PADT makes 100th Microloan through Kiva over 10 years

Today PADT hit a bit of a milestone, we gave out our 100th microloan over the past 10 years, to a guy named Roger Yester who makes adobe bricks in Peru.  Microloans are small loans, created by pooling bite-sized amounts of money from many people, given to individuals or small groups to help them with their business. It may be to buy raw materials to fulfil an order, as is the case with our 100th loan, or to buy inventory for a small store they operate out of stall in the local village.  The movement started as an alternative to high interest rate loans from predatory lenders and has grown as a way to fund people all over the world from every economic level.

We put $1000 into Kiva back in June of 2007, ten years ago.  (I like round numbers).  We added another $500 a few years later and have been reinvesting that same capital over and over again since.  This re-use of funds has lead to $7,900 lent across 100 loans. We have only had two defaults and have donated $935 to Kiva to cover overhead during that time.

The loans have gone to 50 different types of enterprises, mostly agricultural. We have helped buy breeding pigs and chickens in several countries, funded a new motorcycle for a taxi service in Cambodia, and backed a furniture maker in Mongolia.  Over the years PADT’s investments have supported 5 different beauty salons in Vietnam, Tanzania, Nigeria, Peru, and Jordan.  Our most common investment is in clothing sales with 8 different entrepreneurs backed for that industry.

We have even given loans to help families send their daughters to secondary school.

You can see some of our key loans and more statistics at:www.kiva.org/lender/padtinc.

If you think this sounds like something you, your family, or your company might like to do, sign up through this link and they add $25 to our loan pool when you make your first loan: www.kiva.org/lender/padtinc. 

 

 

Aerospace Summit, Additive Manufacturing Peer Group, and Industry-Education Partnership – A Three Event, Three State Hat Trick

Sometimes everything happens at once.  This June 22nd was one of those days.  Three key events were scheduled for the same time in three different states and we needed to be at all of them. So everyone stepped up and pulled it off, and hopefully some of you reading this were at one of these fantastic events.  Combined they are a great example of PADT’s commitment to the local technology ecosystem, showing how we create true win-win partnerships across organizations and geographies.   Since the beginning we wanted to be more than just a re-seller or just consultants, and this Thursday was a chance to show our commitment to doing just that.

Albuquerque: New Mexico Technology Council 3D Printing Peer Group Kickoff

Everyone talks about how they thing we should all work together, but there never seems to be someone who is willing to pull it all together. That is how the additive manufacturing committee in New Mexico was until the New Mexico Technology Council (NMTC) stepped up to host a peer group around 3D Printing.  Even though it was a record 103f in Albuquerque, 35 brave 3D Printing enthusiasts ventured out into the heat and joined us at Rio Bravo Brewing to get the ball rolling on creating a cooperative community.  We started with an introduction from NMTC, followed by an overview of what we want to achieve with the group. Our goals are:

  1. Create stronger cooperation between companies, schools, and individuals involved in 3D Printing in New Mexico
  2. Foster cooperation between organizations to increase the benefits of 3D Printing to New Mexico
  3. Make a contribution to New Mexico STEM education in the area of 3D Printing

To make this happen we will meet once a quarter, be guided by a steering committee, and grow our broad membership.  Anyone with any involvement in Additive Manufacturing in the state is welcome to join in person or just be part of the on-line discussion.

Then came the best part, where we went around the room and shared our names, orginization, and what we did in the world of 3D Printing.  What a fantastic group.  From a K-12 educator to key researchers at the labs, we had every industry and interest representing. What a great start.

Here are the slides from that part of the presentation:

NMTC-PADT-3D-Printing-Peer-Group-2017_06_22

Once that was done PADT’s Rey Chu gave a presentation where it went over the most important developments in Additive Manufacturing over the last year or so.  He talked about the three new technologies that are making an impact, new materials, and what is happening business wise.  Check out his slides to learn more:

NMTC-PADT-New-3D-Printing-2017_06_22

After a question and answer period we had some great conversations in small groups, which was the most valuable part.

If you want to learn more, please reach out to info@padtinc.com and we will add you to the email list where we will plan and execute future activities.  We are also looking for people to be on the steering committee and locations for our next couple of meetings. Share this with as many people as you can in New Mexico so that next event can be even better!

Denver: MSU Advance Manufacturing & Engineering Sciences Building Opening

Meanwhile, in Denver it was raining.  In spite of that,  supporters of educating the next generation of manufacturers and engineers gathered for the opening of the Advanced Manufacturing and Engineering Sciences Building at Metropolitan State University.  This 142,000 sqft multi-disciplinary facility is located in the heart of downtown Denver and will house classes, labs, and local companies.  PADT was there to not only celebrate the whole facility, but we were especially excited about the new 3D Printing lab that is being funded by a $1 million gift from Lockheed Martin.  A nice new Stratasys Fortus 900 is the centerpiece of the facility.  It will be a while before the lab itself is done, so watch for an invite to the grand opening.  While we wait we are working with MSU, Lockheed Martin, Stratasys, and others to put a plan together to develop the curriculum for future classes and making sure that the engineers needed for this technology are available for the expected explosion of use of this technology.

Stratasys and PADT are proud to be partners of this fantastic effort along with many key companies in Colorado.  If you want to learn more about how we can help you build partnerships between industry and academia, please reach out to info@padtinc.com or give us a call.

Phoenix:  2017 Aerospace, Aviation, Defense + Manufacturing Conference

The 113f high in Phoenix really didn’t stop anyone from coming to the AADM conference. This annual event was at ASU SkySong in Phoenix and is sponsored by the AZ Tech Council, AZ Commerce Authority, and RevAZ.  PADT was proud to not only be a sponsor, but also have a booth, participate in the advanced manufacturing panel discussion, and do a short partner presentation about what we do for our Aerospace and Defense Customers.

Here is Rob’s presentation on PADT:

PADT-AeroConf-AZTC-2017

We had great conversations at our booth with existing customers, partners, and a few people that were new to us.  This is always one of the best events of the summer, and we look forward to next year.

If you want to know more about how PADT can help you in your Aerospace, Defense, and Manufacturing efforts, reach out and contact us.

Celebrating the Impact and Innovation of CEI, PADT’s Startup Home

In Phoenix, just North of the airport on a record hot day of 119f, about 30 people gathered into a conference room to celebrate a place that has become a bright success in the region’s startup community. The Center For Entrepreneurial Innovations, or CEI, held their first ever Innovation and Impact Celebration.  This gathering of sponsors, clients, mentors, and staff of CEI highlighted the success that this outstanding incubator has enjoyed since its grand opening in 2013.

Some of the key numbers shared were:

  • 247 high paying jobs created by CEI clients
  • $28,000,000 raised by CEI clients in investments, grants, and awards
  • $69,000,000 in revenue generating by CEI clients
  • 3,240 hours given in mentoring and consulting to CEI clients

To celebrate this success, four awards were given out.  PADT was honored to design and 3D Print these awards (read more in a separate post here) and be there to hear the great stories from the winners about how CEI has been such a great resource.

  • Paraffin International won for Graduate of the Year
  • Beacon Biomedical was awarded Client of the Year
  • Tom Lagerhausen & Tommy Andrews were recognized as Mentors of the Year
  • The City of Phoenix received Sponsor of the Year

As a tenant at CEI, PADT gets to see the inner workings that produce such fantastic numbers.  In fact, we decided to put our focus on startups at CEI because of the quality of people, programs, and support that they offer.  Back in April of 2015, we opened PADT StartUpLabs as a place to host our outreach to the community and as a way to offer affordable 3D Printing to startups. We also host seminars and meetings there because it is just a great facility.

The primary reason that we partnered with them was a little more blunt. We saw that the companies they incubated succeeded.  When many others talk the talk of startup support, CEI has been busy walking the walk.  We see it almost every day, and it is pretty unique how well they do.  Huge fans, and great to see the key success stories and contributors being recognized!

Check out this recent video to learn a bit more about how they do it:

Check it out, and get involved.  If you are a startup, look at becoming a client.  Or maybe you can volunteer to help in some way.  But what they need the most if strong partners and sponsors.   PADT has never regretted our partnership and it has  been a great win-win experience.  Stop talking about making the Phoenix area startup ecosystem better, and step up and join CEI in making it happen.

 

 

 

Assembly Modeling with ANSYS

In my previous article, I wrote about how you get what you pay for with your analysis package.  Well, buckle up for some more…but this time we’ll just focus on handling assemblies in your structural/thermal simulations.  If all you’re working on are single components, count yourself lucky.  Almost every simulation deals with one part interacting with another.  You can simplify your boundary conditions a bit to make it equivalent, but if you have significant bearing stresses, misalignments, etc…you need to include the supporting parts.  Better hope your analysis package can handle contact…

Image result for get what you pay for

First off, contact isn’t just for structural simulations.  Contact allows you to pass loads across difference meshes, meaning you don’t need to create a conformal mesh between two parts in order to simulate something.  Here’s a quick listing on the degrees of freedom supported in ANSYS (don’t worry…you don’t need to know how to set these options as ANSYS does it for you when you’re in Workbench):

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You can use contact for structural, thermal, electrical, porous domain, diffusion, or any combination of those.  The rest of this article is going to focus on the structural side of things, but realize that the same concepts apply to essentially any analysis you can do within ANSYS Mechanical..

First, it’s incredibly easy to create contact in your assembly.  Mechanical automatically looks for surfaces within a certain distance from one another and builds contact.  You can further customize the automated process by defining your own connection groups, as I previous wrote about.  These connection groups can create contact between faces, edges, solids bodies, shell bodies, and line bodies.

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Second, not only can you create contact to transfer loads across different parts, but you can also automatically create joints to simulate linkages or ‘linearize’ complicated contacts (e.g. cylindrical-to-cylindrical contact for pin joints).  With these joints you can also specify stops and locks to simulate other components not explicitly modeled.  If you want to really model a threaded connection you can specify the pitch diameter and actually ‘turn’ your screw to properly develop the shear stress under the bolt head for a bolted joint simulation without actually needing to model the physical threads (this can also be done using contact geometry corrections)

image Look ma, no threads (modeled)!

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If you’re *just* defining contact between two surfaces, there’s a lot you simulate.  The default behavior is to bond the surfaces together, essentially weld them closed to transmit tensile and compressive loads.  You also have the ability to let the surfaces move relative to each other by defining frictionless, frictional, rough (infinite coefficient of friction), or no-separation (surfaces don’t transmit shear load but will not separate).

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Some other ‘fancy’ things you can do with contact is simulate delamination by specifying adhesive properties (type I, II, or III modes of failure).  You can add a wear model to capture surface degradation due to normal stress and tangential velocity of your moving surfaces.  You can simulate a critical bonding temperature by specifying at what temperature your contacts ‘stick’ together instead of slide.  You can specify a ‘wetted’ contact region and see if the applied fluid pressure (not actually solving a CFD simulation, just applying a pressure to open areas of the contact interface) causes your seal to open up.

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Now, it’s one thing to be able to simulate all of these behaviors.  The reason you’re running a finite element simulation is you need to make some kind of engineering judgement.  You need to know how the force/heat/etc transfers through your assembly.  Within Mechanical you can easily look at the force for each contact pair by dragging/dropping the connection object (contact or joint) into the solution.  This will automatically create a reaction probe to tell you the forces/moments going through that interface.  You can create detailed contour plots of the contact status, pressure, sliding distance, gap, or penetration (depending on formulation used).

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Again, you can generate all of that information for contact between surface-to-surface, surface-to-edge, or edge-to-edge.  This allows you to use solids, shells, beams, or any combination you want, for any physics you want, to simulate essentially any real-world application.  No need to buy additional modules, pay for special solvers, fight through meshing issues by trying to ‘fake’ an assembly through a conformal mesh.  Just import the geometry, simplify as necessary (SpaceClaim is pretty awesome if you haven’t heard), and simulate it.)

For a more detailed, step-by-step look at the process, check out the following video!


Additive Manufacturing: 3D Printing a Metal Shift Knob for Faster Cooling

When Nathan Huber moved to Arizona from Colorado to join PADT he learned a lot, and one of the things he learned fast was that the inside of cars get very hot in the summer here.  In fact, the shift knob on his car was untouchable in July.  This coincided with his learning more about metal 3D Printing and an idea occurred, what about 3D Printing a metal shift knob designed to cool off faster, and that looked cool.  Oh, and use ANSYS to drive the design.

He blogged about it before (here and here), and Additive Manufacturing online picked up the story and added to it on their blog post “3D Printing a Metal Shift Knob for Faster Cooling”  Check it out, they did a nice job of explaining what we did and how Nathan used several of our tools like ANSYS Mechanical and our Concept Laser metal system to realize the design.

 

3D Printing Peer Group of New Mexico Tech Council Launching on June 22

We are very pleased to announce the launch meeting of the newest New Mexico Technology Council peer group: 3D Printing.  After the success of other peer groups, and a similar committee in the Arizona Technology Council, PADT is partnering with the NMTC to start a group focused on all things Additive Manufacturing, which is the more technical name for 3D Printing. Schools, businesses, and individuals who have any involvement or interest in this exciting and transformative technology will be able to network and organize to get greater value from 3D Printing. This includes understanding the technology, working together on research projects, and getting to know what services are available locally.  It will also serve as a platform to coordinate the use of 3D printing in STEM education.

    

For this launch event, PADT’s Rey Chu will share his thoughts on the latest and most interesting advancements in 3D Printing.

What: NMTC 3D Printing Peer Group Launch
Networking
Beer
Where: Rio Bravo Brewing Company, 1912 2nd St NW, Albuquerque, NM 87102
When: June 22, 2017
5:00 pm – 7:00 pm
Who: Anyone (21 years of age or older) involved in Academia, Industry, or Research that is involved or interested in Additive Manufacturing
Why: To build cooperation between the growing 3D Printing community in the state
How: Being social, creating connections, and joining the group to take action in the future

We will kick off the meeting with introductions around the room, then listen to Rey share his views on what is new and interesting in this industry, then talk about the peer group, answer questions, and start planning our next activities.  At around 6:45 or so we will commence with the networking.

Please contact PADT at info@padtinc.com if you have any questions before the event.   We hope to see you there.

Don’t forget to register, and please let anyone else you think might be interested know about the event.

 

Advanced ANSYS Functionality

Just like any other marketplace, there are a lot of options in simulation software.  There are custom niche-codes for casting simulations to completely general purpose linear algebra solvers that allow you to write your own shape functions.  Just like with most things in life, you truly get what you pay for.

Image result for get what you pay for

 

For basic structural and thermal simulations pretty much any FE-package should suffice.  The difference there will be in how easy it is to pre/post process the work and the support you receive from the vendor.  How complicated is the geometry to mesh, how long does it take to solve, if you can utilize multiple cores how well does it scale, how easy is it to get reactions at interfaces/constraints…and so on.  I could make this an article about all the productivity enhancements available within ANSYS, but instead I’ll talk about some of the more advanced functionalities that differentiate ANSYS from other software out there.

  • Radiation

You can typically ignore radiation if there isn’t a big temperature gradient between surfaces (or ambient) and just model your system as conduction/convection cooled.  Once that delta is large enough to require radiation to be modeled there are several degrees of numerical difficulty that need to be handled by the solver.

First, radiating to ambient is fairly basic but the heat transfer is now a function of T^4.  The solver can also be sensitive to initial conditions since large DT results in a large heat transfer, which can then result in a large change in temperature from iteration to iteration.  It’s helpful to be able to run the model transiently or as a quasi-static to allow the solver to allow some flexibility.

Next, once you introduce surface to surface radiation you now have to calculate view factors prior to starting the thermal solution. If you have multiple enclosures (surfaces that can’t see each other, or enclosed regions) hopefully there are some processes to simplify the view factor calculations (not wasting time calculating a ‘0’ for elements that can’t radiate to each other).  The view factors can sometimes be sensitive to the mesh density, so being able to scale/modify those view factors can be extremely beneficial.

Lastly you run into the emissivity side of things.  Is the emissivity factor a function of temperature?  A function of wavelength?  Do you need to account for absorption in the radiation domain?

Luckily ANSYS does all of this.  ANSYS Mechanical allows you to easily define radiation to ambient or surface-to-surface.  If you’re using symmetry in your model the full radiating surface will be captured automatically.  You can define as many enclosures as possible, each with different emissivity factors (or emissivity vs Temperature).  There are more advanced features that can help with calculating view factors (simplify the radiating surface representation, use more ray traces, etc) and there is functionality to save the calculated view factors for later simulations.  ANSYS fluid products (CFX and Fluent) can also account for radiation and have the ability to capture frequency-based emissivity and participating media.

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Automatic expansion of radiating surfaces across symmetry planes

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Different enclosures to simplify view factor calculations

Long story short…you don’t have to know what the Stefan-Boltzman constant is if you want to include radiation in your model (bonus points if you do).  You don’t have to mess with a lot of settings to get your model to run.  Just insert radiation, select the surface, and run.  Additional options and technical support is there if necessary.

  • Multiple/Multi-physics

I’d expect that any structural/thermal/fluids/magnetics code should be able to solve the basic fundamental equations for the environment it simulates.  However, what happens when you need to combine physics, like a MEMs device.  Or maybe you want to take some guess-work/assumptions out of how one physics loads another, like what the actual pressure load is from a CFD simulation on a structural model.  Or maybe you want to capture the acoustic behavior of an electric motor, accounting for structural prestress/loads such as Joule heating and magnetic forces.

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ANSYS allows you to couple multiple physics together, either using a single model or through data mapping between different meshes.  Many of the data mapping routines allow for bi-directional data passing so the results can converge.  So you can run an magnetic simulation on the holding force between a magnet and a plate, then capture the deflected shape due to an external load, and pass that deformed shape back to the magnetic simulation to capture the updated force (and repeat until converged).

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If you have vendor-supplied data, or are using another tool to calculate some other results you can read in point cloud data and apply it to your model with minimal effort.

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To make another long story short…you can remove assumptions and uncertainty by using ANSYS functionality.

  • Advanced Material Models

 

Any simulation tool should be able to handle simple linear material models.  But there are many different flavors of ‘nonlinear’ simulation.  Does the stiffness change due to deflection/motion (like a fishing rod)?  Are you working with ductile metals that experience plastic deformation?  Does the stiffness change due to parts coming into/out-of contact?  Are surfaces connected through some adhesive property that debonds under high loads?  Are you working with elastomers that utilize some polynomial form hyper-elasic formulation?  Are you working with shape memory alloys?  Are you trying to simulate porous media through some geomechanical model?  Are you trying to simulate a stochastic material variation failure in an impact/explosive simulation?

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Large deflection stiffness calculations, plasticity, and contact status changes are easy in ANSYS.  Debonding has been available since ANSYS 11 (reminder, we’re at release 18.0 now).  ANSYS recently integrated some more advanced geomechanical models for dam/reservoir/etc simulations.  The explicit solver allows you to introduce stochastic variation in material strengths for impact/explosive simulations.

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ANSYS also has all the major flavors of hyper-elastic material models.  You can choose from basic Neo-Hookean, Arruda-Boyce, Gent, all the way through multiple variations of Mooney-Rivlin, Yeoh, Ogden, and more.  In addition to having these material models available (and the curve fitting routines to properly extract the constants from test data) ANSYS also has the ability to dynamically remesh a model.  Most of the time when you’re analyzing the behavior of a hyperelastic part there is a lot of deformation, and what starts out as a well-shaped mesh can quickly turn into a bad mesh.  Using adaptive meshing, you can have the solve automatically pause the solution, remesh the deformed shape, map the previous stress state onto the new nodes/elements, and continue with the solution.  I should note that this nonlinear adaptive remesh is NOT just limited to hyperelastic simulations…it is just extremely helpful in these instances.

The ending of this story is pretty much the same as others.  If you have a complicated material response that you’re trying to capture you can model it in ANSYS.  If you already know how to characterize your material, just find the material model and enter the constants.  We’ve worked with several customers in getting their material tested and properly characterized.  So while most structural codes can do basic linear-elastic, and maybe some plastic…very few can capture all the material responses that ANSYS can.

  • MEMs/Piezo/Etc

I know I’ve already discussed multiple physics and advanced materials, but once you start making parts smaller you start to get coupling between physics that may not work well for vector-based coupling (passing load vectors/deformations from one mesh to another).  Luckily ANSYS has a range of multi-physics elements that can solve use either weak or strong coupling to solve a host of piezo or MEM-related problems (static, transient, modal, harmonic).  Some codes allow for this kind of coupling but either require you to write your own governing equations or pay for a bunch of modules to access.

If you have the ANSYS Enterprise-level license you can download a free extension that exposes all of these properties in the Mechanical GUI.  No scripting, no compiling, just straight-up menu clicks.

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Using this extension you can define the full complex piezoelectric matrix, couple it with an anisotropic elasticity matrix, and use frequency dependent losses to capture the actual response of your structure.  Or if you want you can use simplified material definitions to get the best approximation possible (especially if you’re lacking a full material definition from your supplier).

 

Long story short…there are a lot of simulation products out there.  Pretty much any of them should be able to handle the basics (single part, structural/thermal, etc).  What differentiates the tools is in how easy it helps you implement more real-world conditions/physics into your analysis.  Software can be expensive, and it’s important that you don’t paint yourself into a corner by using a single point-solution or low-end tool.

Thoughts from my day in a smart home – the importance of connecting right

When I was asked to take part in a demonstration put on by one of our local communication companies, Cox Communications, showing off what a “smart home” looks like, I of course said yes.  I love gadgets, and smart gadgets more.  On top of that it was another chance to evangelise on the power of 3D Printing.  And I got to hang out in a brand new luxury condo in Downtown Phoenix, a post kid lifestyle change that is very appealing.  Plus we deal with customers designing and improving Internet of Things (IoT) devices all the time, and this is the perfect chance to see such products in action.

So I packed up one of our Makerbots, none of our Fortus machines fits in the back of my Prius, and headed downtown.  The first thing that shocked me was that I had the printer, my iPhone, iPad, and laptop connected to their network in about one minute.  The printer showed up on the Makerbot Print app on my iPad and I was printing a part in about three minutes.

My station, showing off 3D Printing in the home.

The whole point of the demonstration was to show how the new high-speed Internet offering from Cox, Gigablast, can enable a true smart home.  So I was focused on the speed of the connection to the Internet, which was fast.  What I didn’t get till I connected was that the speed and bandwidth of the WiFi in the house was even more important.

When everything was connected, we had 55 devices on the local network talking to each other and the Internet. At one point I was downloading a large STL file to the printer while on a teleconference on my iPhone and my “roommate” was giving a violin lesson to one of his students in Canada.

Oh, and the roomba started to vacuum the floor. On the balcony someone was giving a golf lesson and a doctor was diagnosing a patient in the master bedroom.  That was on top of the smart kitchen gadgets.  And it all worked.  Yes, it all worked.

I’m trying to convey shock and surprise because the reality is that nine times out of ten when I show up for some event, at a customer, or at a friends house and we try and connect things to the internet… it doesn’t work.  If you are a technical guy you know that feeling when your vacation or visit for dinner turns into an IT house call.  All I could think of was how awesome it was that everything worked and it was fast.

So I went to work printing little plastic Arizona style houses with COX on the roof. And then a reporter showed up. “3D Printing, interesting.  Hmmmm…  they are cool and all but really, what does that have to do with a smart house?”  Damn reporters and their questions.  I was still reveling in the fact that everything worked so well, I hadn’t taken to time to think about the “so what.”

Then I thought about it.  3D Printing in the home is just now starting to take off, and the reason why is actually high-speed internet connections. If you wanted a 3D Printer in your home in the past you needed the printer, a high end computer, and some good 3D modeling software on that computer.  Basically you had to create whatever you wanted to make.  Unless you are a trained engineer, that may not be so easy.

My “house” that I was printing at the invent sits on the cloud in my Thingiverse account.

But with a well connected home you have access to places like Thingiverse and Grabcad to download stuff you want to print.  And if you do want to create your own, you can go to Tinkercad or Onshape and use a free online 3D modeler to create your geometry.  All over the web, even on a pad, phone (I don’t recommend trying to do modeling on a phone, but it does work), or on a basic computer.  The files are stored in the cloud and downloaded directly to your printer.  No muss, no fuss.  All you need is a reliable and fast connection to the internet and in your home.

High speed internet and a smart 3D printer makes anyone a maker.

And when we had a three hour break, I went downstairs to a coffee shop on the ground floor of the condo and worked, while monitoring my builds using the camera in the smart 3D Printer.

Pretty cool when you step back and think about how far we have come from that first Stereolithography machine that PADT bought in 1994.  We had to use floppy disks to get the data from our high-end Unix workstation to the machine.  Now it sits on the web and can be monitored.

This may be what we have been waiting for when it comes to 3D Printers in the home moving beyond that technologists and makers.

I’ve been focused on my experience with the 3D printing in the smart home, but there was a lot more to look at.  Check out these stories to learn more:

Phoenix Business Journal: Cox shows off a smart home with 55 connected devices and fast gigabyte internet

The Arizona Republic: Cox ‘smart home’ in Phoenix displays future at the push of a button

I also did a piece for the Phoenix Business Journal while I was at the event on “3 keys to success for smart home devices” based on what I learned while playing with the other devices in the smart home.

All and all a good day.  Oh, and being a 10 minute walk from my favorite pub made the idea of living downtown not such a bad idea, which doesn’t have much to do with high speed internet, connected devices, or 3D Printing.  But one of my goals was to check out post-child urban living…

 

 

Introducing our new Newsletter: The PADT Pulse

We are very pleased to announce our new newsletter, the PADT Pulse.  For a while now customers have been asking for a monthly update on what is going on without having to go through our blog. So we are taking the best of what we did in a given month and sharing it in this newsletter.

Not only does it have a recap of important activities, it summarizes our most popular blog posts, shares some outside news of interest, and keeps you up to date on our upcoming events. We hope you enjoy it.

Here is a link to the online version.

And you can subscribe here.

PADT Welcomes John Williams to Business Development Role

Please join Phoenix Analysis and Design Technologies in welcoming our new engineering services business development manager, John Williams. John will be an integral part of our growth in helping customers turn their innovations into real products through our advanced engineering capabilities, flexible project management skills and careful vendor selection process.

“With John joining our team, we’ll be able to take our engineering services business to the next level and expand on our offerings,” said Eric Miller, co-founder and principal at PADT. “His sales and business development experience at the national and international level makes him ideal to handle our diverse client portfolio and position us as a major player in this category.”

To help PADT improve its market position in engineering services and product development, Williams will help define long-term organizational goals, build customer relationships, identify new business opportunities, and maintain extensive knowledge of market conditions.

“PADT is a diverse and innovative company that presents a number of exciting opportunities,” said Williams. “I look forward to using my experience and reach to raise awareness of the great engineering expertise the company can provide. Once companies realize how PADT can help them solve tough problems and implement their designs, the word will spread that PADT really does make innovation work.”

Williams brings more than 16 years of sales experience to the position. He joins PADT from Bell Helicopter Textron Inc. in South Asia where he was the director of business development. Prior to working at Bell Helicopter, John was Regional Sales Director for Textron Aviation for South Asia.  Prior to this, he was President of Williams Consulting Group (WCG) in Phoenix, AZ.

Before starting WCG, Williams spent 12 years with The Boeing Company where he was last responsible for implementing Boeing’s offset programs in India. He also played a key role in successfully winning several large orders for Boeing. Prior to this assignment, Williams was in International Contracts at Boeing Defense Systems where he successfully negotiated and closed several major Commercial and US FMS contracts with foreign governments.

Williams holds a Bachelor’s Degree in Economics from Northwestern College. He has numerous professional certifications including a Master’s Certificate in Global Leadership from Thunderbird, the American Graduate School of International Management; as well as certifications in various U.S. Federal Acquisition Programs.

Making Solids Water Tight in ANSYS Spaceclaim for ANSYS Workbench Meshing

Occasionally when solid geometry is imported from CAD into ANSYS SpaceClaim the geometry will come in as solids, but when a mesh is generated on the solids the mesh will appear to “leak” into the surrounding space. Below is an assembly that was imported from CAD into SpaceClaim. In the SpaceClaim Structure Window all of the parts can be seen to be solid components.

When the mesh is generated in ANSYS Mechanical it appears like the assembly has been successfully meshed.

However, when you look at the mesh a little closer, the mesh can be missing from some of the surfaces and not displayed correctly on others.

Additionally, if you create a cross-section through the mesh, the mesh on some of the parts will “leak” outside of the part boundaries and will look like the image below.

Based on the mesh color, the mesh of the part in the center of the assembly has grown outside of the surfaces of the part.
To repair the part you need to go back to SpaceClaim and rebuild it. First you need to hide the rest of the parts.

Next, create a sketch plane that passes through the problem part.

In the sketch mode create a rectangle that surrounds the part. When you return to 3D mode in SpaceClaim, that rectangle will become a surface that passes through the part.

Now use the Pull tool in SpaceClaim to turn that surface into a part that completely surrounds the part to be repaired, making sure to turn on the “No Merge” option for the pull before you begin.

After you have pulled the surface into a solid, it should like the image below where the original part is completely buried inside the new part.

Now you will use the Combine tool to divide the box with the original part. Select Combine from the Tool Bar, then select the box that you created in the previous step. The cutter will be activated and you will move the cursor around until the original part is highlighted inside the box. Select it with the left mouse button. The Combine tool will then give you the option to select the part of the box that you want to remove. Select the part that surrounds the original part. After it is finished, close the combine tool and the Structure Tree and 3D window will now look like the following:

Now move the new solid that was created with the Combine tool into the location of the original part and turn off the original one and re-activate the other parts of the assembly. The assembly and Structure Tree should now look like the pictures below.

Now save the project, re-open the meshing tool, and re-generate the mesh. The mesh should now be correct and not “leaking” beyond the part boundaries.

License Usage and Reporting with ANSYS License Manager Release 18.0

Remember the good old days of having to peruse through hundreds and thousands of lines of text in multiple files to see ANSYS license usage information?  Trying to hit Ctrl+F and search for license names.  Well those days were only about a couple months ago and they are over…well for the most part.

With the ANSYS License Manager Release 18.0, we have some pretty nifty built in license reporting tools that help to extract information from the log files so the administrator can see anything from current license usage to peak usage and even any license denials that occur.  Let’s take a look at how to do this:

First thing is to open up the License Management Center:

  • In Windows you can find this by going to Start>Programs>ANSYS Inc License Manager>ANSYS License Management Center
  • On Linux you can find this in the ansys directory /ansys_inc/shared_files/licensing/start_lmcenter

This will open up your License Manager in your default browser as shown below.   For the reporting just take a look at the Reporting Section.  We’ll cover each of these 4 options below.

License Management Center at Release 18.0

License Reporting Options

 

 

VIEW CURRENT LICENSE USAGE

As the title says, this is where you’ll go to see a breakdown of the current license usage.  What is great is that you can see all the licenses that you have on the server, how many licenses of each are being used and who is using them (through the color of the bars).  Please note that PADT has access to several ANSYS Licenses.  Your list will only include the licenses available for use on your server.

Scrolling page that shows Current License Usage and Color Coded Usernames

You can also click on Show Tabular Data to see a table view that you can then export to excel if you wanted to do your own manipulation of the data.

Tabular Data of Current License Usage – easy to export

 

 

 

VIEW LICENSE USAGE HISTORY

In this section you will be able to not only isolate the license usage to a specific time period, you can also filter by license type as well.  You can use the first drop down to define a time range, whether that is the previous 1 month, 1 year, all available or even your own custom time range

Isolate License Usage to Specific Time Period

Once you hit Generate you will be able to then isolate by license name as shown below.  I’ve outlined some examples below as well.  The axis on the left shows number of licenses used.

Filter Time History by License Name

1 month history of ANSYS Mechanical Enterprise

 1 month history of ANSYS CFD

Custom Date Range history of ANSYS SpaceClaim Direct Modeler

 

 

 

VIEW PEAK LICENSE USAGE

This section will allow you to see what the peak usage of a particular license during a particular time period and filter it based on data range.  First step is to isolate to a date range as before, for example 1 month.  Then you can select which month you want to look at data for.

Selecting specific month to look at Peak License Usage

Then you can isolate the data to whether or not you want to look at an operational period of 24/7, Monday to Friday 24/5 or even Monday to Friday 9am-5pm.  This way you can isolate license usage between every day of the week, working week or normal working hours in a week. Again, axis on left shows number of licenses.

Isolating data to 24/7, Weekdays or Weekday Working Hours

 Peak License Usage in March 2017 of ANSYS Mechanical Enterprise (24/7)

Peak License Usage in February 2017 of ANSYS CFD (Weekdays Only)

 

 

VIEW LICENSE DENIALS

If any of the users who are accessing the License Manager get license denials due to insufficient licenses or for any other reason, this will be displayed in this section.  Since PADT rarely, if ever, gets License Denials, this section is blank for us.  The procedure is identical to the above sections – it involves isolating the data to a time period and filtering the data to your interested quantities.

Isolate data with Time Period as other sections

 

 

Although these 4 options doesn’t include every conceivable filtering method, this should allow managers and administrators to filter through the license usage in many different ways without needing to manually go through all the log files.   This is a very convenient and easy set of options to extract the information.

Please let us know if you have any questions on this or anything else with ANSYS.

Kids, Race Cars, and Scanned Turtle Shells: PADT’s 2017 SciTech Festival Open House

There is something about a kid running down a hallway screaming “mom, you HAVE to see this!” #openhousegoals.

Last night was our annual event where we open up the doors of PADT with a family oriented event sharing what we engineers do.  We also invited some students from high school and University to share their engineering activities.  With over 250 attendees and more than one excited kid running down the hall, we can safely call it a success.

Attendies were able to see our 3D Printing demo room including dozens of real 3D printed parts, learn about engineering, explore how 3D Printing works, and check out our new metal 3D Printer. They were also able to learn about school projects like the ASU Formula SAE race car as well as a prosthetic hand project and research into cellular structures in nature from BASIS Chandler.

Oh, and there was Pizza.

Pictures speak louder than words, so here is a galary of images from the event.

Press Release: PADT, Avnet and Tiempo Development Introduce Design Days, Hosted by Center for Entrepreneurial Innovation

PADT-Press-Release-IconPADT and CEI have partnered with Avnet and Tiempo Development to offer a free technical advice to local startups at CEI.  Anyone needing advice on mechanical design, electrical design, or software can now sign up for an hour with an engineer from one of these fantastic local technology leaders.

CEI has been a great host for these events with just PADT for a while now, and we are pleased to announce that we have added electrical and software to what is offered, and we are officially anouncing it to the whole community. Check out the press release to learn more or visit the the CEI website: info.ceigateway.com/padt-design-days

Official copies of the press release can be found in HTML and PDF.

Press Release:

PADT, Avnet and Tiempo Development Introduce Design Days, Hosted by Center for Entrepreneurial Innovation

Design Days Brings Arizona’s Top Product Development Experts Together to Provide Free Technical Advice to Local Startup

TEMPE, Ariz., February 16, 2017 ─  In a move that gives startups and product developers the opportunity to get design and production consultations from the top product development experts in Arizona, Phoenix Analysis & Design Technologies (PADT), in partnership with Avnet, Tiempo Development and the Center for Entrepreneurial Innovation (CEI), are officially opening Design Days to the local startup community. Hosted by the Center for Entrepreneurial Innovation (CEI) at 275 N. GateWay Drive Phoenix, Arizona 85034. The next session takes place on February 21 from 1- 4 p.m.

“We’ve compiled a roster of top industry experts in product development from a wide-range of disciplines for Design Days,” said Patti Dubois, Assistant Executive Director at CEI. “Our goal is simply to lend a hand to entrepreneurs who aspire to develop great products and software. When we’re able to help an organization or individual grow and innovate, it elevates Arizona’s technology community as a whole.”

CEI lends its fantastic space as participants will gain access to engineers who will be available to offer one-on-one assistance with product development needs. These experts will provide their opinions on the feasibility of an idea, make recommendations on the product development process, provide ballpark estimates on design and development costs, identify key differentiators of a product and more. All companies and individuals needing product development support for physical and software designs are encouraged to participate.

“CEI is the leading incubator and accelerator in the Valley making them the perfect host for Design Days,” said Eric Miller, principal and co-founder at PADT. “We are proud to partner with CEI, Avnet and Tiempo in support of helping entrepreneurs develop revolutionary innovations that will continue to put Arizona on the map as a leading tech hub.”

PADT, the Southwest’s largest provider of simulation, product development, and 3D printing services and products, will provide physical product design and prototyping consultation. Avnet, a global company ranked on the FORTUNE 500, with extensive knowledge of electronic component solutions and embedded computing products, will give advice on electrical engineering. Tiempo Development, named one of the 5000 Fastest-Growing Private Companies in America, from 2011 to 2015, specializes in offshore software development in nearshore locations, and will provide software architecture consultation.

“We’re very excited to be involved with Design Days and to work alongside these wonderful partners,” said Mike Hahn, VP of engineering at Tiempo Development. “Our organization has always been dedicated to giving back to the Valley, and I can’t think of better way to support our community than by offering our staff’s expertise to budding startups and entrepreneurs.”

“CEI has helped to establish one of the premier locations for young technology hopefuls in the nation, said Eric Leahy, Emerging Business Development Manager, Avnet. “The opportunity to be part of the next generation of a tech superstar’s growth is something we are always eager to do. I’d like to give a big thanks to CEI, PADT and Tiempo for working with us in putting on such a great event.”

Visit the Design Days page at http://www.ceigateway.com/ or here to register and find out more. Participants can select the specific consultation category they are interested in when they register. This free service is offered every month and qualification requirements are listed on the Design Days page.

About Phoenix Analysis and Design Technologies

Phoenix Analysis and Design Technologies, Inc. (PADT) is an engineering product and services company that focuses on helping customers who develop physical products by providing Numerical Simulation, Product Development, and Rapid Prototyping solutions. PADT’s worldwide reputation for technical excellence and experienced staff is based on its proven record of building long term win-win partnerships with vendors and customers. Since its establishment in 1994, companies have relied on PADT because “We Make Innovation Work.” With over 80 employees, PADT services customers from its headquarters at the Arizona State University Research Park in Tempe, Arizona, and from offices in Torrance, California, Littleton, Colorado, Albuquerque, New Mexico, and Murray, Utah, as well as through staff members located around the country. More information on PADT can be found at http://www.PADTINC.com.

About CEI

The Center for Entrepreneurial Innovation is a community-based business incubator supported by and located on the GateWay Community College campus. CEI provides targeted business services and proactive business support to create a systematic link between technology development, compelling markets and opportunities; entrepreneurial and managerial talent development; early stage capital sourcing; and education and training, interns, coaching and business counseling from Maricopa Small Business Development Center (SBDC) analysts and other leading industry specialists. For more about CEI, visit www.ceigateway.com.

About Avnet, Inc.

From components to cloud and from design to disposal, Avnet, Inc. (NYSE:AVT) accelerates the success of customers who build, sell and use technology by providing a comprehensive portfolio of innovative products, services and solutions. Avnet is a global company ranked on the FORTUNE 500 with revenues of $26.2 billion for the fiscal year 2016. For more information, visit www.avnet.com.

About Tiempo Development

Tiempo offers a unique and very successful combination of a Nearshore business model, Agile Methodology, deep expertise, and advanced talent management. Building the powerful software that fits client vision and strategy, no matter whether that client relies on it to run the business or whether it is a product provided to customers. Tiempo helps companies accomplish software releases with great velocity and most cost-effectively. To learn more, visit visit www.tiempodev.com or contact Tiempo Development.

# # #

Media Contact
Alec Robertson
TechTHiNQ on behalf of PADT
585-281-6399
alec.robertson@techthinq.com
PADT Contact
Eric Miller
PADT, Inc.
Principal & Co-Owner
480.813.4884
eric.miller@padtinc.com

 

Open House: Scientifically fun for the whole family at PADT

Scientifically fun for
the whole family

March 2nd 2017, 5:00 PM – 8:00 PM MST

Once again, PADT Inc. is proud to partner with AZ SCITECH to promote and celebrate Arizona’s STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, and Math) programs!

As part of this event, we will be hosting an open house that will give you an inside look at what our engineers do all day, as well as a first hand display of the capabilities of innovative technology such as 3D Printing and Simulation.
Come see how we make innovation work!
PADT Inc. | 7755 S Research Dr | Tempe | AZ | 85284
This event will be divided up into three main areas:

Come and see what additive manufacturing is capable of. Learn how 3D Printing and Scanning can bring an idea to life, from concept to a functional part!

PADT prides ourselves in being on the cutting edge of innovation. Visit the metal room to see the future of 3D Printing in action as PADT’s senior additive manufacturing technologist Dhruv Bhate shows off the capabilities of the state of the art Metal 3D Printer.
 Walk from booth to booth and check out a plethora of fun and exciting projects that our engineers here at PADT have been working on, each showing the unique ways that PADT makes innovation work!