3D printed bolts produced on the Stratasys Origin One printer.

Exploring the new Stratasys Origin One Printer – Such Smooth Parts!

Recently I had the chance to start printing parts on PADT’s new Stratasys Origin One 3D printer, and now I can’t get enough of it. It creates parts by curing a shallow tray of liquid resin, a full layer at a time, based on DLP (digital light processing) technology. That means, whether you print just one part or as many as can fit on the build-platform, the print-time is the same. If you’re accustomed to filament-based printing, this system is FAST, and the resulting surface finish rivals that of injection-molded parts.

Completed build of 24 threaded bolt “sleeves” printed on a Stratasys Origin One P3 printer. (Image courtesy PADT Inc.)

The Origin One’s DLP process is termed Programmable PhotoPolymerization (P3, for short, because of course we need another acronym in this field). The photocurable resins it uses are single-component materials, which simplifies the build process compared to those that require two-part epoxies: there’s no waste since parts can print overnight, and each open resin vat can stay open for a week.

In addition, unused resin can be strained and returned to the bottle, easily lasting a month, while unopened resins display a six-month-to-one-year shelf-life. And what a range of resins and applications! The Origin One system is open; several material companies (Henkel Loctite, Covestro Somos and BASF) have already worked with the printer’s developers, matching the hardware’s operation with the best build-prep parameters for their formulas.

All P3 resins are tuned to 385 nanometers. The combination of this wavelength, shorter than that of other DLP and LCD systems, along with a 4K light engine, supports feature sizes as small as 50 microns and strong molecular cross-linking for exceptional material properties. Printing across a build platform that is 7.5 inches by 4.25 inches, the typical build layer is 100 microns, and the proprietary pneumatic release mechanism (key to great adhesion plus speed) easily supports layer print-times of 15 seconds. The build volume height is 14.5 inches, which can accommodate a decently large number of parts; you may have seen how Origin helped develop and print thousands of certified nasal-swabs in the first months of the COVID pandemic (approximately 1500 swabs every eight hours).

PADT Inc.’s Origin One DLP 3D printer, with a completed build. Parts print upside down and need only a shallow tray of resin, as the DLP system projects an image of each layer from below through a glass cover and the clear membrane mounted at the tray’s lower edge. (Image courtesy PADT Inc.)

Print Setup

Print set-up in Autodesk netfabb software, ready to print on the Origin One printer. These parts built directly on the build-platform and did not require any support structure. (Image courtesy PADT Inc.)

If you already have Autodesk netfabb Premium software, you’ve got what you need to prepare an STL part file for printing; if not, the Origin One printer comes with the first-year free of netfabb, or you can use other file preparation software such as Materialise Magics. Depending on the part geometry, you may place the parts directly on the build platform (as with typical DLP printers, the parts print upside-down), or you can choose to add supports of many styles; these will be snipped off during post-processing.

Post-Processing

Bolts printed in BASF ST45 on the Origin One printer, ready to be popped off the build plate with a putty knife or razor blade. Post-processing is quick and easy with IPA and a small UV oven. (Image courtesy PADT Inc.)

This is fast, too! I found I could complete the post-processing workflow in 30 minutes to an hour, and of that only about 20 minutes was hands-on time. Here are the recommended steps:

  1. Swish the build-platform with the parts still on it, in a tub of IPA, for about 5 seconds.
  2. Slide the parts off with a putty knife, or just pop them off with gloved hands.
  3. Rinse the parts in agitated IPA for five to ten minutes. (We use an automated shaker-table unit, but sonicator units are also an option.)
  4. Air-dry the parts with compressed air.
  5. Cure the parts in a UV oven for anywhere from 30 seconds to 20 minutes or so, depending on the material, geometry and oven power.
  6. Done!

Geometry Design Capabilities

The feature size that can be achieved with this system is pretty impressive:

– As small as 0.5mm diameter cylinder (8mm tall),

– As small as 0.2mm diameter horizontal through-holes, and

– Up to a 3mm unsupported 90-degree overhang.

Inner section of two-part 3D printed “bolt” which will be mated with its reverse-threaded outer sleeve. These parts also printed directly on the build-plate of the Origin One printer. (Image courtesy PADT Inc.)

Material categories

So far, Stratasys has qualified the set-up parameters for 12 resins, some of which are available in more than one color or in clear. These materials offer options for the following use cases.

  • Heat-resistant
  • Tough
  • General purpose
  • Elastomers
  • Medical

The parts I printed in these photos were done in BASF Ultracur3D ST 45 Black; that material is considered a general-purpose resin but I find it also tough and smooth – so smooth that we were able to print a threaded bolt with a reverse-threaded sleeve that unscrews to display fine lettering both raised and indented (shout-out to PADT’s new 3D Printing Application Engineer @ChaseWallace for the design). The ease-of-motion when assembling both parts is terrific.

Components of the two-part bolt, plus final assembly, printed on the Origin One printer. (Images courtesy PADT Inc.)

In the first week of November, I’ll be headed to Stratasys headquarters for official hands-on training with the Origin One printer and a variety of materials. I can’t wait to print more parts that push the limits of surface finish, minimal support structures and end-use-part durability.

PADT Inc. is a globally recognized provider of Numerical Simulation, Product Development and 3D Printing/3D Scanning products and services. For more information on Stratasys printers and materials, contact us at info@padtinc.com.

How do you remove the dashboard from a car, intact? Very carefully – especially when the dashboard comes from one of only 19 ever-made vehicles. Here, Bogi Lateiner (at right) and volunteer Ally Abel work to disengage every electrical component, screw and snap-fit connector keeping the S60 T8 Polestar dashboard in place. (Image courtesy PADT Inc.)

Girl Gang Garage Iron Maven Project: Taking Shape, Moving Ahead

The two cars have become one! The body of the 1961 Volvo PV544 is now welded to the chassis-frame of a new 2019 Volvo S60 T8 Polestar Engineered sedan. (Image courtesy PADT Inc.)
The two cars have become one! The body of the 1961 Volvo PV544 is now welded to the chassis-frame of a new 2019 Volvo S60 T8 Polestar Engineered sedan. (Image courtesy PADT Inc.)

If you’ve been following Girl Gang Garage on LinkedIn or Instagram, you know there’s been a ton of progress on the Iron Maven Volvo-rebuild project since PADT’s last post in July. Back then, most of the work had focused on gutting the 1961 Volvo PV544 body and interior, and PADT was able to capture much of the sheet metal shape and dimensions with its GOM Tscan Hawk 3D scanner. We also started brainstorming various 3D printed parts to enable new component designs produced on Stratasys 3D printers.

Since then, Bogi Lateiner, co-owner of Girl Gang Garage (and TV host of Motortrend’s All Girls Garage and Garage Squad), co-owner Shawnda Williams, and a rotating team of volunteer women have turned their efforts to disassembling the second vehicle: the new 2019 Volvo S60 T8 Polestar Engineered sedan (donated by corporate sponsor Volvo) and merging its chassis with the PV544 body.

Sounds simple, sort of? It might be if it weren’t for the facts that:

  • a) the wheelbase (front-tire center to rear-tire center) of the two cars differs: the PV544 clocks in at 102.5 inches but the S60 is quite a bit longer, at 113 inches.  Also,
  • b) the track width (axle length) differs – this time the PV544 is about 12 inches narrower at the front (51 inches versus 63 inches), which means the Girl Gang team needs to expand both of the front fenders by half that amount to accommodate everything in the engine compartment. And, lastly and conversely,
  • c) the S60 dashboard is so wide that it needs to be reconfigured from 56 inches down to about 50 inches or less, to fit the interior dimensions.

Growing Fenders, Redesigning a Grill

Original PV544 front bumper/grill housing and fenders. It all looks huge, right? But with the track-width difference between this design and that of the new Volvo S60 chassis, the Girl Gang Garage team needs to splice in about twelve more inches, probably incorporated in the fenders. (Image courtesy PADT Inc.)
Original PV544 front bumper/grill housing and fenders. It all looks huge, right? But with the track-width difference between this design and that of the new Volvo S60 chassis, the Girl Gang Garage team needs to splice in about twelve more inches, probably incorporated in the fenders. (Image courtesy PADT Inc.)

The old-school approach to reconstructing the front bumper-grill section and fenders would involve cutting the original sheet metal, shaping new metal splices by eye and tape-measure, and welding everything together with skilled handwork. This time, although the first and last steps still apply, that project becomes a much more precise, and predictable, task thanks to the digital workflow of 3D scanning -> data processing -> CAD design. These steps are now underway and will set the stage for a cool new grill and fenders that will act big but fool the eye just a bit to keep the overall lines intact.

3D scan of passenger-side fender of PV544, ready for conversion to CAD and creative expansion. (Image courtesy PADT Inc.)
3D scan of passenger-side fender of PV544, ready for conversion to CAD and creative expansion. (Image courtesy PADT Inc.)
PV544 front bumper/grill scan data acquired with a GOM Tscan Hawk handheld laser 3D scanner. (Image courtesy PADT Inc.)
PV544 front bumper/grill scan data acquired with a GOM Tscan Hawk handheld laser 3D scanner. (Image courtesy PADT Inc.)

It’s pretty clear that this front-end has seen better days, so the analysis and measurements of the existing surface needed to be carefully analyzed. Donated expertise for this task came from Chris Strong and Hayati Dirim of Rapid Scan 3D, who mapped the scanned mesh onto planes and surfaces that define the current grill-mount opening.

Surface data file created from the PV544 bumper/grill scanned mesh. Note the reference plane constructed along the left side. File conversion and measurements completed by Rapid Scan 3D. (Image courtesy Rapid Scan 3D.)
Surface data file created from the PV544 bumper/grill scanned mesh. Note the reference plane constructed along the left side. File conversion and measurements completed by Rapid Scan 3D. (Image courtesy Rapid Scan 3D.)

This information has been handed off to the CAD support team. Working hand-in-hand with the Girl Gang Garage experts, the team is using Fusion 360 CAD software, donated from Iron Maven sponsor Autodesk, to analyze these defining surfaces and design a new grill in CAD, which we expect will be 3D printed and painted to match the updated (not yet announced) body color from sponsor BASF.

Knowing both the fender and grill/frame exact dimensions also supports the team in defining the connections and shape of the widened fenders.

Critical surfaces and dimensions extracted from the bumper/grill scan, converted into CAD and brought into Autodesk Fusion 360. The four planes define the current limits of the opening for the grill. This information will guide the CAD-layout of the brand-new grill design and also serve as boundary layers that mate up to the expanded fenders. (Image courtesy PADT Inc.)
Critical surfaces and dimensions extracted from the bumper/grill scan, converted into CAD and brought into Autodesk Fusion 360. The four planes define the current limits of the opening for the grill. This information will guide the CAD-layout of the brand-new grill design and also serve as boundary layers that mate up to the expanded fenders. (Image courtesy PADT Inc.)

Dashboard Surgery

cially when the dashboard comes from one of only 19 ever-made vehicles. Here, Bogi Lateiner (at right) and volunteer Ally Abel work to disengage every electrical component, screw and snap-fit connector keeping the S60 T8 Polestar dashboard in place. (Image courtesy PADT Inc.)
How do you remove the dashboard from a car, intact? Very carefully – especially when the dashboard comes from one of only 19 ever-made vehicles. Here, Bogi Lateiner (at right) and volunteer Ally Abel work to disengage every electrical component, screw and snap-fit connector keeping the S60 T8 Polestar dashboard in place. (Image courtesy PADT Inc.)

The brand-new 2019 Volvo S60 T8 Polestar Engineered sedan was almost too cool to cut up – but Girl Gang Garage knew that something even better would emerge in the end. Before the roof was cut off (see the video on LinkedIn), the work timeline required removing the dashboard with all its electronic components.

Here’s the extracted S60 dashboard, viewed from the bottom and front:

Volvo S60 Dashboard removed from the car by Girl Gang Garage, to be mounted in the PV544 body of the Iron Maven project. (Image courtesy PADT)

And the frame behind it:

Mounting frame for the original Volvo S60 dashboard. It will need to be retrofitted for the PV544 Volvo rebuild project. (Image courtesy PADT)

And here are the existing red PV544 dash and the black S60 version side by side (the dots are the reflective targets used with the 3D laser scanner). The S60 configuration needs to fit in the original PV544 space. To compress this at least five inches, the glove-box probably has to go.

Both Volvo dashboards side by side: the large new S60 dashboard and the original PV544 dashboard. The new one is more than five inches wider and will have to be cut down. (Image courtesy PADT)

Once again, the team is turning to scan data, and that analysis is in process.

Top view of the S60 dashboard, as scanned with the GOM Tscan Hawk 3D scanner. (Image courtesy PADT Inc.)
Top view of the S60 dashboard, as scanned with the GOM Tscan Hawk 3D scanner. (Image courtesy PADT Inc.)

Stay Tuned

Due to the scheduling and travel challenges presented by the ever-shifting COVID scene, Girl Gang Garage has decided to complete the Iron Maven for presentation at the 2022 SEMA Show (highlighting automotive specialty products). This also allows more time for 3D printing the new components which are coming off the Stratasys F370 printer. PADT will be documenting updates and sharing cool photos of this one-of-a-kind project in the months to come.

PADT Inc. is a globally recognized provider of Numerical Simulation, Product Development and 3D Printing products and services. For more information on GOM 3D scanners and Stratasys printers and materials, contact us at info@padtinc.com.