
-n: number of nodes
-m: (optional) max number of cores. Useful if you want to make a run with 4 cores on a computer with 16 cores
-v: target solver version

The second method is to compile the UDF locally and upload all files to a virtual desktop infrastructure (VDI) session. Then the compiled UDF can be used with Fluent through the VDI session. Note that the UDF can’t be compiled on a VDI session with versions 2020R2 and earlier.

Lastly, with 2021R1 Fluent has a built in Clang compiler which will allow you to compile a UDF in a VDI session. However, the Clang compiler still won’t allow you to submit a Fluent job with a UDF through the ACT.

Ansys Cloud VDI solution running on a local desktop via RDP

All Things Ansys 085: Additive & Structural Optimization Updates in Ansys 2021 R1

 

Published on: April 5th, 2021
With: Eric Miller & Doug Oatis
Description:  

In this episode your host and Co-Founder of PADT, Eric Miller is joined by PADT’s Lead Mechanical Engineer, Doug Oatis in order to discuss what is new with regards to additive and structural optimization in Ansys 2021 R1.

If you have any questions, comments, or would like to suggest a topic for the next episode, shoot us an email at podcast@padtinc.com we would love to hear from you!

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@ANSYS #ANSYS