Investigation Signal Integrity: How to find problems before they find you – Webinar

In the Age of IoT, electronics continue to get smaller, faster, more power efficient, and are integrated into everything around us. Increasingly, companies are incorporating simulation early in the product development process, when the cost of design changes are at their lowest, to meet the challenges presented by Signal Integrity. For this to be effective, simulation tools need to be easy-to-use, compatible with existing work flows, and accurate, all while delivering meaningful results quickly.

If you or your company are designing or using electronics that are:
Critical to revenue, performance, or safety
Getting smaller, faster, or more efficient
Communicating with Gbps data rates
Using several or new connectors
Using long cables or backplanes
Then you could be a victim of Signal Integrity failure!

Join us September 7th, 2016 at 1 pm Pacific Time for this free webinar to discover how ANSYS is delivering intuitive Signal Integrity analysis solutions that can easily import ECAD geometry to compute SYZ parameters, inter-trace coupling, or impedance variations. Learn how ANSYS can help identify Signal Integrity problems and optimize potential solutions faster and cheaper than prototyping multiple iterations.

This webinar will introduce:

  • What products ANSYS provides for Signal Integrity problems
  • How these products can integrate into existing design workflows
  • And how easy these products are to use, even for novice operators

Followed by a Q&A session!

Click Here to register for this event and be sure to add it to your calendar to receive reminders.

Can’t make it? We suggest you register regardless, as our webinars are recorded and sent out along with a PDF of the presentation to our contacts within 24 hours of the presentation finishing.

There is Plenty of Space in Arizona: PADT Joins Discussion on Channel 8’s Arizona Horizon to Talk about the Space Industry in Arizona

arizona_horizonPADT’s Eric Miller was asked to return to take part in a discussion about the somewhat hidden Space industry in Arizona.  Eric was joined by Kjell Stakkestad, CEO of KinetX Aerospace to answer questions and provide insight into this critical part of Arizona’s high tech industry landscape.

The show features some serious but not-so-fun topics… and the title for the video reflects those.  So ignore the title and see what Eric and Kjell have to say starting at 17:55.

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Phoenix Business Journal: 5 simple goals for social network marketing

pbj-phoenix-business-journal-logoI feel a little awkward as an engineer giving advice on marketing, but this stuff works for us and there is no reason it can’t work for others.  In “5 simple goals for social network marketing” I go over the goals we have found that helped us build a Social Networking strategy that has proven to help our business. Heck, you are reading this post so we must be doing something right.

Phoenix Business Journal: ​Nudging behavior by making things easy

pbj-phoenix-business-journal-logoBusiness is often a process of trying to influence people to do something you want. Study after study shows something simple, the approach that seemed to work over and over again was the simplest: make things easy. In “Nudging behavior by making things easy” I look at this phenomenon and relate it to the business of high technology.

Video Tips: Changing Multiple Load Step Settings in ANSYS Mechanical

ANSYS Mechanical allows you to specify settings for load steps one at a time. Most users don’t know that you can change settings for any combination of load steps using the selection of the load step graph. PADT’s Joe Woodward shows you how in this short but informative video.

Engineering a Better Pokemon Go Experience

padt-pikachu-1The other day, I saw a post on Engadget about a special case for Pokemon Go users to solve the problem of missing your prized Jigglypuff that you have happened across in the wild (or let’s face it, probably a CP 10 Rattata who is going to break out multiple times before disappearing in a puff of smoke…). The case is designed to give the user access to on screen controls and a nice channel to keep your Pokeball flinging finger straight and true.

Pokemon Go Photo 0
Original Device designed by Jon Clever

As pointed out in the article on Engadget, this case is only useful in the capture screen. This caveat aside, the other issue with the case is that it obscures the screen. Here at PADT, we are fortunate to sell a wide variety of 3D Printing machines, some of which are capable of multiple colors and material durometers. I decided to design my own take on the case from Jon Clever to be prototyped on our Stratasys Connex 3.

Pokemon Go Photo 1

Pokemon Go Photo 2

The case was made with black and clear material. The black material can be combined to produce a custom stiffness, so we made that part soft and rubber like and kept the clear portion rigid. The clear has good optical quality, which could be increased with a layer of “clearcoat.”

Pokemon Go Photo 3

If you have a Stratasys Connex 3 or J750 and an iPhone 6, you can make your own with these STL files, one for the rubber part and one for the clear part.

Iphone 6 Pokemon_Prod_R1-CLEAR

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  Pokemon Go stl 1

Other variations and additional possibilities would be made possible with the new Stratasys J750, the first true full color printer that can also mix clear and solid as well as hard and soft materials.  The J750 was just released and highlighted on our recent road show. Visit our blog article on the Scottsdale show to learn more about this incredible printer.

Additional information about PADT and our wide range of 3D Printing offerings here.

Phoenix Business Journal: ​I’m lucky, I get to work with smart people

pbj-phoenix-business-journal-logoIn “I’m lucky, I get to work with smart people” I take a look at why it is a good thing to be able to work every day with the intelligent employees, partners, vendors, and customers I interact with every day.  Not only is it personally rewarding, it helps make me and PADT better.

Press Release: PADT Honored with 2016 Most Admired Leaders Award from the Phoenix Business Journal

PADT-Press-Release-IconWe are pleased to announce that PADT was recognized by the Phoenix Business Journal as one of 2016’s “Most Admired Leaders.” It is a real honor to be recognized by our peers in the business community and reflects on the hard work and contributions of the entire PADT family.  We are especially honored to be included in such a great group of people.

We look forward to joining  everyone for the awards ceremony on September 27, 2016, from 5:30 p.m. – 9:00 p.m. at the Montelucia Resort in Scottsdale, Arizona.

Please find a copy of the press release below.

The official announcement from the Phoenix Business Journal can be found here.

Official copies of the press release can be found in HTML and PDF.

Press Release:

Phoenix Analysis and Design Technologies Honored with 2016 Most Admired Leaders Award from the Phoenix Business Journal

Award based on leadership, dedication and impact on an organization, and the Arizona community

TEMPE, Ariz., August 10, 2016 —  In a special honor that recognizes leadership within its organization and the community, Phoenix Analysis and Design Technologies (PADT) announced today that the company is a recipient of Phoenix Business Journal’s 2016 Most Admired Leaders award.  Eric Miller, principal and co-founder of PADT will be on hand to accept the accolade on September 27, 2016, from 5:30 p.m. – 9:00 p.m. at the Montelucia Resort in Scottsdale, Arizona.

“Expanding from its headquarters in Tempe to offices throughout the Southwest, PADT is a great example of growth and success in Arizona’s entrepreneurial community,” said Jim Goulka, managing director of Arizona Technology Investors and CEO of Lone Mountain Associates, LLC. “The company’s leadership is known for its high level of integrity and is richly deserving of this award.”

PADT is the Southwest’s largest provider of numerical simulation, product development and 3D Printing services and products, but the company’s involvement in the communities in which it serves extends much further. In Arizona, PADT is an active angel investor and serves on the steering committee of Arizona Tech Investors as well as on numerous boards including BioAccel’s Council of Advisors and the President’s STEM Advisory Board of Grand Canyon University. Each year, PADT serves as a judge on the Arizona Commerce Authority’s Innovation Challenge and acts as a mentor to entrepreneurs seeking to start, build and grow their businesses.

“PADT is proud to be a part of Arizona’s community — an entire ecosystem of talented and innovative professionals,” said Eric Miller, Principal of Phoenix Analysis Design Technologies. “We are honored to receive this award, and could not have achieved it without the talented, hard-working, and energetic group of employees we work with every day.”

About Phoenix Analysis and Design Technologies

Phoenix Analysis and Design Technologies, Inc. (PADT) is an engineering product and services company that focuses on helping customers who develop physical products by providing Numerical Simulation, Product Development, and Rapid Prototyping solutions. PADT’s worldwide reputation for technical excellence and experienced staff is based on its proven record of building long term win-win partnerships with vendors and customers. Since its establishment in 1994, companies have relied on PADT because “We Make Innovation Work.” With over 80 employees, PADT services customers from its headquarters at the Arizona State University Research Park in Tempe, Arizona, and from offices in Torrance, California, Littleton, Colorado, Albuquerque, New Mexico, and Murray, Utah, as well as through staff members located around the country. More information on PADT can be found at http://www.PADTINC.com.

 

Media Contact
Linda Capcara
TechTHiNQ on behalf of PADT
480-229-7090
linda.capcara@techthinq.com
PADT Contact
Eric Miller
PADT, Inc.
Principal & Co-Owner
480.813.4884
eric.miller@padtinc.com

 

ANSYS AIM Webinar: Increase Simulation Realism with Multiphysics

Some product designs require a single physics solution, while others require multiple physics simulations. Electronics cooling, wind loading on a solar array and the thermal performance of a heat exchanger are just a few examples of applications that require multiphysics simulation. Setting up and running multiphysics simulations used to be a challenging task involving the transfer of data between multiple physics solvers. With AIM, multiphysics simulations are easy to perform. AIM provides a consistent workflow and intuitive simulation environment for fluids, structures and electromagnetics that lowers the barrier to entry for multiphysics simulations.

 

Join us for this webinar to discover how AIM makes it easier than ever to solve your multiphysics design challenges in a single, easy-to-use environment. Don’t settle for single physics approximation when multiphysics simulations yield more accurate results with AIM.

This webinar will be held on September 1st from 1:00 – 2:00 pm PT 
Click Here to register for this webinar
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ANSYS AIM Webinar: Democratize Simulation for Your Design Engineers

Innovative companies are using simulation early in the product development process to improve and optimize product designs. Companies deploying up-front simulation to their product design teams require simulation software that is easy-to-use, provides accurate simulation results and allows customization to enforce best practices. Such design engineering simulation software allows teams to develop and refine design ideas early in the design cycle when the cost of making design changes is still low.

Join us for this webinar to discover how AIM’s intuitive simulation workflow delivers high levels of automation and allows customization to automate engineering simulation best practice. Learn how AIM’s custom applications enable every engineer in your organization to benefit from simulation insights.
This webinar will be held on August 24th from 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm PT

 

Click Here to register for this webinar

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Introducing Signal Integrity: What is it and how does it impact you? – Webinar

Is your comapny designing or using electronics that are:
  • Critical to revenue, performance, or safety
  • Designed in-house or by 3rd parties
  • Using wireless technology (e.g. Wi-Fi, Bluetooth)
  • Connecting to the cloud or Internet of Things (IoT)
  • Collecting large sets of data
  • Getting smaller, faster, or more efficient
If so then you could potentially be a victim of signal integrity failure!
Join us August 17th, 2016 at 1 pm Pacific Time for a free webinar covering an introduction to Signal Integrity

This is a high-level introduction that will cover:
  • What Signal Integrity is
  • Some of the challenges related to it
  • How to identify those at risk of signal integrity related failure
  • What is being done in response
Followed by a Q&A session afterwards!

Click Here to register for this event and be sure to add it to your calendar to receive reminders.

 

Can’t make it? We suggest you register regardless, as our webinars are recorded and sent out along with a PDF of the presentation to our contacts within 24 hours of the presentation finishing.

Albuquerque Business First: What you need to consider when designing for the Internet of Things

ABF-Albuquerque_Business_FirstAlmost everyone in the technology industry agrees: the Internet of Things, or IoT, is “the next big thing.” Taking products and connecting them to the internet will change how people live their lives and how companies do their work. In “What you need to consider when designing for the Internet of Things” I explain three suggestions for designing an IoT device.

Phoenix Business Journal: ​Flaming hoverboards – Why engineering matters

pbj-phoenix-business-journal-logoEngineering is all around us, but most people don’t think about how important engineering is to our modern lives. In “Flaming hoverboards: Why engineering matters” I take a look at a specific example of where a lack of engineering can cause problems.

Five Basic Windows 10 Computer Skills Every Engineer Should Know

WINDOWS-ANSYS-1
At PADT we provide help to many of our customers who have trouble with their ANSYS simulations. At the top level, though, there are some computer skills for Windows that we consider basics that every engineer should know. If these are skills you already have in your tool belt, fantastic! If not, hopefully this information will help you be more effective in your simulation tasks.
Also, since most of us have been or are currently being updated to Windows 10, I’m providing the instructions for Windows 10. Windows 7 is similar, though.

Second-hand computers or second-hand laptops? Second-hand computers and second-hand laptops are an excellent solution for various computer tasks. At Computers R Us, you can find high quality Used Laptop Shop.

1. Run as Administrator

This allows us to run programs, a.k.a. “apps” with administrator privilege, even if our login credentials don’t allow this level of usage. This is the case for most users of engineering software. Certain components of ANSYS, including the CAD Configuration Manager and the Client ANSLIC_ADMIN Utility require changes to your computer that non-admin rights won’t allow. By running as administrator, we allow the program to make the needed changes.

To do this, click the Start Menu, then find the program (app) you need to run in the resulting list, such as the Client ANSLIC_ADMIN Utility, but one important thing to keep is mind is to use a privacy filter, it is important to maintain your privacy. Next, right click on that program, select More with the left mouse button, then select Run as Administrator with the left mouse button. If you are prompted to allow changes to your system, click Yes. Here is what it will look like:

ansys-windows-10-f01
2. View File Extensions

When using Windows Explorer, now known as File Explorer in Windows 10, by default you probably won’t see file extensions. Instead, you’ll see the prefix of files, but won’t see the endings of the file names. This will be the case when browsing for files to open or save as well. Sometimes you can rely on the icons associated with a file to know which program it’s associated with or the Type field in the list view, but sometimes there are conflicts. For example, an ANSYS Mechanical APDL macro file will have the extension .mac. You can probably guess that there is at least one other major company that can have software that uses that extension. By viewing the file extensions, even if the icons are wrong, we can more easily identify the files we need. Here is how it’s done:
Click Start, then File Explorer:

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The default view using “Details” in File Explorer will look something like this (file names don’t include extensions):

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To view the extensions, we click on the View menu in File Explorer, then Options, then Change Folder and Search Options.

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The way I set this option for all folder on my computer is to then click on the View tab in the resulting small window, then uncheck the box for Hide extensions for known file types, then click Apply to Folders, then click OK.

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Now the list view (using Details under the View menu) in File Explorer looks like this, with each file showing its extension in the list:

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3. Define and Edit Environment Variables

Environment Variables are values that are used by certain programs to define settings. For example, an environment variable can be used to specify the license server for certain programs. It’s good to know how to define and edit these if needed. To do this, we bring up the control panel. In Windows 10, click on the Start button, then Settings:

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A quick way to get there is to type “environment” in the search window in the resulting Settings window:

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The search should find Edit the System Environment Variables. Click on that:

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In the resulting System Properties window, click on the Environment Variables button in the Advanced tab:

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A new window will open with a list of currently defined User variables (just for your login) and System variables (for anyone who is logged in), like this:

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You can click on an environment variable to edit it using the Edit… button, or you can click on the New… button to create a new one. One ANSYS-related environment variable that occasionally needs to be set is ANSYSLMD_LICENSE_FILE. This is only needed if the default license server specifications aren’t working for some reason. You won’t need to set this under normal circumstances. Just in case, here is how to define it, using the New… button under System variables. We type in the Variable Name, in this case ANSYSLMD_LICENSE_FILE and then the Variable Value, which in this example is 1055@myserver.

ansys-windows-10-f12
When done defining and editing environment variables, we click on the OK button to complete the action and get out of that environment variable-related windows.

4. Check Usage of Your Computer Resources

As simulation experts, we are often pushing the limits of our computer resources. It’s good to know how to check those. First is disk space. An easy way to check disk space is to bring up File Explorer again. Click on This PC on the left side. This will give you a snapshot of the available space on each hard drive that is accessible on this computer:

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Next, we may want to check CPU or memory utilization. Perhaps we want to make sure that our solution is running on multiple cores as we have requested.
To do this, hold down the Alt, Control, and Delete keys on the keyboard, all at the same time. Then click on Task Manager in the resulting window (it will look for a second like your computer is going to restart – it won’t actually do that).
In the resulting Task Manager window, click on More details:

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In the resulting window, we can click on the Performance tab and view, for example, the current memory utilization, or we can click on Open Resource Monitor and get even more details, including utilization on each CPU:

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5. Search for Large Files

It’s very common in the simulation world to end up filling up your disk drives. Therefore, it’s good to be able to find large files so we can delete them if they are no longer needed. For a simple way to do this, we’ll start with File Explorer again. This time, we’ll click in the search window at upper right, but won’t actually type in anything. We just want the search tools menu to appear:

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Next, click on Search under Search Tools, followed by Size, then Gigantic (I will argue that 128 MB isn’t all that gigantic in the simulation world, but Microsoft hasn’t caught up with us yet):

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Windows will now perform a search for files larger than 128 GB. If any of these are no longer needed, you can right click and delete them. Just make sure you don’t delete any files that are truly needed!

That completes our discussion on 5 computer skills every engineer should know. In conclusion, these basic skills should help you be more productive over time as you perform your simulation tasks. We hope you find this information useful, if it is is not enough, than visit this website for more infromation.

Also read: Windows SQL Server by SaveOnIT.Com.

PADT Events – August 2016

PADT-Events-LogoIt’s August and the activities keep coming. Those of us in the Tempe office managed to travel to cooler climates in July, and we have pictures to prove it below.  This month’s events are mostly online.  As always, check back to see if we have added anything. You can also see a list of events on our homepage and on the right column of the blog.


solid-freeform-logoAugust 8-10: Austin, TX
2016 Annual International Solid Freeform Fabrication Symposium

This event is the academic side of 3D Printing.  Less about the business and splash of the industry, this symposium focuses on R&D around the technology of freeform fabrication.  PADT’s very own Dhruv Bhate will be there presenting a paper and interacting with other researchers in industry and academia.


AZTC-logoAugust 15: Phoenix, AZ
AZ Additive Manufacturing Committee Meeting

Industrials leaders in 3D Printing across Arizona will be gathering for this month’s committee meeting at PADT.  After the normal discussions, Dhruv Bhate will give a presentation then a tour of our 3D Printing resources.


PADT-Webinar-Logo

We have several great Webinars on tap for August. All PADT webinars are recorded, so even if you can’t make the specified time register and we will send you a link to the recording.

Wednesday, August 10, 2016 – 12:00 PM AZ/PDT, 1:00 PM MDT
ANSYS AIM: Simulation For Product Design Engineers
Register
Wednesday, August 24, 2016 – 12:00 PM AZ/PDT, 1:00 PM MDT
ANSYS AIM: Democratize Simulation for Your Design Engineers
Register
Thursday, September 1, 2016 – 12:00 PM AZ/PDT, 1:00 PM MDT
ANSYS AIM: Increase Simulation Realism with Multiphysics
Watch this space for the date and registration link.
Register

July Events in Review

Last month was all about 3D Printing, with a booth in Tucson and a road show to show off a brand new printer.


The ACTE AZ event in Tucson is always a fantastic chance for us to meet with our education customers and show educators why industrial quality systems are the right solution for classrooms and labs. The team had a great time… but didn’t send any pictures.


ICOSA_07169-150x150The “Full Color 3D Printer Road Show” was a big success. We started in Denver at a Brewery (we need to do this more often) with great presentations and a ton of sample parts that highlight the capability of the new Stratasys J750. We then moved the machines and parts on to Downtown Salt Lake City and where the interaction was fantastic amongst many veteran users.  The final stop was in Scottsdale Arizona where we had our largest crowd and more great interaction.

ICOSA_30368-768x512The Denver event was on the local Money Talk radio station. You can listen to the interview here.

Not to be outdone, a local TV station covered the Arizona event. That clip can be found here.

You can read about each event and see pictures by following these links:
Denver – Salt Lake CityPhoenix

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