Active Solution Monitoring during a solve in ANSYS CFX

One of the cool new features in CFX 18 is the ability to actively review results while the calculation is running. It is supported for steady state and transient calculations, and now includes support for rotating reference frames as well.

What follows are some tutorial-esque steps to get you started.

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Jet Engines to Golf Clubs – Phoenix Area ANSYS Users Share their Stories

ansys-padt-skysong-conference-1There is nothing better than seeing the powerful and interesting way that other engineers are using the same tools you use.  That is why ANSYS, Inc. and PADT teamed up on Thursday to hold an “ANSYS Arizona Innovation Conference”  at ASU SkySong where users could come to share and learn.

The day kicked off with Andy Bauer from ANSYS welcoming everyone and giving them an update on the company and some general overarching direction for the technology.  Then Samir Rida from Honeywell Aerospace gave a fantastic keynote sharing how simulation drive the design of their turbine engines.  As a former turbine engine guy, I found it fascinating and exciting to see how accurate and detailed their modeling is.

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Next up was my talk on the Past, Present, and Future of simulation for product development.  The point of the presentation was to take a step back and really think about what simulation is, what we have padt-ansys-innovation-az-2016-pptbeen doing, and what it needs to look at in the future.  We all sort of agreed that we wanted voice activation and artificial intelligence built in now.  If you are interested, you can find my presentation here: padt-ansys-innovation-az-2016.pdf.

After a short break ANSYS’s Sara Louie launched into a discussion on some of the new Antenna Systems modeling capabilities, simulating multiple physics and large domains with ANSYS products.  The ability to model the entire interaction of an antenna including large environments was fascinating.

Lunchtime discussions focused on the presentations in the morning as well as people sharing what they were working on.

img_1632The afternoon started with a review by Hoang Vinh of ANSYS of the ANSYS AIM product. This was followed by customer presentations. Both Galtronics and ON Semiconductor shared how they drive the design of their RF systems with ANSYS HFSS and related tools.  Then Nammo Talley shared how they incorporated simulation into their design process and then showed an example of a projectile redesign from a shoulder launched rocket that was driven by simulation in ANSYS CFX.  They had the added advantage of being able to show something that blows up, always a crowd pleaser.

ping-ansysAnother break was followed by a great look at how Ping used CFD to improve the design of one of their drivers.  They used simulation to understand the drag on the head through an entire swing and then add aerodynamic features that improved the performance of the club significantly. Much of the work is actually featured in an ANSYS Advantage article.

We wrapped things up with an in depth technical look at Shock and Vibration Analysis using ANSYS Mechanical and Multiphysics PCB Analysis with the full ANSYS product suite.

The best part of the event was seeing how all the different physics in ANSYS products were being used and applied in different industries.  WE hope to have similar events int he future so make sure you sign up for our mailings, the “ANSYS – Software Information & Seminars” list will keep you in the loop.

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Activating Hyperdrive in ANSYS Simulations

punch-it-chewie-ansysWith PADT and the rest of the world getting ready to pile into dark rooms to watch a saga that we’ve been waiting for 10 years to see, I figured I’d take this opportunity to address a common, yet simple, question that we get:

“How do I turn on HPC to use multiple cores when running an analysis?”

For those that don’t know, ANSYS spends a significant amount of resources into making the various solvers it has utilize multiple CPU processors more efficiently than before.  By default, depending on the solver, you are able to use between 1-2 cores without needing HPC licenses.

With the utilization of HPC licenses, users can unlock hyperdrive in ANSYS.  If you are equipped with HPC licenses it’s just a matter of where to look for each of the ANSYS products to activate it.

ANSYS Mechanical

Whether or not you are performing a structural, thermal or explicit simulation the process to activate multiple cores is identical.

  1. Go to Tools > Solve Process Settings
  2. The Solve Process Settings Window will pop up
  3. Click on Advanced to open up the Advanced Settings window
  4. You will see an option for Max number of utilized cores
  5. Simply change the value to your desired core count
  6. You will see below an option to allow for GPU acceleration (if your computer is equipped with the appropriate hardware)
  7. Select the GPU type from the dropdown and choose how many GPUs you want to utilize
  8. Click Ok and close
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Go the proper settings dialog
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Choose Advanced…
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Specify the number of cores to use

Distributed Solve in ANSYS Mechanical

One other thing you’ll notice in the Advanced Settings Window is the option to turn “Distributed” On or Off using the checkbox.

In many cases Distributing a solution can be significantly faster than the opposite (Shared Memory Parallel).  It requires that MPI be configured properly (PADT can help guide you through those steps).  Please see this article by Eric Miller that references GPU usage and Distributed solve in ANSYS Mechanical

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Turn on Distributed Solve if MPI is Configured

ANSYS Fluent

Whether launching Fluent through Workbench or standalone you will first see the Fluent Launcher window.  It has several options regarding the project.

  1. Under the Processing Options you will see 2 options: Serial and Parallel
  2. Simply select Parallel and you will see 2 new dropdowns
  3. The first dropdown lets you select the number of processes (equal to the number of cores) to use in not only during Fluent’s calculations but also during pre-processing as well
Default Settings in Fluent Launch Window
Default Settings in Fluent Launch Window
Options When Parallel is Picked
Options When Parallel is Picked

ANSYS CFX

For CFX simulations through Workbench, the option to activate HPC exists in the Solution Manager

  1. Open the CFX Solver Manager
  2. You will see a dropdown for Run Mode
  3. Rather than the default “Serial” option choose from one of the available “Parallel” options.
  4. For example, if running on the same machine select Platform MPI Local Parallel
  5. Once selected in the section below you will see the name of the computer and a column called Partitions
  6. Simply type the desired number of cores under the Partitions column and then either click “Save Settings” or “Start Run”
Change the Run Mode
Change the Run Mode
Specify number of cores for each machine
Specify number of cores for each machine

ANSYS Electronics Desktop/HFSS/Maxwell

Regardless of which electromagnetic solver you are using: HFSS or Maxwell you can access the ability to change the number of cores by going to the HPC and Analysis Options.

  1. Go to Tools > Options > HPC and Analysis Options.
  2. In the window that pops up you will see a summary of the HPC configuration
  3. Click on Edit and you will see a column for Tasks and a column for Cores.
  4. Tasks relate to job distribution utilizing Optimetrics and DSO licenses
  5. To simply increase the number of cores you want to run the simulation on, change the cores column to your desired value
  6. Click OK on all windows
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Select the proper settings dialog
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Select Edit to change the configuration
Specify Tasks and Cores
Specify Tasks and Cores

There you have it.  That’s how easy it is to turn on Hyperdrive in the flagship ANSYS products to advance your simulations and get to your endpoint faster than before.

If you have any questions or would like to discuss the possibility of upgrading your ship with Hyperdrive (HPC capabilities) please feel free to call us at 1-800-293-PADT or email us at support@padtinc.com.

CUBE Systems are Now Part of the ANSYS, Inc. HPC Partner Program

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The relationship between ANSYS, Inc. and PADT is a long one that runs deep. And that relationship just got stronger with PADT joining the HPC Partner Program with our line of CUBE compute systems specifically designed for simulation. The partner program was set up by ANSYS, Inc. to work:

CUBE-HVPC-512-core-closeup3-1000h_thumb.jpg“… with leaders in high-performance computing (HPC) to ensure that the engineering simulation software is optimized on the latest computing platforms. In addition, HPC partners work with ANSYS to develop specific guidelines and recommended hardware and system configurations. This helps customers to navigate the rapidly changing HPC landscape and acquire the optimum infrastructure for running ANSYS software. This mutual commitment means that ANSYS customers get outstanding value from their overall HPC investment.”

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PADT is very excited to be part of this program and to contribute to the ANSYS/HPC community as much as we can.  Users know they can count on PADT’s strong technical expertise with ANSYS Mechanical, ANSYS Mechanical APDL, ANSYS FLUENT, ANSYS CFX, ANSYS Maxwell, ANSYS HFSS, and other ANSYS, Inc. products, a true differentiator when compared with other hardware providers.

Customers around the US have fallen in love with their CUBE workstations, servers, mini-clusters, and clusters finding them to be the right mix between price and performance. CUBE systems let users carry out larger simulations, with greater accuracy, in less time, at a lower cost than name-brand solutions. This leaves you more cash to buy more hardware or software.

Assembled by PADT’s IT staff, CUBE computing systems are delivered with the customer’s simulation software loaded and tested. We configure each system specifically for simulation, making choices based upon PADT’s extensive experience using similar systems for the same kind of work. We do not add things a simulation user does not need, and focus on the hardware and setup that delivers performance.

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Is it time for you to upgrade your systems?  Is it time for you to “step out of the box, and step in to a CUBE?”  Download a brochure of typical systems to see how much your money can actually buy, visit the website, or contact us.  Our experts will spend time with you to understand your needs, your budget, and what your true goals are for HPC. Then we will design your custom system to meet those needs.

 

CFX Expression Language–Part 4: Applying Ramped and Stepped Boundary Conditions Using CEL

In three previous entries we introduced CFX Expression Language, CEL:

In this fourth installment we will demonstrate the use of CEL to apply ramped or stepped boundary conditions. In certain circumstances we might want to ramp a load rather than apply it all at once. For example, convergence difficulties can sometimes arise when a fast rotation rate is applied initially in rotating machinery simulations. Starting off with a smaller value of load and ramping it to the final value can aid in convergence in these circumstances.

Note that the rate of load application can be manually changed during the solution in the solver manager, but why not take advantage of CEL and do it automatically? As we will see, this is fairly easy to do.

The ability to ramp a load makes use of a built-in CEL variable labeled “aiturn”, which is the accumulated value of the iteration number. If we assign an expression for the number of iterations we want, we can then create a combined expression for the ramped load:

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In the above list of expressions, Flow999 is our desired full amount of flow at the end of ramping. Iter is defined to have a value of 100. Both of those are names that we picked. We then defined expression flowapplied, which is the value of Flow999 times the built-in expression aitern (the current solver iteration number) divided by the total number of iterations desired for the ramping, Iter. Once aitern = 100, then the value of flowapplied will equal Flo999 or 9.99 ft/sec in this case.

Here is a plot of the expression flowapplied for values of aitern between 0 and 100. The plot is in m/s but the peak works out to be 9.99 ft/sec.

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As we have seen in prior entries in this series, we plug in the expression name for the input in the appropriate field. In this case, the name of the expression flowapplied is entered in the Normal Speed field in the Inlet boundary details.

After solution, we can verify that at the end of the solution the applied inlet velocity had reached the full value of 9.99 ft/sec. in CFD Post:

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The next step might be rerun the solution while maintaining a constant value of the applied load for an extended period of time. This can be accomplished by modifying the expression which defines the load so that it has some additional values:

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In the above expression we have added a step() function, which can either be typed in or added by right clicking, Functions > CEL > step. This causes the ramped load to peak at the value of Flow999 when aitern reaches the previously defined value of Iter at 100, then drop to zero after that. This happens because if Iter-aitern is greater than one, step=1, but if Iter-aitern is less than one, step=0. Here is the resulting plot in CFX Pre:

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That’s not quite what we want, but if we tweak the expression a bit more, we can get it to ramp to the full value then remain constant.

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Now we have another term involving the step() function, but with the expression names inside the step function reversed. This means that once aitern exceeds the value of Iter, the first term becomes zero and the second term takes over with a constant value of the load equal to Flow999, as shown here:

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By using similar expressions involving time, we can create a load history that turns off and on at desired time points.

Hopefully by now you’re starting to see the value of CEL. We are just scratching the surface here, but once you start using it you will find that CEL has a lot of potential powerful uses. In the next installment we’ll cover some additional capabilities available in CEL.

CFX Expression Language–Part 3: Applying Boundary Conditions Using CEL

In two previous entries we introduced CFX Expression Language, CEL:

Part 1: Accessing CFD Simulation Information in CFX (and FLUENT)

Part 2: Augmenting Material Property Assignments in ANSYS CFX

In this third installment we will see how to use CEL to apply boundary conditions as equations rather than constant values. For example, if a non-constant velocity profile can be defined as an equation, we can use CEL to define as well as apply the profile.

Let’s look at an example in which the velocity profile is a function of y coordinate:

u(y) = 6 * Umax * y / H * (1 – y/H) (m/s)

Using the procedure we learned in part 1 of this series, in CFX Pre we have defined expressions for H and Umax. We then defined the equation for the velocity profile as Uprofile:

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Next we go to the Plot tab within the Expressions editor to verify that our velocity profile matches expectations:

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To use our new expression in CFX Pre, we just enter the expression name in the appropriate field when defining the inlet velocity:

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Finally, this velocity plot from CFD Post shows that indeed our desired velocity profile was applied at the inlet.

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Hopefully this demonstrates how easy it can be to use CFX Expressions to define non-constant boundary conditions. In the next part of the series, we will look at using expressions to ramp or step apply loads.

CFX Expression Language – Part 2: Augmenting Material Property Assignments in ANSYS CFX

In a previous entry we introduced CFX Expression Language, CEL.  You can view that post here

Before we get started, there are some key things to remember:

  1. Expressions can be easily created by right-clicking in the Expressions tab after double clicking on Expressions in the CFX Pre object tree.
  2. Expressions and their contents are case sensitive.

In this next part of the series, we’ll show how to use CEL to augment your material property definitions in CFX. If material properties are constants then their input is straightforward. However, if the properties are defined as equations, we can use CEL to input those equations in CFX.

For example, if viscosity is defined as a function of shear strain rate, we need to define viscosity using an equation that captures that relationship, such as

m = K * gn-1

Below are shown two ways in which that equation can be captured using CFX Expression Language, visc1 and visc2. The second equation, visc2, is more flexible in that we have defined the constant terms as expressions themselves.

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It’s always a good idea to verify the input. Most expressions can be easily plotted by clicking on the Plot tab in the Details view. Here is a plot of the viscosity vs. shear strain rates between 0 and 1, as calculated by expression visc2:

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Similarly, the Evaluate tab can be used to evaluate the expression for desired values of the inputs.

So, we have defined an expression for a material property, viscosity in this case. How do we get CFX to use that expression? In the material property input, we click on the expression icon to the right of the particular material property we are defining, then enter the name of the expression, as shown here for expression visc2:

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Summing it up, we can use CFX Expression Language to define material property equations for non-constant material values. In the next installment we will look at how to use CEL to define changing boundary conditions, such as a ramped load.