PADT Part of “Made in Tempe” Exhibit at Tempe History Museum

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When you are a small company, there are a lot of things you expect to happen. Being in a history museum is not one of them.  This past November 8th  PADT was featured in the latest exhibition at the Tempe History Museum: Made in Tempe.

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It is a strange thing to stroll through a museum, chatting with a docent, and turn the corner and see something you worked on sitting inside a display case. Then, looking up seeing a display describing who PADT is and what we do was a bit emotional.  But the best part was when a visitor comes up and start reading next to you, and then asks out loud “what is that white thing in the middle, are those gears, was that made on a 3D Printer?” And with a bit of a lump in your throat, replying “Why yes, yes it was.” That very moment was capture by someone from the museum in this image:

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As the museum points out on their website:

“Most people think of Tempe as the home of Arizona State University, Tempe Town Lake and Mill Avenue, but Tempe is also the location for hundreds of manufacturing companies, ranging from hot sauce to heart defibrillators and the Tempe History Museum wants to honor their role in the progress of this city.”

And don’t forget Four Peaks Brewing… definitely some great company to keep.

The attendance was very strong, with many people involved in the Museum, the City of Tempe, and technology spending their Friday night mingling and learning about all of the companies.

Here we see Josh mingling with the other guests:

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The highlight of the evening was to cut the ribbon and officially open the “Made in Tempe” Exhibition, standing with fellow Tempe business owners and executives:

Museum1We are very pleased to be based here in Tempe, Arizona.  It is a great home for companies of all types, but especially technology companies who want a city government that actually gets high-tech, gets the need to have good infrastructure and strong schools, supports a world class university, and makes the type of investments that result in a great environment for long term growth.

PADT is proud to now be part of the city’s official history and especially proud to be “Made in Tempe.”

 

Making Charts and Tables in ANSYS Mechanical

imageOne of the nicer features in ANSYS Mechanical is the fact that when you enter in any type of tabular data, or look at any type of tabular results, you can view it as a table or as a graph.  But what if you want to make your own graph, maybe even viewing values from two different solutions?  ANSYS Mechanical has a little used feature called “New Chart and Table” that will allow you to make a table or a graph (chart) of quantities in your model tree that make sense when displayed as a graph or table: Time, loads applied over time, and results over time.

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I have found myself exporting data to excel and making graphs all the time. And this is OK if you just do it once. But if you make a change to the model, you need to export again and redo your graph.  The Chart and Table function makes this an automatic step, right there in your model tree.

For this posting, we will just use a simple plasticity bending example. We hold the bottom of a round bar with a grove cut in the bottom part and push on the top with forces.

In its simplest form the “Chart and Table” duplicates what you see in the graph and Tabular Data windows when you click on a load or a result. Here is what you get when you click on a displacement:

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And if you select the probe in the tree and click on the “New Chart and Table” icon you get:

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No woop.  But even if I want to just plot one value, I can now customize the look of the graph a bit.  Take a look at the Details for the Chart:

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With the Chart Controls you can define what is shown on the X axis; if you want lines, points or both with Plot Style, log or linear scale, and if you want horizontal, vertical, neither, or both gridlines.

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This is what it looks like if I turn on both gridlines and use a log scale for the Y Axis.

Next, we can add axis labels with “Axis Labels:”

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The “Report” Section tells the program what to do when a report is generated. By Default you get a table and a graph.  But you can do either, both, or you can suppress it in the report.  You can give the plot and/or table in the report a caption by filling in the Caption field.  It comes out nice:

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Note that it actually includes a legend in the report. If you want the legend when you are looking at a graph interacively, just Right Mouse Button on the graph and choose “Show Legend” to turn it on:

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Note that the legend shows the name of the branch in the tree. That is not very informative. So I change it to something useful and now the legend is useful:

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So even with a basic graph, we can do a lot. But the real power is when you want to look at more. Let’s say I want to plot the force and the stress over time. I create a new chart with the icon then select the force and the stress results as my “Outline Selection”

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I get a lot of stuff on my graph. That is because the program starts by plotting all the components for the load, and all max and min stress over time for the result. I simply change the ones I don’t want from “Display” to “Omit.”  Then I get:

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Much more useful.  Note that it does not create two separate Y axis. Instead it normalizes the values between the min and max for each. This is not ideal, and hopefully in the future they will support multiple axis, but it still works for most cases when you want to compare things. Note that I renamed the branches in my tree so they show up in the legend correctly.  Next I will add some labels and turn on gridlines.

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We have been neglecting the table. It also gets created:

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As with any table in ANSYS Mechanical, it can be exported to Excel. So if you find yourself grabbing data from multiple input or result tables and pasted them into Excel, make a Chart and Table item to grab all the data you want in one place, then export it once.  To be honest, the quality of the graphs that are made are good enough for engineering, but maybe not good enough for a presentation. By making a Chart & Table of what you need, then exporting to Excel or some other graphing tool, you can still save a lot of time.

Next, let us look at plotting values from multiple simulations.  If you look at the tree, you will notice that the charts are a child of the model, not the simulations.  This signals that we can show data form the same model, but different simulations:

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In our example I’ve simply made one with a tip force in the Y direction, and one with a tip force in the X direction. And I can show that by making a chart:

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And I get a table:

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HINT: If you want to make a single table or chart that shows all your input loads over time, in a single simulation or across multiple simulations, this is the way to do it.  If I add a third simulation where I vary the load in all three directions, I can capture all three cases in one table:

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These examples show loads. Here is what it looks like if we review the deflection on the tip probe over time for two simulations:

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Or mash it all up, and show stress and deflection for both cases:

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In every case so far we have used time (Load Step for static) as our X axis. But you can put any value you want on the X axis.  Here is Force applied vs Tip Deflection:

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Make sure you turn off Time and loads you don’t want to see.  This is a great way to plot hysteresis effects.

You may notice the plots in this posting are nice and big and have a good aspect ratio. And your screen looks like this:

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Every window in ANSYS Mechanical can be dragged out of the frame and positioned/sized however you want. So I pull off the Graph window by itself and resize it to the aspect ratio I want. Now when I want to save the image all I have to do is select that window and hit Alt-Print Screen. The image is now stored in the clipboard and I can past it where I want.

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To get the normal window configuration back, click View>Windows>Reset Layout.

As always, play with it to figure more out. I’ve included my simple test case in case you want to play with it first:

Three Open Jobs at PADT – CFD Engineer, BusOps, QA Engineer

PADT-Company-2013-04-30-4As all aspects of our business continue to thrive, we find ourselves in need of three new employees to join the PADT team in our Tempe, Arizona headquarters.  Two are brand new postings and the third is a position we have been looking to fill for some time. Please feel free to forward this information on to anyone you think might be interested in helping us “… Make Innovation Work.”

Part Time Medical Device Quality Engineer: Part-time and/or contract Quality Engineer to support our  quality management system (QMS) in our Medical Device Group.

Product Support Business Operations Administrator: This position manages the business logistics required for PADT’s 3D Printer customer support and service team.

Experienced CFD Analysis Engineer: Engineer with 8-25 years of experience in the area of CFD simulation to join our Simulation Services team providing analysis services, technical support, training, and mentoring to our customers around the world. Must be a US Citizen or Legal Resident and have turbomachinery experience.

 

PADT Shows Golf “Participation” at Annual Phoenix Society of Manufacturing Engineers Tournament

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PADT has a great reputation for a lot of things: ANSYS expertise, the people solve those tough engineering problems in product development, outstanding knowledge and quality in rapid prototyping, the knowledge and enthusiasm of our employees. Notice that golf is not listed in there. It is still not listed.

This last Saturday was the annual Phoenix Chapter 067 Society of Manufacturing Engineers Golf Tournament. This well attended event is held to raise money towards scholarships for Manufacturing Engineering students at Arizona State University.  A great cause and the turnout was awesome with eighteen foursomes hitting the fairways at the Arizona Grand Resort. The picture above shows John, Brad, and Eric posing at the hole that PADT sponsored.  Our fourth player prefers to remain anonymous.

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John-GolfPADT hired the bulk of our manufacturing team from the ASU program and we support their efforts to educate future leaders in manufacturing technology. In fact, the picture to the right is of John taking a swing – he is a graduate of this program. Some of the things we do  include internships, onsite tours of our rapid manufacturing facility, lecturing, and donating items to and sponsoring their fundraising auctions.  We also sponsor breakfast and a hole at this event each year.  What we do not do is strike fear and trepidation in the hearts of the other golfers.

PADT-Last-Place-Golf

Sigh… 18th out of 18.  Note how they used a different color of ink to make sure everyone noticed we were last. We did get a consolation prize of a large box of golf balls, a not so subtle hint to get out there and practice more.

However, it was a very nice day and we had a great time out there.

 

Annual Halloween Pumpkin Fest Time at PADT

PADT-2013-Halloween-feastWe kicked off the first official event of the holiday season today with our Halloween Pumpkin Fest.  BBQ and “Pumpkin Inspired Dessert” were on the menu as we celebrate the return of awesome weather to Arizona when we can all leave our air-conditioned cubicles and venture outside and sit in the sun without melting.  Very nice.

For those that follow us, we are sad to report that there was no pumpkin launch this year. We have been swamped with work recently and our team of pumpkin projecting professionals just did not have the time to prepare the equipment this year.

We wish all of you a Happy Halloween and we look forward to Thanksgivukkah, Christmas, and the New Year and enjoying a strong end to a great 2013!

 

 

What is Going on with MakerBot’s Acquisition by Stratasys?

Back in June it was announced that Stratasys was acquiring MakerBot. Many of you have been asking about the acquisition and how it impacts Stratasys and PADT. We now have some answers so we thought we would share them with you.

PADT has been involved in what is now called 3D Printing since our founding in 1994. We have seen the technology grow in popularity beyond our core engineering customer base to become a mainstream technology. The addition of MakerBot to the Stratasys family allows us to become more involved in those mainstream applications. Exciting times.

First off, the deal was a stock only transaction worth about $400,000,000, so it does not impact the ability of Stratasys to continue to invest in product growth and improvement. That was great news.

Second, it looks like for now MakerBot will be run as a separate subsidiary of Stratasys, Ltd. At first we were a bit worried about that because we wanted to interact more with the whole MakerBot universe. We soon found out that Stratasys understood this and although marketing, sales, and support are separate, there is some great cross-pollination going on.

PADT received a MakerBot Replicator 2 Desktop 3D Printer a few weeks ago and we have been playing around with it in our Colorado office. Our sales people and engineers are learning as much as they can about the system so we can better explain it to everyone we meet out there who are interested in 3D Printing.

Although we do not sell or support MakerBot products directly, we can now offer access to the MakerBot online store through a PADT link. When you purchase a printer, scanner, material, or parts after using the link, everyone knows you are a friend of PADT and we receive a small commission. We plan on using those funds to help support local 3D printer networking and education activities. And you do not have to be an existing PADT customer or located in our Stratasys sales and support territory. Anyone can purchase through the PADT link.

We will announce events, videos, and articles about MakerBot through our social media outlets and email as they get scheduled.

2013 Cleantech Open Finalists Announced for Rocky Mountain Region

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Last week the Rocky Mountain Region of the Cleantech Open announced the three finalists and sustainability award winner that they will be sending to the Cleantech Open Global Forum in San Jose, CA this November to compete for the $200,000 award package. The finalists worked through the regional accelerator with twenty other companies and then competed to come out on top and travel to the national finals.

Read the press release here.

As a sponsor, PADT was honored to be in attendance at Denver’s Cable Center for the 5th Anniversary event.  The best part was that two of the three finalists were companies from Tucson Arizona.  The three winners were:

  • Grannus (Tucson, AZ) as a finalist and sustainability award winner for their zero-emissions process for making nitrogen fertilizer.
  • HJ3 Composite Technologies (Tucson, AZ) as a finalist for their composite infrastructure repair system.
  • OptiEnz Sensors (Ft. Colins, CO) as a Finalist for their in-situ organic chemical sensors.

We enjoyed working with all of the applicants throughout the year and look forward to working with the finalists as they move forward.  We wish them the best of luck and are rooting for them to return to the region as one of the winners.

 

Video Tips: DesignXplorer – Single Objective Parameterization

This video gives an example of using DesignXplorer to automate the optimization of a tuning fork to achieve a particular desired frequency

ANSYS 14.5.7 Quick Install Instructions for Windows

ANSYS-14-5-7_Install-GuideAs part of our support for our existing ANSYS customers we prepare a quick install guide that we can send users when they get the new releases. The contents are based upon our own install experience, and what we have learned helping our customers install on a large number of different networks.  We just updated the 14.5.7 guide for Windows and thought we would share it with the community.

This particular release is fairly straight forward, so this is a short doc.

We hope you find it useful:

ANSYS 14 5 7_Install_Quick_Guide

Customers and Partners Win at AZBio Awards and Pittsburgh Tech 50 for 2013

It is awards season and PADT partners and customers are racking up the wins around the country.

AZBio-Awards-2013-Header-10-10

On October 10th we were fortunate enough to be at the 2013 AZBio Awards where we were pleased to see:

  • The founder of customer Ventana Medical Systems,  Thomas M. Grogan, M.D, win a Lifetime Achievement Award.
  • Customer W. L. Gore and Associates picked up the Arizona Bioscience Company of the Year Award.
  • Linda Hunt, the President and CEO of Dignity Health Arizona received the Arizona Bioscience Leader of the Year award. The Barrow Neurological Institute, part of Dignity Health, is a PADT customer.

Not only were we pleased to see these winners, but once again PADT provided the trophies for these awards so they were able to take a little piece of PADT home with them.

AZ-Bio-Awards-2013

 

More images from the event can be found on their Facebook page.

Pittsburgh-tech-50-ANSYS-Alung-2013Then just today we received word that the Pittsburgh Technology Council announced the winners of their Tech 50 for 2013.  And once again, a PADT customer and one of our most important partner received an award.

  • Medical device customer ALung won the Life Sciences Company of the Year award.
  • ANSYS, Inc., a partner and customer, was awarded the Tech Titan Award for, well being a tech titan.

We offer our congratulations to all of the winners and hope to see more as the awards season continues.

If you want to win a few technology awards, maybe you should consider being a PADT customer… seems like a trend.

Final PADT Open House Held at Littleton Colorado Office

SONY DSCThis past Wednesday customers, vendors, and friends of PADT gathered at our new Littleton, Colorado office for the third and final open house for 2013.  It was definitely a little cold outside, but that did not keep people away from some good discussions, beverages, and a chance to meet other people in the area who are interested in the sort of things that PADT does: simulation, product development, and rapid prototyping.

We were fortunate to have Debbie Brinkman, the mayor of Littleton, and several council members in attendance along with representatives from the South Metro Denver Chamber of Commerce and the Colorado Space Business Roundtable.

Besides the chance to socialize, the highlights of the evening were the ribbon cutting ceremony and the tour of PADT’s new office.  As always the 3D Printers were a big hit.

Here are some pictures of the event:

SONY DSC  When the sun was still out, it was a good time to share a beer and talk about engineering and technology in Colorado.

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The old county courthouse served as a great backdrop for the event.

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Since this is a new office for s, the city held a ribbon cutting ceremony.  From left to right were:  John Brackney (South Metro Denver Chamber), Ward Rand (PADT Co-Owner), Eric Miller (PADT Co-Owner), Mayor Debbie Brinkman (Littleton), Edgar Johansson (Colorado Space Business Roundtable), and Norman Stucker (PADT Colorado GM)SONY DSC

Clinton Smith, Patrick Barnett, and Stephen Theron from PADT were there to meet with customers and catch up.

SONY DSCMario Vargas, PADT’s Hardware Sales manager, spent much of the evening showing off PADT’s collection of 3D printers that are in the Littleton office.

When Colorado’s attendance of 125 is added to around 50 people at the Albuquerque, New Mexico open house, 300 in Tempe, Arizona we estimate that over 475 people came to one of our events this year.  We hope to see even more for our 20th anniversary celebrations in 2014.

 

PADT on Panel for Immigration Reform Discussion at University of Colorado Boulder

The Global Innovation Forum and several other groups (see picture) put together a very informative discussion on immigration reform and its impact on high-technology companies and university research.  PADT’s Eric Miller was asked to server on the panel and share our experience with the immigration process and how the current system impacts our business.

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We learned several key things during the discussion:

  1. The need for immigration reform is a high priority item across high technology industry companies.
  2. The issues that companies have with the current immigration system seem to be consistent: not enough H1B visas, a lottery system that is often overwhelmed by a few large companies, once a year lottery, and the non-portability of a visa if the immigrant changes jobs.
  3. The Senate comprehensive reform bill actually addresses many of the concerns raised, but it is stalled in the US House of Representatives.  It may pass in pieces.
  4. There is strong consensus on most details of immigration reform, the sticking point seems to be what to do about those who are currently in the country without a visa or a clear path to one.
  5. We learned a lot about the significant problems that students and professors face when they are studying/working in the US on an educational visa. It especially impacts their family.

This group seems to be trying to advocate a common sense approach to fixing our immigration system.  A very interesting meeting and it was an honor to participate.

We encourage all of you to engage in such a discussion and change the dialog to think of immigration comprehensively and update our system so that the US can continue its leadership in the areas of innovation and research.

And in the end: we know that process of immigration is hard and stressful, so it is better to check your address registration with https://www.us-mailing-change-of-address.com/blog/change-of-address-texas/, so you can get your documents at the right place and time.

/HBC: One of Those Little Known Commands

The other day we received a tech support call requesting a way to remove the space between the element faces on a pressure plot.  He wanted this so that he could get a contour plot without seeing the contours of the elements on the back side of the part. So I built my trusty test block and applied a pressure. By turning on the pressure load symbols with  the /PSF command, also under PlotCrtls > Symbols, you can get plots like this.

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Face Outlines (/PSF,1,1)

 

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Arrows (/PSF,1,2)

 

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Contours (/PSF,1,3)

Of course the customer was using this last contour plot option, but as you can see below, if you have pressure on both sides of the model, then the backside pressures show through the gaps. The plot can get a bit confusing. So after some digging, starting with the /PSF command, and not finding any reference on how to change the plot behavior, I asked around if anyone else had a way to do it, other than my first inclination which was to write a macro. So as I reverted to creating a macro, to do what should be a simple task, I thought, “No, there HAS to be an easier way.” Of course there is.

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The one thing I’ve learned over the years… Well, yes, I’ve learned more than ONE thing, but I’m trying to make a point here… The one thing I’ve learned over the years, is that no matter how much I learn, there is always someone who know more than me.  So I asked Sheldon! (Not the Sheldon on Big Bang Theory; ANSYS, Inc’s very own Sheldon Imaoka.) I thought, “Surely he will know some undocumented command to save me time.  It took him all of three minutes to get back to me with the /HBC command. It is a fully documented, but seldom used, command that is hidden in the recesses of the Command Reference that determines how boundary condition symbols are displayed. When turned on, it will “use an improved pressure contour display.” So you go from the picture on the top, to the picture on the bottom.

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So I learned two new things. One is the /HBC command can give you nicer looking plots. The other, and even more useful thing, is to click the links on the help page at the upper right corner.

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For if I did, I would have found the /HBC command on my own.

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It looks like I need to sit down with a nice cup of hot chocolate* and the Command Reference and just scan the listing for commands that I don’t recognize and learn what they do.  Oh, what I go through for you people. Well, I’ll just make sure that it’s really good hot chocolate*.   I’ll write a new post from time to time on cool commands I find useful.

Have a great day!!!

*It’s 85 degrees here this week and I really meant iced tea, but I didn’t want to rub it in. Smile

Part 2: ANSYS FLUENT Performance Comparison: AMD Opteron vs. Intel XEON

AMD Opteron 6308, INTEL XEON e5-2690 & INTEL XEON e5-2667V2 Comparison using ANSYS FLUENT 14.5.7

Note: The information and data contained in this article was complied and generated on September 12, 2013 by PADT, Inc. on CUBE HVPC hardware using FLUEN 14.5.7.  Please remember that hardware and software change with new releases and you should always try to run your own benchmarks, on your own typical problems, to understand how performance will impact you.

By David Mastel

Due to the response to the original article on this subject,  I thought it would be good to do a quick follow-up using one of our latest CUBE HVPC builds. Again, the ANSYS Fluent standard benchmarks were used in garnering the stats on this dual socket INTEL XEON e5-2667V2 configuration.

CUBE HVPC Test configurations (Same as in last comparison)

  • Server 1: CUBE HVPC c16
  • CPU: 4, AMD Opteron 6308 @ 3.5GHz (Quad Core)
  • Memory: 256GB (32x8G) DDR3-1600 ECC Reg. RAM (1600MHz)
  • Hardware RAID Controller: Supermicro AOC-S2208L-H8iR 6Gbps, PCI-e x 8 Gen3
  • Hard Drives: Supermicro HDD-A0600-HUS156060VLS60 – Hitachi 600G SAS2.0 15K RPM 3.5″
  •  OS: Linux 64-bit / Kernel 2.6.32-358.18.1.e16.x86_64
  • App: ANSYS FLUENT 14.5.7
  • MPI: Platform MPI
  • HCA: SMC AOC-UIBQ-M2 – QDR Infiniband
    • The IB card installed however solves were run distributed locally
  • Switch: MELLANOX IS5023 Non-Blocking 18-port switch

Server 2: CUBE HVPC c16i (Intel server from last comparison)

  • CPU: 2, INTEL XEON e5-2690 @ 2.9GHz (Octa Core)
  • Memory: 128GB (16x8G) DDR3-1600 ECC Reg. RAM (1600MHz)
  • RAID Controller: Supermicro AOC-S2208L-H8iR 6Gbps, PCI-e x 8 Gen3
  • Hard Drives: Supermicro HDD-A0600-HUS156060VLS60 – Hitachi 600G SAS2.0 15K RPM 3.5″
  • OS: Windows 7 Professional 64-bit
  • App: ANSYS FLUENT 14.5.7
  • MPI: Platform MPI

Server 3: CUBE HVPC c16ivy (New “Ivy” based Intel server)

  • CPU: 2, INTEL XEON e5-2667V2 @ 3.3 (Octa Core)
  • Memory: 128GB (16x8G) DDR3-1600 ECC Reg. RAM (1600MHz)
  • RAID Controller: Supermicro AOC-S2208L-H8iR 6Gbps, PCI-e x 8 Gen3
  • Hard Drives: Supermicro HDD-A0600-HUS156060VLS60 – Hitachi 600G SAS2.0 15K RPM 3.5″
  • OS: Linux 64-bit / Kernel 2.6.32-358.18.1.e16.x86_64
  • App: ANSYS FLUENT 14.5.7
  • MPI: Platform MPI
  • HCA: SMC – QDR Infiniband
    • The IB card installed however solves were run distributed locally

ANSYS FLUENT 14.5.7 Performance using the ANSYS FLUENT Benchmark suite provided by ANSYS, Inc.

ANSYS Fluent Benchmark page link:http://www.ansys.com/Support/Platform+Support/Benchmarks+Overview/ANSYS+Fluent+Benchmarks

Release ANSYS FLUENT 14.5.7 Test Cases
(20 Iterations each)

  • Reacting Flow with Eddy Dissipation Model (eddy_417k)
  • Single-stage Turbomachinery Flow (turbo_500k)
  • External Flow Over an Aircraft Wing (aircraft_2m)
  • External Flow Over a Passenger Sedan (sedan_4m)
  • External Flow Over a Truck Body with a Polyhedral Mesh (truck_poly_14m)
  • External Flow Over a Truck Body 14m (truck_14m)

Here are the results for all three machines, total and average time:

Intel-AMD-Flunet-Part2-Chart1Intel-AMD-Flunet-Part2-Chart2

 

Summary: Are you sure? Part 2

So I didn’t have to have the “Are you sure?” question with Eric this time and I didn’t bother triple checking the results because indeed, the Ivy Bridge-EP Socket 2011 is one fast CPU! That combined with a 0.022 micron manufacturing process  the data speaks for itself. For example, lets re-dig into the data for the External Flow Over a Truck Body with a Polyhedral Mesh (truck_poly_14m) benchmark and see what we find:

Intel-AMD-FLUENT-Details

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Intel-AMD-FLUENT-summary

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Current Pricing of INTEL® and AMD® CPU’s

Here is the up to the minute pricing for each CPU’s. I took these prices off of NewEgg and IngramMicro’s website. The date of the monetary values was captured on October 4, 2013.

Note AMD’s price per CPU went up and the INTEL XEON e5-2690 went down. Again, these prices based on today’s pricing, October 4, 2013.

AMD Opteron 6308 Abu Dhabi 3.5GHz 4MB L2 Cache 16MB L3 Cache Socket G34 115W Quad-Core Server Processor OS6308WKT4GHKWOF

  •  $501 x 4 = $2004.00

Intel Xeon E5-2690 2.90 GHz Processor – Socket LGA-2011, L2 Cache 2MB, L3 Cache 20 MB, 8 GT/s QPI

  • $1986.48 x 2 = $3972.96

Intel Xeon E5-2667V2 3.3 GHz Processor – Socket LGA-2011, L2 Cache 2MB, L3 Cache 25 MB, 8 GT/s QPI,

  • $1933.88 x 2 = $3867.76

REFERENCES:
http://www.ingrammicro.com
http://www.newegg.com

INTEL XEON e5-2667V2
http://ark.intel.com/products/75273/Intel-Xeon-Processor-E5-2667-v2-25M-Cache-3_30-GHz

INTEL XEON e5-2690
http://ark.intel.com/products/64596/

AMD Opteron 6308
http://www.amd.com/us/Documents/Opteron_6300_QRG.pdf

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Double-precision_floating-point_format

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Central_processing_unit#Integer_range

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Floating_point

STEP OUT OF THE BOX, STEP INTO A CUBE

PADT offers a line of high performance computing (HPC) systems specifically designed for CFD and FEA number crunching aimed at a balance between cost and performance. We call this concept High Value Performance Computing, or HVPC. These systems have allowed PADT and our customers to carry out larger simulations, with greater accuracy, in less time, at a lower cost than name-brand solutions. This leaves you more cash to buy more hardware or software.

Let CUBE HVPC by PADT, Inc. quote you a configuration today!

 

PADT at University of Denver Industry Day and Lecturing at Univerisity of New Mexico

IndustryDay-DU-PADT2It is a busy couple of days for PADT and Academia.  Jeff Strain is visiting with customers in Albuquerque and popped in to the “Finite Element Methods in Solid Mechanics” class at the University of New Mexico to give a talk on the ANSYS products and give some  on real world insight in to using finite elements in industry.

We were also happy to attend Industry Day at the University of Denver’ School of Engineering & Computer Science.  It was another great opportunity to interact with students,  give them some real world feedback, and meet with other technology companies in the area.