Phoenix Business Journal: What does living in a post-fact world imply for business?

Just-Published-PBJ-1One of the many realizations to come from this election cycle is that telling the truth really doesn’t matter anymore, we live in a post-fact world where you can say or post anything and ignore proof that it is wrong.  In this week’s post, I ask: “What does living in a post-fact world imply for business?

ANSYS 17.2 Executable Paths on Linux


ansys-linux-penguin-1When running on a machine with a Linux operating system, it is not uncommon for users to want to run from the command line or with a shell script. To do this you need to know where the actual executable files are located. Based on a request from a customer, we have tried to coalesce the major ANSYS product executables that can be run via command line on Linux into a single list:

ANSYS Workbench (Includes ANSYS Mechanical, Fluent, CFX, Polyflow, Icepak, Autodyn, Composite PrepPost, DesignXplorer, DesignModeler, etc.):

/ansys_inc/v172/Framework/bin/Linux64/runwb2

ANSYS Mechanical APDL, a.k.a. ANSYS ‘classic’:

/ansys_inc/v172/ansys/bin/launcher172 (brings up the MAPDL launcher menu)
/ansys_inc/v172/ansys/bin/mapdl (launches ANSYS MAPDL)

CFX Standalone:

/ansys_inc/v172/CFX/bin/cfx5

Autodyn Standalone:

/ansys_inc/v172/autodyn/bin/autodyn172

Note: A required argument for Autodyn is –I {ident-name}

Fluent Standalone (Fluent Launcher):

/ansys_inc/v172/fluent/bin/fluent

Icepak Standalone:

/ansys_inc/v172/Icepak/bin/icepak

Polyflow Standalone:

/ansys_inc/v172/polyflow/bin/polyflow/polyflow < my.dat

Chemkin:

/ansys_inc/v172/reaction/chemkinpro.linuxx8664/bin/chemkinpro_setup.ksh

Forte:

/ansys_inc/v172/reaction/forte.linuxx8664/bin/forte.sh

TGRID:

/ansys_inc/v172/tgrid/bin/tgrid

ANSYS Electronics Desktop (for Ansoft tools, e.g. Maxwell, HFSS)

/ansys_inc/v172/AnsysEM/AnsysEM17.2/Linux64/ansysedt

SIWave:

/ansys_inc/v172/AnsysEM/AnsysEM17.2/Linux64/siwave

The Chemistry Behind Soluble Support Removal in Fused Deposition Modeling

fdm-support-chemestry-1In the Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM) process, support structures are needed for features with overhang incline angle less than 45-degree from horizontal. Stratasys developed a series of support materials for different model materials: SR-30TM for ABS, SR-100TM for polycarbonate and SR-110TM for nylon. Also, they developed the Waterworks Soluble Concentrate, P400-SC, to be used to dissolve these support materials. In this blog post, I develop a theory for the chemical reaction how P400-SC Waterworks dissolves SR-30TM, SR-100TM and SR-110TM support materials. As part of this, I explain how PADT’s Support Cleaning Apparatus (SCA) tank, with its heating and unique circulation and agitation capabilities that are important for the support dissolving process.

Materials Introduction

We begin by looking at the composition of the different materials involved in the table below.

stratasys-support-removal-chemestry-table-01Adapted from Stratasys.com

How P400-SC Works for Support Materials Removal

Polymer can swell and then dissolve into water as a consequence of abundant hydrophilic groups, like carboxyl group (-COOH), ether group (-O-), hydroxyl group (-OH) and so on in its molecular structure. Theoretically, SR-30TM and SR-100TM /SR-110TM Soluble Support Materials including a carboxyl group (-COOH) in their repeat unit are likely to be water soluble. However, they also have a hydrophobic ester group (-COO-) in their repeat unit, which counteracts the efficacy of the hydrophilic group on the long carbon chain. Thus, the key to making SR-30TM and SR-100TM /SR-110TM soluble, is to somehow get rid of the ester group.

A great example of supports on an FDM part. The part on the right has had the supports dissolved away
A great example of supports on an FDM part. The white material on the part to the left is the soluble support material. The part on the right has had the supports dissolved away

Hydrolysis of ester in pure water is a slow process even the system is heated. Both acid and alkaline conditions can catalyze and speed up the process. Under the acid condition, the hydrolysis is a reversible process until it reaches an equilibrium state, whereas alkaline conditions promote a thorough hydrolysis with a stirring and heating system.

P400-SC Waterworks contains sodium carbonate, sodium hydroxide, sodium lauryl sulfate and sodium metasilicate. The last two constituents, with 1-5 wt% respectively, are auxiliaries in the P400-SC Waterworks. The remaining two react with carboxylic acid and ester group per the following chemical reaction:

  1. R-COOH + NaOH =  R-COONa+ + H2O (neutralization reaction)
  2. 2 R-COOH + Na2CO3 =  2 R-COONa+ + H2O + CO2
  3. R1–COO-R2 + NaOH ≜ R1-COONa+ + R2OH (ester hydrolysis under alkaline condition)

where R is the remaining carbon chain apart from carboxyl group and R1, R2 represent the two-side segments of ester group. Ester hydrolysis is the main reaction we need, which ionizes the ester group and makes it water soluble with an increased polarity. These reactions would happen when SR-30TM or SR-100TM /SR-110TM supports are dropped into a tank with P400-SC Waterworks cleaning solution inside.

From the table above, we can see that ABS-M30TM and PC-10TM don’t have hydrophilic groups, which restrains their solubility into water. Nylon is semi-crystalline polymer and difficult to dissolve into water and most organic solvent, despite the presence of the hydrophilic group acylamino (-CONH-), which still results in a nice water-absorbing ability. All these model materials are common-use engineering plastic with nice chemical resistance (depending on their functional groups), they can be safe in the cleaning solution.

SCA1200HT-side1PADT’s Support Cleaning Apparatus (SCA)

The SCA tank offers an optimized environment with agitation and heating for the ester hydrolysis reaction. The tank has four preset temperature options (50 ℃, 60℃, 70℃, 85℃) for ABS-M30TM, PC-10TM, and FDMTM Nylon 12 model materials, due to their different thermal resistance. The innovative custom designed pump is key to cause the solution to effectively and efficiently dissolve and remove the support materials.

For more information on PADT’s entire line of SCA, please see http://www.supportremoval.com/

The first webinar of the ANSYS Breakthrough Energy Innovation Campaign is now available

download-6

Register here to watch

Simulation of Planar Magnetic Components – Possible or Impossible?

Planar magnetic components consisting of a ferrite magnetic core and numerous conductor/insulation layers have been in use for many years. Historically, determining temperature dependent winding and core losses has only been possible using iterative testing of physical models due to the difficulty in determining 3-D frequency and thermal dependency. The only way to accomplish this now is to use frequency and thermally dependent material properties in a 2-way spatially coupled simulation.

Additionally, you can only construct a frequency dependent system model that accurately represents the real device after the steady-state temperature condition has been reached throughout the device.

Recent breakthrough developments in simulation technology and high-performance computing from ANSYS make it possible to design, simulate and optimize planar magnetic components without building physical models or compromising simulation fidelity.

This webinar demonstrates how you can use ANSYS software tools, featuring a customized interface complete with manufacturer libraries, to automatically set up and then solve a frequency dependent, 2-way coupled magnetic-thermal model.

Register here to watch

This webinar is presented by Mark Christini, the lead ElectromagneticsMark Christini Application Engineer at ANSYS.

He has been working in design, development, application and manufacturing of electrical devices and systems for the past 30 years. Mark has a strong interest in transformers of all kinds ranging, from small electronic transformers to large oil-filled EHV power transformers.

Keep checking back to the Energy Innovation Homepage for more updates on upcoming segments, webinars, and other additional content.

Phoenix Business Journal: It’s time to stop putting innovation on a pedestal, and praise getting stuff done

Just-Published-PBJ-1Innovation has become almost a magic word, and in the startup world innovators are given demi-god status. We like to think that there are people out there who just come up with ideas that change the world. Reality is that we kind of overkill the whole thing and “It’s time to stop putting innovation on a pedestal, and praise getting stuff done.”  Channeling a little Andy Rooney on this one.

Phoenix Business Journal: Pitching a startup well: What I learned while competing for the Unicorn Cup

Just-Published-PBJ-1We had a lot of fun while learning a lot during the first ever Perfect Pitch competition at PADT.  This is an event where startup mentors get up and pitch the same fictitious company. During that process, we learned a few things that are useful for anyone trying to fundraise for a startup or those who mentor companies.  “Pitching a startup well: What I learned while competing for the Unicorn Cup” highlights those lessons.

Thoughts on Biofabrication (and a Visit to WFIRM)

The Wake Forest Institute of Regenerative Medicine (WFIRM) hosted about 400 attendees at the annual Biofabrication conference, held this year at Winston-Salem, NC (Oct 28-Nov 1, 2016). The conference included a 2 hour tour of WFIRM’s incredible facilities, 145 posters, 200 or so presentations and a small trade show with about 30 exhibitors. As a mechanical engineer attending my first bio-related conference, I struggled to fully comprehend many concepts and terms in some of the deeper technical presentations. Nonetheless, there was a lot I DID learn, and this post serves to summarize my thoughts on the four high-level insights I gleaned amidst the pile of information on offer. I hope these are of value to the larger community that is not on the front lines of this exciting and impactful area of research.

More than Organs

To say biofabrication is all about making organs is like saying manufacturing is all about making spacecrafts carrying humans to Mars. It misses a lot of the other valid human needs that can be met and suggests organs are the end of the biofabrication R&D curve, when they only represent one manifestation (arguably the most difficult one in our current sense of the world) of the application of the science. If we take a step back, biofabrication is fundamentally about “manufacturing with living materials” – in that sense, biofabrication blurs the lines between natural and man-made entities. If you could manipulate and engineer living cells in physical constructs, what all could you do? Here is a list of some examples of the different applications that were discussed at the conference:

  • Toxicology Studies – Organovo’s examples of skin, liver and kidney tissue being used to evaluate drug efficacy
  • Body-on-a-Chip – A solution to aid in pre-clinical work to study whole systems (a key regulatory hurdle) and potentially displace animal studies in the future
  • Tissues for Therapy – This could involve patches, stents and other such fixes of a therapeutic nature (as opposed to replacing the entire organ in question)
  • Non-Medical ApplicationsModern Meadow is a company that is using biofabrication techniques to make leather and thereby help reduce our dependency on animal agriculture. Biofabricated meat is another potential application.
  • Functional Tissues and Organs – An interesting thought presented by Prof. Rashid Bashir is that replacing organs with matched constructs may not be optimal – we may be able to develop biological entities that get the job done without necessarily replicating every aspect of the organ being replaced. A similar thought is to to use biological materials to do engineering tasks. The challenge with this approach is living cells need to be kept alive – this is easier done when the fabricated entity is part of a living system, but harder to do when it is independent of one.
  • Full Organ Replacement – Replicating an organ in all its detail: structurally and functionally – WFIRM has done this for a few organs that they consider Level 1-3 in terms of complexity (see Figure 1). Level 4 organs (like the heart) are at the moment exceedingly challenging due to their needs for high vascularity and large size.
Fig 1. Levels of complexity in organs, adapted from Dr. Anthony Atala’s talk at the conference. Image Attributions: Cancer Research UK (Wikimedia Commons), NA, Mikael Häggström (Wikimedia Commons), OpenStax College (Wikimedia Commons)

It Takes a Village (and a Vivarium)

Imagine this is the early 2000s and you are tasked with establishing a center dedicated to accelerating the progress of regenerative medicine. What are the parts this center needs to house? This was probably what Dr. Anthony Atala and others were working out prior to establishing WFIRM in 2004. To give you a sense of what goes on in WFIRM today, here is a (partial) list of the different rooms/groups we visited on our tour: decellularization, imaging, tissue maturation, bioprinting, electrospinning, lab-on-a-chip, direct writing, vivarium that cares for animals (mice, ferrets, sheep, pigs, dogs – beagles to be specific, and “non-human primates”) and a cleanroom for pre-clinical studies. Add administrative, outreach and regulatory staff. Today, about 450 people work at WFIRM and many more collaborate. Going into this conference, I was well aware this field was an inter-disciplinary one. The tour opened my eyes to just how many interdependent parts there are that make an end-to-end solution possible, some more interdisciplinary in nature than others and just how advantageous it must be to have all these capabilities under one roof dedicated to a larger mission instead of spread across a large university campus, serving many masters.

“I Have a Hammer, Where is the Nail?”

I will be honest – I justified my interest in biofabrication on the very dubious basis of my experience with 3D printing, a long standing interest in the life sciences that I had hitherto suppressed, and the fact that I am married to a cancer researching biochemist – bioprinting was my justification for finally getting my feet (close to a) wet (lab). I suspect I am not alone in this (support group, anyone?). When I described this to the only surgeon who entertains my questions, he accurately summarized my approach in the afore mentioned hammer-nail analogy. So, armed with my hammer, I headed to the biofabrication conference seeking nails. The good news is I found a couple. As in exactly two. The bad news? See the section above – this stuff is hard and multi-faceted – and there are folks with a multi-decade head start. So for those of us not on the front lines of this work or not in college planning our next move, the question becomes how best can we serve the scientists and engineers that are already in this field. Better tools are one option, and the trade show had examples of these: companies that make bioprinters (see Figure 2 below), improved nozzles for bioprinting, clean-room alternatives, biomaterials like hydrogels, and characterization and testing equipment. But solving problems that will help the biofabrication community is another approach and there were about 5-10 posters and
presentations (mine included) which attempted to do just that. What are some of the areas that could benefit from such peripheral R&D engagement? My somewhat biased feeling is that there is opportunity for bringing some of the same challenges Additive Manufacturing is going through to this area as well:

  • Design for Bioprinting: fully exploiting the possibilities of bioprinting – “in Silico” has made some progress with medical devices – a similar window of value exists for biofabrication due to the design freedom of 3D printing
  • Modeling: Biofabrication almost always involves multi-materials, often with varying constitutive behaviors and further are in complex, time-varying environments – getting some handle on this is a precursor to item 1 above
  • Challenges of Scale: This has many elements: quality control, cost, automation, data security, bio-safety. This is one of the key drivers behind the recent DOD call for an Advanced Tissue Biofabrication Manufacturing Innovation Institute and is likely to drive several projects in this space over the next 5-7 years.

Moral of the story for me: carry your hammer with pride but take the time to learn, ask and probe to find the pain points that are either already there or are likely to arise in the future, and keep refining your hammer with input from the biofabrication community – conferences are the best place to do this – IF you go in with that intent and prepare ahead of time identifying the people you want to talk to and the questions you wish to ask them – something I hope to be better at next time around.

bioprinters
Fig 2. A few of the Bioprinters on display at the Biofabrication 2016 conference: Rokit, CellInk and RegenHU represented here (the others were: Advanced Solutions, Biobots and EnvisionTEC)

The Rate-of-Progress Paradox

Finally, a more abstract point. From the sidelines, we may ask how far has the field of biofabrication come and how fast is it progressing? It is one thing to sift through media hype and reconcile it with ground realities. It is quite another to discover this conflict seemingly exists even in the trenches – there are several examples of transplanted biofabricated entities, yet there is a common refrain that we have a long way to go to doing just so. And that struck me initially as a paradox as I heard the plenary talks that were alternatingly cautious and wild – but on the very last day I started to appreciate why this was not a paradox at all, it is just the nature of the science itself. Unlike a lot of engineering paradigms, there are limits to efficiencies that can be gained in the life sciences – and once these are gained (shared resources, improved methods etc.), success in one particular tissue or organ may not make the next one progress much faster. Take Wake Forest’s own commonly used approach for regenerative medicine, for example: harvest cells, culture them, build scaffold constructs, mature cells on these constructs, implant and monitor. Sounds simple, but takes 5-10 years to get to clinical implantation and another 5-10 of observation before the results are published. And just because you have shown this in one area, bladder for example, doesn’t make the next one much faster at all. All the same steps have to be followed: pathways to be re-evaluated, developmental studies to be done – prior to extensive animal and clinical trials. The solution? Pursue multiple tissues/organs in parallel, follow each step diligently and be patient. Wake Forest seems to have envisioned this over a decade ago and I expect the coming decade will show a cascade of biofabrication successes hit us with increasingly boring steadiness.

Concluding Thoughts

Finally, we should all be thankful to the many PhD students and post-docs from all over the world putting in the bulk of the disciplined, hard work this field demands, most of them, in my opinion, at salaries not reflective of their extensive education and societal value. We should also spare a thought for all the animals being sacrificed for this and other research, even in the context of best veterinary practices – my personal hope is that biofabrication enables us to stop all animal trials at some point in the near future – indeed, this seems to be the only technology that can. Then we can truly say with confidence, that we have first and foremost, done no harm.

Thank you WFIRM, for a wonderful conference and all the work you do everyday!

ANSYS Startup Roadshow Kickoff – CEI Phoenix

Click Here to Register

Click Here to Register

Can’t make it? Keep an eye out as we will be hosting events in other locations as the roadshow continues on!

In the meantime, click here for more information on the ANSYS Startup Program.

PADT Events – November 2016

PADT-Events-LogoWelcome to November, when things start getting really busy with end of year events.  We have a lot going on with celebrations and seminars.  Take a look and we hope to see you this month!


Print

November 6-10: Las Vegas, NV
ANS Winter Meeting & Expo

PADT’s Flownex team will be at the winter meeting with a both and presentations to talk about how to use the Flownex Simulation Environment to model nuclear reactors and related systems.  Always a good show, it is a chance to learn about the power Flownex for thermal fluid simulation. See you at Caesar’s Palace

The full agenda and all the details for this event are here.


AZTC-logo

November 10: Phoenix, AZ
Governor’s Celebration of Innovation Awards

One of our favorite events every year where everyone who is involved in technology in the state of Arizona comes together to celebrate what has been achieved and to catch up on what happened during the year. We will be there at 4:00 in our booth and would love for people to stop by and say hello.  Awards start at 5:30, and PADT was on the selection committee and helped make the awards again this year.

This really is a must attend event, at the Phoenix Convention Center, for anyone involved in tech in the state, large company, small company, or academic.

Get the details and register here.


asme-imece-logo

November 11-17: Phoenix, AZ
ASME International Mechanical Engineering Congress & Exposition

We are very fortunate to have this year’s congress here in Phoenix at the Convention Center!  We hope to see many of the people we know from around the world.  Please do stop by our booth (November 13-16) and say hello.  Dr. Bhate is also giving some presentations on 3D Printing and simulation and we will be hanging about with our ANSYS and Stratasys partners as well.

Get the details and register here.


ansys-startup-program-logo

November 18: Phoenix, AZ
ANSYS Startup Roadshow Kickoff

We are kicking our ANSYS Startup Roadshow off at CEI in Phoenix to introduce the ANSYS Startup Program to, you guessed it, startups. This fantastic offering from ANSYS, Inc. allows early stage customers access to the high-end tools they need to get their products to market faster, with better performance, and reliability.  We will also be presenting on how to use simulation to make your startup a success.

If you are a startup and you are making things, this is a must attend.

Register here and watch this blog and your email for events in other locations as we take this on the road to New Mexico, Colorado, Utah, and Southern California.

250+ Gather to Celebrate Arizona Engineering and Manufacturing at Nerdtoberfest

nerdtoberfest-logo-nt-1-800w

Customers, friends, partners, and students braved 100 degree temperatures and some unusual traffic to gather at PADT’s Tempe office to celebrate engineering and manufacturing in Arizona at Nerdtoberfest.  Machinists, startup experts, engineers, and professors mingled under the stars and took a tour of the facilities while enjoying pizza and beer.

The day started with a seminar on Metal 3D Printing given by Dr. Dhruv Bhate.  If you missed it, you can watch his talk here:

We followed that with the first ever PADT Perfect Pitch competition, where four teams pitched the same fictitious company as an exercise in seeing if those who teach, can do.  That was such a big part of the day that it has it’s own blog post including a link to a video of all of the pitches.

And after the the laughing and congratulations to the winner of the Unicorn Cup, we started the open house.  A chance to tour PADT and network with other members of the Arizona Tech Community.

If you have ever read a post before about one of our open houses you know we have a consistent problem. Once the party starts we stop taking pictures. The only one I got was of Dhruv showing off our new Laser Concepts Metal 3D Printer.

img_2197

That room was definitely the star of the show and we calculated that Dhruv was talking from 3:00 to 8:30 – five and a half hours non-stop.  He earned his pizza and beer.

The table from Basis Chandler was also popular, where they talked about their 3D Printed prosthetic hand project.  We also had representatives from the SciTech Festival and RevAZ talking to visitors.  The 3D Printing demo room was great and many people stopped to hear about how we are combining 3D Printing and ANSYS Simulation.

We always enjoy these events, they give us a chance to socialize with people we see all the time in work situations.  It is also a great opportunity for us to introduce people that would probably otherwise not meet, and grow the strength of the Arizona engineering and manufacturing ecosystem.

First Perfect Pitch Startup Presentation Competition a Success – CEI Takes Home the Unicorn Cup

perfect-pitch-16-all-2The verdict is in, if the company barq! actually existed they would have raised a lot of seed money yesterday.  Members of the Phoenix area startup community gathered at PADT to try out a new idea: what if the experts who mentor and coach startups tried their hands at pitching a company?  The result was fun, funny, and educational.

title-slides-perfect-pitch-2017Local incubators/accelerators CEI, Seed Spot, and Tallwave joined PADT in pitching a totally made up company, barqk! to a group of judges who are startup experts.  We talked about poop, doggy depression, bessel functions, big data, valuations, and the cat revolt. In the end we ended up with four fantastic examples of how to pitch a company and how to answer questions from investors.  One of the best parts was that every single team finished their pitch in the 10 minutes they were given, and they covered everything that needed to be covered. Yes, it can be done!

And the winner is… The Center for Entrepreneurial Innovation (CEI).  Tom Schumann and Patti DuBois told a story, explained the product, and got across the value to the investors of the product

.  perfect-pitch-16-winners-text

You can watch the recording of the presentations in the video below.  Take some time to watch the pitches and get a feel for barqk!, and how different organizations approach telling the story and more importantly, attracting investors.  The audience noticed that each team had a unique take that represented their strengths.

Our judges were Jim Goulka from Arizona Technology Investors, Christie Kerner from ASU, Carine Dieude of Altima Business Solutions, and Linda Capcara with TechTHiNQ, and they did a fantastic job, especially with keeping a straight face when the contestants responded with some very inventive responses. Their contribution was important.

If you are interested in doing a similar event, here is some background information:

barqk-logo-200-1Rules:

  • Each team gets a copy of the angel group funding application and a logo.
  • Each team gets 10 minutes to pitch
  • The judges have up to 5 minutes to ask questions
  • The other presenters can listen in
  • PowerPoint slides are allowed
  • Some variation from the company application is allowed for humor or to fill gaps, but everyone should stick to the same basic material

Here is their angel funding application, everything you need to know about them is in there: barqk-angel-application-1.pdf

We look forward to doing this again, hopefully as part of a larger startup event. Thank you to all who participated by pitching, judging, or being in the audience.

photo-oct-27-4-24-33-pm
Who will win the Unicorn Cup next?

Phoenix Business Journal: Manufacturing Month in Arizona – Looking Strong

Just-Published-PBJ-1October is not just the long awaited end of high temperatures in Arizona, it is also Manufacturing Month. As we start to have lunch outside again, it is a good time for those of us involved in making stuff to reflect on our recent successes and on what we can do to make things even better. Find some interesting statistics and suggestions on next steps in “Manufacturing Month in Arizona – Looking Strong

Phoenix Business Journal: ​The Cloud, the other enabler for what is next

Just-Published-PBJ-1The Cloud, everyone talks about it but have you really taken the time to see where it fits in to physical product development, especially when dealing with the Internet of Things.  I take a look from PADT’s perspective in: “The Cloud, the other enabler for what is next

Press Release: PADT Co-founder and Principal, Eric Miller, Elected to Arizona Technology Council Board of Directors

PADT-Press-Release-IconWe are pleased to announce that PADT’s contribution to the technology community was recognized with the election of one of the owners to the Arizona Technology Council Board of Directors.  Please read the press release below to learn more.

This honor will allow us to increase our involvement with the Arizona Technology Council and help where we can to add even more value to this great orginization.  If you have any questions about the AZTC or how you can get more involved in the state’s dynamic technology community, contact us or come to our open house this Thursday (10/27/2016), Nerdtoberfest.

Official copies of the press release can be found in HTML and PDF.

Press Release:

PADT Co-founder and Principal, Eric Miller, Elected to Arizona Technology Council Board of Directors

PADT Brings Innovative Ideas and Experience to Help the Council Fulfill Its Goals of Advancing Arizona’s Technology Sector

TEMPE, Ariz., October 26, 2016 – Phoenix Analysis and Design Technologies (PADT), the Southwest’s largest provider of numerical simulation, product development and 3D Printing services and products, today announced its Co-founder and Principal, Eric Miller, has been elected to serve on the Arizona Technology Council’s Board of Directors for a three-year term.

eric-twitterMiller brings more than 30 years of technology industry experience to the Council’s existing world-class board, represented by 39 Arizona companies. He will serve in an advisory and fiduciary role by representing the interests of the state’s technology industries in the Council’s strategic planning and on-going operations.

“As engineers, we are all about things being value-added, and the Council has proved to be one of the most value-added organizations that we have worked with in the state,” said Miller. “We look forward to contributing to their outstanding efforts in STEM education, pro-technology legislation, building networks in the community, and serving as the focal point for this growing and critical business sector.”

PADT is actively involved in Arizona’s technology community and is represented on the steering committee of Arizona Technology Investors. The company also serves on numerous boards including BioAccel’s Council of Advisors and the President’s STEM Advisory Board of Grand Canyon University.

“PADT is a leader in Arizona’s technology sector and has demonstrated a track record of serving and advocating for our technology community,” said Steven G. Zylstra, president and CEO of the Arizona Technology Council. “The key lessons they’ve learned and knowledge of what it takes to grow a successful business will be valuable in helping the Council achieve its goals.”

About Phoenix Analysis and Design Technologies
Phoenix Analysis and Design Technologies, Inc. (PADT) is an engineering product and services company that focuses on helping customers who develop physical products by providing Numerical Simulation, Product Development, and Rapid Prototyping solutions. PADT’s worldwide reputation for technical excellence and experienced staff is based on its proven record of building long term win-win partnerships with vendors and customers. Since its establishment in 1994, companies have relied on PADT because “We Make Innovation Work.” With over 80 employees, PADT services customers from its headquarters at the Arizona State University Research Park in Tempe, Arizona, and from offices in Torrance, California, Littleton, Colorado, Albuquerque, New Mexico, and Murray, Utah, as well as through staff members located around the country. More information on PADT can be found at http://www.PADTINC.com.

About the Arizona Technology Council
The Arizona Technology Council is Arizona’s premier trade association for science and technology companies. Recognized as having a diverse professional business community, Council members work towards furthering the advancement of technology in Arizona through leadership, education, legislation and social action. The Arizona Technology Council offers numerous events, educational forums and business conferences that bring together leaders, managers, employees and visionaries to make an impact on the technology industry. These interactions contribute to the Council’s culture of growing member businesses and transforming technology in Arizona. To become a member or to learn more about the Arizona Technology Council, please visit http://www.aztechcouncil.org.

Media Contact
Alec Robertson
TechTHiNQ on behalf of PADT
585-281-6399
alec.robertson@techthinq.com
PADT Contact
Eric Miller
PADT, Inc.
Principal & Co-Owner
480.813.4884
eric.miller@padtinc.com

 

AZ Big Media: How 3D Printing is Changing Manufacturing

azbusinessleaders-1Rey Chu, one of PADT’s owners and our head of Manufacturing Technologies, is featured in the 2017 issue of AZ Business Leaders with his article “How 3D Printing is Changing Manufacturing” It is a great overview of 3D printing and how it is impacting the way we make things.

3dprinting-sotry-azleaders