3D Printing Peer Group of New Mexico Tech Council Launching on June 22

We are very pleased to announce the launch meeting of the newest New Mexico Technology Council peer group: 3D Printing.  After the success of other peer groups, and a similar committee in the Arizona Technology Council, PADT is partnering with the NMTC to start a group focused on all things Additive Manufacturing, which is the more technical name for 3D Printing. Schools, businesses, and individuals who have any involvement or interest in this exciting and transformative technology will be able to network and organize to get greater value from 3D Printing. This includes understanding the technology, working together on research projects, and getting to know what services are available locally.  It will also serve as a platform to coordinate the use of 3D printing in STEM education.

    

For this launch event, PADT’s Rey Chu will share his thoughts on the latest and most interesting advancements in 3D Printing.

What: NMTC 3D Printing Peer Group Launch
Networking
Beer
Where: Rio Bravo Brewing Company, 1912 2nd St NW, Albuquerque, NM 87102
When: June 22, 2017
5:00 pm – 7:00 pm
Who: Anyone (21 years of age or older) involved in Academia, Industry, or Research that is involved or interested in Additive Manufacturing
Why: To build cooperation between the growing 3D Printing community in the state
How: Being social, creating connections, and joining the group to take action in the future

We will kick off the meeting with introductions around the room, then listen to Rey share his views on what is new and interesting in this industry, then talk about the peer group, answer questions, and start planning our next activities.  At around 6:45 or so we will commence with the networking.

Please contact PADT at info@padtinc.com if you have any questions before the event.   We hope to see you there.

Don’t forget to register, and please let anyone else you think might be interested know about the event.

 

Stratasys – PolyJet Agilus 30 Webinar

Introducing New PolyJet Material: Agilus30

PADT is excited to introduce the newest polyjet material available from Stratasys, Agilus30! Agilus30 is a superior Rubber-like PolyJet photopolymer family ideal for advanced design verification and rapid prototyping.

Get more durable, tear-resistant prototypes that can stand up to repeated flexing and bending. With a Shore A value of 30 in clear or black, Agilus30 accurately simulates the look, feel and function of Rubber-like products. 3D print rubber surrounds, overmolds, soft-touch coatings, living hinges, jigs and fixtures, wearables, grips and seals with improved surface texture.

Agilus30 has applications in a number of areas, including:

  • Medical Models

  • Tooling needing rubber-like characteristics

  • Consumer Goods

  • Sporting Goods

  • General Prototyping

  • Overmolding & many more!

Want to know more about PolyJet’s toughest flexible material to date? 

Join PADT’s 3D Printing Application Engineer James Barker along with Stratasys Materials Business Manager Ken Burns for a presentation on the various benefits and attributes that Agilus30 has to offer, which machines are compatible with it, and how companies are making use of it’s unique capabilities.

3D Metal Printing: A Role in Military Fleet Readiness

The project to keep a 1944 P-51 Mustang flying was covered again, this time in 3D Metal Printing Magazine (Pg 23-33).   Concept Laser worked with PADT to reverse engineer and print the exhaust manifold from a P-51 to keep it flying.  Unlike the other article and video on the project, this reporter used this example as a great way to look at the readiness of military aircraft, and not just antique planes.

As PADT’s Rey Chu says ““This was a great exercise that’s suitable for numerous military applications and very relevant to the future use of 3D metal printing to maintain fleets in the field,” Chu says. “Maintaining spare-parts inventory has become a significant challenge, for example, to the Air Force. Additive manufacturing could be the solution.”

Kidneys and Child Hearts – Our Recent Real World Experiences with 3D Printing in Medicine

Mostly we make boxes.  Pretty boxes but the bulk of what we 3D Print is some sort of plastic box that people stuff electronics in to. Most of the time we also don’t really know what customers do with the objects we make for them.  But every once in a while you get involved in a project that really makes a difference. That could not be more true than two recent medical applications for 3D Printing that we worked on with Intermountain Healthcare (IHC) in Salt Lake City, Utah.

KSL, a local TV station, did a story on our IHC was deploying 3D Printing to produce better outcomes for their patients. You can view the story here.

PADT was fortunate enough to be part of two of the cases mentioned in the story.  The first was a St George man who was feeling some pain in his back. He had a scan and they found 12 kidney stones.  On top of that, his kidney was not in the right place and was distorted.  PADT helped print a model of the scan so that the doctors could just get a real feel for what they were dealing with, and then plan the surgery.

The second situation really pulled at our heart strings.  A 10 year old boy needs heart surgery and its a complicated problem. They need a model fast so we worked with Stratasy to quickly print an accurate model so that the Top surgeons could come up with a plan. We still have not heard how it went, they are scheduling things, but the feedback from the team was that the 3D model was extremely helpful.  We are talking life saving.

Both of these recent situations build on years of examples where we have worked the doctors and their technical assistance to convert scans of patients into usable 3D Models. If you are in the surgery or surgery planning space and want to learn more about how accurate 3D models printed directly from scan data can be used to improve patient outcome, contact PADT at info@padtinc.com and we will connect you with our 3D Printing team.

Increase your throughput and reduce manufacturing costs

Fast, easy to use lightweighting for structural analysis is now only a few clicks away thanks to the introduction of Topology Optimization in ANSYS 18.

Engineers who use Finite Element Analysis (FEA) can reduce weight, materials, and cost without switching tools or environments. Along with this, Topology Optimization frees designers from constraints or preconceptions, helping to produce the best shape to fulfill their project’s requirements.

Topology Optimization also works hand-in-hand with Additive Manufacturing; a form of 3D printing where parts are designed, validated, and then produced by adding layers of material until the full piece is formed. Pairing the two simply allows users to carry out the trend of more efficient manufacturing through the entirety of their process.

Join PADT’s simulation support manager Ted Harris for a live presentation on the full
benefits of introducing Topology Optimization into your manufacturing process. This webinar will cover:

  • A brief introduction into the background of Topology Optimization and Additive Manufacturing, along with an overview of it’s capabilities

  • An explanation of the features available within this tool and a run through of it’s user interface and overall usage

  • An in-depth look at some of the intricacies involved with using the tool as well as the effectiveness of it’s design workflow

Thoughts from my day in a smart home – the importance of connecting right

When I was asked to take part in a demonstration put on by one of our local communication companies, Cox Communications, showing off what a “smart home” looks like, I of course said yes.  I love gadgets, and smart gadgets more.  On top of that it was another chance to evangelise on the power of 3D Printing.  And I got to hang out in a brand new luxury condo in Downtown Phoenix, a post kid lifestyle change that is very appealing.  Plus we deal with customers designing and improving Internet of Things (IoT) devices all the time, and this is the perfect chance to see such products in action.

So I packed up one of our Makerbots, none of our Fortus machines fits in the back of my Prius, and headed downtown.  The first thing that shocked me was that I had the printer, my iPhone, iPad, and laptop connected to their network in about one minute.  The printer showed up on the Makerbot Print app on my iPad and I was printing a part in about three minutes.

My station, showing off 3D Printing in the home.

The whole point of the demonstration was to show how the new high-speed Internet offering from Cox, Gigablast, can enable a true smart home.  So I was focused on the speed of the connection to the Internet, which was fast.  What I didn’t get till I connected was that the speed and bandwidth of the WiFi in the house was even more important.

When everything was connected, we had 55 devices on the local network talking to each other and the Internet. At one point I was downloading a large STL file to the printer while on a teleconference on my iPhone and my “roommate” was giving a violin lesson to one of his students in Canada.

Oh, and the roomba started to vacuum the floor. On the balcony someone was giving a golf lesson and a doctor was diagnosing a patient in the master bedroom.  That was on top of the smart kitchen gadgets.  And it all worked.  Yes, it all worked.

I’m trying to convey shock and surprise because the reality is that nine times out of ten when I show up for some event, at a customer, or at a friends house and we try and connect things to the internet… it doesn’t work.  If you are a technical guy you know that feeling when your vacation or visit for dinner turns into an IT house call.  All I could think of was how awesome it was that everything worked and it was fast.

So I went to work printing little plastic Arizona style houses with COX on the roof. And then a reporter showed up. “3D Printing, interesting.  Hmmmm…  they are cool and all but really, what does that have to do with a smart house?”  Damn reporters and their questions.  I was still reveling in the fact that everything worked so well, I hadn’t taken to time to think about the “so what.”

Then I thought about it.  3D Printing in the home is just now starting to take off, and the reason why is actually high-speed internet connections. If you wanted a 3D Printer in your home in the past you needed the printer, a high end computer, and some good 3D modeling software on that computer.  Basically you had to create whatever you wanted to make.  Unless you are a trained engineer, that may not be so easy.

My “house” that I was printing at the invent sits on the cloud in my Thingiverse account.

But with a well connected home you have access to places like Thingiverse and Grabcad to download stuff you want to print.  And if you do want to create your own, you can go to Tinkercad or Onshape and use a free online 3D modeler to create your geometry.  All over the web, even on a pad, phone (I don’t recommend trying to do modeling on a phone, but it does work), or on a basic computer.  The files are stored in the cloud and downloaded directly to your printer.  No muss, no fuss.  All you need is a reliable and fast connection to the internet and in your home.

High speed internet and a smart 3D printer makes anyone a maker.

And when we had a three hour break, I went downstairs to a coffee shop on the ground floor of the condo and worked, while monitoring my builds using the camera in the smart 3D Printer.

Pretty cool when you step back and think about how far we have come from that first Stereolithography machine that PADT bought in 1994.  We had to use floppy disks to get the data from our high-end Unix workstation to the machine.  Now it sits on the web and can be monitored.

This may be what we have been waiting for when it comes to 3D Printers in the home moving beyond that technologists and makers.

I’ve been focused on my experience with the 3D printing in the smart home, but there was a lot more to look at.  Check out these stories to learn more:

Phoenix Business Journal: Cox shows off a smart home with 55 connected devices and fast gigabyte internet

The Arizona Republic: Cox ‘smart home’ in Phoenix displays future at the push of a button

I also did a piece for the Phoenix Business Journal while I was at the event on “3 keys to success for smart home devices” based on what I learned while playing with the other devices in the smart home.

All and all a good day.  Oh, and being a 10 minute walk from my favorite pub made the idea of living downtown not such a bad idea, which doesn’t have much to do with high speed internet, connected devices, or 3D Printing.  But one of my goals was to check out post-child urban living…

 

 

ASU Polytechnique Deploys Robots in Project for 3D Printing Automation for Orbital ATK

Sometimes we run across some great exampls of industry and academia working together and like to share them as examples of win-win partnerships that can move technology forward and give studends a great oportunity.   A current Capstone Design Project by students at ASU Polytechnique is a great example.  It is also an early exmple of what can be done at the brand new Additive Manufacturing Center that was recently opened at the campus.

I’ll let ASU Mecanical Enginering Systems student Dean McBride tell you in his own words:

Orbital ATK in Chandler currently utilizes two Stratasys Dimension SST 1200es printers to prototype various parts with.  These printers print on parts trays, which must be removed and re-inserted into the printer to start new prints.  Wanting to increase process efficiency, Orbital had the desire of automating this 3D printing process during times when employees are not present to run the printers.  After the idea was born, Orbital presented this project to ASU Polytechnic as a potential senior capstone design project.  Shortly after, an ambitious team was assembled to take on the project.

 Numerous iterations of the engineering design process took place, and the team finally arrived at a final solution.  This solution is a Cartesian style robot, meaning the robot moves in linear motions, similar to the 1200es printer itself.  The mechanical frame and structure of the robot have been mostly assembled at this point.  Once assembly is achieved, the team will focus their efforts on the electrical system of the robot, as well as software coding of the micro-controller control system.  The team will be working to fine tune all aspects of the system until early May when the school semester ends.  The final goal of this project is to automate at least two complete print cycles without human interaction.

Here is a picture of the team with the robot they are building along side the Stratasys FDM printer they are automating.

 

Phoenix Business Journal: Installing a metal 3-D printer was a lesson on working with regulators

While installing our new metal 3D Printer we learned a couple of important lessons on working with local inspectors.  In “Installing a metal 3-D printer was a lesson on working with regulators” we share what we captured.

inBusiness: Riding the Wave of 3-D Printing

The Greater Phoenix inBusiness magazine just did a profile on PADT and co-founder Eric Miller.  “Eric Miller: Riding the Wave of 3-D Printing” gives some history and insite into what makes PADT unique.  It even includes some fun facts about the company.

Kids, Race Cars, and Scanned Turtle Shells: PADT’s 2017 SciTech Festival Open House

There is something about a kid running down a hallway screaming “mom, you HAVE to see this!” #openhousegoals.

Last night was our annual event where we open up the doors of PADT with a family oriented event sharing what we engineers do.  We also invited some students from high school and University to share their engineering activities.  With over 250 attendees and more than one excited kid running down the hall, we can safely call it a success.

Attendies were able to see our 3D Printing demo room including dozens of real 3D printed parts, learn about engineering, explore how 3D Printing works, and check out our new metal 3D Printer. They were also able to learn about school projects like the ASU Formula SAE race car as well as a prosthetic hand project and research into cellular structures in nature from BASIS Chandler.

Oh, and there was Pizza.

Pictures speak louder than words, so here is a galary of images from the event.

Tour ConceptLaser’s Metal 3D Printing lab at AeroDef

Attending AeroDef this year in Fort Worth? Make sure you register to tour Concept Laser on March 6th before AeroDef! You’ll hear an update on the GE acquisition and presentations on customer applications and machine safety. Registration ends February 24th, 2017, so don’t miss this opportunity!

Register now: http://aerodefevent.com/sessions/concept-laser-tour/

Speed, superior quality monitoring, and an open architecture that enables innovation – that is what makes Concept Laser’s Direct Metal Laser Melting (DMLM) technology a leader in the metal additive manufacturing industry. Come and hear about how Concept Laser is investing to bring you innovation through new products and processes that will lead to revenue-generating opportunities for your business.

The Tour is March 6th from 8:30am to 11:30pm and includes round trip transportation from the conference and more.

What you will see on the tour:

  • Direct Metal Laser Melting
  • In-situ Quality Assurance
  • Best-in-class safety guidelines when interacting with reactive and non-reactive materials
3D Printed Exhaust Gas Probe (RSC Engineering and Concept Laser Inc.)
Titanium implant leveraging lattice designs (Concept Laser)

Learn About the New Stratasys 3D Printers and New Orleans

It was my first time visiting New Orleans. I have heard many stories of how good the food is and how everyone is really nice there so I was excited to visit this city for a business trip. Stratasys Launch 2017! There was some buzz going on about some new FDM printers that Stratasys has been working on and I was really excited to see them and hear what sets them apart from the competition. Rey Chu (Co-Owner of PADT), Mario Vargas (Manager of 3D Printer Sales), Norman Stucker (Account Executive in Colorado), and I (James Barker, Application Engineer) represented PADT at this year’s Launch.

The city did not disappoint! I ate the best gumbo I’ve ever tried. Below is a picture of it with some Alligator Bourbon Balls. The gumbo is Alligator Sausage and Seafood. Sooooo Good!!


My last night in New Orleans, Stratasys rented out Mardi Gras World. That is where they build all the floats for Mardi Gras. They had a few dancers and people dressed up festive. I was able to get a picture of Rey in a Mardi Gras costume.

After dinner at Mardi Gras World, I took Rey and Mario down Bourbon Street one last time and then we went to Café Du Monde for their world famous Beignets. Everyone told me that if I come home without trying the Beignets, then the trip was a waste. They were great! I recommend them as well. Below is picture of Mario and me at the restaurant.

As you can see we had a fun business trip. The best part of it was the unveiling of the new FDM printers! Mario and I sat on the closest table to the stage and shared the table with Scott Crump (President of Stratasys and inventor of FDM technology back in 1988). These new printers are replacing some of Stratasys entry level and mid-level printers. What impressed me most is that they all can print PLA, ABS, and ASA materials with the F370 being able to print PC-ABS. You also can build parts in four different layer heights (.005, .007, .010, and .013”), all while utilizing new software called GrabCad Print.

GrabCad Print is exciting because you can now monitor all of you Stratasys FDM printers from this software and setup queues. What made me and many others clap during the unveiling is that with GrabCad Print you no longer have to export STL files! You can import your native CAD assemblies and either print them as an assembly or explode the assembly and print the parts separately.

      

Everyone wants a 3D Printer that can print parts faster, more accurately and is dependable. You get that with the family of systems! Speed has increased big time, they are twice as fast as the Dimension line of FDM printers. Stratasys has published the accuracy of these new printers to be ±.008” up to a 4 inch tall part and then every inch past 4 inches, you add another .002”. These machines are very dependable. They are replacing the Uprint (Uprint SE Plus is still current), Dimension, and Fortus 250 machines that have been workhorses. Many of our customers still have a Dimension from 2002 when they were first launched. In addition to the 43 existing patents that Stratasys has rolled into this phenomenal product, they have an additional 15 new patents that speaks volumes as to the innovation in these 3D printers.

Stratasys Launch was a blast for me. Seeing these new printers, parts that were printed from them, and understanding why these are the best FDM printers on the market was well worth my time! I look forward to helping you with learning more about them. Please contact me at james.barker@padtinc.com for more information. If you would like to hear my recorded webinar that has even more information about the new F170, F270, and F370, here is the link.  Or you can download the brochure here.

PADT Events – February 2017

Although February is a short month, we have lots of activities scheduled to talk about new releases from both ANSYS and Stratasys as well as a STEM and Medtech event. Take a look for details below or visit the bottom of our home page to see the latest.


Arizona Science Bowl

02/04/17
ASU West Campus
Glendale, AZ

PADT will be attending this great event for middle and high schools. Dr. Bhate will be speaking to the middle school students
Learn more

2017 Stratasys New Product Launch Webinar

02/09/17
Online

Stratasys is introduce some new products and you are invited to attend online to learn how once again they will advance 3D Printing to the next level. PADT’s engineers will not just share information about these new systems, they will also explain what we thing is important about each machine and what its new advantages are.
Learn more

ANSYS 18 – Mechanical APDL & HPC Update Webinar

02/14/17
Online

ANSYS is rolling out a new version of their entire software platform, and we are offering seminars to help users understand what is new and cool. This first webinar will be focused on ANSYS Mechanical APDL and what is going on way deep under the hood.
Learn more

AZ Tech Council MedTech
Conference, 2017

02/23/17
Spear Education
Scottsdale, AZ

Medtech has grown a lot in Arizona over the past couple of years, so the Tech Council is putting on an event for everyone involved to get together to network and learn. PADT will have a booth and will be talking about 3D Printing in medical devices. If you are at all involved in medical technology, you should attend.
Learn more

ANSYS 18 – HPC Licensing Update Webinar

02/28/17
Online

ANSYS is rolling out a new version of their entire software platform, and we are offering seminars to help users understand what is new and cool. This second webinar will be focused on ANSYS HPC licensing and how that has changed.
Learn more

Stratasys Release Webinar 2017

We here at PADT are excited to share information on the next big release from Stratasys, the global leader in 3D printing, additive solutions, materials and services.

The name Stratasys has always been synonymous with top of the line machines that meet even the most advanced rapid prototyping needs, and excel at every stage of the design prototyping process.

This new release is no exception.

Keep an eye out for more information on February 6th

Update on ASU 3D Printing Research and Teaching Lab

Two weeks ago we were part of a fantastic open house at the ASU Polytechnic campus for the grand opening of the Additive Manufacturing Research center, a part of the Manufacturing Research and Innovation Hub.  What a great event it was where the Additive Manufacturing community in Arizona gathered in one place to celebrate  this important piece in the local ecosystem.  A piece that puts Arizona in the lead for the practical application of 3D Printing in industry.

I could go on and on, but better writers by far have penned some great stories on the event and on the lab.

ASU’s article is here: New hub’s $2 million in cutting-edge 3-D printing equipment will allow students to stay on forefront of rapidly growing sector

And Hayley Ringle of the Phoenix Business Journal summed it all up, with some great insight into the impact on education and job growth in “See inside the Southwest’s largest 3D printing research facility at ASU

And last but not least, here are some pictures related to PADT that ASU provided: